October 19, 2021

Letter to the Editor: Political, Personal Agendas and Extremist Rhetoric Have No Place at Board of Education Table

To the Editor:

Parents and taxpayers of Old Lyme, please pay close attention to this year’s November municipal elections, particularly to the candidates for the Region 18 Board of Education.

Old Lyme enjoys a school system that is broadly recognized for its quality across the region, the state, and indeed the nation.

Based on my tenure of sixteen years as a former member and chair of the Region 18 Board of Education, I cannot adequately stress the importance of having a Board composed of well-qualified members to maintain that level of quality.  Political and personal agendas and extremist rhetoric have no place at the Board of Education table. The top priorities must always be preserving a highest standard of educational excellence, and protecting the health and safety of the school community.

In my personal experience, the Old Lyme Democrats have always put forth responsible, qualified and reasonable candidates for the Board of Education seats, and they have done so again this year. They clearly understand their role in delivering quality education to our students, as well as responsible budgets to the taxpayers. 

In our electoral process, political parties have a principal role in nominating suitable candidates. When that process fails, it becomes even more important for the electorate to be informed and active, and most importantly, to vote.

Choose wisely, Old Lyme!

Sincerely,

Susan Fogliano,
Old Lyme.

Oct. 18 COVID-19 Update: Three New Cases in Old Lyme, One in Lyme Take Cumulative Town Totals Respectively to 435, 131

Photo by CDC on Unsplash.

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Report issued Monday, Oct. 18, at 4 p.m. by the Connecticut Department of Health (CT DPH) shows three new confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme compared with Friday’s number, taking the town’s cumulative total of cases to 435. 

Lyme also reported a new case taking its cumulative total to 131 cases.

The state does not issue reports over the weekend nor on public holidays. The next report from CT DPH will be Tuesday, Oct. 19, at around 4 p.m.

On Aug. 26, Old Lyme’s cumulative case total stood at 372, meaning there have been 63 new cases there since that date. Meanwhile, Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 indicating 17 new cases have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools started the new academic year Aug. 26.

COVID-19 Cases in Lyme-Old Lyme Schools

This is the latest information that we have with the most recent cases first — there may have been further updates, however, which we have not yet received.

On Wednesday, Oct. 5, Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser informed the school community that a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Lyme-Old Lyme High School had been reported the previous evening.

On Thursday, Sept. 16, Neviaser informed the school community that a previously reported positive case of COVID-19 is now impacting Mile Creek School and Center School.

On Monday, Sept. 13, a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School, which had been reported the previous day, was announced.

On Wednesday, Sept. 1,  a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Mile Creek School was announced.

On Tuesday, Aug. 31, Neviaser informed the school community that late on Monday, Aug. 30, a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Lyme-Old Lyme High School had been reported.

On Saturday, Aug. 28, Neviaser informed the school community that late on Friday, Aug. 27, a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Lyme School had been reported.

In all cases, contact tracing was completed and those individuals who needed to quarantine were notified. They will be able to return to school following their quarantine period. All other students and staff will continue to attend school as scheduled.

Fatalities Due to COVID-19 in Lyme, Old Lyme

There is no change in the number of fatalities reported in either Lyme (0) or Old Lyme (3).

The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male. Details of the third, which was reported in 2021, have not been made available.

Visit this link for our Oct. 14 update, which includes statewide data.

Caryn B. Davis of Lyme Shares ‘A Photographer’s Vision,’ Tonight to Offer Inspiration for ‘Imagining Lyme’ Photo Program

Caryn B. Davis

LYME — Join award-winning photographer Caryn B. Davis for a presentation of her landscapes from the natural world and to celebrate the Lyme Land Trust’s photography program, Imagining Lyme. Davis’s presentation will take place Tuesday, Oct. 19, at 7 p.m. in the Lyme Public Library Community Room.

Davis will show images of gardens and also some from her recent trips to Antarctica and Yellowstone National Park.

She will explain how the natural world influences her creative process with particular attention to composition, learning the rules and then breaking them, the artistry of abstract images verses realistic, and how using different focal lengths within the same scene can yield different compositional results.

To register for the program, email education@lymelandtrust.org

Davis is a Lyme resident, who has specialized in architecture, interiors, garden and travel photography for over 20 years. Her career has spanned the globe taking her to over 50 countries. She is also a prolific writer with articles that have been featured in the New York Times, Town & Country, Lonely Planet, Conde Nast Traveler, Fine Art Connoisseur, New Zealand Geographic, and others.

Davis has produced two commissioned photography books, A Connecticut Christmas: Celebrating the Holiday in Classic New England Style, and the newly-published Connecticut Waters: Celebrating Our Coastline and Waterways. She is currently working on her third book due out in 2023.

Editor’s Note: Visit this link to read a review of ‘ Connecticut Waters: Celebrating Our Coastline and Waterways’ by LymeLine.com publisher Olwen Logan.

Deadline to Submit Questions for Region 18 BOE ‘Meet the Candidates’ Event is Today at 5pm

LYME-OLD LYME — Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB) and the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce are hosting a ‘Meet the Candidates for Board of Education’ event on Wednesday, Oct. 20, starting at 7 p.m. at Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School. All are welcome.

The eight candidates running for the Old Lyme open seats on the Region 18 Board of Education (BOE) will give prepared statements and answer questions posed by the Event Moderator, Attorney John A. Collins III of Suisman Shapiro Attorneys at Law.

Readers are invited to submit questions for possible inclusion in the event by one of these options:

All questions will be treated anonymously in terms of the name of the sender and also maintained confidential, i.e., they will not be shared with the candidates in advance. The deadline for receiving questions is 5 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 18.

Three Old Lyme incumbents on the current Region 18 BOE — Chair Diane Linderman, Treasurer Jean Wilczynski and Rick Goulding — have chosen not to seek re-election. Old Lyme incumbent Martha Shoemaker is seeking reelection.

Lyme incumbent Stacey Leonardo (D) is also not seeking re-election.

The eight candidates running for the four, four-year-term Old Lyme seats are:

  • Marisa Calvi-Rogers, (D)
  • Mona Colwell, (U) Endorsed by Old Lyme Republicans
  • Laura Dean-Frazier, (U) Endorsed by Old Lyme Republicans
  • Jason Kemp, (D)
  • Alexander Lowry, (D)
  • Michael Presti, (R)
  • Martha Shoemaker, (D), incumbent
  • Christopher Staab, (R)

Anna James (D), who is unable to attend the event, is running uncontested for the open Lyme seat.

The event planning committee will be solely responsible for selecting the questions asked at the event.  There will not be any questions taken from the floor.

The program will be livestreamed on the Region 18 BOE YouTube channel: Lyme-Old Lyme Board Of Education Region18 – YouTube. It will be recorded and posted at the same link for future viewing.

Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 2.

LymeLine.com is proud to sponsor this event.

For further information, contact Mary Seidner at mseidner@lysb.org or 869-434-7208.

Red Ribbon Week Encourages Everyone to Take Stand Against Drug Misuse, Starts Saturday,

LYME/OLD LYME — Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB) and Lyme/Old Lyme Prevention Coalition (LOLPC) are planning a number of activities to celebrate Red Ribbon Week, which is set for Oct. 23 through Oct. 31.

The week is aimed at uniting youth, parents, schools, and communities in order to take a stand against drug misuse. As part of this year’s observance — which will be themed “Drug Free Looks Like Me” — the Upstanders Club at Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School (LOLMS) is hosting a Door-Decorating Contest and other Red Ribbon events, and LYSB will be aglow in red lights for the week.

Also, a National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day event is planned for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 23, at the Old Lyme Fire House. This drive-through collection event, which is held in partnership with local law enforcement, will give residents an opportunity to safely dispose of expired, unused and unwanted medications.

On Thursday Oct. 28, from 7 to 8:30 p.m., the LOLPC is sponsoring a virtual workshop titled, The Dangerous Truth About Today’s Marijuana: Johnny Stack’s Life and Death Story.

Laura Stack, best-selling author and public speaker, will share the story of her son Johnny’s marijuana addiction from a mother’s point of few, a poignant chronicle of shocking descent from innocence to eventual suicide. This important event is free and registration to obtain the Zoom link for the presentation is available at this link or at www.lysb.org.

These events are supported by the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of a financial assistance award funded by ONDCP.

Editor’s Note: For more information about Red Ribbon Week or the Lyme-Old Lyme Prevention Coalition, contact Alli Behnke, MSW, MA at abehnke@lysb.org.

Oct. 15 COVID-19 Update: New Case in Old Lyme Takes Cumulative Total to 432, Lyme Holds at 130

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Report issued Friday, Oct. 15, at 4 p.m. by the Connecticut Department of Health (CT DPH) shows one new confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme compared with Thursday’s number, taking the town’s cumulative total of cases to 432. 

Lyme meanwhile, maintained its cumulative total at 130 cases for the fifth consecutive reporting day.

The state does not issue reports over the weekend nor on public holidays. The next report from CT DPH will be Monday, Oct. 18, at around 4 p.m. and will include weekly updates.

On Aug. 26, Old Lyme’s cumulative case total stood at 372, meaning there have been 60 new cases there since that date. Meanwhile, Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 indicating 16 new cases have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools started the new academic year Aug. 26.

COVID-19 Cases in Lyme-Old Lyme Schools

This is the latest information that we have with the most recent cases first — there may have been further updates, however, which we have not yet received.

On Wednesday, Oct. 5, Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser informed the school community that a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Lyme-Old Lyme High School had been reported the previous evening.

On Thursday, Sept. 16, Neviaser informed the school community that a previously reported positive case of COVID-19 is now impacting Mile Creek School and Center School.

On Monday, Sept. 13, a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School, which had been reported the previous day, was announced.

On Wednesday, Sept. 1,  a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Mile Creek School was announced.

On Tuesday, Aug. 31, Neviaser informed the school community that late on Monday, Aug. 30, a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Lyme-Old Lyme High School had been reported.

On Saturday, Aug. 28, Neviaser informed the school community that late on Friday, Aug. 27, a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Lyme School had been reported.

In all cases, contact tracing was completed and those individuals who needed to quarantine were notified. They will be able to return to school following their quarantine period. All other students and staff will continue to attend school as scheduled.

Fatalities Due to COVID-19 in Lyme, Old Lyme

There is no change in the number of fatalities reported in either Lyme (0) or Old Lyme (3).

The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male. Details of the third, which was reported in 2021, have not been made available.

Visit this link for our Oct. 14 update, which includes statewide data.

Wildcats Celebrate Senior Day with Scoring Bonanza Against Montville in Inaugural Game on New Turf Field

Aggie Hunt blasts the ball into the net for the second goal in Saturday’s game against Montville. All photos by Elizabeth Mauro.

OLD LYME — It was a huge day in her first season as coach for Kendra Flaherty’s Old Lyme soccer girls.

Celebrating the Seniors with the Old Lyme’s unique and time-honored tradition of decorated sheets.

Saturday was not only Senior Day, when the seniors are honored at their last home game of the regular season, but it was also the team’s first game on the brand new, all-weather field at Lyme-Old Lyme High School … and the team set out to celebrate both events with no holds barred.

Ella Curtiss-Reardon kicks the ball past the Montville keeper for the Wildcat’s third goal.

The girls came out onto the field exuberantly and by the end of the game had put a total of five goals past the Montville keeper, while their opponents had yet to find the net.
In the first half, Abby Manthous started the scoring after 14 minutes off an assist from Kate Walsh.
Next to score was Aggie Hunt with 11 minutes left in the half and assisted by Alexis Fenton.

Hannah Britt displays some deft footwork during the game.

One minute later, Ella Curtiss-Reardon scored the ‘Cats third goal unassisted and then the fourth came from Kate Walsh assisted by Lyla Powers.

Maddie McCulloch prepares to make a shot.

After the scoring bonanza in the first half, Old Lyme slowed things down in the second half but still managed to add a fifth goal after 13 minutes when Alexis Fenton stepped up and drove a penalty kick home.

Wildcat goalie Rhyleigh Russell (in pink) came in for the injured Olivia Kelly and made five important saves.

Old Lyme keeper Olivia Kelly made one save before leaving on the game with an injury. She was replaced by Rhyleigh Russell, who went on to make five saves for the Wildcats.

Free Flu Shots for Lyme, Old Lyme Residents Offered Today

Photo by CDC on Unsplash.

LYME/OLD LYME — On Saturday, Oct. 16, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., the Old Lyme Visiting Nurse Association will offer free flu shots to Lyme and Old Lyme residents at a drive-through clinic at the Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School.

No insurance paperwork is required.

Those attending this clinic are requested to wear face masks.

Oct. 14 COVID-19 Update: Lyme, Old Lyme Both in Gray (Lowest) Case Rate Zone for First Time Since July, But Statewide Number of Towns in Red Zone Increases

This map, updated Oct. 14, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Old Lyme and Lyme are both in the Gray (lowest) Zone. Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.) Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper. Details in italics are the same for each of the maps included in this article.

LYME/OLD LYME — Updated with Ledge Light information issued Oct. 15. The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Thursday, Oct. 14, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 13, has good news for both Lyme and Old Lyme. This report includes the weekly update, which is issued each Thursday.

The report shows that Old Lyme has moved down from the Orange (second highest) Zone for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19, in which it was placed last week, to the Gray (lowest) Zone, where Lyme has been since mid-September. The last time both towns were in the Gray Zone was July 22, 2021.

See detailed description of all four zones in italics below.

Connecticut’s daily positivity rate, however, has increased from 1.70 percent last week to 2.23 this week.

Reflecting that marginal increase in the positivity rate statewide, the latest average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks (see map above) similarly shows the number of towns in the Red Zone also marginally increasing from 37 last week to 40 this week.

Old Lyme reported no new, confirmed COVID-19 cases Thursday, Oct. 14, compared with Wednesday, Oct. 13, keeping Old Lyme’s cumulative total of confirmed cases at 431 for the ninth day in succession.

Lyme also reported no new cases on Thursday, Oct. 14, and therefore maintained its cumulative total of 130 for the third day in succession.

Both Lyme and Old Lyme reported Average Daily Case Rates of less than five this week,

On Aug. 26, the cumulative total of cases in Old Lyme was 372, meaning 59 cases have been confirmed since that date. Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 meaning 16 have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools re-opened to students Aug. 26.

The Gray category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is less than five or less than five reported cases.
The Yellow category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between five and nine reported cases.
The Orange category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between 10 and 14.
The Red category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town exceeds 15.
In all cases, this rate does not include cases or tests among residents of nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.

Weekly Report from Ledge Light Health District (LLHD)

Editor’s Note: We have now received the LLHD report for this week. 

Stephen Mansfield, LLHD Director of Health,  prefaced the weekly LLHD report sent out Oct. 15, with these words, “We are happy to see a slight decrease in the number of new COVID cases.”

He added though, “It is imperative that we remain diligent in our mitigation strategies. We strongly advise everyone to wear masks indoors in public settings, regardless of vaccination status”

Mansfield also noted, “We have scheduled reoccurring COVID vaccination clinics at Ledge Light Health District every Wednesday.”.

The nine towns included in the LLHD show:

  • three in the Red Zone: Ledyard, Waterford and North Stonington;
  • three in the Orange (second highest) Zone: East Lyme, New London and Groton;
  • three in the Yellow (second lowest) Zone: Stonington;
  • two in the Gray Zone: Lyme and Old Lyme.

Vaccination Rates

Vaccination rates in Lyme and Old Lyme are encouraging with 86.5 percent of the population in Lyme having received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and the equivalent number for Old Lyme being 75.8 percent.

Percentages for the fully vaccinated are 82.0 for Lyme and 74.9 for Old Lyme.

These rates remain among the higher percentages in the state.

COVID-19 Cases Over Time: Dec. 2020-Aug. 2021

The following maps show has the picture of COVID-19 cases has gone from an almost totally red map back in Dec. 2020 to an almost all-gray map on June 17, 2021 and then back to a map with all colors represented in substantial number again.

Oct. 7

This map, updated Oct. 7, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Old Lyme has moved down to the Orange (second from highest) Zone while Lyme remains in the Gray (lowest) Zone.

The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Thursday, Oct. 7, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT-DPH) has good news for Lyme but slightly improved news for Old Lyme.

The report showed that Old Lyme had moved down from the Red (highest) Zone for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19, in which it was placed the previous week, to the Orange (second from highest) Zone.

Lyme was still in the Gray (lowest) Zone and had had no new cases confirmed since Sept. 13.

Other signs were much more positive for our towns, with Lyme maintaining an Average Daily Case Rate of 0 (same as last week) while Old Lyme’s was 11.7 (down from 20.5 on Thursday last week.)

Connecticut’s daily positivity rate had increased from 1.26 percent last week to 1.70 this week.

Also, statewide, the latest average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks (see map above) had continued to slow with 37 towns now in the Red Zone, which was 20 less than last week’s total of 57.  On Sept. 2, the total was 91 so the trend was clearly downward, and it has now surpassed the most recent record low of 39 reported on Aug. 12.

Old Lyme reported no new, confirmed COVID-19 cases Thursday, Oct. 7, compared with Wednesday, Oct. 6, keeping Old Lyme’s cumulative total of confirmed cases at 431 for the second day in succession.

Lyme also reported no new cases on Thursday, Oct. 7, and therefore maintained its cumulative total of 129 for the 21st day in succession. There was a blip on Oct. 4 and 5, when the state reported a new case in Lyme, but the state has now corrected that error.

On Aug. 26, the cumulative total of cases in Old Lyme was 372, meaning 59 cases have been confirmed since that date. Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 meaning 15 have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools re-opened to students Aug. 26.

Sept. 30

This map, updated Sept. 30, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Old Lyme remains in the Red (highest) Zone while Lyme has moved down to the Gray (lowest) Zone.

The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Thursday, Sept. 30, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 29, had good news for Lyme but continuing bad news for Old Lyme.

The report showed that Old Lyme remained in the Red (highest) Zone for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19. This was the fourth week in succession that Old Lyme had found itself in the Red Zone.

Lyme, meanwhile, had fallen from the Red (highest) Zone, in which it was placed last week, into the Gray (lowest) Zone.

Other signs were much more positive for our towns, however. Lyme now had an Average Daily Case Rate of 0 (down from 18.5 on Thursday last week) while Old Lyme’s was 20.5 (down from 22.5 on Thursday last week.)

Lyme had no new cases confirmed since Sept. 13; Old Lyme’s cumulative total has held steady since Sept. 27.

Statewide, there was also good news. Connecticut’s daily positivity rate stood at 1.26 percent down from 2.28 percent on Thursday last week.

Also, statewide, the latest average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks (see map above) continued to slow with 57 towns now in the Red Zone, which is 24 less than last week’s total of 81.  On Sept. 2, the total was 91 so the trend is clearly downward, although it is still up from the 39 reported on Aug. 12.

Old Lyme reported no new, confirmed COVID-19 cases Thursday, Sept. 30, compared with Wednesday, Sept. 29. keeping Old Lyme’s cumulative total of confirmed cases at 426 for the fourth day in succession.

Lyme also reported no new cases on Thursday, Sept. 30, and therefore maintained its cumulative total of 129 for the 14th day in succession.

On Aug. 26, the cumulative total of cases in Old Lyme was 372, meaning 54 cases have been confirmed since that date. Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 meaning 15 have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools re-opened to students Aug. 26.

Sept. 23

This map, updated Sept. 23, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme have moved into the Red (highest) Zone.

The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Thursday, Sept. 23, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health  (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 22, showed the following:

Both towns remained in the Red (highest) Zone for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19. This was the third week in succession that both towns had found themselves in the Red Zone.

Lyme had an Average Daily Case Rate of 18.5 (down from 43.2 on Thursday last week) while Old Lyme’s was 22.5 (down from 30.3 on Thursday last week.) A rate over 15.0 places a town in the Red Zone.

Connecticut’s daily positivity rate stood at 2.28 percent down from 2.93 percent on Thursday last week.

Statewide, the latest average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks (see map above) had continued to slow marginally with 81 towns now in the Red Zone, which is three down from the  previous week’s total of 84.  On Sept. 2, the total was 91 so the trend was undoubtedly downward although it was still up significantly from the 39 reported on Aug. 12.

Old Lyme reported no new, confirmed COVID-19 cases Thursday, Sept. 23, compared with Wednesday, Sept. 22. keeping Old Lyme’s cumulative total of confirmed cases at 419. This was the first day that there had not been a single new case reported in a 24-hour period in Old Lyme since Aug. 26.

Lyme also reported no new cases on Thursday, Sept. 23, and therefore maintained its cumulative total of 129 for the fourth day in succession.

On Aug. 26, the cumulative number of cases in Old Lyme was 372 meaning 47 cases had been reported since that date, while 12 had also been confirmed in Lyme during the same period.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools re-opened to students Aug. 26.

Sept. 16

This map, updated Sept. 16, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme have moved into the Red (highest) Zone.

The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Thursday, Sept. 16, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health  (CT-DPH) showed the following:

Both towns remained in the Red (highest) Zone for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19. This is the second week in succession that both towns found themselves in the Red Zone. See detailed description of the zones in italics below.

Lyme had an Average Daily Case Rate of 43.2 while Old Lyme’s was 30.3. A rate over 15 places a town in the Red Zone.

Connecticut’s daily positivity rate stood at 2.93 percent, down from 3.36 on Thursday last week.

Despite this poor situation locally, statewide, the latest average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks (see map above) remained relatively constant over the past week with 84 towns now in the Red Zone, which was only one higher than last week’s total of 83.

Old Lyme reported four new, confirmed COVID-19 cases Thursday, Sept.16, since the previous CT DPH report issued Wednesday, Sept. 15. This means Old Lyme’s cumulative total of confirmed cases rose to 411, while Lyme reported no new cases and therefore kept its cumulative total at 129.

On Aug. 26, the cumulative number of cases in Old Lyme was 372 meaning 39 cases have been reported since that date, while 12 have also been confirmed in Lyme during the same period.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools re-opened to students Aug. 26.

Sept. 9

This map, updated Sept. 9, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme have moved into the Red (highest) Zone.

The Daily Data Report issued Thursday, Sept. 9, by the Connecticut Department of Health (CT DPH) showed the following:

These 47 towns were in the Orange (second highest) Zone: Avon, Bethlehem, Bloomfield, Branford, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Burlington, Colchester, Danbury, Durham, East Haddam, East Lyme, East Windsor, Easton, Ellington, Fairfield, Farmington, Greenwich, Groton, Hamden, Killingly, Killingworth, Lebanon, New Milford, Newington, North Canaan, Old Saybrook, Pomfret, Portland, Salem, Shelton, Sherman, Simsbury, Somers, South Windsor, Southbury, Stamford, Stonington, Suffield, Tolland, Washington, West Hartford, Wethersfield, Willington, Wilton, Windsor Locks and Woodstock.

These 19 towns were in the Yellow (second lowest) Zone: Bethany, Bethel, Canton, Clinton, Coventry, Darien, Essex, Guilford, Haddam, Madison, Mansfield, New Canaan, Redding, Ridgefield, Thompson, Westbrook, Westport, Winchester and Woodbury.

These 20 towns were in the Gray (lowest) Zone: Andover, Barkhamsted, Bridgewater, Canaan, Chester, Colebrook, Cornwall, Deep River, Eastford, Goshen, Granby, Hampton, Hartland, Kent, Middlefield, Morris, Norfolk, Roxbury, Scotland and Weston.

All other towns in the state, including Lyme and Old Lyme, were in the Red (highest) Zone.

Sept. 2

This map, updated Sept. 2, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Lyme is still in the (lowest) Gray Zone, while Old Lyme has moved back down into the Yellow Zone.

The map above is from Sept. 2 when 91 towns were in the Red Zone, which is down one from 92 a week ago on Aug. 26, but still up significantly from 73  on Aug. 19, and 39 on Aug. 12.

Connecticut’s seven-day positivity rate stood at 3.36 percent, down from 3.52 last week.

Old Lyme had fallen to the Yellow (second lowest) Zone along with 10 other towns. This total of 11 towns is unchanged from last week, when Old Lyme was in the Orange Zone.

Lyme was in the Gray (lowest) Zone. This was the 24th straight week for Lyme in the Gray Zone. Again, this total of 20 towns in the Gray Zone was unchanged from last week.

Forty-seven towns were in the Orange (second highest) Zone.

Aug. 26

This map, updated Aug. 26, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Lyme is still in the (lowest) Gray Zone, while Old Lyme has moved back down into the Yellow Zone.

The map above is from Aug. 26, when Old Lyme was in the Orange (second highest case rate) Zone with a daily case rate per 100,000 of 10.8. Other towns in the Orange Zone, which are within the Ledge Light Health District (LLHD), were East Lyme (12.4), North Stonington (13.7) and Stonington (14.2).

Towns in the Red Zone in the LLHD were Groton – Town & City (15.6), New London (31.1), and Ledyard (25.9). Locally, Norwich, Montville and Waterford were also categorized as red, but they are not in the LLHD.

Eleven Connecticut towns were in the Yellow (second lowest) Zone down from 20the previous week. Locally, these included Deep River, Old Saybrook and Haddam.

The remaining 20 towns in the state, including Lyme, were in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone. This was the 23rd straight week for Lyme in the Gray Zone.

Aug. 19

This map, updated Aug. 19, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Lyme is still in the (lowest) Gray Zone, while Old Lyme has moved back into the Orange Zone.

The map above is from Aug. 19 when Old Lyme was back in the Orange (second highest case rate) Zone with a two-week case rate per 100,000 of 11.7. Other towns in the Orange Zone, which are within the Ledge Light Health District (LLHD), were East Lyme (10.4) and Stonington (12.7).

Almost 50 towns in the state remained in the Orange Zone, which was around the same number as the previous week including non-LLHD members Westbrook, Old Saybrook, Chester, and Salem locally.

Towns in the Red Zone in the LLHD were Groton – Town & City (15.6), New London (26.3), Ledyard (21.0), and North Stonington (17.9). Locally, Norwich and Waterford were also categorized as red, but they are not in the LLHD.

Less than 20 Connecticut towns were in the Yellow (second lowest) Zone down from 40 the previous week. Locally, these included including Deep River, Essex and East Haddam.

The remaining 20 towns in the state, including Lyme, are in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone. This was the 22nd straight week for Lyme in the Gray Zone.

Aug. 12

The map below is from Aug. 12 and shows that Old Lyme had fallen out of the Orange (second highest case rate) Zone into the Yellow (second lowest) Zone — but only by a fraction. Old Lyme’s two-week case rate per 100,000 was 9.8 — if it were 10.0, then it would have still been in the Orange Zone.

Towns in the Red Zone, which are within the Ledge Light Health District (LLHD), included New London, Ledyard, Stonington and North Stonington. Locally, Norwich and Waterford were also categorized as red, but they are not in the LLHD.

Other towns in the red category included Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Cheshire, East Haven, Easton, Hartford, Meriden, Middletown, New Britain, New Haven, North Branford, North Haven, Norwich, Plymouth, Stamford, Thomaston and Waterbury. At least three of these towns — Easton, Hartford and Thomaston — were in the Red Zone for the second consecutive week.

Almost 50 towns were in the Orange (second highest case rate) Zone — up from 33 the previous week — including Westbrook and Salem locally.

Old Lyme joined the Yellow (second lowest) Zone along with around 40 other Connecticut towns, including Old Saybrook, East Lyme, and Essex.

All remaining towns in the state, including Lyme, along with Deep River and Chester, were in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone. This was the 21st straight week for Lyme in the Gray Zone.

This map, updated Aug. 12, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Lyme is still in the (lowest) Gray Zone, but Old Lyme has moved into the Orange Zone.

Aug. 5

The map below is from Aug. 5 when six towns were in the Red (highest case rate) Zone (the previous week’s number was four) and 33 in the Orange (second highest case rate) Zone — the previous week’s number was four.

The towns in the Red Zone were East Hampton, Easton, Hampton, Hartford, Hartland, North Stonington*, and Thomaston.

There were 33 towns in the Orange Zone including Old Lyme, Waterford, New London, Groton, Ledyard and Stonington, all of which are in the Ledge Light Health District, as are the towns denoted with an * in the other zones.

East Lyme* had reentered the Yellow (second lowest) Zone along with more than 50 other Connecticut towns.

All remaining towns in the state, including Lyme*, were in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone. This was the 20th straight week for Lyme in the Gray Zone.

This map, updated Aug. 5, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Lyme is still in the (lowest) Gray Zone, but Old Lyme has moved into the Orange Zone.

July 29

The map below is from July 29, when four towns were in the Red Zone –Harland, Salem, Bozrah and Sprague — and four towns were in the Orange Zone — Easton, East Hampton, Ledyard and Thompson.

Old Lyme had reentered the Yellow (second lowest) Zone along with more than 50 other Connecticut towns. All remaining towns in the state, including Lyme, were in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone. This was the 19th straight week for Lyme in the Gray Zone.

This map, updated July 29, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Lyme is still in the (lowest) Gray Zone, but Old Lyme has moved into the Yellow Zone.

July 22

The map below is from July 22, when two towns, Franklin and Salem, were in the Red Zone (indicating the highest rate of COVID-19 new cases), which is up one from the previous week, and Andover remained in the (second highest rate) Orange Zone (down from two towns last week.)

Eight towns were in the Yellow Zone (indicating the lowest but one rate of COVID-19 new cases), which is up from two last week. They were Clinton, East Hampton, Manchester, Newington, Stonington, Westbrook, Windsor and Windsor Locks.

This map, updated July 22, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

July 15

The map below is from July 15, when one town, Franklin, was in the Red Zone (indicating the highest rate of COVID-19 new cases) and another two, Salem and Andover, were in the (second highest rate) Orange Zone. New Hartford and Griswold were in the Yellow Zone (indicating the lowest but one rate of COVID-19 new cases.)

This map, updated July 15, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

The map below is from July 8, when New Hartford was the sole town in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated July 8, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

The map below is from July 1, when Marlborough and Prospect were in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated July 1, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

The map below is from June 24, when Somers, Prospect and Bolton were in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated June 24, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

This is the June 17 map, when just one town, Bolton, was in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated June 17, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

For comparison, the map below is from June 3 and shows one town, Waterbury, in the Orange Zone and 21 towns in the Yellow Zone, down from 48 the previous week. The towns in the Yellow Zone were: Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Bloomfield, Brooklyn, Coventry, Cromwell, Derby, East Hartford, East Haven, Granby, Hamden, Hartford, Manchester, New Britain, New Haven, New London, Putnam, Rocky Hill, Shelton, Waterford and Windsor.

This map, updated June 3, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the previous two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

Below is the map from May 27 that showed one town in the Red Zone, Putnam, and 10 towns in the Orange Zone.

This map, updated May 27, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme were still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

Compare the maps above with the one we published Dec. 18, 2020 to see the remarkable progress that has been made with controlling the spread of the virus through expansion of vaccination rates and improved mitigation strategies.

Map of Connecticut dated Dec. 17, 2020 showing both Lyme and Old Lyme now in the CT DPH-identified ‘Red Zone.’ This is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is over 15.

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/

Letter to the Editor: BOE Members Should be ‘Smart, Empathetic, Focused’: Democratic Slate Meets That Need

To the Editor:

Reflecting back on my nearly eight years of service on the Region 18 Board of Education, I am incredibly proud of what we have accomplished with the support and encouragement of the broader Old Lyme and Lyme community.

As I approach my final month on the Board, I am optimistic and excited to support four candidates with exactly the backgrounds needed as the Board engages in strategic planning and a review of potential facility upgrades to four schools that were last substantially updated nearly two decades ago:  educational credentials and a focus on children.  Life-long educators Martha Shoemaker (retired teacher), Marisa Calvi-Rogers (doctorate in education, retired principal) and Alexander Lowry (current teacher), along with Jason Kemp (family relations counselor, CT Judicial Branch), will bring over 90 years of collective public service in support of children to the Board.  Alexander and Jason are also the parents of current R18 students.

We need smart, empathetic, and focused leaders who view challenges as opportunities and can widen the realm of possible solutions through creative problem-solving.  Our small town needs Board of Education members who understand public education and the needs of children and families, as well as the importance of incorporating into their decisions the wide variety of viewpoints held by our community members.

I strongly encourage you to elect these four Democratic candidates to represent our Old Lyme community on the Region 18 Board of Education.

Sincerely,

Jean Wilczynski, CFP®,
Old Lyme.

Editor’s Note: The author currently serves as treasurer of the Regional School District 18 Board of Education.

Oct. 13 COVID-19 Update: No New Cases in Either Town; Old Lyme Holds at 431, Lyme at 130

Photo by CDC on Unsplash,

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Report issued Wedesday, Oct. 13, at 4 p.m. by the Connecticut Department of Health (CT DPH) shows no new confirmed COVID-19 cases in either Lyme or Old Lyme compared with Tuesday’s number of 130 and 431 respectively.,

Old Lyme maintained its cumulative total at 431 cases for the fourth consecutive reporting day. Lyme’s had increased to 130 on Tuesday.

The state does not issue reports over the weekend nor on public holidays. The next report from CT DPH will be Thursday, Oct. 14, at around 4 p.m. and will include weekly updates.

On Aug. 26, Old Lyme’s cumulative case total stood at 372, meaning there have been 59 new cases there since that date. Meanwhile, Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 indicating 16 new cases have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools started the new academic year Aug. 26.

COVID-19 Cases in Lyme-Old Lyme Schools

This is the latest information that we have with the most recent cases first — there may have been further updates, however, which we have not yet received.

On Wednesday, Oct. 5, Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser informed the school community that a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Lyme-Old Lyme High School had been reported the previous evening.

On Thursday, Sept. 16, Neviaser informed the school community that a previously reported positive case of COVID-19 is now impacting Mile Creek School and Center School.

On Monday, Sept. 13, a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School, which had been reported the previous day, was announced.

On Wednesday, Sept. 1,  a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Mile Creek School was announced.

On Tuesday, Aug. 31, Neviaser informed the school community that late on Monday, Aug. 30, a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Lyme-Old Lyme High School had been reported.

On Saturday, Aug. 28, Neviaser informed the school community that late on Friday, Aug. 27, a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Lyme School had been reported.

In all cases, contact tracing was completed and those individuals who needed to quarantine were notified. They will be able to return to school following their quarantine period. All other students and staff will continue to attend school as scheduled.

Fatalities Due to COVID-19 in Lyme, Old Lyme

There is no change in the number of fatalities reported in either Lyme (0) or Old Lyme (3).

The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male. Details of the third, which was reported in 2021, have not been made available.

Visit this link for our Oct. 8 update, which includes statewide data.

Oct. 12 COVID-19 Update: One New Case in Lyme Takes Cumulative Total to 130; OL Holds Steady at 431

Photo by CDC on Unsplash,

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Report issued Tuesday, Oct. 12, at 4 p.m. by the Connecticut Department of Health (CT DPH) shows one new confirmed COVID-19 case in Lyme over Friday’s number of 129, taking the cumulative total for the town to 130. This is the first new confirmed case in Lyme since Sept. 13. (The CT DPH previously reported a new case in Lyme on Oct. 4, then deleted it on Oct. 6.)

Old Lyme maintained its cumulative total at 431 cases for the third consecutive reporting day.

The state does not issue reports over the weekend nor on public holidays so Tuesday’s report is the first since Friday, Oct. 8. The next report will be Wednesday, Oct. 13, at around 4 p.m..

On Aug. 26, Old Lyme’s cumulative case total stood at 372, meaning there have been 59 new cases there since that date. Meanwhile, Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 indicating 16 new cases have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools started the new academic year Aug. 26.

COVID-19 Cases in Lyme-Old Lyme Schools

This is the latest information that we have with the most recent cases first — there may have been further updates, however, which we have not yet received.

On Wednesday, Oct. 5, Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser informed the school community that a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Lyme-Old Lyme High School had been reported the previous evening.

On Thursday, Sept. 16, Neviaser informed the school community that a previously reported positive case of COVID-19 is now impacting Mile Creek School and Center School.

On Monday, Sept. 13, a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School, which had been reported the previous day, was announced.

On Wednesday, Sept. 1,  a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Mile Creek School was announced.

On Tuesday, Aug. 31, Neviaser informed the school community that late on Monday, Aug. 30, a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Lyme-Old Lyme High School had been reported.

On Saturday, Aug. 28, Neviaser informed the school community that late on Friday, Aug. 27, a positive case of COVID-19 impacting Lyme School had been reported.

In all cases, contact tracing was completed and those individuals who needed to quarantine were notified. They will be able to return to school following their quarantine period. All other students and staff will continue to attend school as scheduled.

Fatalities Due to COVID-19 in Lyme, Old Lyme

There is no change in the number of fatalities reported in either Lyme (0) or Old Lyme (3).

The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male. Details of the third, which was reported in 2021, have not been made available.

Visit this link for our Oct. 8 update, which includes statewide data.

Final Day for ‘The Farmer’s Market’ at Tiffany Farms in Lyme is Saturday, Oct. 16

View of The Farmer’s Market at Tiffany Farms in Lyme.

LYME —‘The last day of the 2021 season for The Farmer’s Market at Tiffany Farms’ in Lyme is Saturday, Oct. 16, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Vendors this season include

  • Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm
  • Biscotti and Beyond
  • Bittersweet Farms
  • Chatfield Hollow Farm
  • Confections by Tonie Marie (new – confections!)
  • Dondero Orchards
  • Fat Stone Farm (returning!)
  • From the Farm
  • Long Table Farm
  • Maple Breeze Farm
  • Marna Roons. (New – macaroons!)
  • Sankow Beaver Brook Farm
  • TALK Seafood
  • Tiffany Farms Pasture Raised Beef (started in September and was a HUGE success!)
  • Traveling Italian Chef
  • Wave Hill Breads

Jennifer Tiffany, who runs the market with her husband Bill Hurtle, told LymeLine by email, “We have a well-rounded list of returnees in addition to a couple of new vendors to fill our sweet tooth cravings!”

Bill Hurtle and Jen Tiffany who are preparing to open ‘The Farmers Market at Tiffany Farms’ on June 15.

Social distancing is requested and masks are optional.

“The Heart Seen ‘Round Lyme” looks out at the community from the silo at Tiffany Farms.

This year’ tag-line for the market is “Keeping the trade alive as stewards of the land.”

Editor’s Note: We wish Jen and Bill the very best in this venture throughout the season, which lasts until mid-October.

Visit this link to read an article we published in 2019 about the inaugural season at The Farmer’s Market.

 

The Movie Man: Craig is Captivating, Seydoux is Stunning, But ‘No Time To Die’ Fails to Live Up to Expectations

Daniel Craig at the film premiere of ‘Spectre’ in Berlin. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Special to LymeLine.com

Kevin Ganey is ‘The Movie Man.’

This is a special review for me.

My first ever published piece as a writer was a review for the previous Bond film, Spectre. Much has transpired since then, both for me and the world.

But the appreciation of the art of cinema, manifested in many forms, remains as we struggle with whatever trouble life throws our way. Paraphrasing Mel Brooks, it’s, “Just another defense against the universe,” and a defense that has a special place in my heart.

Bond films are not known for their groundbreaking, cinematic expertise, even if they do consult Stanley Kubrick for lighting (The Spy Who Loved Me, 1977). Yet, they remain a necessity for the movie-going experience. Indeed, there were plenty over the years that pushed boundaries and blew us away.

But No Time to Die is not among those ranks.

Apart from being another installment in the Bond franchise made for the sake of pure entertainment, this one is necessary for screening since it is the final performance of Daniel Craig, who, I will proudly assert, is the best performer to take on the role of Ian Fleming’s iconic spy.

I will praise the movie on three separate counts. Two of them being characters and the other being a driving force for the plot.

Craig’s final run as Bond is indeed the most vulnerable of the 25 occasions the character has graced the silver screen, often portrayed as hardened man, who turns to booze, pills, and sex as a coping mechanism for years of trauma.

Then there is Léa Seydoux, who is the only actress to reprise her Bond girl character from a previous movie. For the record, yes, Maud Adams appeared in two films, but as two separate characters, namely Andrea Anders in The Man with the Golden Gun and the title character in Octopussy.)

Seydoux is, without question, the most sophisticated of all the women, who have blown the world away with their beauty alongside Bond, and she has now provided additional reasons for us to remember her contribution to the franchise.

While I can praise Craig and Seydoux, the same cannot be said for the film’s villains (Academy Award-winners Christoph Waltz and Rami Malek), who simply cannot live up to their performers’ hypes.

Then there is the plot.

Upon screening it, viewers will pick up on some hackneyed elements. But the danger is perhaps the most authentic since Goldfinger (in which the title character seeks to detonate a dirty bomb inside Fort Knox and the subsequent contamination of the gold thus wrecking the US economy.)

Why repeat the evil plans of the third film? Simply put: to remind the reader how impressive it is.

I close this review by thanking Craig for breathing new life into a character. When he took on the role, he transformed Bond from the occasionally campy figure to the gritty, no-nonsense, adrenaline-pumping performances he gave for an era dealing with new forms of international turmoil.

Will he read this? Very unlikely (unless he decides to scavenge local, online newspapers throughout the world), but I can dream, can’t I?

Again, thank you, Daniel Craig. The history of cinema will unquestionably look kindly on you.

About the Author: Though no longer a resident of Lyme, Kevin knows he can never sever his roots to the tree of his identity. When not attending to his job in Boston, he is committed to ensuring a better grasp of current (and past) releases of cinema to his home community as he strives to leave his own mark in the same field that has always been his guide to understanding life. If you enjoy his published reviews here on LymeLine.com, follow him on his new website at ‘The City of Cinema and read more of his unique insights into entertainment.

Lyme Garden Club Hosts Meeting This Morning, Includes Program at 11am on Ceremonial Stonework

LYME — The Lyme Garden Club will hold a meeting and program, Tuesday, Oct. 12, starting at 9:30 a.m. with refreshments, then the  business meeting will be held at 10 a.m., which, in turn, is followed by the program at 11 a.m.

The meeting will be held at the Lyme Fire Company on Hamburg Rd.

The program will be, “Ceremonial Stonework, The Enduring Native American Presence on the Land,” and given by Markham Starr, a documentary photographer and author, who will speak on the stonework left behind by the indigenous population of New England.

Guests and potential members are welcome.

Contact Sue Hessel  at 860-434-3035 for more information.

Old Lyme Soccer Girls Crush Westbrook 5-0

Freshman Kate Walsh passes the ball to senior Abby Manthous in Monday’s game against Westbrook. All photos by Elizabeth Mauro.

OLD LYME — Playing on their home field Monday afternoon, the Old Lyme girls emphatically defeated the Westbrook Knights 5-0.

The scoring started in the first half when Alexis Fenton scored a goal off an assist from Livie Bass with 28:22 left on the clock. Fenton then reversed roles and made the assist off which Kate Walsh scored the second goal with 7:23 left in the half.

With the score at 2-0 at the half-time whistle, the game could still have gone either way.

Stephanie Mauro (#18) scored the third goal unassisted.

But Steph Mauro tipped the balance when she opened the scoring in the second half with an unassisted goal just 15 seconds after the whistle was blown.

Callie Bass then scored a goal off a pass from Kanon O’Haru with 11 minutes left.

Zoe Eastman-Grossel rounded off the scoring with seven minutes left when she netted a goal off a pass from Kate Walsh.

Freshman goalie Oliva Kelly had four saves for Old Lyme.

Old Lyme is now 6-0-4.

The Wildcats next game is Thursday, Oct. 14, at home against Hale Ray.

In It Together: College Drinking — Rite of Passage or Risky Business?

Photo by Meritt Thomas on Unsplash.

Underage college drinking is a significant public health problem, and it exacts an enormous toll on the intellectual and social lives of students on campuses across the United States. Drinking at college has become a ritual that students often see as an integral part of their higher education experience.

Many students come to college with established drinking habits, and the college environment can exacerbate the problem. 

About one in four college students report academic consequences from drinking, including missing class, falling behind in class, doing poorly on exams or papers, and receiving lower grades overall.

In a national survey of college students, binge drinkers who consumed alcohol at least three times per week were roughly six times more likely than those who drank but never binged to perform poorly on a test or project as a result of drinking, and five times more likely to have missed a class.

Although the majority of students come to college already having some experience with alcohol, certain aspects of college life, such as unstructured time, the widespread availability of alcohol, inconsistent enforcement of underage drinking laws, and limited interactions with parents and other adults, can intensify the problem.

In fact, college students have higher binge-drinking rates and a higher incidence of driving under the influence of alcohol than their non-college peers.

The first six weeks of freshman year are a vulnerable time for heavy drinking and alcohol-related consequences because of student expectations and social pressures at the start of the academic year. 

How much is a drink?

To avoid binge drinking and its consequences, college students (and all people who drink) are advised to track the number of drinks they consume over a given period of time. That is why it is important to know exactly what counts as a drink.

In the United States, a standard drink is one that contains about 14 grams of pure alcohol, which is found in:

  • 12 ounces of beer with 5 percent alcohol content;
  • 5 ounces of wine with 12 percent alcohol content;
  • 1.5 ounces of distilled spirits with 40 percent alcohol content.

Unfortunately, although the “standard” drink amounts are helpful for following health guidelines, they may not reflect customary serving sizes. A large cup of beer, an over-poured glass of wine, or a single mixed drink could contain much more alcohol than a standard drink. 

Factors related to specific college environments also are significant. Students attending schools with strong Greek systems and with prominent athletic programs tend to drink more than students at other types of schools.

In terms of living arrangements, alcohol consumption is highest among students living in fraternities and sororities and lowest among commuting students, who live with their families.

An often-overlooked preventive factor involves the continuing influence of parents. Research shows that students who choose not to drink often do so because their parents discussed alcohol use and its adverse consequences with them.

Ongoing research continues to improve our understanding of how to address the persistent and costly problem of harmful and underage student drinking. Successful efforts typically involve a mix of strategies that target individual students, the student body as a whole, and the broader college community.

For more information and resources, contact Alli Behnke, Prevention Coordinator at LYSB, abehnke@lysb.org   www.lysb.org/prevention

Article source: NIH

Alli Behnke

About the Author: Alli Behnke, MSW, MA is the Prevention Coordinator at Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau. She has been a Social Worker for 20 years working in the fields of prevention, therapy, youth leadership, and health coaching. Alli believes strongly in providing accurate information, education, and tools for success when empowering the Lyme/Old Lyme Prevention Coalition and REACH Youth Coalition to work together on strengths-based campaigns. The Coalitions address substance abuse and other risky behaviors challenging our youth and families. Contact her at abehnke@lysb.org or visit  www.lysb.org to become involved in this important community work.

Oct. 8 COVID-19 Update: Old Lyme Falls From Red (Highest) to Orange (2nd Highest) Case Rate Zone, Lyme Stays in Lowest; One New Case in OL Takes Cumulative Total to 431, Lyme Holds at 129

This map, updated Oct. 8, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Old Lyme has moved down to the Orange (second from highest) Zone while Lyme remains in the Gray (lowest) Zone. Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.) Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper. Details in italics are the same for each of the maps included in this article.

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Thursday, Oct. 8, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 7, has good news for Lyme but slightly improved news for Old Lyme. This report includes the weekly update, which is issued each Thursday.

The report shows that Old Lyme has moved down from the Red (highest) Zone for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19, in which it was placed last week, to the Orange (second from highest) Zone.

Lyme, meanwhile is still in the Gray (lowest) Zone and has had no new cases confirmed since Sept. 13.

See detailed description of all four zones in italics below.

Other signs are much more positive for our towns, with Lyme maintaining an Average Daily Case Rate of 0 (same as last week) while Old Lyme’s is 11.7 (down from 20.5 on Thursday last week.)

Connecticut’s daily positivity rate, however, has increased from 1.26 percent last week to 1.70 this week.

Also, statewide, the latest average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks (see map above) has continued to slow with 37 towns now in the Red Zone, which is 20 less than last week’s total of 57.  On Sept. 2, the total was 91 so the trend is clearly downward, and it has now surpassed the most recent record low of 39 reported on Aug. 12.

Old Lyme reported no new, confirmed COVID-19 cases Thursday, Oct. 7, compared with Wednesday, Oct. 6, keeping Old Lyme’s cumulative total of confirmed cases at 431 for the second day in succession.

Lyme also reported no new cases on Thursday, Oct. 7, and therefore maintained its cumulative total of 129 for the 121st day in succession. There was a blip on Oct. 4 and 5, when the state reported a new case in Lyme, but the state has now corrected that error.

On Aug. 26, the cumulative total of cases in Old Lyme was 372, meaning 59 cases have been confirmed since that date. Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 meaning 15 have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools re-opened to students Aug. 26.

The Gray category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is less than five or less than five reported cases.
The Yellow category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between five and nine reported cases.
The Orange category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between 10 and 14.
The Red category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town exceeds 15.
In all cases, this rate does not include cases or tests among residents of nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.

Weekly Report from Ledge Light Health District (LLHD)

Stephen Mansfield, LLHD Director of Health,  prefaced the weekly LLHD report sent out Oct. 9, with these words, “We are happy to see a steadily decreasing number of new COVID cases.”

He added though, “It is imperative that we remain diligent in our mitigation strategies. We strongly advise everyone to wear masks indoors in public settings, regardless of vaccination status”

Mansfield also noted, “LLHD encourages everyone 12 and older to get vaccinated. Information regarding vaccination opportunities and other relevant information can be found at Ledge Light Health District | Promoting Healthy Communities (llhd.org)

The nine towns included in the LLHD show:

  • two in the Red Zone: New London and Ledyard;
  • three in the Orange (second highest) Zone: Old Lyme, Waterford, and Groton;
  • three in the Yellow Zone: East Lyme, Stonington and North Stonington;
  • and Lyme all on its own in the Gray Zone.

Vaccination Rates

Vaccination rates in Lyme and Old Lyme are encouraging with 86.83 percent of the population in Lyme having received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and the equivalent number for Old Lyme being 79.28 percent.

Percentages for the fully vaccinated are 81.9 for Lyme and 74.9 for Old Lyme.

These rates remain among the higher percentages in the state.

COVID-19 Cases Over Time: Dec. 2020-Aug. 2021

The following maps show has the picture of COVID-19 cases has gone from an almost totally red map back in Dec. 2020 to an almost all-gray map on June 17, 2021 and then back to a map with all colors represented in substantial number again.

Sept. 30

 

This map, updated Sept. 30, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Old Lyme remains in the Red (highest) Zone while Lyme has moved down to the Gray (lowest) Zone.

The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Thursday, Sept. 30, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 29, had good news for Lyme but continuing bad news for Old Lyme.

The report showed that Old Lyme remained in the Red (highest) Zone for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19. This was the fourth week in succession that Old Lyme had found itself in the Red Zone.

Lyme, meanwhile, had fallen from the Red (highest) Zone, in which it was placed last week, into the Gray (lowest) Zone.

Other signs were much more positive for our towns, however. Lyme now had an Average Daily Case Rate of 0 (down from 18.5 on Thursday last week) while Old Lyme’s was 20.5 (down from 22.5 on Thursday last week.)

Lyme had no new cases confirmed since Sept. 13; Old Lyme’s cumulative total has held steady since Sept. 27.

Statewide, there was also good news. Connecticut’s daily positivity rate stood at 1.26 percent down from 2.28 percent on Thursday last week.

Also, statewide, the latest average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks (see map above) continued to slow with 57 towns now in the Red Zone, which is 24 less than last week’s total of 81.  On Sept. 2, the total was 91 so the trend is clearly downward, although it is still up from the 39 reported on Aug. 12.

Old Lyme reported no new, confirmed COVID-19 cases Thursday, Sept. 30, compared with Wednesday, Sept. 29. keeping Old Lyme’s cumulative total of confirmed cases at 426 for the fourth day in succession.

Lyme also reported no new cases on Thursday, Sept. 30, and therefore maintained its cumulative total of 129 for the 14th day in succession.

On Aug. 26, the cumulative total of cases in Old Lyme was 372, meaning 54 cases have been confirmed since that date. Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 meaning 15 have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools re-opened to students Aug. 26.

Sept. 23

This map, updated Sept. 23, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme have moved into the Red (highest) Zone.

The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Thursday, Sept. 23, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health  (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 22, showed the following:

Both towns remained in the Red (highest) Zone for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19. This was the third week in succession that both towns had found themselves in the Red Zone.

Lyme had an Average Daily Case Rate of 18.5 (down from 43.2 on Thursday last week) while Old Lyme’s was 22.5 (down from 30.3 on Thursday last week.) A rate over 15.0 places a town in the Red Zone.

Connecticut’s daily positivity rate stood at 2.28 percent down from 2.93 percent on Thursday last week.

Statewide, the latest average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks (see map above) had continued to slow marginally with 81 towns now in the Red Zone, which is three down from the  previous week’s total of 84.  On Sept. 2, the total was 91 so the trend was undoubtedly downward although it was still up significantly from the 39 reported on Aug. 12.

Old Lyme reported no new, confirmed COVID-19 cases Thursday, Sept. 23, compared with Wednesday, Sept. 22. keeping Old Lyme’s cumulative total of confirmed cases at 419. This was the first day that there had not been a single new case reported in a 24-hour period in Old Lyme since Aug. 26.

Lyme also reported no new cases on Thursday, Sept. 23, and therefore maintained its cumulative total of 129 for the fourth day in succession.

On Aug. 26, the cumulative number of cases in Old Lyme was 372 meaning 47 cases had been reported since that date, while 12 had also been confirmed in Lyme during the same period.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools re-opened to students Aug. 26.

Sept. 16

This map, updated Sept. 16, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme have moved into the Red (highest) Zone.

The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Thursday, Sept. 16, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health  (CT-DPH) showed the following:

Both towns remained in the Red (highest) Zone for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19. This is the second week in succession that both towns found themselves in the Red Zone. See detailed description of the zones in italics below.

Lyme had an Average Daily Case Rate of 43.2 while Old Lyme’s was 30.3. A rate over 15 places a town in the Red Zone.

Connecticut’s daily positivity rate stood at 2.93 percent, down from 3.36 on Thursday last week.

Despite this poor situation locally, statewide, the latest average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks (see map above) remained relatively constant over the past week with 84 towns now in the Red Zone, which was only one higher than last week’s total of 83.

Old Lyme reported four new, confirmed COVID-19 cases Thursday, Sept.16, since the previous CT DPH report issued Wednesday, Sept. 15. This means Old Lyme’s cumulative total of confirmed cases rose to 411, while Lyme reported no new cases and therefore kept its cumulative total at 129.

On Aug. 26, the cumulative number of cases in Old Lyme was 372 meaning 39 cases have been reported since that date, while 12 have also been confirmed in Lyme during the same period.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools re-opened to students Aug. 26.

Sept. 9

This map, updated Sept. 9, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme have moved into the Red (highest) Zone.

The Daily Data Report issued Thursday, Sept. 9, by the Connecticut Department of Health (CT DPH) showed the following:

These 47 towns were in the Orange (second highest) Zone: Avon, Bethlehem, Bloomfield, Branford, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Burlington, Colchester, Danbury, Durham, East Haddam, East Lyme, East Windsor, Easton, Ellington, Fairfield, Farmington, Greenwich, Groton, Hamden, Killingly, Killingworth, Lebanon, New Milford, Newington, North Canaan, Old Saybrook, Pomfret, Portland, Salem, Shelton, Sherman, Simsbury, Somers, South Windsor, Southbury, Stamford, Stonington, Suffield, Tolland, Washington, West Hartford, Wethersfield, Willington, Wilton, Windsor Locks and Woodstock.

These 19 towns were in the Yellow (second lowest) Zone: Bethany, Bethel, Canton, Clinton, Coventry, Darien, Essex, Guilford, Haddam, Madison, Mansfield, New Canaan, Redding, Ridgefield, Thompson, Westbrook, Westport, Winchester and Woodbury.

These 20 towns were in the Gray (lowest) Zone: Andover, Barkhamsted, Bridgewater, Canaan, Chester, Colebrook, Cornwall, Deep River, Eastford, Goshen, Granby, Hampton, Hartland, Kent, Middlefield, Morris, Norfolk, Roxbury, Scotland and Weston.

All other towns in the state, including Lyme and Old Lyme, were in the Red (highest) Zone.

Sept. 2

This map, updated Sept. 2, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Lyme is still in the (lowest) Gray Zone, while Old Lyme has moved back down into the Yellow Zone.

The map above is from Sept. 2 when 91 towns were in the Red Zone, which is down one from 92 a week ago on Aug. 26, but still up significantly from 73  on Aug. 19, and 39 on Aug. 12.

Connecticut’s seven-day positivity rate stood at 3.36 percent, down from 3.52 last week.

Old Lyme had fallen to the Yellow (second lowest) Zone along with 10 other towns. This total of 11 towns is unchanged from last week, when Old Lyme was in the Orange Zone.

Lyme was in the Gray (lowest) Zone. This was the 24th straight week for Lyme in the Gray Zone. Again, this total of 20 towns in the Gray Zone was unchanged from last week.

Forty-seven towns were in the Orange (second highest) Zone.

Aug. 26

This map, updated Aug. 26, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Lyme is still in the (lowest) Gray Zone, while Old Lyme has moved back down into the Yellow Zone.

The map above is from Aug. 26, when Old Lyme was in the Orange (second highest case rate) Zone with a daily case rate per 100,000 of 10.8. Other towns in the Orange Zone, which are within the Ledge Light Health District (LLHD), were East Lyme (12.4), North Stonington (13.7) and Stonington (14.2).

Towns in the Red Zone in the LLHD were Groton – Town & City (15.6), New London (31.1), and Ledyard (25.9). Locally, Norwich, Montville and Waterford were also categorized as red, but they are not in the LLHD.

Eleven Connecticut towns were in the Yellow (second lowest) Zone down from 20the previous week. Locally, these included Deep River, Old Saybrook and Haddam.

The remaining 20 towns in the state, including Lyme, were in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone. This was the 23rd straight week for Lyme in the Gray Zone.

Aug. 19

This map, updated Aug. 19, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Lyme is still in the (lowest) Gray Zone, while Old Lyme has moved back into the Orange Zone.

The map above is from Aug. 19 when Old Lyme was back in the Orange (second highest case rate) Zone with a two-week case rate per 100,000 of 11.7. Other towns in the Orange Zone, which are within the Ledge Light Health District (LLHD), were East Lyme (10.4) and Stonington (12.7).

Almost 50 towns in the state remained in the Orange Zone, which was around the same number as the previous week including non-LLHD members Westbrook, Old Saybrook, Chester, and Salem locally.

Towns in the Red Zone in the LLHD were Groton – Town & City (15.6), New London (26.3), Ledyard (21.0), and North Stonington (17.9). Locally, Norwich and Waterford were also categorized as red, but they are not in the LLHD.

Less than 20 Connecticut towns were in the Yellow (second lowest) Zone down from 40 the previous week. Locally, these included including Deep River, Essex and East Haddam.

The remaining 20 towns in the state, including Lyme, are in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone. This was the 22nd straight week for Lyme in the Gray Zone.

Aug. 12

The map below is from Aug. 12 and shows that Old Lyme had fallen out of the Orange (second highest case rate) Zone into the Yellow (second lowest) Zone — but only by a fraction. Old Lyme’s two-week case rate per 100,000 was 9.8 — if it were 10.0, then it would have still been in the Orange Zone.

Towns in the Red Zone, which are within the Ledge Light Health District (LLHD), included New London, Ledyard, Stonington and North Stonington. Locally, Norwich and Waterford were also categorized as red, but they are not in the LLHD.

Other towns in the red category included Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Cheshire, East Haven, Easton, Hartford, Meriden, Middletown, New Britain, New Haven, North Branford, North Haven, Norwich, Plymouth, Stamford, Thomaston and Waterbury. At least three of these towns — Easton, Hartford and Thomaston — were in the Red Zone for the second consecutive week.

Almost 50 towns were in the Orange (second highest case rate) Zone — up from 33 the previous week — including Westbrook and Salem locally.

Old Lyme joined the Yellow (second lowest) Zone along with around 40 other Connecticut towns, including Old Saybrook, East Lyme, and Essex.

All remaining towns in the state, including Lyme, along with Deep River and Chester, were in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone. This was the 21st straight week for Lyme in the Gray Zone.

This map, updated Aug. 12, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Lyme is still in the (lowest) Gray Zone, but Old Lyme has moved into the Orange Zone.

Aug. 5

The map below is from Aug. 5 when six towns were in the Red (highest case rate) Zone (the previous week’s number was four) and 33 in the Orange (second highest case rate) Zone — the previous week’s number was four.

The towns in the Red Zone were East Hampton, Easton, Hampton, Hartford, Hartland, North Stonington*, and Thomaston.

There were 33 towns in the Orange Zone including Old Lyme, Waterford, New London, Groton, Ledyard and Stonington, all of which are in the Ledge Light Health District, as are the towns denoted with an * in the other zones.

East Lyme* had reentered the Yellow (second lowest) Zone along with more than 50 other Connecticut towns.

All remaining towns in the state, including Lyme*, were in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone. This was the 20th straight week for Lyme in the Gray Zone.

This map, updated Aug. 5, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Lyme is still in the (lowest) Gray Zone, but Old Lyme has moved into the Orange Zone.

July 29

The map below is from July 29, when four towns were in the Red Zone –Harland, Salem, Bozrah and Sprague — and four towns were in the Orange Zone — Easton, East Hampton, Ledyard and Thompson.

Old Lyme had reentered the Yellow (second lowest) Zone along with more than 50 other Connecticut towns. All remaining towns in the state, including Lyme, were in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone. This was the 19th straight week for Lyme in the Gray Zone.

This map, updated July 29, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Lyme is still in the (lowest) Gray Zone, but Old Lyme has moved into the Yellow Zone.

July 22

The map below is from July 22, when two towns, Franklin and Salem, were in the Red Zone (indicating the highest rate of COVID-19 new cases), which is up one from the previous week, and Andover remained in the (second highest rate) Orange Zone (down from two towns last week.)

Eight towns were in the Yellow Zone (indicating the lowest but one rate of COVID-19 new cases), which is up from two last week. They were Clinton, East Hampton, Manchester, Newington, Stonington, Westbrook, Windsor and Windsor Locks.

This map, updated July 22, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

July 15

The map below is from July 15, when one town, Franklin, was in the Red Zone (indicating the highest rate of COVID-19 new cases) and another two, Salem and Andover, were in the (second highest rate) Orange Zone. New Hartford and Griswold were in the Yellow Zone (indicating the lowest but one rate of COVID-19 new cases.)

This map, updated July 15, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

The map below is from July 8, when New Hartford was the sole town in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated July 8, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

The map below is from July 1, when Marlborough and Prospect were in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated July 1, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

The map below is from June 24, when Somers, Prospect and Bolton were in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated June 24, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

This is the June 17 map, when just one town, Bolton, was in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated June 17, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

For comparison, the map below is from June 3 and shows one town, Waterbury, in the Orange Zone and 21 towns in the Yellow Zone, down from 48 the previous week. The towns in the Yellow Zone were: Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Bloomfield, Brooklyn, Coventry, Cromwell, Derby, East Hartford, East Haven, Granby, Hamden, Hartford, Manchester, New Britain, New Haven, New London, Putnam, Rocky Hill, Shelton, Waterford and Windsor.

This map, updated June 3, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the previous two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

Below is the map from May 27 that showed one town in the Red Zone, Putnam, and 10 towns in the Orange Zone.

This map, updated May 27, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme were still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

Compare the maps above with the one we published Dec. 18, 2020 to see the remarkable progress that has been made with controlling the spread of the virus through expansion of vaccination rates and improved mitigation strategies.

Map of Connecticut dated Dec. 17, 2020 showing both Lyme and Old Lyme now in the CT DPH-identified ‘Red Zone.’ This is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is over 15.

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/

Girl’s Soccer: With Six Goals in Four Games, Fenton Continues Her Scoring Ways as Old Lyme Defeat H-K

Alexis Fenton has been a major feature in Old Lyme’s scoring success this season.

LYME/OLD LYME — The Old Lyme girls notched another victory this past Thursday (Oct. 7) afternoon moving to a season record of five wins, four ties and no losses. Playing Haddam-Killingworth (H-K) away, and although down one goal at the end of the first half, Old Lyme ended the game with a 3-1 victory.

H-K scored the lone goal in the first half off a deflected corner kick.

Then in the second half, Old Lyme’s Kate Walsh scored off an assist from Steph Mauro within the first five minutes in the second half. Alexis Fenton followed with an unassisted goal with seven minutes left to play and Ella Curtiss-Reardon scored the final goal off a ball from Kate Walsh with 3:21 left in the game.

Freshman goalie Olivia Kelly made seven saves for Old Lyme.

On Monday, Oct. 4, the Wildcats faced East Hampton away, where again, although level 1-1 at the half, they came through to secure a 2-1 victory.

Fenton scored less than a minute into the game from a pass by Ali Kyle. Then East Hampton scored off of a corner kick that went into the goal off an Old Lyme player with 22 minutes left in the half.

Fenton scored with a ball over the goalie’s head after a through ball from Lyla Powers in the second half to win the game.

This time, Kelly had nine saves for Old Lyme.

The previous Thursday, Sept. 30, the girls drew at home 0-0 with Cromwell, with Wildcat goalkeeper Kelly making eight saves for Old Lyme and junior Lily Kenney having six for Cromwell.

Going all the way back to Tuesday, Sept. 28, Old Lyme — playing at home — met Coginchaug and ended the game with a emphatic 3-0 victory and moreover, all three goals were scored by the same player, namely, Alexis Fenton.

The half-time score was 1-0 after Fenton scored unassisted with 26:53 left on the clock.

Fenton scored another goal in the second half, again unassisted, and this time with 36:15 minutes remaining.

Completing her hat-trick, Fenton scored a third time, but assisted by Callie Bass on this occasion, with 11:03 minutes to play.

Meanwhile, Kelly had six saves for Old Lyme, while junior goalie Emma Samperi made nine for Coginchaug.

‘Imagining Lyme’ Spring/Summer Photo Contest Deadline Extended Until Midnight Tonight

Light over Lyme. Photo by Joe Standart.

LYME — The Lyme Land Trust’s Imagining Lyme Amateur Photography program is a visual exploration of Lyme’s Preserves.

It encourages everyone to expand their visual awareness and highlight the beauty of the Lyme preserves owned by the Lyme Land Trust, the Town of Lyme and the Nature Conservancy by taking photographs prompted by inspiration from Joe Standart, a professional photographer and Land Trust Board member. 

All photos must be taken in Lyme Preserves owned by the Lyme Land Trust, the Town of Lyme and The Nature Conservancy.

The subject for Spring, March 20 through Oct. 2, 2021 is “Depth – Compositional elements to create depth– How to use the feeling of depth to express a mood.” An additional week has now been added to the original deadline of Oct.9.

Submit up to three photos that tell a story or express a mood using the feeling of depth by midnight on Oct. 9,  to ImaginingLyme.com. You do not have to be a resident of Lyme to enter the contest, but photography must not be a principal source of your income.

For further information including the rules of the contest, visit ImaginingLyme.com.  Email education@lymelandtrust.org with any questions.