June 24, 2019

Clear Out Your Closets! Intake for 83rd Annual White Elephant Sale Starts Thursday

Intake, which starts this year Thursday, June 27, is always a busy time.

The ever popular White Elephant Sale (WES) hosted by the Ladies Benevolent Society of the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme is just around the corner.

For those not familiar with it, this 83rd annual sale is one of the main events on both local town and church calendars.  It all starts with the intake period when you can drop off unwanted (but neither broken nor in poor condition) items at the church from your house — perhaps your basement, attic or closets — or yard.

Crowds anxiously await the first strike of 9 a.m. when the White Elephant Sale begins.

Garage, tag and rummage sales may be everyday affairs, but few, if any, can match the size and color of this one.  The sale items are organized into some 20 departments that fill the church buildings as well as every available space on the lawn.  The WES has grown so large that it has become a true “community event” since many of the donations are from non-church members and quite a number of volunteers are also from outside the church.

The sale raises a significant amount of money for missions and good works both locally and throughout the world.  Some of the beneficiaries include food pantries, health organizations, family support centers, children’s programs, literacy volunteers, affordable housing, and disaster relief worldwide.

Always a big draw are the huge number of bikes for sale at bargain prices.

Intake begins on Thursday, June 27, from 9 a.m. to 2 pm continuing for the same time period Friday, June 28, Saturday, June 29, and Monday, July 1.  Then there is a break for the July 4th holiday after which intake restarts for the final two days Friday, July 5, and Saturday, July 6.  There will be no evening intake sessions this year and also no large furniture pick-up. See the list below for a summary of donations that are welcomed, and those that are not.

The sale itself will be held on Friday, July 12, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Saturday, July 13, from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.  Most departments offer items at half-price on the second day.

For more information about the sale or if you would like to volunteer to help in any capacity, whether with intake, the sale itself, or clean-up, call the church office at 860.434.8686 and/or visit www.fccol.org.

Items that will GLADLY be accepted  [Quality Please!]
Antiques, Fine China, Silver                      
Appliances, Small (Working)
Art, Sculpture, Posters, Frames
Automobiles, Trucks [call church]
Bedding, Linens
Boats, Canoes, Kayaks
Bicycles, Tricycles
Books: Children’s, Non-Fiction, Fiction
Clothes & Shoes:
>Child’s, Men’s, Women’s
>Fine, Fashion
>Vintage, Costume & Accessories
Collections
Computer Hardware (working)
Curtains, Drapes
Electronics (Working)
Furniture: Indoor & Outdoor [call church 434-8686]
Gifts, Sundries, Knickknacks & Baskets
Jewelry: Costume & Fine
Kitchen Items (Appliances, Dishes, Cookware)
Lamps (Working)
Luggage [soft side or Steamer trunks only]
Musical Instruments
Plants, Containers
Skis – downhill must be “shape” style
Sporting Goods [good condition]
Tools (House & Garden)
Toys, Stuffed Animals [new]
DVDs (Family Content)

Items that WILL NOT be accepted:
Dirty or Broken Items or Junk

Appliances (Large):
>Air Conditioners
>Refrigerators, freezers & Stoves
>Washers & Dryers
Bike helmets [used – safety concerns]
Books: Technical or Textbooks, Encyclopedias
Car Seats – safety concerns
Cribs – safety concerns
Chemicals & Paint
Computer monitors [unless flat screen]
Fuel cans with Gasoline or Kerosene
Guns, Knives, Weapons
Luggage [hard sided]
Magazines, Newspapers
Mattresses and Box Springs
Particle board furniture
Rugs [used]
Sewing Machines
Skis – old style downhill
Stuffed animals [used]
Stuffed sofas / sofa beds
Tires
Treadmills
TVs [unless flat screen]

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Carney Hosts Office Hours in Old Saybrook This Morning, 8-9am

State Representative Devin Carney (R-23rd)

State Reps. Devin Carney (R-23rd) and Jesse MacLachlan (R-35th) along with State Sen. Paul Formica (R-20th) will hold Office Hours throughout the 23rd District on various dates between June 10 and 27.

These events will provide constituents with an opportunity to ask questions or share their ideas and concerns about state government, local issues and the 2019 legislative session which will come to a close on June 5.

The remaining Office Hours schedule is as follows:

Old Saybrook
Monday, June 24, from 8 – 9 a.m.
State Rep. Carney
Vicky G. Duffy Pavilion
155 College St.

Westbrook
Thursday, June 27, from 6 – 7 p.m.
State Rep. Carney & State Rep. McLachlan
Westbrook Public Library
Community Room
61 Goodspeed Dr.

Anyone unable to attend, but who would like to speak to Rep. Carney may contact his office at 800-842-1423 or by email at: devin.carney@housegop.ct.gov.

Carney represents the 23rd General Assembly District, which includes the towns of Lyme, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook and a portion of Westbrook.

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‘A Farmers’ Market’ Opens Saturdays for the Season at Tiffany Farms

Bill Hurtle and Jen Tiffany are preparing to open ‘The Farmers Market at Tiffany Farms’ on June 15.

Editor’s Note: The Farmer’s Market enjoyed a wonderful Opening Day last Saturday with more than 500 people visiting the market. Congratulations to Jen and Bill on such a successful and well-deserved start to their new enterprise.  We heartily commend them for having the courage to take on this venture, the total belief in its mission, and the passion to make it happen.

LYME — It was looking as though Lyme Farmers Market, which has for more than 15 years been a perennially popular destination for both local and regional shoppers, was going to be absent from the landscape this year.

In an exciting turn of events, Jennifer Tiffany and her husband Bill Hurtle have reincarnated the market with a new name and location, and will open for business on June 15.  Tiffany explained in an exclusive interview with LymeLine.com that Bill has fostered the idea of running a farmers market for many years. He hails from Long Island and was used to seeing the numerous farm stands at the side of the road there and longed to do something similar in Lyme.

But there was no inclination to follow through with the plan in any major sense while Lyme Farmers Market was still bustling just up the road on Ashlawn Farm in Lyme.

A view of the iconic Tiffany Farms where the new market is planned.

Their first iteration of Bill’s dream happened last summer when Tiffany started hanging buckets of flowers on the feed bunk by the ‘Ladies in Waiting’ sign at the corner of Sterling City Rd. and Hamburg Rd., where the Holstein cows known as the “Ladies of Lyme” used to congregate. But someone said they thought it was a memorial for the cows which are no longer kept at the farm.

As a result, Tiffany says, they “dragged out“ Tiffany Farm’s old silage cart and placed it on the same corner and Tiffany’s daughter, Lisa Simiola, fashioned a nameplate out of wood calling it “From the Farm.” Tiffany and Hurtle then added farm produce to the flower selection  on the stand, all of which was successfully sold on the honor system.

However, when Tiffany read online that Lyme Farmers Market would not be opening this year, she and Bill saw an opportunity.  Jen is passionate about the current plight of farmers — “they’re a dying breed,” she notes sadly — and wants people to understand that her and Bill’s overarching intent in starting the new farmers market is to help and support farmers.  

Tiffany stresses that this venture is absolutely not a money-making one on their part — they both have full-time jobs so it’s “not their bread and butter,” she explains.  Rather, she sees it a way not only to support farmers, but also to bring life and beauty back to the iconic farm and regenerate the sense of community vibrancy previously associated with Lyme Farmers Market.  Any income from the market will be plowed back into the operation to help fund the overheads.

Opening Day for ‘The Farmers Market at Tiffany Farms’ is Saturday, June 15, and the market will be open from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and Tiffany stresses, “All Department of Agriculture, Markets, Department of Health and CT Grown guidelines will apply.”  She is “envisaging the same look as [Lyme Farmers Market at] Ashlawn,” which means there will be neither entertainment nor what she describes as “flea-market-type stuff.”  The aim is a “very classy ” market in Tiffany’s words, focused on Connecticut-grown or-produced items such as dairy, beef, vegetables, herbs, jellies and syrups.

Aerial view of Tiffany farms showing where the Farmer’s Market will be located.

The field generously made available for the market by Susan B. Tiffany — the current owner of Tiffany Farms — is a “secluded area where my grandfather kept draft ponies,” notes Tiffany, adding the layout of the market will involve keeping cars and vendors separate. She and Hurtle are hoping to have a minimum of 10 vendors and says they will be “elated” if the number reaches 20.

The list of vendors who have already signed up for Opening Day includes:

  • Four Mile River Farm
  • Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm
  • Upper Pond Farm (also representing Ashlawn Farm)
  • Sweet Pea Cheese and House of Hayes
  • T.A.L.K. Seafood
  • Fat Stone Farm
  • Dondero Orchards
  • Deep River Farm
  • Wave Hill Breads
  • Beaver Brook Bakery
  • From the Farm

Vendors are still welcome to apply for a spot at “The Farmers Market at Tiffany Farms.”  Vendor applications are available by calling Jennifer Tiffany at 860-434-6239 or 860-575-4730 or emailing jtiffany01@msn.com

 

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Family Hosts Celebration of Life, Memorial Event for Glenn ‘Chip’ Dahlke This Afternoon

The late Glenn ‘Chip’ Dahlke.

The Dahlke family hosts a Celebration of Life and Memorial Event for the late Glenn ‘Chip’ Dahlke this afternoon at Ashlawn Farm in Lyme, Conn., Saturday, June 22.

There will be a cookout, live music, and a keg. Feel free to BYOB.

The celebration begins at 2 p.m. and lasts until the cows come home.

Bring your best Chip stories as everyone will gather to open the mic up to guests who wish to share a memory.

All are welcome. Reply to the event at this link as ‘Going’ so that the family may plan accordingly.

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Lyme Library Book Sale Continues Today

Lyme_Library_Logo_632x447

Calling all booklovers!

The Friends of Lyme Library have announced that they will hold their Summer Book Sale this year on Friday and Saturday, June 14 and 15, in the library’s community room.

The sale will be open on Friday from 3 to  7 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be a large selection of books, both fiction and nonfiction, for sale. Most of the books for sale are hard cover along with a good selection of trade paperbacks, children’s books, DVD’s, and CD’s.

Credit cards will be accepted for purchases over $20. Stop by and find some treasures to add to your home collection.

The library is located on Rte. 156 in the new town complex shared with the Lyme Town Hall and Lyme Consolidated School.

The Friends appreciate your support and generous donations. They look forward to seeing you at the the Friends’ Summer Book Sale.

For library hours and directions, visit www.lymepl.org.

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Sing! Cappella Cantorum Offers One-Day Vocal Camp Today

Photo by David Beale on Unsplash.

The valley-shore chorus of Cappella Cantorum offers a One-Day Vocal Camp on Saturday, June 15, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, 5 Lyme St., Old Lyme. All singers ages 13 and up are welcome to attend.

The camp offers intensive choral practice in group and private lessons that will improve sight reading, ear training and blending in a choral environment.

Learn from accomplished choral leaders Simon Holt, director of the Salt Marsh Opera, Cappella Cantorum and the choir of the Congregational Church of Old Lyme, and Paul Laurence Fletcher, critically acclaimed oratorio and concert soloist.

Lunch will be provided. Cost is $45 for the group session and $55 for the group session plus a private vocal lesson with Mr. Fletcher. The private lessons are limited and offered on a first-come, first-served basis.

Reserve a spot at www.cappellacantorum.org or by calling 860-941-8243.

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Congratulations to the Class of 2019!

Graduates from the Class of 2019 celebrate receiving their Lyme-Old Lyme High School diplomas! All photos by Rosemary Comerford Reid.

Congratulations to the Class of 2019 on their graduation from Lyme-Old Lyme High School. The commencement ceremony was held outside yesterday evening under cloudy skies and included speeches from the Class President, Valedictorian, Salutatorian and Honor Essayist.  Chosen by the Class, English teacher Jennifer Burke was named the Mildred Sanford Outstanding Educator of 2019.

The Class of 2019 celebrates its graduation with the traditional hat toss.

 

These students patiently await their turn to go forward onto the stage and receive their High School Diploma.

 

Superintendent Ian Neviaser reaches out his hand to shake that of a just conferred graduate of Lyme-Old Lyme High School.

 

One happy Wildcat graduate!

 

And on a personal note, we are so proud of our outstanding intern Katie Reid (center), who graduated yesterday with the Class of 2019, and is now off to Bowdoin College.

For a more detailed report of the evening, read Mary Biekert’s article on TheDay.com at this link.

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Lyme-Old Lyme High School Hosts Graduation Ceremony Tonight

Hats high! Lyme-Old Lyme High School graduates celebrate their success. File photo by Kim Tyler.

Lyme-Old Lyme High School will hold its Commencement Ceremony for the Class of 2019 this evening on the field between the middle and high schools starting at 6 p.m.

Entry to the field is open and the public is welcome to attend the event.

Congratulations to the Class of 2019!

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Getting Your House Ready to Show? Learn How with Maddy Mattson at Lyme Library, Tonight

Maddy Mattson

Maddy Mattson, Global Luxury Property Specialist with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage, will present a talk about getting your home ready to sell on Wednesday, June 12 at 7 p.m. at the Lyme Public Library.  She will speak about how to de-clutter, clean up and organize your home before putting it on the market, and why it is an important part of the moving process.

Whether you plan to move next week, next month or next year or just want to get out from underneath your clutter, there are things you should do before you list your home.  

The program is free. 

Call 860-434-2272 or email programreg@lymepl.org to register. The Library is located at 482 Hamburg Rd., Lyme.

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Talking Transportation: Why the Scorn for Bus Riders?

Jim Cameron

Why do many people have such scorn for those who take the bus?

Forty-one million trips are taken on 12,000 public buses each year in Connecticut in communities across the state (not counting school buses.)  Yet, those riders are regarded as losers, not by the transit operators, but by those who drive by car.

When Southington was recently considering restoring bus service for the first time since 1969, a local resident wrote a letter to the local paper declaring “Towns that have bus service are towns that frankly have a lesser quality of people.”

Really?  “Lesser quality,” how?  Because they can’t afford to own a car?  Or because they are minorities?  That comment is either racist or classist or both.

As I wrote recently, the Greater Bridgeport Transit bus system carries 18,000 passengers every day (5.2 million a year), 90 percent of them either going to school or work.  Something like 26 percent of all Bridgeport train riders got to or from the station by bus.

Sure, some are non-white or non-English speaking.  But why begrudge them transportation?  You’d rather they not have a job or an education?

And yes, their fares are kept low with state subsidies.  But their incomes are also low and for them, even a $1.75 bus fare is expensive.  Remember … Metro-North trips (26.5 million per year), though also expensive (the highest in the US), are also subsidized.

But the biggest target of transit scorn is CTfastrak, the four-year-old, 9.4-mile-long dedicated BRT (bus rapid transit) system running between Hartford and New Britain.  Transit planners from across the country come to study CTfastrak. The Feds are looking to spend $665 million on similar systems across the US.

Yet Connecticut Republicans were trying to close it before it even began.

When it first opened in 2014, the CDOT projected 16,000 daily riders.  To date, the ridership is closer to 11,400.  Fares are cheap ($1.75 round-trip) and service is frequent with buses departing every few minutes.  From New Britain to downtown Hartford, it’s only 20 minutes, even at rush hour.  That’s about half the time you’d spend on I-84 stuck in bumper-to-bumper traffic.

From the dedicated bus-only right-of-way, buses can also transfer to local roads into downtown Hartford and communities ranging from New Britain and Bristol to Cheshire and Waterbury.  The stations are clean and modern and the buses even offer free Wi-Fi … something we still don’t (and probably never will) have on Metro-North.

Critics complain about “empty buses” riding up and down the system.  Sure, the buses may not be jammed like Metro-North on a summertime Friday, but they do carry thousands every day.  Imagine if those bus riders were in cars.  How’d you like the traffic then?

Why the scorn for bus riders?  Beyond racism and class-warfare, I think there’s actually some jealousy.  Why do they get a fast, clean, cheap ride when I’m stuck in traffic?  Well, for some it’s a matter of necessity: they don’t own or have access to a car.  For others, as with train riders, it’s a matter of choice: they prefer the bus for speed and convenience.

So can we please stop shaming bus riders?

Like all of us, they have places to go, so let’s just allow them to ride in peace and harmony.

Posted with permission of Hearst CT Media

About the author: Jim Cameron is founder of The Commuter Action Group, and a member of the Darien RTM.  The opinions expressed in this column are only his own.  You can reach him at CommuterActionGroup@gmail.com  For a full collection of  “Talking Transportation” columns, visit www.talkingtransportation.blogspot.com

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Legal News You Can Use: Injured at Work? Should I Make a Worker’s Comp. Claim?

Looks safe enough, but injuries can happen anywhere in a work environment.

Sponsored Post from Suisman Shapiro Attorneys-at-Law 

Imagine that you’re working at your desk. There are no significant hazards around you. You reach up and pick up a heavy box above you, and you suddenly feel a snap along your shoulder. You’ve been working in the same position for many hours, and combined with the strain of the weight of the box, you’re now struggling with a painful injury.

Situations like yours aren’t uncommon. It’s actually relatively common for accidents to happen on the job with little that can be done to prevent them. Whether it’s because of repetitive motions, picking up something too heavy or other causes, injuries can happen in an instant.

When they do, you need to know what to do next. No matter what kind of injury you suffer, your employer should help you file a claim with the workers’ compensation insurance carrier. If your injury is extremely painful, a coworker can take you to the hospital, or your employer can call for an ambulance.

It’s important that you receive care right away so that you can prevent the injury from worsening.

What information should you keep from the hospital visit?

Keep every piece of paperwork you receive. You should also inform the medical provider that this is a work-related injury so that they can give you copies of the correct documents for your employer.

If you are hurt on the job in any way, workers’ compensation should be there to protect you and pay for your medical care. Don’t delay in telling someone if you get hurt so you can get care quickly.

The Suisman Shapiro website has more information on the compensation and benefits you may receive after a work injury.

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Join a ‘Leading Together’ Conversation This Afternoon at Old Lyme Library, Hosted by Community Foundation of Eastern CT

The Community Foundation of Eastern Connecticut (CFECT) is committed to hearing the voices of residents and convening state leaders, experts and communities to discuss issues affecting Eastern Connecticut. In recent years, the CFECT has held Thriving Community Conversations on women, arts, youth, animal welfare and environmental issues, as well as Connecticut’s fiscal crisis and its impact on the nonprofit sector in our region.

The next LeadingTOGETHER Thriving Community Conversation will be held at the Phoebe Griffin Noyes Old Lyme Library on Tuesday, June 4, from 4 to 5:30 p.m. The discussions will help to inform and inspire the Foundation’s work while offering the opportunity for participants to think creatively about community solutions, sparking new or deeper connections to lead together for change.

In addition, the Phoebe Griffin Noyes Old Lyme Library will be sharing information about their current and upcoming programs and invite community members to engage in further conversations and opportunities.

All Old Lyme and Lyme residents are invited to join the conversation. Those interested in attending should RSVP by email to events@cfect.org or call Pam Mola at 860.442.3572.

Serving 42 towns and comprised of over 500 charitable funds, the Community Foundation of Eastern Connecticut puts philanthropy into action to address the needs, rights and interests of the region. The Foundation stewards net assets of over $88 million and has awarded more than $56 million in grants and scholarships to nonprofits and students since its founding in 1983. To learn more, visit cfect.org.

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Two Lyme-Old Lyme Organizations Combine Their Talents to Build a Beautiful Butterfly Garden

Duck River Garden Club member Fay Wilkman digs deep during Saturday’s event with the Lyme-Old Lyme Junior Women’s Club to plant a butterfly garden at the Cross Lane Playground. Meanwhile, Old Lyme Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal (standing to rear of photo) takes a break from her digging. Photo by Kimberly Russell Thompson.

A wonderful example of community cooperation took place in Old Lyme last Saturday, which generated not only a great deal of fun and camaraderie at the time, but also a beautiful garden for the future.

It all began with the Lyme-Old Lyme Junior Women’s Club (LOLJWC)’s multi-year campaign to raise funds for new playground equipment at Cross Lane Park, which came to fruition with the official opening of the playground in April 2018.  During the campaign, the Club received a generous sum, to which the donor attached two requests.  The first was that it should remain anonymous and the second that it be used to create a butterfly garden at the renovated playground as a memorial.

Due to the timing of the playground’s installation, it was not possible to plant the butterfly garden last year but this year everything came together.

Sarah Michaelson plants more perennial pollinator bushes.  Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

Petie Reed, owner of Perennial Harmony Garden and Landscape in East Lyme, who is a member of both the LOLJWC and the Duck River Garden Club (DRGC), proposed that the LOLJWC should share development of the project with the DRGC and the DRGC enthusiastically embraced the idea.  Reed was assisted throughout the project by her partner, Rich Oliver.
Reed worked with numerous members of both organizations including Suzanne Thompson of the DRGC and Anna Reiter, outgoing LOLJWC President. The group designed it to be a wildlife garden of native plants well-suited for the shaded, boggy terrain.  The selection of native shrubs and perennials includes aromatic sumacs, viburnum, huchera, black-eyed susans and baptisia will support many pollinator insects and birds.

Reiter explained that during design discussions, Reed, “suggested we allow for a more community feel to the garden, by allowing families to “adopt” a garden plot.” Reiter continued, “For a nominal fee, we supplied some specific native plants that will encourage local wildlife and pollinators for each of the community garden plots, and families were encouraged to bring their own non-invasive plants for their plot.”

From left to right, Kay Reiter stands with long-time DRGC member Mim Beardsley, incoming LOLJWC President Kim Russell Thompson, and Izzy Thompson.  Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

The finishing touch was that the LOLJWC also supplied a ceramic garden stake, which families can take to Ocean Art Studio in Old Saybrook to customize and then place in their garden.

Reiter noted there are still some plots available for purchase, emphasizing that the owner families and LOLJWC members will be watering the gardens throughout the summer to get them established.  Once settled in, these native plants will need minimal watering and will continue to spread and naturalize the area around the playground.
A large group of DRGC and LOLJWC members of all ages along with spouses, children, relatives and friends turned out Saturday to spend the morning cheerfully planting and watering. Fay Wilkman and Mim Beardsley, both members of the DRGC, also assisted with the installation, and incoming LOLJWC President Kimberly Russell Thompson summed up the universal feeling at the end of the successful event when she said simply, “It was a very fun day!”

Fun and flowers … and smiles! An LOLJWC member and her daughter (in foreground) and incoming LOLJWC Vice President Angela Mock and her daughter Ally all take a well-earned break from their labors.  Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

Looking to the future, Reiter commented, “Petie and I hope these beds also will provide inspiration and ideas to families who want to plant more native flowers and shrubs in their own yards,” while Thompson added,  “Next steps are to seek grant funding so we can put up educational signs in the beds, to identify the plants and their benefits to wildlife.”
After expressing sincere thanks to the anonymous donor and all those who had made creation of the butterfly garden a reality, Reiter concluded positively, “We are hoping the community will walk through the gardens and enjoy the beauty of the park and the wildlife — this was a very special gift!”

Editor’s Note: Garden plots are still available for purchase at $30 each.  The purchaser must agree to tend and water their garden throughout this season.  A rain barrel and water cans are available to make watering fun and easy.  If you wish to purchase a plot, visit the LOLJWC website at www.loljwc.com or email Anna Reiter at loljrwomencub@gmail.com. There is a link to purchase a plot on the website. 

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Lyme Land Trust Introduces NaturePlace Self-guided Trail Today, CT Trails Day

A view of the Lyme Land Trust’s Banningwood Preserve, where the NaturePlace Self-guided Trail will be opened on Saturday.

On Saturday, June 1, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., join the Lyme Land Trust for the opening of the NaturePlace Self-guided Trail, which highlights the fascinating ecology, history and geology at the Lyme Land Trust’s Banningwood Preserve. A new map and brochure will provide details about the interpretive trail, which is designed to engage curious hikers of all ages and interests.

NaturePlace is an outdoor education space inspired by the vision of Diana and Parker Lord.

Lyme Land Trust Directors and environmentalists Regan Stacey and Wendolyn Hill will guide the group through the stations on the tour with the assistance of Parker Lord, history enthusiast.

Reservations are appreciated at openspace@townlyme.org

Inclement weather cancels.

Directions: 41°25’25.11″N 72°24’07.49″W, Banningwood Preserve, Town Street (Rte. 82), Lyme CT. About one quarter mile north of Hadlyme Four Corners (the intersection of Brush Hill Rd, Rte. 82, and Rte. 148).

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Join the Parade! LYSB Invites “Anyone on Wheels” to March With Them Tomorrow

Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB) invites any youth in Lyme and Old Lyme, who are not already participating in the Memorial Day parade down Lyme Street on Monday, to join the parade and march with them, saying, “Everyone belongs at LYSB!”

Decorate your bikes, scooters, wagons, strollers … basically anything with wheels (but nothing that’s motorized!) and then join the fun!

Meet at the corner of the Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School tennis courts (behind the large illuminated “Lyme-Old Lyme Public Schools” sign) at 10:30 a.m. The parade steps off at 11 a.m.

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Lost Dog in Lyme

This beautiful dog, Dexter, is missing.

Dexter, a 10-year-old dark brown (with white spots) German Shorthaired Pointer mix, has been missing since Thursday afternoon. Dexter is generally friendly, but he may be frightened and disoriented at this point. He was last seen near Hamburg Cove on Wednesday, 5/22/19, and was wearing a collar with nametags and rabies vaccination tag. He also has a microchip.

If you have any information, call Richard Gordon at 617-549-2776 or Andrew Barker at 617-669-7195.

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The Movie Man: ‘Game of Thrones’ Has Ended — What Did YOU Think of the Finale? And Will You Sign the Petition??

Kevin Ganey

“What is dead may never die.”

In spring of 2011 I saw advertisements for an upcoming fantasy show on IMDb, Game of Thrones. I did not pay much attention to it, but it did not take long for me to see its effect on everybody else. It became a phenomenon.

Two years later, South Park aired an episode parodying the affairs of Westeros with the imminent Black Friday as retail’s version of “winter is coming.” I was intrigued and asked around if this show was all that it was hyped up to be. My Christmas list that year included the DVD for the available seasons.

But I did not catch on.

I made it to the third episode and got distracted. This paralleled my fitness life, “I should get back to it, but I’ll need some motivation.”

So, the next several years passed by, and I was always out of the loop when it came to references such as “You know nothing, Jon Snow” and “Hold the door.” I even accompanied a friend to a tattoo parlor as he had the phrase “Valar Morghulis” (All men must die) permanently inked into his body. My other attempts of getting into the series proved to be fruitless, as well. But I was aware that nobody was safe, as George R. R. Martin killed off his characters like it was a bodily function.

Then in 2017, I happened to meet the actor Pedro Pascal through my job, and I had to confess I did not know who he was, and he proceeded to fill me in on his role as Oberyn Martell, but I informed him I had only made it three episodes in. Pascal consoled me saying that I would need to get into the second or third season to get that “hook” that everybody experienced. The next year, I tried watching again, and I made it past the first season, but was distracted (again).

Finally, after taking a position in the night shift, I decided to give it my full attention, and by the end of March 2019, I got “the hook.” After finishing one episode, I would instinctively start the next one, without thinking.

I finally understood what everyone was talking about when they repeated those iconic phrases, and the memes that would perfectly allude to real life events. I would spend hours watching interviews with the cast, particularly Emilia Clarke (her interviews prove that she is a phenomenal actress, nothing like the steadfastly ambitious Daenerys, but someone so silly and adorable that you feel the need to hug her.)

And above all, I was finally ready for the end of the series. HBO opted not to air the eighth and final season in 2018, but rather delayed it another year. Perhaps I can be naïve and think it was cosmically arranged for me to get caught up? But whatever. I had my computer ready to screen each episode after my work was done.

I enjoyed the first three episodes, tearing up when Jamie knighted Brienne, and clenching my grip on the chair as the North battled the armies of the Night King. I was already speculating on how the series would end. It was revealed in the previous season that the supposed bastard Jon Snow was the true heir to the Iron Throne, not Daenerys, the girl we were rooting for the entire time, so how would things turn out?

Would he abdicate in favor of the Mother of Dragons?

Would there be a conflict between the two of them?

And what would become of the malevolent and self-centered Cersei?

Nearly a third of my text messages in the last six weeks dealt with me trading theories with friends and commenting on whether they would work or not. It had to be good, since the show had so many satisfying moments in their conflicts, particularly when Sansa imprisoned the poster boy of sadism, Ramsay Bolton, who tormented her and several others, and had him fed to his own hounds (I was grinning ear to ear and pumping my fists when I watched this transpire.)

But when the last three episodes aired, I did not get the fulfillment I anticipated. To be frank, it was the weakest conclusion to the most intense series I had ever watched. It was almost as if one of Daenerys’ dragons gathered in as much air as he could, cocking his head back, and then thrusting forward to reveal, not a firestorm, but rather a mouth full of sparklers that had replaced his teeth.

Really?

I put so much priority over the course of five years to get myself hooked on the show that had taken the world by storm, and I finally caught on for the lamest conclusion ever. They had us on the hook for over eight years, and they could not provide a fitting conclusion. I sat before my computer, often wondering to myself out loud “How much longer is this?” It’s almost as if their creativity ran dry, and they thought to themselves, “How else are we going to get paid?”

Without giving away any spoilers, I can say, even if it seems arrogant, that this is not the ending we fans deserve. In fact, this is not the ending that the show, in itself, deserves (particularly the actors who have been there since the beginning!)

Yes, this is probably what was bound to happen when George R. R. Martin neglected to publish his final books as the series took the world by storm, having nothing to work with at the end of season five … but David Benioff and D. B. Weiss did manage to make the two following seasons without the use of Martin’s base material.

There is already a petition circulating the internet of fans demanding that the eighth season be tossed away, and a replacement season made in its place. A piece of retroactive continuity (similar to how Halloween’s sequels were done away with, and the 2018 installment is now a direct sequel.) Here is a link to the petition, and should a reader reach a similar conclusion as this review, I would urge them to sign it.

“And now our watch has ended.”

About the Author: Kevin Ganey has lived in the Lyme/Old Lyme area since he was three-years-old, attended Xavier High School in Middletown and recently graduated from Quinnipiac University with a degree in Media Studies. Prior to his involvement here at LymeLine.com, he worked for Hall Radio in Norwich, as well as interned under the Director of Communications at High Hopes Therapeutic Riding Center. Kevin has a passion for movies, literature, baseball, and all things New England-based … especially chowder.

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Ride the 7th Annual ‘Tour de Lyme’ Today! Registration Open at Event, Proceeds Benefit Lyme Land Trust

And away they go … the 7th annual Tour de Lyme takes place this Sunday.

Join the seventh annual Tour de Lyme on Sunday, May 19.  For competitive riders, this is a chance to warm up for the cycling season ahead. For others, it provides a wonderful occasion to pedal through Lyme and enjoy the surrounding countryside.  If you are a mountain biker, this is an opportunity to ride through private lands open only for this event.

Everyone – riders, sponsors, and volunteers – will enjoy a post-ride picnic at Ashlawn Farm with popular food trucks, beer and live music.  This year there will be physical therapists to help with any injuries, the always popular massage therapists to loosen tight muscles, and a plant sale to stock up on herbs for the season ahead. There will also be Tour de Lyme shirts for sale.

For complete information and online registration, visit www.tourdelyme.org

Ready to ride!

It’s not a race but a carefully planned series of rides designed to suit every level of skill and endurance. There are four road rides of varying length and degree of difficulty:

  • The CHALLENGE, the name says it all, is 60 miles – a real workout;
  • The CLASSIC, shorter at 25 miles, but still a challenge;
  • The VALLEY Rides pleasant easier rides with fewer hills, 26 miles or 35 miles
  • The FAMILY at just 8 miles designed for riding with children. 

There are also two mountain bike options;

  • the RIDER’S TEST a 26.5 mile ride for serious enthusiasts
  • a shorter, less challenging option.

The Tour de Lyme is hosted by The Lyme Land Conservation Trust.  Since 1966, the Lyme Land Trust has been conserving the unique and historic landscapes of Lyme, Connecticut. During those years, the Lyme rural community has shown that a small population can have a big impact and protect more than 3000 acres of woodlands, working farm fields, and bird-filled marshes. The result is an outdoor paradise – open to all. 

Money raised from the Tour de Lyme will create added opportunities for public enjoyment of the Land Trust preserves while protecting and maintaining what has already been conserved for generations to come. 

The Lyme Land Trust is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization – registration and donations are tax deductible.

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Where Art Meets Nature: I-Park Hosts Free, Open Studios Event Today

The public is invited to visit I-Park for its first Open Studios of the 2019 season. Guests will be able to meet six of the seven resident artists on Sunday, May 19, at 2 p.m. I-Park is located at 428 Hopyard Rd. in East Haddam, which adjoins the Devil’s Hopyard State Park.

The facility is generally closed to visitors to give the artists undisturbed time to work on their creative endeavors. But once a month, at the conclusion of each residency, visitors are invited to meet the artists in their studios, attend the presentation segment that features select time-based works, enjoy complimentary refreshments and stroll the trails winding through I-Park’s scenic, art-filled campus.

The studios will only be open from 2 until 3:30 p.m. so guests are encouraged to arrive early so they have enough time to visit all the studios before the 3:30 p.m. presentations.

A reception with refreshments will follow.

I-­Park is an artists-in-residence program offering fully funded residencies in visual arts, creative writing, music composition/sound art, moving image and architecture/landscape design. Since its founding in 2001, I-­Park has sponsored more than 900 residencies, and has developed cross-­‐disciplinary projects of cultural significance and brought them to life in the public domain.

Set within a 450-acre nature preserve, I-­Park has a strong interest in site-responsive and environmental art – and has been the setting for exhibitions, performances, symposia and programs that facilitate artistic collaboration.

The Artists-in-Residence at I-Park.

The artists-in-residence are:

Marianne Barcellona is a painter and professional photographer from New York City. Her extensive travels provide raw inspiration for her paintings.

Hugh Livingston is a composer and sound artist from California who creates multi-media installations related to natural and built spaces; he also performs exploratory cello music. His artworks have been installed internationally.

Colette Lucas is a mixed media artist and gardening enthusiast based in New Hampshire. Her botanical motifs are created from a combination of imagination, observation and research.

Tom Nazziola, a New Jersey composer, has had his music featured on virtually every medium in the world of music. From “live film music” to choral and orchestral pieces, his compositions have been performed around the world.

Dominica Phetteplace is a prize-winning Washington (state) poet and writer whose work has appeared in Asimov’s, Zyzzyva, Copper Nickel and Ecotone as well as numerous other publications.

Allison Roberts is a lens-based artist from Oklahoma. She works primarily with photography, video and installation to address memory, place and identity as such are experienced during periods of transition.

Jane Simpson is a mixed media artist from New Hampshire. Her collage and assemblage work is comprised mainly of found paper – made either by mother nature or human ingenuity. Recently she has incorporated graphite drawings inspired by vintage photographs.

Although admission to Open Studios is free, advance reservations are requested. To reserve your space, visit i-park.org. For additional information, email events@i-park.org, call 860-873-2468 or visit i-­‐park.org.

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Lyme-Old Lyme High School, Middle School Announce Q3 Honor Rolls

Lyme-Old Lyme High School
2018-19 Quarter 3 Honor Roll   

High Honors

Grade 12: Kendall Michelle Antoniac, Kathryn Sean Atkinson, Madison Olivia Babcock, Jacqueline Patricia Barry, Casey Madison Blue, Mackenzie May Blue, Ann Marie Cote, Emma Carolyn Danes, Britney Jean DeRoehn, Corey Paxton Drummond, Grace Anne Edwards, Olin Burns Frederiks, Zachary Thomas Gidius, Grace Ann Gilbert, Emily Nicole Grenier, Kylie Erva Hall, Colin Emanuel Hallahan, Sarah Katherine Hayward, Haley Rose Heath, Kate Niamh Hickie, Liam Francis Holloway, Riley May Jacobson, Mya Lynn Johnson, Sophie Anne Elizabeth Kyle, Henry Alexander Lahm, John Thomas Manthous, Danielle Marie McCarthy, Brynn Elizabeth McGlinchey, Hannah Nichole Morrison, Leah Marie Neithamer, Emily Anne O’Brien, Jacob Thomas Olsen, Thomas William Pennie, Katherine Duyen Reid, Noah William Rumm, Kellie Marie Sablone, Caroline Anne Sagristano, Anna Ruth Sather, Robert Louis Sedlatschek, Justin Colby Shaw, Penelope Jeanne Small, Emily Xinping Tan, Caroline Anna Wallace, Colleen Elizabeth Walsh, Alexander Clay Williams

Grade 11: Emily Eileen Balocca, Emma Elizabeth Bass, Audrey Campbell Berry, Faith Laurel Caulkins, Rory Nelligan Cavicke, Isabel Priscilla Dean-Frazier, Arianna Teresa DelMastro, Maria Ashley Denya, Raymond Michael Doll, Nicholas Bernardo Fava, Jada Anaelsa Fuentes, Tanner James Griffin, Sophia Rose Griswold, Kamber Hani Hamou, Lauren Elizabeth Huck, Jeffy Mathew Joshy, Rachael Anne Larson, Brenna Paige Lewis, Connor Patrick Maguire, Jacqueline Rose Malizia, Thomas Peter McCarthy, Ryan Patrick McTigue, Samantha Heather Olson, Jenna Tracy Porter, Andre Jeffrey Salkin, Garrett Michael Smith, Emily Marie Speckhals, Evan Thomas St.Louis, Olivia Mae Stack, Olivia Lucy Tetreault, Kiera McKeon Ulmer, Megan Lynn VanSteenbergen, Theodore Wilson Wayland, Trevor Dennis Wells, Anna Elliott Williams, Maggie Vaughan Wisner, Conner David Wyman, Katherine Ruby Zelmanow

Grade 10: Juliette Frances Atkinson, Rachel Katherine Barretta, Emma Ann Boardman, Keenan Lawrence Burr, Martinez Erika Yanira Carcamo, Kate Margaret Cheney, Emerson Mylon Colwell, John Berry Cox, Megan Dorothy Cravinho, Bianca Serapilia Dasilva, Emily Jane DeRoehn, Fiona Mary Frederiks, Schuyler Bates Greenho, Lillian Ellette Grethel, Emma Rose Griffith, Catharine Judith Harrison, Isabella Faith Hine, Grace Ann Lathrop, Owen Russell Macadam, Elle Addison McAraw, Emma Meekhoff, Marina May Melluzzo, Riley Elizabeth Nelson, Sophia Grace Ortoleva, Connie Wendy Pan, Lauren Adam Pitt, Jacob Leary Quaratella, Hayden Brooks-McCall Saunders, Tait Alexander Sawden, Jesper Fredrik Silberberg, Jake Talin Stewart, Lian Elise Thompson, Angus James Graeme Tresnan, Lauren Elizabeth Wallace, Kelly Marie Walsh, Ellery Hope Zrenda

Grade 9: Grace Avery Arnold, Nihad Bicic, Hannah Faith Britt, Evan Davis Clark, Anne Josephine Colangelo, John Glynn Conley, Lauren Elizabeth Creagan, Caroline Grace Crolius, Elias Orion D’Onofrio, Elizabeth Mackenzie Duddy, Eleanor Eliza Dushin, Samantha Brie Geshel, Aiden John Goiangos, Madison Grace Hubbard, Fiona Dorothy Hufford, Nevin Varkey Joshy, Kian Kardestuncer, Owen Talbot Kegley, Cora Catalina Kern, Michael Richard Klier, Felse Alexandra Catherine Mary Kyle, William Christopher Larson, Reese Jameson Maguire, Abigail Eve Manthous, Stephanie Marie Mauro, Grace Corbett McAdams, Evan David Morgan, Elle Jolie Myers, Bella Kai Orlando, Adeline Michelle Riccio, Katie Ann Roberts, Margaret Jeanne Rommel, Alexander Joseph Roth, Frank Louis Sablone, Olivia Fu Xin Schaedler, Calvin Nicklas Scheiber, Abigail Jane Sicuranza, Abby Katherine Speckhals, Drew Michael St.Louis, Nikolai Stephens-Zumbaum, Victoria Grace Stout, Madison Grace Thompson, Olivia Elizabeth Turtoro, Aidan Matthew Ward, Melanie Emma Warren, Ellie Donna Wells, Mary Katherine Wholean, Ryan Everett Zbierski

Honors

Grade 12: Teresa Elisabeth Rosie Allan, Catherine Marie Battalino, Lauren Ann Birk, Claire Constance Britton, Paige Catherine Britton, Jocelyn Miracle Campbell, Tyler Wilson Clark, John Joseph Coughlin, Lily Marilyn Cox, Thomas Martin Creagan, Marlena Julianne Elmoznino, Aoife Marie Hufford, Andrea Rose Kathe, Joshua William Liefeld, Nicholas Noah Myers, Jenny Yana Ritchie, Eaven Rivera, James Patrick Rollins, Quintin Robert Romeo, Nicholas Francis Roth, Olivia Leigh Rugg, Griffin Rex Standish, Carson Selden Swope, Ethan Gabriel Tracano

Grade 11: Anabella Nicola Arias, Martinez Lisbet Yosery Carcamo, Emilia Annmarie Cheesman, Sarah Belle Conley, Elizabeth Anne Cravinho, Ty Kenton Dean, Theodore Edward Enoch, Emily Grace Evers, Araselys Rose Farrell, Lucy Marie Gilbert, Parker Phillip Hubbard, Renate Jane Kuhn, Biuma Kazadi Mariame, Melissa Nicole Mauro, Natalie Grace Meyers, Ryan Christopher Mitchell, Maxwell Derek Morrissey, Chandler Mary Munson, Samantha Elizabeth Owen, Cajamarca Jenny Gabriela Pelaez, Jared Scott Ritchie, Jane Stacey Scheiber, Taylor Ann Sedlatschek, Colby Patrick Sides, Summer Abigail Siefken, Haley Ryan Stevens, Ryan Jules Tetreault, Lydia Grace Tinnerello, Sydney Kathleen Trowbridge, Jackson Calvert Warren, Clair Margaret Wholean

Grade 10: Colbe Kent Andrews, Kaylee Ann Armenia, Olivia Louise Bartlett, Maxwell Otto Bauchmann, Jason Richard Beebe, Ava Campbell Berry, Truman Arthur Boller, Kyuss Buono, Patrick Nuhad Dagher, Francette Mae Donato, Corah Serene Engdall, Leslie Dorothy Farrell, Sadie Caffry Frankel, Eveliz Adelaide Fuentes, Regan Joshua Kaye, Corey Aidan Klimaszewski, Paige Elizabeth Kolesnik, Destiny Marita Kus, Gabriel Ilunga Lavoie, Mackenzie Rose Machnik, Emma Kay McCulloch, Brianna Frances Melillo, Michael Joseph Milazzo, Timothy Shane O’Brien, Anwyn Mae Paynter, Gavin Lawrence Porter, Ezra Nathaniel Pyle, Tessa Leighann St.Germain, Katrina Marie Wallace, Alison Grace Ward

Grade 9: Nicholas Mark Adeletti, John Cochrane Almy, Andrew James Bennett, Ethan Jeremiah Carr, Ryan Joseph Clark, James William Creagan, Elise Marie DeBernardo, Mischa Jo Elmoznino, Nicholas Michael Fiore, Iona Dominique Fitzgerald, Victoria Noel Gage, Nicolette Cote Hallahan, Andrew Edward Hedberg, Julia Lee Johnston, Olivia Frances Lecza, Alex Almeida Lee, Mikayla Grace Masilotti, Jacob Douglas Meyers, Samuel Alias Mullaney, Brendan Patrick O’Brien, Michael St.John O’Donnell, Jacob Paul Ritchie, Aidan Lee Russell, McLean Ivana Signora, Matthew William Snyder, Maverick Anthony Swaney, John Russell Videll, Evan Joseph Visgilio, Aden River Wilson, Paige Alyssa Winchell, Avery Richard Wyman

Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School
2018-19 Q3 Honor Roll   

High Honors

Grade 8: Bridget Allan, William R Barry, Callie Grace Bass, Livie Abigail Bass, Jillian Hope Beebe, Jordan Faith Beebe, Gillian Anna Bradley, Ava Brinkerhoff, Jamie Lyn Bucior, Gretchen Wood Burgess, Sarah Frost Burnham, Hayley Marie Cann, Liam Foley Celic, Luke Harty Celic, Alexander John Chrysoulakis, Grace Victoria Colwell, William Christopher Danes, Anna Rebecca Davis, Kylie Praylyn Dishaw, Cole Raymond Dobratz, John Pierson Eichholz, Clarence Charles Hinckley, Willa Kate Hoerauf, Dylan Scott Hovey, Karissa Kanghan Huang, Owen Alexander Ingersoll-Bonsack, Aidan Shea Kerrigan, Phoebe Athena Lampos, Jonah Michael Lathrop, Monique Makwes Lavoie, Jacob Lopez-Bravo, Ford Harris Macadam, Marielle Grace Mather, Madalyn Josephine McCulloch, Caden Charles Monte, Cooper Kenneth Munson, Kelsey MacKinstry Pryor, Izzadora Georgia Reynolds, Benjamin Joseph Roth, Eli Winston Ryan, Alyssa Nicole Spooner, Tova Maeve Toriello, Kaitlyn Emily Ward, Harry William Whitten, George Henry Williams, Quinn Madison Williams

Grade 7: Peighton Andrews, Emma Catherine Bayor, Oliver Campbell Berry, Alis Bicic, Elliot Bjornberg, Henry Edison Boller, Henry Ronald Boremski, Drew Arthur Brackley, Natalie Faith Buckley, Jackson Charles Bullock, Sarah Jane Colangelo, Ava Cummins, Ella Curtiss-Reardon, Macklin David Cushman, Eric Jacques Dagher, Eva Rose D’Onofrio, Ryder James-Edward Goss, Sydney Grace Goulding, Nyla Susan Goulis, Alexis Lee Grasdock, Justin James Green, Katherine Lynette Gryk, Abby Janet Hale, Nathaniel Flynn Heon, Leland Gerber Hine, Sedona Holland, Agatha Fay Hunt, Beatrice Stelfox Hunt, Sabina June Jungkeit, Emmerson Norcia Kaye, Dakota Wills Kotzan, Luke Samuel Legein, Matthew William Mazzalupo, Anna Gerety McAdams, Griffin Sam McGlinchey, Matthew Braden Burns Miller, Katherine Elizabeth Mullaney, Delaney Grace Nelson, Isabelle McEntire O’Connor, Kayla Ann O’Leary, Grace Olivia Phaneuf, Jack David Porter, Luisa Lambert Raby, Haley Rae Shaw, Owen Thomas Snurkowski, Keara Megan Ward, Louisa Warlitz, Mason Scott Wells, Tyler Joseph Wells, Summer Paige Wollack

Grade 6: Emma Rose Arelt, Ella Aley Austin, Natalie Amelia Barndt, Micah Everett Bass, Molly Grace Boardman, Samuel David Bocian, Chase Miles Calderon, Tabitha Rose Colwell, Gloria Luz Conley, Chloe Irene Datum, Zoe Siena Eastman-Grossel, Caeli Anne Edmed, Anna Sophia Eichholz, Ella Evans, Grace Elisabeth Ferman, Hoshena Sora Gemme, Marcella Margaret Gencarella, Salvatore Anthony Gencarella, Ava Clare Gilbert, Henry Martin Griswold, Kyle Nathaniel Ingersoll-Bonsack, Shyla Chantelle Jones, Simon Maxwell Karpinski, Aven Irene Kellert, Olivia Grace Kelly, Ella Frances Kiem, Ada Marie LaConti, James Emmanuel Lahot, Elise Grace Leonardo, Andrew Liu, Colette Elena Marchant, Nathan James Morgan, Abigail Nancy O’Brien, Kanon Amy Oharu, Filip Jaromir Pecher-Kohout, Sophie Catriona Pennie, Mutia Quarshie, Drea Lyn Simler, Morgan Kelly Standish, Charlotte Rebekah Tinniswood, Leah Fay Volponi, Kathleen Noel Walsh, Ava Gray Wilcox, Ava Rose Wood-Muller

Honors

Grade 8: Olivia Grace Alpha, Elsie Beatrice Arafeh-Hudson, Whitney Tyler Barbour, Cooper Russell Bowman, Arber Hoxha, Madison Madonna Krol, Karleigh Paige Landers, Joseph Nicholas Montazella, Calvin Andrew Monte, Alain Jaromir Pecher-Kohout, Santiago Israel Rodriguez, Rhyleigh Berit Russell, Anders Erik Silberberg

Grade 7: Nicholas Paul Cheesman, Lucas Milo DaSilva, Amelia Lynn Gage, Brodie Cole Lippincott, Elaina Marie Morosky, Ronald Peter Olin, Ava Sophia Roth, Kylie-Jean Patricia Sevigny, Sydney Morgan Siefken, Madeleine Sydney Soriano, Gabriel Charles Tooker, Kalea VanPelt

Grade 6: Christopher Patrick Anderson, Oliver Pierre Avelange, Austin Ruben Buckingham, Mark Kasper Burnham, Autumn Reign Dionne, Shane Hudson Eastman-Grossel, Samantha Rose Fiske, Abigail Ann Griffith, Jonathan Cole Harms, Brenden Thomas Landry, Elizabeth Blackwell Lopez, Ysabel Mariflor Rodriguez, Kelly Fei Sheehan, Andrew John Sicuranza

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