December 14, 2018

Six Years Ago Today …

Today is the sixth anniversary of the tragic shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) issued the following statement,

“Today is an awful day. I’ll think a lot about my youngest son, who went off to his first grade classroom this morning, as I remember the precious children and brave educators whose lives were unimaginably taken six years ago.”

He continued, “I’ve had the honor of representing, and becoming friends with, many of the families of the victims. Nothing we do can ever bring those kids back, but we should be inspired by Newtown’s efforts to make the world a kinder, more loving place. We can reach out to one another and help those in need.”

Caitlin Nosal (center), elder daughter of Old Lyme Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal, and her friend (right), a resident of Newtown, Conn., along with former Old Lyme Selectman Mervin Roberts (left) visited Newtown in late December 2012 to pay their respects to the victims of the horrific shooting that had taken place Dec. 14 at Sandy Hook Elementary School that same month. In this file photo, they are seen looking at some of the memorials to the 26 teachers and students killed

Murphy noted that this morning he is delivering meals to families in need in New Haven and commented, “I hope everyone takes some time to do their own act of kindness – big or small – in their communities.”

He concluded, “We will never stop remembering, and honoring, and fighting for the lives senselessly lost six years ago. We have to keep going. For me, that means I will never give up trying to change our broken gun laws to keep our kids safe from gun violence.”

“A national movement for stronger gun laws started six years ago today, and today I feel more confident than ever before that Congress will listen and act on changing our gun laws next year. We would not be here without the voices of so many of the family members from Newtown who want us to honor their loved ones with action,” Murphy added.

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Want Your Gifts Wrapped? Old Lyme Girls Scouts Host Holiday Wrap Fundraiser Tomorrow

Girl Scout Troop 60608 will hold a Holiday Gift-wrapping fundraiser at Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau at 59 Lyme Street tomorrow from 1 to 5 p.m. 

The suggested donation is $2 per gift

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Need a Sitter While You Shop Tomorrow? LYSB is Here for You

Tomorrow between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m., Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB) Youth Advisory Council will provide a babysitting service at their premises at 59 Lyme Street.

The elves at LYSB will watch your kids while you finish your holiday errands and chores.

Children of all ages will be entertained by members of the LYSB

The cost is $20 and includes lunch, crafts, games, snacks, movies and fun.

Pre-registration is required. Pre-Register at www.lysb.org.  Space is limited  

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Talk on ‘Black Bears in Connecticut’ at Lyme Library Tonight

There will be a presentation tonight by Paul Colburn, a certified Master Wildlife Conservationist, on “Black Bears in Connecticut” from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Lyme Public Library.

This talk will focus on the natural history of black bears in Connecticut, as well as their habitat, diet, behavior, population and reproduction, plus current research efforts.

Colburn will also offer practical recommendations for coexistence between the black bear and humans.

For more information, call 860-434-2272 or email programreg@lymepl.org

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Join a ‘Messiah, Christmas Section’ Sing or Listen at ‘the Kate,’ Sunday

A ‘Messiah’ Sing or Listen, Christmas Section, will be sponsored by Cappella Cantorum on Sunday, Dec. 16, at 4 p.m. at The Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, (the Kate), 300 Main St., Old Saybrook 06475. There will be a short rehearsal for singers at 3:30 p.m.

Soloists will be Soprano Danielle Howard, Mezzo-Soprano Rachel Abrams, Tenor William Sorenson and Baritone Kenneth Holton. The Sing is open to all, under the direction of Barry Asch and accompanied by Deborah Lyon.

Bring ‘Messiah’ scores if you have them or they will be provided. There is a $12 fee for singers and audience. Singers will sit in sections, the audience is invited to sit in the back, witness the short rehearsal, and then the Sing will begin at 4 p.m.

Tickets will be available online at www.thekate.org and through the Box Office, 869-510-0453, open Tues–Fri 10 a.m. –2 p.m., no reserved seats.

For more information, call Barry Asch at 860-388-2871.

The Sing ends at 5:15 p.m.

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The Movie Man: ‘Ralph Breaks the Internet’ Offers Existentialism for Kids 101

In this sequel to 2012’s Wreck it Ralph, the title character and his adorable best friend, Vanellope, venture beyond their familiar arcade community into the world of the Internet.

And this depiction of the Internet is a tangible and personified version of the World Wide Web, akin to a thriving city with anthropological beings embodying many things with which we are familiar, such as algorithms and search engines (including a frustrated reminder to say “thank you” when your search engine brings you what you were seeking.)

There are some philosophical themes in these movies, at least entry-level for the younger crowds screening them (despite reading Dostoyevsky at a book club meeting later on, the film does not exactly go into themes from The Grand Inquisitor about whether we are responsible enough to handle freedom).

Vanellope ponders what the meaning of everything is beyond their games, the stark reality of being 0’s and 1’s, and wanting more, while Ralph expresses, not only contention, but joy with what his life is.

The previous film tackled the issue of personal identity and worth, with Ralph wanting to be more than just the “bad guy” character and Vanellope being included in her game.

This installment now tackles the issue of friendship, and what being a true friend really means: whatever is best for your friend, regardless of how it affects you. (And this is where memories of my Catholic education came to mind, reminding me that the real definition of love is to will the good of the other).

While the Wreck it Ralph movies have not demonstrated themselves to be Disney’s most groundbreaking movies in recent years (the plots can seem familiar at times), they still prove to be highly entertaining and filled with unique, lovable characters.

And Disney did have the joy of referencing itself by bringing Vanellope to Oh My Disney to see numerous iconic characters and environments, making everything more enjoyable. And the theme of Girl Power is brought up when she takes refuge in the Princesses’ dressing room, which will delight numerous girls (young and old.)

For the sake of pure entertainment, I would definitely recommend this film to viewers of all ages. It is not necessary for Disney to break ground through every film they release, but they certainly know how to make a good time at the movies.

Editor’s Note: This is the opinion of Kevin Ganey.

Kevin Ganey

About the Author: Kevin Ganey has lived in the Lyme/Old Lyme area since he was three-years-old, attended Xavier High School in Middletown and recently graduated from Quinnipiac University with a degree in Media Studies. Prior to his involvement here at LymeLine.com, he worked for Hall Radio in Norwich, as well as interned under the Director of Communications at High Hopes Therapeutic Riding Center. Kevin has a passion for movies, literature, baseball, and all things New England-based … especially chow

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Legal News You Can Use: Are Connecticut Roads Prepared for Winter?

Snow’s so pretty but are the roads — and you and your vehicle — ready for the next winter storm? Photo by Korey Moore on Unsplash

SPONSORED POST by Suisman Shapiro Attorneys-at-Law.

Connecticut’s first winter storm of the season in mid-November caught many people off-guard, including the Department of Transportation. Snow blanketed many areas of the state just as people left work. Although the DOT salted the roads, it wasn’t enough.

Crashes and stuck cars closed three highways, causing major back-ups. A man from Florida died when he left his spun-out vehicle and another car hit him. Connecticut is no stranger to snow and winter driving, so what went wrong this time?

More snow than expected

First, the state received more snow than expected, but not by a huge amount. Fairfield County took the brunt of it, but many areas received over half a foot. This may have been enough to cause trouble. Drivers knew there would be snow, but didn’t expect quite so much of it. Connecticut drivers are used to driving in snow, and they may have thought they could handle it.

Bad timing

The storm’s timing did not help matters, either. Anytime bad weather coincides with the rush hour commute, you have a terrible combination. Commuters hurrying to make it home blocked the plows trying to clear the roads. Police had to escort them out of traffic.

Operations center failure

Unfortunately, the storm also caught Governor Malloy off-guard. He was speaking on prisoner reforms in California at the time of the storm and did not activate the emergency operations center. Nor did his chief of staff, Brian Durand, who sought advice from the Transportation Commissioner.

Are you prepared?

If you haven’t done your winter car check, now is the time to do it. You should check the following before hitting the snowy roads:

  • Battery. Many garages can test your battery. Carry jumper cables, even if you have a good battery. You may be able to save a neighbor in need.
  • Fluids. Top them off, especially windshield washer fluid and anti-freeze. Keep your gas tank at least half-full, as well.
  • Tires. Switch to winter tires if you have them. Otherwise, make sure your all-weather tires are in good condition.
  • Lights. It gets dark much earlier, and you want other drivers to see you.
  • Emergency kit. Make sure you fully stock your winter car kit with flashlights, water, snacks, a warm blanket, a first aid kit and kitty litter or sand.

Winter has only just begun. We will see more snow before the season is over. Stay safe and make sure you are prepared for the next winter storm. 

Visit the Law Firm of Suisman Shapiro  at this link for more information.

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Superintendent/Student Recognition Award Presented to LOLHS Seniors McGlinchey, Fava

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser stands between Brynn McGlinchey and Nick Fava after they had received CAPSS Student Recognition Awards

Brynn McGlinchey and Nicholas Fava, students at Lyme-Old Lyme High School, have been awarded the Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents’ (CAPSS) Superintendent/Student Recognition Award for leadership service to the school, academic prowess relative to ability, and service to others in the community at a ceremony held Nov. 26, at Saybrook Point Inn.

Ian Neviaser, Superintendent of Schools of Regional School District 18, made the presentation as part of a program designed by school administrators to recognize students who have served their schools and communities while maintaining good scholastic progress.

The Superintendent/Student Recognition Program awards a Certificate of Excellence at the discretion of the local superintendent of schools according to a distribution formula set for all state school districts. Awards are generally given during American Education Week in November in order to provide a meaningful focus for each school district and to enhance the quality of the certificate. 

Brynn McGlinchey is a bright young woman in every sense of the word. She is an intelligent, high-level student while taking an extremely competitive course load. She is a spirited member of the school community and involved in many activities at school. She gets others to be interested, enthusiastic and involved.

McGlinchey’s style of leadership is calm and deeply thoughtful; she steps to the forefront representing her peers while serving on the Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau Board of Directors and as the student representative of the Board of Education. She is proof that leadership is not about volume but rather the quality of one’s actions and the ability to foster compromise and moving forward effectively.

McGlinchey’s vision of the world values our community but reaches much, much wider and it will take her far. 

Nicholas Fava has been involved in leadership and service at the high school since his earliest days of his freshman year. He is vice-president of his class and can be counted on to show up and get the job done, whatever the task may be.

A three-season athlete, Fava is a key member of Techno-Ticks Robotics Team and the Community Service Club.

Fava can seem quiet by nature, but is an excellent listener, assessing the situation and feedback around him to know how the group needs to proceed. He is academically talented, conquering everything from honors math to college-level Spanish. We have yet to see anything slow Nick down, and we are proud he has come so far so fast.

CAPSS, the statewide school superintendents’ professional organization, is based in West Hartford and provides professional development, personal support, statewide conferences, legislative information and educational services to its membership.

For more information about CAPSS, contact Ian Neviaser at neviaseri@region18.org or 860-434-7238.

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Talking Transportation: Trucker Shortage Takes Its Toll

What does the future hold for the trucks on our highways? Photo by Rhys Moult on Unsplash

As if crumbling bridges and pot-holed highways weren’t enough to worry about, now America’s transportation network is facing a new crisis:  a shortage of truck drivers.

According to the American Trucking Association (ATA), trucks carry more than 70 percent of all domestic freight, bringing in $719 billion in revenue.  It’s trucks, not trains, that deliver our Amazon purchases and fill the shelves of our favorite big box stores for the holidays. So while we hate to drive behind them on our highways, we love what trucks deliver.

But now, of the existing half-million truck drivers in the US, demographics are taking their toll as more and more retire each year, leaving those jobs unfilled. The ATA estimates the industry needs 51,000 new truck drivers.  And new candidates are not stepping forward.

Why?  Well, the ATA says Gen Z’ers don’t like the lifestyle.  They don’t want to spend long, lonely days or weeks doing long-hauls, eating bad food and sleeping in their rigs.  Even money, like $50,000 signing bonuses, isn’t attracting them.

The average trucker makes $59,000 and drivers for private fleets can make $86,000. But lengthy, expensive training courses present a roadblock to immediate recruitment.  And newly-mandated technology tracking drivers’ time on the road is exacerbating the problem.

Drivers are only supposed to drive 11 hours of every 14 hours a day, but many used to fudge their paper log-book records because they got paid by the mile.  Since last December, electronic logging has been the law, so the safety rules are impossible to circumvent.  Of course, nobody wants tired drivers on the road, but in the cause of safety, truckers are losing efficiency.

Where will the industry find new drivers?  Well, women still only represent about 6 percent of all drivers.  And minorities have seen their numbers increase 12 percent in the past year.  And the industry is also seeking a reduction in the minimum driving age from 21 to 18.

What’s this all mean to us as consumers?  Higher costs.

Amazon saw a 38 percent increase in shipping costs in the first quarter, forcing it to raise its (unlimited free-shipping) Amazon Prime membership fee from $99 to $119 a year.  Across the industry spectrum, shipping rates are rising.

But the real solution will probably be self-driving trucks.

That’s why big companies like Waymo (owned by Google), Tesla and Uber, as well as truck-builders like Freightliner and Volvo are investing heavily in the autonomous technology.

Not that we’ll be seeing driverless trucks on Connecticut interstates anytime soon.  There’s probably too much congestion to make them practical.  But there are vast stretches of interstates in “fly over country” out west where self-driving trucks make perfect sense, delivering truckloads of products to automated warehouses where robots will unload them.

Automating trucking may be good for the industry but it certainly doesn’t help with recruitment.  Who wants to sign on for a career knowing full well they may be replaced by a robot?

Sociologist and 13-year trucker Steve Viscelli says the solution is in changing the system:  paying truckers for actual hours on the road (not just mileage), including those times when truckers must waste hours or days waiting for a new load.

Whatever the solution, it’s clear who’ll end up paying:  consumers.

Posted with permission of Hearst CT Media.

Jim Cameron

About the author: Jim Cameron is founder of The Commuter Action Group, and a member of the Darien RTM.  The opinions expressed in this column are only his own.  You can reach him at CommuterActionGroup@gmail.com

For a full collection of  “Talking Transportation” columns, visit www.talkingtransportation.blogspot.com

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‘Light Up Old Lyme’ Continues Through the Holidays, Check Out Our Full Calendar of Events


Here is a calendar to help readers navigate all the Light Up Old Lyme holiday events that are happening in Old Lyme during the weeks leading up to the Christmas holiday.

We have also included a few events, which take place outside Old Lyme, because the hosts are Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Chamber of Commerce members.

The LOL Chamber pulled most of this information together and we have added a few more events of which we have been notified.

If we have missed any events, please let us know as soon as possible and we will add them promptly.

FRIDAY, NOV. 30

Community Tree Lighting hosted by the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce
4-4:45pm:
 outside Center School (inside if inclement weather).
Festive music by Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School Band, conducted by Carrie Wind. Community carol sing. Seasonal refreshments provided by Essex Savings Bank.

Holiday Book Sale: Preview Night with Wine Reception hosted by Phoebe’s BookCellar
4-7pm:
 Old Lyme-Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library

Shopping, live music, and light refreshments.  Gift quality – including rare and collectible- books available for purchase in the festively-decorated Reading Room.  All BookCellar books half-price or less. All proceeds benefit the Library. Sale continues Saturday, Dec. 1, 9am-2pm.

Deck the Walls Opening Reception
5-7pm: Lyme Art Association
This annual member show features more than 200 works of art priced for holiday gift giving.  Opening Reception Friday, November 30, 5-7pm.  Gallery hours Wed- Sun, 10-5 pm, and by appointment.   $5 donation suggested.

Delights of December Holiday Pops Concert by Old Lyme Town Band
7:30pm
: Christ the King Church 
Free admission.
A second concert will be given on Sunday, Dec. 2, 2pm, at Lymes’ Senior Center, Town Woods Rd., Old Lyme.

SATURDAY, DEC. 1

Cookie Walk hosted by Child & Family Agency  
9am-12 noon: Old Lyme Town Hall.
Choose from a huge selection of beautiful, delicious, homemade cookies and other gift items. Benefits Child & Family Agency.

Pictures with Santa!  hosted by Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau.
10am-12 noon: Old Lyme Town Hall.
Meet Santa and his Elves! Free. Donations benefit LYSB.

Elephants-in-Winter Christmas Sale
9am–2pm: First Congregational Church of Old Lyme Fellowship Hall
Assorted Christmas decorations, gifts, handmade craft items, and stocking stuffers for sale. , or add just the right touch to your holiday decor.  Sale also sale includes special treasures from mission partnerships in South Dakota, Haiti and Palestine. Donations benefit Church missions.

Musical Masterworks 
5pm: First Congregational Church of Old Lyme
Program includes Schubert’s Winterreise by baritone Randall Scarlata and veteran pianist, Jeewon Park. Join Edward Arron, Artistic Director, for a pre-concert talk before the performance at 4pm.
Tickets: MusicalMasterworks.org.  or 860 434 2252.  There will be a second concert on Sunday at 3pm with a pre-concert talk at 2pm

Magic of Christmas
Nov. 23 through Jan. 6, 2019: Florence Griswold Museum
Enjoy Miss Florence’s Artist TreesChristmastime Teas, special events and hands-on crafts for all ages, and wonderful items in The Shop.

SUNDAY, DEC. 2

Cappella Cantorum Christmas Concert
3pm: John Winthrop Middle School, Deep River
Cappella’s Masterworks Chorus will perform Puccini’s “Messa Di Gloria” and Saint-Saens’ “Christmas Oratorio.” Featured soloists will be soprano Abigail Paschke, tenor Brian Cheney and baritone Paul Fletcher. Simon Holt will direct the chorus and professional orchestra. Tickets are $30 purchased in advance, $35 at the door. Tickets at www.CappellaCantorum.org or 860-526-1038.

MONDAY, DEC. 3

Annual Community Wreath Making Event hosted by Duck River Garden Club  
6:30pm: Rogers Lake Community Center
Bring gloves, clippers, and clipped evergreens if you have some! Our community is invited to join Club members and create festive wreaths for town buildings.

FRIDAY, DEC. 7

Student Holiday Art Sale Opening Reception
5-7 pm: Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts of the Univ. of New Haven, Sill House Gallery
Art Sale on View: Dec. 7 – 14.

Con Brio Choral Society
8pm: Christ the King Church
Danielle Munsell Howard, Soprano; Louise Fauteux, Soprano; Allison Messier, Mezzo Soprano, and the Con Brio Festival Orchestra, conducted by Dr. Stephen Bruce. Open seating, unreserved. Tickets at conbrio.org or 860.526.5399, or at the door.
There will be a second performance on Sunday, Dec. 9, at 3pm. 

SATURDAY, DEC. 8

2018 Homes for the Holidays Tour hosted by the Old Lyme Children’s Learning Center
11am-3pm. Along Lyme Street.
Self-guided tour of beautifully decorated village homes & businesses.
Ticket stubs valid for free admission to Florence Griswold Museum Magic of Christmas that day.  The Lyme Art Association’s Deck the Walls exhibit will also be open. Lyme-Old Lyme High School’s Select Singers perform at the OL Historical Society; Old Lyme Town Hall hosts a Holiday Boutique from 10am-4pm, featuring beautiful, hand-crafted items. Tickets $25 in advance, or $30 at the door. Call 860-434-1728, Ext. 1 and leave a message or purchase through Eventbrite @ olclchometour2018.eventbrite.com

Santa’s Trunk Show
9am-4pm: APC Driving GalleryOld Lyme Shopping Center.
Car art, automobilia and collectibles for the holidays.

The Nutcracker by Eastern Connecticut Ballet,
1:30 and 7pm:  at The Garde Arts Center, New London. Tickets at 860-444-7373 ext.1 or gardearts.org.
There will be a third performance on Sunday, Dec. 9, at 1:30pm

Holiday Sale of Old Lyme Historical Society Books & Gifts
Sat., Dec. 8 (am): at Old Lyme Post Office
Books, calendars, household items and other Society merchandise.
On Dec. 8,  OLHSI’s 55 Lyme Street headquarters will be part of the OLCLC Home for the Holidays tour.
Book and gift sales will also be held in the morning and afternoon on both Saturdays, Dec. 15 & 22.

SUNDAY, DEC.. 9, TUESDAY, DEC.. 11 & TUESDAY, DEC.. 18

Holiday Gift Workshops hosted by LYSB
Gingerbread House Family Workshop  12/9, 12:30-2pm. An annual tradition Fee: $15/house
Festive Felt Stocking12/11, 4-6pm and Felt Holiday Ornaments, 12/18, 4-6 pm.  Fee: $25.  Registration required.

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“Chasing the Dragon”: Important Heroin & Opioid Awareness Event to be Held Tonight Community Urged to Attend


There have been overdoses and overdose deaths in every county in Connecticut; New London County – and the town of Old Lyme – are no exception.

Opioid addiction knows no boundaries.

This coming Thursday, Dec. 6, Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau, Lyme-Old Lyme Prevention Coalition, and Lyme Old Lyme Schools are jointly sponsoring a Heroin & Opioid Awareness Event.The program, which will be presented by the US Attorney’s Office for the District of Connecticut and the US Heroin Education Action Team (USHEAT), starts at 7 p.m. at Lyme-Old Lyme High School. It will offer an in depth look at the opioid crisis and how it is affecting families from communities just like our own.

The program is free and open to the public.

This presentation will also be given to students in grades 9-12 earlier in the week.  The program includes a showing of the film “Chasing the Dragon: The Life of an Opiate Addict,” a powerful documentary created by the FBI and DEA to educate students and parents about the dangers of addiction. The movie will be followed by a panel discussion with a federal prosecutor, a DEA agent, and community members, whose lives have been impacted by the opioid crisis.

The mission of the U.S. Attorney’s Heroin Education Action Team (USA HEAT) is to stop the spread of the opioid abuse epidemic in Connecticut by increasing community understanding of the dangers associated with these drugs. USA HEAT is a partnership between the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Connecticut and families who have lost a loved one to an overdose.

These courageous moms, dads, brothers, sisters, and children share their stories in order to educate others about the warning signs and dangers associated with opioid use and abuse. By doing so, they hope to help others avoid the pain they have suffered.

Oxycodone, heroin, fentanyl, and other opioids have become widely and easily available in Connecticut. As a result, we have seen a significant increase in the number of young adults who use and abuse opioids, often with deadly consequences.

The scourge of opioids is not limited to any particular locality, socioeconomic group, race, or gender. Rather, there have been overdoses and overdose deaths in every county in Connecticut; New London County – and the town of Old Lyme – are no exception.

USA HEAT seeks to inform our communities of what we are up against, and what we can do to fight back. Our team members deliver a compelling message based on the tragedy that they have experienced first-hand with the goal of implementing a coordinated, effective response to this growing threat.

For more information contact LYSB at 860-434-7208 or www.lysb.org.

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Tesla Technology Aids Autoimmune Conditions; Pop-Up Event on Revolutionary AmpCoil at OL Library

This photo shows Aaron Bigelow’s wife holding the AmpCoil, while Aaron and the couple’s daughters share the moment.

Join an AmpCoil pop-up event this Sunday, Dec. 2, at 1 p.m. at the Old Lyme Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library.

One of the cofounders of the AmpCoil technology will be speaking about his battle with Lyme Disease and how necessity for his own wellness was the mother of his invention. Aaron Bigelow from Nevada City, Calif., wanted to see the place from which Lyme Disease acquired its name and is visiting Lyme and Old Lyme to speak about his journey with this disease.

The AmpCoil is a modern wellness tool that combines bio-feedback, bio-resonance and a customized coil based on Tesla technology. The use of this technology has transformed Bigelow’s life and he is anxious to share this approach to wellness, which can be applied to numerous autoimmune conditions.

This is a free event with demonstrations for those hoping to open the door to a new level of wellness.

For more information, contact Sandy Garvin at 860-391-3088. 

Visit www.AmpCoil.com to learn more.

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Lyme Land Trust Hosts Ribbon Cutting of George & Rosemary Moore Trail This Morning, Offers Guided Tours

A view of the Pleasant Valley Preserve through which the newly-identified trail passes.

On Saturday, Dec. 1, at 10 a.m., the Lyme Land Conservation Trust will host a ribbon cutting for the opening of the George and Rosemary Moore Trail.  This event will be held at the Mount Archer Woods Parking Lot, Mount Archer Road, Lyme.

Map showing the George and Rosemary Moore Trail.

The new trail, named to honor George and Rosemary Moore’s 14 years of service towards land preservation in Lyme, uses existing trails to provide a seven-mile scenic loop in the River to Ridgetop Preserves through several properties owned and/or managed cooperatively by the Lyme Land Trust. Town of Lyme and the Nature Conservancy. Come for the ceremony only or join a walk afterwards.

There will be three tours as follows:

1. The entire seven-mile loop. Bring a picnic lunch. This could take four or more hours depending upon the speed of the group.
2. The Northern half– about four miles. This could take about three hours. Bring a lunch if you wish.
3. Mount Archer Woods – to the ruins and back — about 3.5 miles.

All tours will start and end at the Mount Archer Parking Lot. Bring a picnic lunch and water. Snacks will be provided.  Reservations are requested at openspace@townlyme.org with your choice of which walk you wish to join.

George Moore, former president of the board and the first executive director of the Lyme Land Trust, retired in 2017. Through his vision and effective management, Moore helped transform the Land Trust into one of the most active and successful trusts in the State.

Inclement weather will cancel this event.

For more information, visit http://www.lymelandtrust.org/event/ribbon-cutting-ofgeorge-and-rosemary-moore-trail-with-guided-tours/

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The Movie Man: ‘The Ballad of Buster Scruggs’ Delights, Challenges

It seems that the newest trend in film is to go from first screenings at movie theaters to permanent availability on Netflix, following the trend that TV shows have started.

Originally, it was seen with popular, but not so artistically influential, stars such as Adam Sandler. But now iconic brothers Joel and Ethan Coen have followed through on this trend with the release of The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, a Western collection of vignettes ranging from bank robberies to covered-wagon journeys.

I finished the film as I expected I would: scratching my head, pondering the meaning of every story in the anthology. But this is the case with nearly every film by the Coen brothers. This happened when I finished No Country for Old Men, A Serious Man, and even The Big Lebowski.

But have no fear, in our digital age, you will not be perpetually stumped. With the assistance of Google, one can find a medium that can help you understand the artistic, and often spiritual, meanings of these films.

But make no mistake: you will enjoy Buster Scruggs. This will not be ranked as one of the Coen’s most memorable and definitive films, but you will be entertained.

They’re back at it with their quirky humor and folksy manner of storytelling that is present in every film (even ones as dark as No Country, upon further reflection.) You will also see tributes to other iconic directors, such as Stanley Kubrick (through their amazing landscape shots that help reinforce the environment of the story), and Spaghetti Western legend Sergio Leone (via silence, creating a build-up of suspense) — and this is more than fitting, being a Western movie.

For most readers, it will be quite easy to screen Buster Scruggs on finishing this review. Simply open a new tab in your internet explorer and log in to your Netflix account.

For everyone else, you will have to go through the painstaking process of pulling out your credit card and paying a whopping $8 to $14 to have thousands of videos at your disposal. It is a convenient way to watch movies now, but I believe it takes the joy out of the occasion of going to the movies … and I hope to write about this in the future.

‘Til next time, this is the Movie Man signing out …

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Lyme-Old Lyme High School, Middle School Announce Q1 Honor Rolls

Lyme-Old Lyme High School  Honor Roll    Quarter 1    2018-19

High Honors

Grade 12: Teresa Allan, Kendall Antoniac, Kathryn Atkinson, Jacqueline Barry, Casey Blue, Mackenzie Blue, Gary Bocian, Claire Britton, Cassandra Burrows, Ann Cote, Thomas Creagan, Noah Crolius, Emma Danes, Britney DeRoehn, Corey Drummond, Olin Frederiks, Zachary Gidius, Emily Grenier, Kylie Hall, Colin Hallahan, Sarah Hayward, Haley Heath, Kate Hickie, Liam Holloway, Aoife Hufford, Mya Johnson, Jess Kegley, Ciara Klimaszewski, Sophie Kyle, John Manthous, Brynn McGlinchey, Hannah Morrison, Leah Neithamer, Emily O’Brien, Jacob Olsen, Katherine Reid, Nicholas Roth, Noah Rumm, Kellie Sablone, Caroline Sagristano, Anna Sather, Justin Shaw, Penelope Small, Eli St.Germain, Emily Tan, Caroline Wallace, Colleen Walsh, Alexander Williams

Grade 11: Audrey Berry, Faith Caulkins, Rory Cavicke, Emilia Cheesman, Elizabeth Cravinho, Isabel Dean-Frazier, Arianna DelMastro, Maria Denya, Raymond Doll, Samuel Dushin, Theodore Enoch, Araselys Farrell, Nicholas Fava, Tanner Griffin, Sophia Griswold, Kamber Hamou, Lauren Huck, Jeffy Joshy, Renate Kuhn, Rachael Larson, Brenna Lewis, Jacqueline Malizia, Melissa Mauro, Thomas McCarthy, Ryan McTigue, Chandler Munson, Kyle Myers, Samantha Olson, Sofia Pecher-Kohout, Carter Popkin, Jared Ritchie, Jane Scheiber, Brady Sheffield, Garrett Smith, Emily Speckhals, Evan St.Louis, Olivia Stack, Haley Stevens, Philip Sweeney, Olivia Tetreault, Ryan Tetreault, Lydia Tinnerello, Kiera Ulmer, Megan VanSteenbergen, Theodore Wayland, Trevor Wells, Anna Williams, Maggie Wisner, Conner Wyman, Katherine Zelmanow

Grade 10: Sophia Arnold, Juliette Atkinson, Rachel Barretta, Ava Berry, Emma Boardman, Sadie Bowman, Kyuss Buono, Kate Cheney, John Cox, Megan Cravinho, George Danes, Bianca Dasilva, Emily DeRoehn, Corah Engdall, Leslie Farrell, Sadie Frankel, Fiona Frederiks, Lillian Grethel, Catharine Harrison, Isabella Hine, Regan Kaye, Paige Kolesnik, Grace Lathrop, Owen Macadam, Mackenzie Machnik, Elle McAraw, Emma McCulloch, Emma Meekhoff, Marina Melluzzo, Riley Nelson, Sophia Ortoleva, Connie Pan, Olivia Papanier, Anwyn Paynter, Lauren Pitt, Ezra Pyle, Ethan Rivera, Hayden Saunders, Tait Sawden, Jesper Silberberg, Tessa St.Germain, Jake Stewart, Lian Thompson, Angus Tresnan, Lauren Wallace, Kelly Walsh, Alison Ward, Ellery Zrenda

Grade 9: John Almy, Grace Arnold, Hannah Britt, Mackenzie Bussolotti, Evan Clark, Ryan Clark, Anne Colangelo, John Conley, Grace Coverdale, James Creagan, Caroline Crolius, Elias D’Onofrio, Elise DeBernardo, Elizabeth Duddy, Eleanor Dushin, Liam Fallon, Victoria Gage, Samantha Geshel, Aiden Goiangos, Andrew Hedberg, Madison Hubbard, Fiona Hufford, Julia Johnston, Nevin Joshy, Kian Kardestuncer, Cora Kern, Michael Klier, Felse Kyle, William Larson, Alex Lee, Reese Maguire, Abigail Manthous, Langley Marshall, Grace McAdams, Jacob Meyers, Samuel Mullaney, Elle Myers, Brendan O’Brien, Michael O’Donnell, Bella Orlando, Adeline Riccio, Margaret Rommel, Frank Sablone, Olivia Schaedler, Calvin Scheiber, Abigail Sicuranza, McLean Signora, Matthew Snyder, Abby Speckhals, Meghan Speers, Drew St.Louis, Nikolai Stephens-Zumbaum, Victoria Stout, Maverick Swaney, Olivia Turtoro, John Videll, Aidan Ward, Melanie Warren, Ellie Wells, Mary Wholean, Avery Wyman

Honors

Grade 12: Catherine Battalino, Lauren Birk, Paige Britton, Jocelyn Campbell, Liam Clark, John Coughlin, Lily Cox, Jacob Curtis, Grace Edwards, Marlena Elmoznino, Dylan Hettick-Harlow, Riley Jacobson, Warren Jones, Andrea Kathe, Jillian Kus, Henry Lahm, Elyza Learned, Joshua Liefeld, Peter Macadam, Lilah McAndrew, Danielle McCarthy, Sydney Ogden, Thomas Pennie, Eaven Rivera, James Rollins, Sadie Rubitski, Olivia Rugg, Robert Sedlatschek, Carson Swope, Adam Syed, Ethan Tracano

Grade 11: Alexandra Alpha, Anabella Arias, Emily Balocca, Emma Bass, Jean-Luc Bolduc, Chloe Cahill, Madison Cann, Ethan Carrion, Sarah Conley, Emily Evers, Jada Fuentes, Katherine Funaro, Lucy Gilbert, Grace Hanrahan, Quinn Hickie, Connor Hogan, Parker Hubbard, Daniel Kendall, Caroline King, Dylan Mulligan, Jenna Porter, Chase Reneson, Andre Salkin, Taylor Sedlatschek, Colby Sides, Summer Siefken, Taylor Thompson, Sydney Trowbridge, Jackson Warren, Katelyn Wells

Grade 10: Paige Alpha, Colbe Andrews, Kaylee Armenia, Olivia Bartlett, Truman Boller, Keenan Burr, Hunter Collins, Emerson Colwell, Axel Cruz, Michael Cushman, Trube Dean, Francette Donato, Eveliz Fuentes, Jackson Goulding, Samantha Gray, Schuyler Greenho, Emma Griffith, Destiny Kus, Gabriel Lavoie, Justen Lessard, Madelyn Maskell, Brendan McTigue, Michael Milazzo, Timothy O’Brien, Gavin Porter, Aidan Powers, Jacob Quaratella, Nicholas Vandette, Katrina Wallace, Avery Welch

Grade 9: Nicholas Adeletti, Andrew Bennett, Nihad Bicic, Ethan Carr, Lauren Creagan, Mischa Elmoznino, Shawn Grenier, Nicolette Hallahan, Jackson Harris, Zoe Jensen, Owen Kegley, Olivia Lecza, Mikayla Masilotti, Stephanie Mauro, James Mazzalupo, Colin McCarthy, Emily Mesham, Evan Morgan, Alexander Roth, Madison Thompson, Evan Visgilio, Aden Wilson, Paige Winchell, Ryan Zbierski

Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School     Honor Roll     Q1 2018-19

High Honors

Grade 8: Bridget Allan, Olivia Alpha, William Barry, Callie Bass, Livie Bass, Jillian Beebe, Jordan Beebe, Cooper Bowman, Ava Brinkerhoff, Jamie Bucior, Gretchen Burgess, Sarah Burnham, Hayley Cann, Liam Celic, Luke Celic, Alexander Chrysoulakis, Grace Colwell, Marjorie Curtis, William Danes, Anna Davis, Cole Dobratz, John Eichholz, Alexis Fenton, Matthew Grammatico, Karissa Huang, Owen Ingersoll-Bonsack, Aidan Kerrigan, Celia LaConti, Jonah Lathrop, Monique Lavoie, Jacob Lopez-Bravo, Ford Macadam, Marielle Mather, Madalyn McCulloch, Caden Monte, Calvin Monte, Cooper Munson, Alexander Olsen, Allott Patterson, Alain Pecher-Kohout, Olivia Powers, Kelsey Pryor, Izzadora Reynolds, Benjamin Roth, Rhyleigh Russell, Eli Ryan, Anders Silberberg, Alyssa Spooner, Samantha Tan, Tova Toriello, Kaitlyn Ward, Harry Whitten, George Williams, Quinn Williams

Grade 7: Peighton Andrews, Emma Bayor, Oliver Berry, Alis Bicic, Elliot Bjornberg, Drew Brackley, Natalie Buckley, Jackson Bullock, Sarah Colangelo, Ava Cummins, Ella Curtiss-Reardon, Eva D’Onofrio, Eric Dagher, Lucas DaSilva, Mulanga Drysile, Amelia Gage, Ryder Goss, Sydney Goulding, Nyla Goulis, Alexis Grasdock, Justin Green, Douglas Griswold, Katherine Gryk, Abby Hale, Nathaniel Heon, Leland Hine, Sedona Holland, Agatha Hunt, Beatrice Hunt, Sabina Jungkeit, Emmerson Kaye, Dakota Kotzan, Brodie Lippincott, Matthew Mazzalupo, Anna McAdams, Griffin McGlinchey, Elaina Morosky, Katherine Mullaney, Delaney Nelson, Isabelle O’Connor, Dylan Paynter, Giovanna Parnoff (for Q4 of 2017-18), Grace Phaneuf, Jack Porter, Luisa Raby, Ava Roth, Charles Sahadi, Kylie-Jean Sevigny, Sydney Siefken, Owen Snurkowski, Hannah Thomas, Gabriel Tooker, Keara Ward, Louisa Warlitz, Mason Wells, Tyler Wells, Summer Wollack

Grade 6: Emma Arelt, Ella Austin, Oliver Avelange, Natalie Barndt, Micah Bass, Molly Boardman, Samuel Bocian, Justin Bonatti, Mark Burnham, Chase Calderon, Tabitha Colwell, Gloria Conley, Chloe Datum, Andrea DeBernardo, Autumn Dionne, Erin Durant, Shane Eastman-Grossel, Zoe Eastman-Grossel, Caeli Edmed, Anna Eichholz, Trinity Empie-Jones, Ella Evans, Davis Fallon, Grace Ferman, Hoshena Gemme, Marcella Gencarella, Ava Gilbert, Henry Griswold, Jonathan Harms, Hannah Johnston, Shyla Jones, Simon Karpinski, Aven Kellert, Olivia Kelly, Ella Kiem, Ada LaConti, James Lahot, Brenden Landry, Elise Leonardo, Evan LeQuire, Andrew Liu, Colette Marchant, Max Novak, Abigail O’Brien, Kanon Oharu, Filip Pecher-Kohout, Sophie Pennie, Charles Pitt, Shannon Pryor, Mutia Quarshie, Trinity Rando, Ysabel Rodriguez, Kelly Sheehan, Andrew Sicuranza, Drea Simler, Josephine Small, Audrey Spiegel, Morgan Standish, Madeline Supersano, Charlotte Tinniswood, Kathleen Walsh, Ava Wilcox, Ava Wood-Muller

Honors

Grade 8: Whitney Barbour, Gillian Bradley, Reece Guillet, Makenna Harms, Clarence Hinckley, Dylan Hovey, Madison Krol, Phoebe Lampos, Theodore Lampos, Karleigh Landers, Kennedy McCormick, Joseph Montazella, Jack Morgan, Jacob Rand, Jenna Schauder, Ned Smith, Joseph Steinmacher, Marco Supersano

Grade 7:  Morgan Bell, Macklin Cushman, Audrey LeCour, Luke Legein, Avra Montazella, Kalea VanPelt

Grade 6: Christopher Anderson, Dominic Clark, Rowan Hovey, Kyle Ingersoll-Bonsack, Peter Kuhn, Nathan Morgan

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State Senator-Elect Needleman Hosts First Office Hours, Dec. 6, in Colchester

State Senator-Elect Norm Needleman

State Senator-elect Norm Needleman (D-Essex) is inviting the public to ask questions, share their concerns and meet their new state senator during his  first public office hours to be held Thursday, Dec. 6, beginning at 7:30 p.m. at the McDonald’s restaurant at 375 South Main Street in Colchester.

For the past 30 years, Sen.-elect Needleman has been the owner and CEO of Tower Laboratories, a pharmaceutical business which employs more than 150 Connecticut residents.  Sen.-elect Needleman serves as a board member of the Middlesex County Chamber of Commerce, and he is also currently serving his fourth term as the first selectman of Essex

Beginning Jan. 9, 2019, Sen.-elect Needleman will represent more than 100,000 Connecticut residents in the 33rd State Senate District, which includes the Town of Lyme along with Chester, Clinton, Colchester, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Deep River, Haddam, Portland, Westbrook, and part of Old Saybrook.

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Join a “Hands-On” Workshop Tonight to Design a Holiday Topiary Arrangement

Back by popular demand, Nancy Ballek will again host a demonstration and workshop at Lyme Public Library on designing a topiary arrangement to adorn your homes for the Holidays.  The class will be held Monday, Nov. 26, from 7 to 9 p.m.
This hands-on workshop is by pre-registration only at a cost of $20 per participant.  All supplies will be provided.
Class size is limited to 25 participants. This event is sure to sell out quickly, so sign up promptly.

Call 860-434-2272 or email programreg@lymepl.org to register.

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Take a Post-Thanksgiving Hike Today in Hartman Park

See the Turtle Rock at Hartman Park on this hike.

Walk off your Thanksgiving overindulgence on this beautiful, moderate trail that winds along craggy ridges strewn with glacial boulders. Wendolyn Hill, Lyme Land Trust Board member, and Lyme Open Space Coordinator, will lead a walk on the Red Trail in Hartman Park on the Sunday after Thanksgiving, Nov. 25, from 1:30 to 4-ish p.m.

Meet at Hartman Park Entrance Parking Lot, Gungy Rd., in Lyme. The parking lot is on Gungy Road about 1.5 miles north of the four-way stop signs at the intersection of Beaverbrook Rd., Grassy Hill Rd., and Gungy Rd.

The route will follow a portion of the Goodwin Trail. The Goodwin Trail, overseen by the Eightmile River Wild & Scenic Coordinating Committee, is an extended trail system crossing four towns: East Haddam, Salem, Lyme and East Lyme. The entire walk is about 3.5 miles. A snack will be provided. Bring something to drink. The walk is sponsored by the Lyme land Trust and the Town of Lyme.

Rain cancels. Check lymelandtrust.org for updates.For more information, contact openspace@townlyme.org

Registration at openspace@townlyme.org would be appreciated.

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Reading Uncertainly? ‘Essays After Eighty’ & ‘A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety’ by Donald Hall

“I teeter when I walk, I no longer drive, I look out the windows … My circles narrow. Each season my balance gets worse, and I sometimes fall. My fingers are clumsy and slow with buttons. I have problems with memory, sure, but it’s short-term memory … My summer nights are NESN and the Boston Red Sox. I enjoy multiple naps.”  So did the New Hampshire poet Donald Hall define life after 80!

I know, I know … I’m about the same age.  I too enjoyed Sidney Bechet when I was younger (a famous New Orleans jazz hero for you younger lads and lasses).  I too listened to Robert Frost in person (he “said” his lines at my high school in 1950 and 1951).  And I too have tried my hand at poetry (the haiku).

Some years ago, I was advised that one should not read a book until one is the same age as when the author wrote it. I let that pass, but now, after becoming immersed in Hall’s two last books, I suspect the advice may be sanguine. But that doesn’t mean that my younger readers should avoid these two volumes. No, not al all …

In these brief, enjoyable, humorous, and always challenging essays (Hall writes that he decided at eighty to dispense with his renowned poetry, after he served as the United States Poet Laureate, shifting to the essay). He describes poems as “ . . . image-bursts from the brain-depths, words flavored by battery-long vowels” that challenge our brains and imaginations, “ . . . delicate rhythms with forceful enjambments and an assonance of dipthongs.” These essays, fortunately, are less poetic!

I enjoyed especially his warnings on writing: “Don’t begin paragraphs with ‘I’” (I failed that one!). “Avoid ‘me’ and ‘my’ when you can. . . . Avoid the personal pronoun when you can. . . . “ and “don’t be afraid of contradiction: it is the cellular structure of life. . . . The emotional intricacy and urgency of human life expresses itself most fiercely in contradiction”.

Death, of course, is on his mind. “There is only one road” and “Of course all of us will be forgotten” but these essays demonstrate a life lived to the fullest, with humor and good feeling for his years in New Hampshire.

Donald Hall died quietly in Wilmot, NH on June 23, 2018. Do read these brief, succinct and poetic essays: perfect for the aging mind, as well as for those advancing inexorably to old age. Enjoy every moment!

Editor’s Note: ‘Essays After Eighty,’ 2014, and ‘A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety,’ both by Donald Hall were published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, New  York, respectively in 2014 and 2018.

Felix Kloman

About the Author: Felix Kloman is a sailor, rower, husband, father, grandfather, retired management consultant and, above all, a curious reader and writer. He’s explored how we as human beings and organizations respond to ever-present uncertainty in two books, ‘Mumpsimus Revisited’ (2005) and ‘The Fantods of Risk’ (2008). A 20-year resident of Lyme, he now writes book reviews, mostly of non-fiction that explores our minds, our behavior, our politics and our history. But he does throw in a novel here and there. For more than 50 years, he’s put together the 17 syllables that comprise haiku, the traditional Japanese poetry, and now serves as the self-appointed “poet laureate” of Ashlawn Farm Coffee, where he may be seen on Friday mornings. His late wife, Ann, was also a writer, but of mystery novels, all of which begin in a village in midcoast Maine, strangely reminiscent of the town she and her husband visited every summer.

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Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm Hosts 29th Annual ‘Farm Day’ Today, All Welcome

Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm Annual ‘Farm Day’ always draws a large number of visitors.

Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm will host their 29th Annual ‘Farm Day’ on Saturday November 24th from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 139 Beaver Brook Rd. in Lyme, Conn. The annual event is a Lyme tradition, bringing families together to celebrate the heritage of the 101-year-old farm.  The open house ‘Farm Day’ is a free event and features activities for people of all ages.

The Sankows invite the public to see the animals; including over 600 sheep, learn the history of the Sankow farm, and to discover how the farm products are produced and used.   Suzanne Sankow says “Stan and I continue to encourage families to learn the importance of farming and local agriculture.  We greatly enjoy seeing the next generations explore the farm, pet a cow, try a sheep’s cheese or just have fun being outdoors before the winter cold arrives”.

Activities for the family include wagon hayrides, wool spinning and sock making demonstrations.  Live music will be performed by The Locomotives, a folk/blues/rock band, who will be playing songs from the 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s in addition some originals.

Visitors can shop from a few local vendors including Four Root Farms who will be onsite selling holiday wreaths and swags made with all-Connecticut grown evergreens, rose hips and berries.

The Farm Market and Wool Shop will be open during the event and will feature a variety of artisanal sheep and cow’s milk dairy products and meats as well as new wool products including wool socks, pillows, blankets, capes and sweater capes. Complimentary tastings of sheep’s and cow’s cheese will be available including the Award-Winning BIG E ‘Best in Class’ Feta Pesto.

Lamb and chicken sausage sandwiches, Abbey, Pleasant Cow and Pleasant Son mac & cheese, lamb and white bean chili, chicken corn chowder, hot chocolate and cider will be available for purchase.

Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm, is a 175 acres sheep and dairy farm located in Lyme, CT.  The 101 year old farm is home to a dozen Jersey Cows alongside the 450-600 sheep – Frislands, Romneys and natural coloreds.

Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm is the largest sheep farm in Connecticut and the only licensed producer of sheep’s milk in Connecticut.  They make and sells artisanal sheep and cow’s milk cheeses as well as yogurts, milk, and gelato.

The Wool Shop on the farm features wool garments including socks, scarves, sweaters, hats, vests, and blankets as well as cones of yarn made from their own wool. They offer fresh lamb meats at their farm store beside homemade entrees such as white bean chili and lamb curry stew.

Visit www.beaverbrookfarm.org for more information.

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