August 2, 2021

‘The Farmer’s Market’ at Tiffany Farms in Lyme is Opens Saturdays for the Season

View of The Farmer’s Market at Tiffany Farms in Lyme.

LYME —‘The Farmer’s Market at Tiffany Farms’ in Lyme open Saturday, June 26, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Vendors this season include

  • Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm
  • Biscotti and Beyond
  • Bittersweet Farms
  • Chatfield Hollow Farm
  • Confections by Tonie Marie (new – confections!)
  • Dondero Orchards
  • Fat Stone Farm (returning!)
  • From the Farm
  • Long Table Farm
  • Maple Breeze Farm
  • Marna Roons. (New – macaroons!)
  • Sankow Beaver Brook Farm
  • TALK Seafood
  • Tiffany Farms Pasture Raised Beef (started in September and was a HUGE success!)
  • Traveling Italian Chef
  • Wave Hill Breads

Jennifer Tiffany, who runs the market with her husband Bill Hurtle, told LymeLine by email, “We have a well-rounded list of returnees in addition to a couple of new vendors to fill our sweet tooth cravings!”

Bill Hurtle and Jen Tiffany who are preparing to open ‘The Farmers Market at Tiffany Farms’ on June 15.

Social distancing is requested and masks are optional.

“The Heart Seen ‘Round Lyme” looks out at the community from the silo at Tiffany Farms.

This year’ tag-line for the market is “Keeping the trade alive as stewards of the land.”

Editor’s Note: We wish Jen and Bill the very best in this venture throughout the season, which lasts until mid-October.

Visit this link to read an article we published in 2019 about the inaugural season at The Farmer’s Market.

 

July 29 COVID-19 Update: Old Lyme Back in Yellow Zone for Two-Week Case Rate; One New Case in OL Takes Cumulative Total to 351, Lyme Holds at 112

This map, updated July 29, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Lyme is still in the (lowest) Gray Zone, but Old Lyme has moved into the Yellow Zone. Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.) Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper. Details in italics are the same for each of the maps included in this article.

‘New London County has moved into the category of “substantial transmission”’ (Deidre S. Gifford, MD, MPH, Senior Advisor to the Governor for Health and Human Services, and Acting Connecticut Department of Public Health Commissioner)

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Thursday, July 29, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health  (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 28, shows the latest average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks (see map above.)

The picture is distressing, reflecting national trends, with four towns now in the Red (highest case rate) Zone and four in the Orange (second highest) Zone. See detailed description of the zones in italics below.

The towns in the Red Zone are Harland, Salem, Bozrah and Sprague. The towns in the Orange Zone are Easton, East Hampton, Ledyard and Thompson.

Old Lyme has reentered the Yellow (second lowest) Zone along with more than 50 other Connecticut towns. All remaining towns in the state, including Lyme, are in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone. This is the 19th straight week that Lyme is in the Gray Zone.

This same report issued Thursday, July 29, also shows that Old Lyme has reported one new confirmed COVID-19 case. This takes Old Lyme’s cumulative total of confirmed cases to 351, while Lyme’s holds steady at 112.

In breaking news, Ledge Light Director of Health Stephen Mansfield sent out a statement at 8:10 a.m. this morning from Deidre S. Gifford, MD, MPH, Senior Advisor to the Governor for Health and Human Services, and Acting Connecticut Department of Public Health Commissioner, which states, “According to new guidance released by CDC this week, all individuals over the age of 2 years—whether vaccinated or unvaccinated—in counties with substantial transmission of COVID-19 should wear masks in public indoor spaces.

As of today, Hartford, New Haven and New London Counties have moved into the category of “substantial transmission” per the CDC classification system.  The Connecticut Department of Public Health strongly recommends that individuals who live in, work in, or are visiting towns located in Hartford, New Haven or New London County follow this recommendation.”

Mansfield said yesterday in a different communication, “The increase in COVID transmission in New London County is cause for concern.”

  • The Gray category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is less than five or less than five reported cases.
  • The Yellow category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between five and nine reported cases.
  • The Orange category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between 10 and 14.
  • The Red category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town exceeds 15.

In all cases, this rate does not include cases or tests among residents of nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.

The map below is from July 22, when two towns, Franklin and Salem, were in the Red Zone (indicating the highest rate of COVID-19 new cases), which is up one from the previous week, and Andover remained in the (second highest rate) Orange Zone (down from two towns last week.)

Eight towns were in the Yellow Zone (indicating the lowest but one rate of COVID-19 new cases), which is up from two last week. They were Clinton, East Hampton, Manchester, Newington, Stonington, Westbrook, Windsor and Windsor Locks.

This map, updated July 22, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone. 

The map below is from July 15, when one town, Franklin, was in the Red Zone (indicating the highest rate of COVID-19 new cases) and another two, Salem and Andover, were in the (second highest rate) Orange Zone. New Hartford and Griswold were in the Yellow Zone (indicating the lowest but one rate of COVID-19 new cases.)

This map, updated July 15, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

The map below is from July 8, when New Hartford was the sole town in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated July 8, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

The map below is from July 1, when Marlborough and Prospect were in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated July 1, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

The map below is from June 24, when Somers, Prospect and Bolton were in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated June 24, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

This is the June 17 map, when just one town, Bolton, was in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated June 17, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

For comparison, the map below is from June 3 and shows one town, Waterbury, in the Orange Zone and 21 towns in the Yellow Zone, down from 48 the previous week. The towns in the Yellow Zone were: Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Bloomfield, Brooklyn, Coventry, Cromwell, Derby, East Hartford, East Haven, Granby, Hamden, Hartford, Manchester, New Britain, New Haven, New London, Putnam, Rocky Hill, Shelton, Waterford and Windsor.

This map, updated June 3, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the previous two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

Below is the map from May 27 that showed one town in the Red Zone, Putnam, and 10 towns in the Orange Zone.

This map, updated May 27, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme were still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

Compare the maps above with the one we published Dec. 18, 2020 to see the remarkable progress that has been made with controlling the spread of the virus through expansion of vaccination rates and improved mitigation strategies.

Map of Connecticut dated Dec. 17, 2020 showing both Lyme and Old Lyme now in the CT DPH-identified ‘Red Zone.’ This is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is over 15.

Vaccination rates in Lyme and Old Lyme are encouraging with 82.47 percent of the population in Lyme having received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and the equivalent number for Old Lyme being 74.17. percent.

Percentages for the fully vaccinated are 79.23 for Lyme and 70.79 for Old Lyme.

These rates remain among the higher percentages in the state.

Information regarding vaccination opportunities and other relevant information can be found at https://llhd.org/coronavirus-covid-19-situation/covid-19-vaccine/

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/

Old Lyme Rowers Just Miss a Medal for Team USA in Men’s Eight Olympic Final

The Olympic Men’s Eight+ final at the 1500 meter mark with New Zealand, who won the gold medal, in Lane 2 and Team USA in Lane 1. Germany in Lane 3 took silver followed by Great Britain in Lane 5, who won the bronze medal.

OLD LYME /TOKYO — Old Lyme’s Austin Hack and Liam Corrigan along with the remaining members of the US Men’s 8+ came in fourth in the closely-contested Olympic final Thursday evening — just missing out on a medal.

New Zealand took the gold with a winning time of 5:24:64 a but a photo finish followed for silver between Great Britain and Germany. The decision went in Germany’s favor and they were declared silver medalists with a time of 5:25:60 and Team GB took the bronze with 5:25:73.

The remaining results were:

  • US: 5:26:75
  • Netherlands: 5:27:96
  • Australia: 5:36:23

Editor’s Note: Austin and Liam, you may not have won a medal but the residents of Lyme and Old Lyme are so proud of you now … and will remain so for years to come!

Volunteers Sought Friday Afternoon for ‘Paddle & Pull’ in Whalebone Cove, Lyme, to Help Eradicate Invasive Water Chestnut

A volunteer gathers invasive water chestnut in her canoe on a previous ‘Paddle & Pull.’

LYME — A very large patch of invasive European water chestnut was discovered last week in a remote location in Whalebone Cove in Lyme that can only be reached by canoe or kayak at high tide.

On Friday, July 30, the Friends of Whalebone Cove (FOWC) are organizing a ‘Paddle & Pull’ volunteer work party to remove the water chestnut starting at 3 p.m. Anyone who has a kayak, canoe or boat is welcome to join the work party. Bring a water bottle, life jacket/PFD and sun block.

The Paddle & Pull will last about two hours. Meet at the Chester-Hadlyme Ferry Boat Launch (east shore),  Ferry Road (Rte. 148), Lyme, CT 06371.

Invasive European water chestnut is spreading in Whalebone Cove.

In the past several years, FOWC has managed to control the spread of European water chestnut in Whalebone Cove and seeks to prevent it from becoming established, because if that should happen, it will change the Cove’s ecology and destroy its natural habitat eco-systems on which species that live in the area rely to survive.

This invasive creates a canopy on the water surface that crowds out native plants and destroys habitat for turtles, fish, birds and other animals. It decreases the oxygen in the water that fish need to survive. Its rosettes cover entire coves and ponds impeding fishing, hunting, swimming and boating, while also killing native plants that birds and marine wildlife need for survival.

Once established, European water chestnut is difficult to control. It can, however, be eradicated and prevented from spreading by removing plants before they have a chance to drop their seeds, which usually starts in late August.

This type of water chestnut has invaded and taken over many other locations in the Connecticut River.

There will be additional “paddle & pull” work parties scheduled later in the summer.

For more details, email fowchadlyme@gmail.com or call/text 518-253-4844

Old Lyme’s Hack, Corrigan Race for Gold in US Men’s Eight TONIGHT in Tokyo

The whole of Lyme and Old Lyme will be cheering on “our” boys, Austin Hack and Liam Corrigan, tonight as they race for gold in Tokyo! This photo is taken from the repechage and includes Hack in the upper left, second boat from the top.

Austin Hack

Liam Corrigan

OLD LYME — Lyme-Old Lyme High School graduates Austin Hack (2010) and Liam Corrigan (2015) race for gold in the US Men’s Eight+ final in the Tokyo Olympics at 9:25 p.m. TONIGHT, Thursday, July 29, (which is tomorrow at 10:25 a.m. Tokyo time.)

The other five teams that qualified for the final are:

  • New Zealand
  • Great Britain
  • Netherlands
  • Germany
  • Australia

 

Lyme DTC Endorses Slate of 14 Candidates for November Elections; Mattson, Kiker Running for Reelection to BOS

Lyme First Selectman Steve Mattson (right) and Lyme Selectman John Kiker, both Democrats, are both running for reelection in November 2021.

LYME – The Lyme Democratic Town Committee (DTC) has announced that, at a local Democratic caucus and committee meeting held July 27, a slate of 14 Democratic candidates was nominated and endorsed to run in the Nov. 2 municipal elections.  

Lyme First Selectman Steven Mattson and Selectman John Kiker received unanimous endorsements  for reelection – as did the other 12 Lyme residents who will be running for public office in November. 

In announcing the candidate slate, Lyme DTC Nominating Committee Chairperson Liz Frankel said,  “For the upcoming election, in addition to Steven and John, who have done a superb job of leading Lyme, we have recruited a select group of individuals who are not only highly qualified, but also extremely interested in serving the town we all love and cherish.” 

Four of the candidates – Anne Littlefield, Jim Miller, Laura Mooney and Alan Sheiness – are running  for public office for the first time, motivated by their love of the town and desire to be of service. 

Endorsed Lyme Democratic candidates for the November 2021 election are, from left to right, John Kiker, Alan Sheiness, Mary Stone, Bob House, Anna James, Toni Phillips, Phyllis Ross, Steve Mattson. Missing: Fred Harger, Ann Littlefield, Jim Miller, Laura Mooney.

Running for election this year will be: 

  • Bob House for Board of Finance 
  • Alan Sheiness for Board of Finance 
  • Jim Miller for Board of Finance Alternate 
  • Mary Stone for Library Board of Directors 
  • Laura Mooney for Library Board of Directors 
  • Phyllis Ross for Planning & Zoning Commission 
  • Mary Stone for Planning & Zoning Commission Alternate 
  • Anne Littlefield for Planning & Zoning Commission Alternate 
  • Anna James for Board of Education 
  • Fred Harger for Zoning Board of Appeals 
  • Toni Phillips for Zoning Board of Appeals Alternate 

Running for reelection will be: 

  • Steven Mattson for First Selectman 
  • John Kiker for Selectman and Zoning Board of Appeals 

The Lyme DTC’s mission is to support and strengthen the Democratic Party in the Town of Lyme  and the State of Connecticut. 

Editor’s Note: This article is based on a press release issued this afternoon, July 28, by the Lyme DTC.

Training, Including Explosives Detonation, to be Held Today at Stone Ranch Military Reservation in East Lyme

LYME/OLD LYME/EAST LYME — The Connecticut Army National Guard will be conducting training today, Thursday, July 29, at their Stone Ranch Military Reservation from 7:30 a.m. to 12 noon each day. The reservation is sited on Boston Post Rd. in East Lyme.

Explosives will be detonated during these trainings, which residents may hear and/or feel during this period of time.

US Men’s 8 with Old Lyme’s Corrigan, Hack, Advance to Olympic Final After Photo Finish in Repechage

This photo shows the finish of the men’s 8+ repechage when it was certain New Zealand had won but second place was yet to be determined after a photo finish. Great Britan was finally given second place and the US third.

TOKYO/OLD LYME — The Men’s Eight Repechage in the Tokyo Olympics turned into a thrilling race that ended with a photo finish for second place between Team US and Team Great Britain.

Ultimately, the US Men’s Eight — with Old Lyme’s Austin Hack and Liam Corrigan as crew members — was deemed to have crossed the line behind Great Britain placing the US boat in third place and Great Britain in second.

New Zealand won the race in a time of 5:22:04.

The US Men’s Eight came in third in the repechage to secure a place in the Olympic final.

The other results were:

Great Britain: 5:23:32
USA: 5:23:43
Australia: 5:25:06
Romania: 5:27:14

The top four boats all advance to the final, for which Germany and the Netherlands have already qualified. Meanwhile, Romania is eliminated.

Due to the weather conditions, all the times recorded in the repechage were significantly faster than those in the heats, for example, Germany’s winning time in its heat was 5:28:95.

The race took place at 12:50 p.m. Tokyo time on Wednesday, July 29, which was 11:50 p.m EST on Tuesday, July 28.

July 26 COVID-19 Update: Three New Cases in Old Lyme Take Cumulative Total to 350, Lyme Holds at 112

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

LYME/OLD LYME —The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Monday, July 26, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health  (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Sunday, July 25, shows that Old Lyme has reported three new confirmed COVID-19 cases.

Three new cases were also reported in Old Lyme on Friday, July 23, meaning a total of six new cases were reported between Friday and Monday inclusive.

There are no new cases in Lyme.

This takes Old Lyme’s cumulative total of confirmed cases to 350, while Lyme’s hold at 112.

The Hartford Courant reported in an article dated Friday July 23, “The delta variant accounts for 69% of COVID-19 cases recently tracked in Connecticut, researchers at the Yale School of Public Health say, as the state continues to see an increase in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations.

Experts say the new variant poses a particular risk to unvaccinated people, who make up the vast majority of people currently hospitalized with COVID-19.

Vaccinated people may face greater risk of infection due to the delta variant as compared to previous strains, research shows, but are unlikely to experience severe illness.” Click on the link above to read the full article.

There is no change in the number of fatalities reported in either Lyme (0) or Old Lyme (3).

The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male. Details of the third, which was reported in 2021, have not been made available.

Visit this link for our July 22 update, which includes statewide data.

Watch Old Lyme’s Hack, Corrigan Tonight in US Men’s 8+ as They Race for Place in Final

Austin Hack (third from right) looks to left at the end of Heat 1 in the US 8+ Olympic championship.

TOKYO/OLD LYME — All Olympic rowing events in Tokyo scheduled for today have been postponed to Wednesday and Thursday due to the arrival of Typhoon Nepartak.

The Men’s 8+ repechage — in which the US boat that includes team members Austin Hack and Liam Corrigan from Old Lyme will participate — was already scheduled for Wednesday, July 28, but its time has been changed. It will now be rowed at 12:50 p.m. Tokyo time, which is 11:50 p.m. EST,  TONIGHT, Tuesday, July 27. (Note: Tokyo time is 13 hours ahead of EST.)

Joan Rivington, mother of Liam Corrigan

Five boats will be in the Men’s 8+ repechage — Australia, Great Britain, New Zealand, and Romania will join the US.

The first four boats in the repachage will then join Germany and The Netherlands in the final. Germany and The Netherlands qualified directly for the final by winning their respective heats.Watch Old Lyme’s Hack, Corrigan in Repechage.

We asked Joan Rivington, who lives in Lyme and is the mother of Liam Corrigan, how she was feeling about the upcoming race,

She responded by email, “That is a great question. I have a million emotions running through me but I think my biggest emotion right now is pure joy watching my son and his boat mates being able to compete in Tokyo after working so hard to get there.”

We are sure Lyme and Old Lyme are sharing her joy and so we say again loudly, “Go, Team USA!”

LYSB, LOL Prevention Coalition to Hold Free NARCAN, QPR Training for Community, Aug. 19; All Welcome to These Potentially Life-Saving Sessions

LYME/OLD LYME — On Thursday, Aug. 19, from 6:30 to 8 p.m., Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB) and the Lyme/Old Lyme Prevention Coalition will be hosting a free Narcan and Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR) training session.

NARCAN (naloxone) is an opiate antidote.  Opioids include heroin and prescription pain pills such as oxycodone, codeine and morphine. NARCAN is a prescription medicine that blocks the effects of opioids and reverses an overdose.

NARCAN® Nasal Spray may counteract the life-threatening effects of an opioid overdose. Since most accidental overdoses occur in a home setting, it was developed for first responders, as well as family, friends, and caregivers—with no medical training required. Its characteristics are:

  • Needle-free
  • Designed for ease-of-use in the community setting
  • Inhalation not required

The Narcan training from 6:30 to 7 p.m. will provide participants with knowledge about overdose prevention strategies, administering Narcan, and support information and resources. Each participant will go home with a free Narcan kit.

The QPR portion from 7 to 8 p.m. will help participants learn the three steps to help save a life, warning signs of a suicide crisis, how to respond, and where to go for resources and support.

These sessions will be held at Old Lyme’s Memorial Town Hall.  Register for one or both trainings at this link.

Data indicates that emergency personnel are seeing a slight uptick in overdose calls in our region with state and national data showing that the pandemic has contributed to this rise.

Every week in the US, an average of 20 people die from a drug overdose, and eight by suicide. Accidental overdose is now the leading cause of death for Americans under 50, and suicide is the 10th leading cause of death.

This training is crucial if you ever find yourself in the position to save a life. It will be facilitated by staff from SERAC (Supporting and Engaging Resources for Action and Change).

For more information about the training sessions, visit this link.

Mental health problems and substance use disorders sometimes occur together. More than one in four adults living with serious mental health problems also has a substance use problem. Substance use problems occur more frequently with certain mental health problems, including depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia and personality disorders because:

  • Certain illegal drugs can cause people with an addiction to experience one or more symptoms of a mental health problem.
  • Mental health problems can sometimes lead to alcohol or drug use, as some people with a mental health problem may misuse these substances as a form of self-medication.
  • Mental health and substance use disorders share some underlying causes, including changes in brain composition, genetic vulnerabilities, and early exposure to stress or trauma

Someone with a mental health problem and substance use disorder must treat both issues. Treatment for both mental health problems and substance use disorders may include rehabilitation, medications, support groups, and talk therapy.

Shared decision making allows an individual and their healthcare provider to determine together the most appropriate treatment or care choices. It is a fundamental process in primary care and behavioral health care integration — making it vital that individuals with behavioral health conditions acquire skills to participate in decisions with their healthcare providers.

For more information on mental health and substance use disorders, visit samhsa.gov  and/or www.lysb.org/prevention

Alli Behnke

About the Author: Alli Behnke, MSW, MA is the Prevention Coordinator at Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau. She has been a Social Worker for 20 years working in the fields of prevention, therapy, youth leadership, and health coaching. Alli believes strongly in providing accurate information, education, and tools for success when empowering the Lyme/Old Lyme Prevention Coalition and REACH Youth Coalition to work together on strengths-based campaigns. The Coalitions address substance abuse and other risky behaviors challenging our youth and families. Contact her at abehnke@lysb.org or visit  www.lysb.org to become involved in this important community work.

Here a Bear, There a Bear …

LYME/OLD LYME — Around 5:50 p.m. on Sunday, July 18, Paul and Barbara Hallwood had just returned to their home on Sterling City Rd. in Lyme, when they saw the black bear, pictured above, hard at work in their yard.

Paul explained, “The bear had destroyed our bird feeder, bending the sturdy, metal pole [and] holding it up to a  right angle with ease. It treated the bird seed holder, which can be seen in the photo, like a lollipop wrapper, tearing at it and then tipping seeds out before eating them and grunting with satisfaction.”

The last the Hallwoods saw of  the bear – and the seed holder – was when the bear dipped down below their patio and, in Paul’s words,  “… presumably, moved on to somebody else’s garden.”

Paul and Barbara Hallwood

Asked, “How did you feel when you saw the bear?” Paul replied, “It was an OMG moment, and just look at the thickness of that fur with rippling muscles also evident!”

Was it the first time they had seen a bear in their yard?  Paul responded in the affirmative, saying, “First time we had ever seen one in our garden or anywhere for that matter. We knew then and there that that was the end of our bird feeder joy – well, at least until the hibernation season.”

He added, “As many neighbors as possible were immediately alerted to the danger.”

We were also sent the photo below, which was taken July 9, in Old Lyme at about 7:30 p.m. by Ron Breault at his neighbor’s house. Breault noted, “Then for the next hour plus the bear roamed our backyard and ravaged our bird feeders.”

Photo by Ron Breault.

We will let Paul Hallwood have the last word on the current, local black bear situation with his wise comment, “It’s a good idea not to feed the birds.”

Old Lyme’s Corrigan, Hack in US Men’s 8+ Boat Finish Second in Heat 1, Now Onto Repechage, Tuesday; Link to Video of Race Added

Aerial view of Heat 1 for the USA Men’s Eight. This was at an early stage in the race when the US was leading.

OLD LYME — The US Men’s Eight came in second to Germany in Friday night’s Heat 1 rowed at noon Tokyo time, 11 p.m EST. The results were:

  1. Germany: 5:28:95
  2. USA: 5:30:57
  3. Romania: 5:39:84
  4. Australia: 5:43:66

In case you missed the race live or would like to re-watch it, here is a link to a video of Heat 1 , (apologies that you have to watch the trailer first!)

The results in Heat 2 were:

  1. Netherlands: 5:30:66
  2. New Zealand: 5:32.11
  3. Great Britain: 5:34.40

Old Lyme’s Austin Hack smiles at the end of the heat.

Germany and the Netherlands automatically qualify for the final while the remaining boats must now participate in the repechage.

Liam Corrigan was in the stroke position in the stern of the Team USA Men’s Eight boat for tonight’s heat.

Paul Fuchs of Old Lyme, who is the Old Lyme Rowing Association’s Director of Rowing, explained how the repechage works, saying that a country must first qualify even to get into the Olympics. Then, he continued, “In the eights, they only have seven spots available and the United States qualified for one of those spots.”

Fuchs continued, “Those seven boats race in two Heats, one of three boats and one of four boats. Only one boat goes directly to the final from each of the Heats.” In the case of these Olympics, those boats are the winning boats of each Heat, Germany and The Netherlands.

The remaining five boats then go to a repechage, which, in Fuchs’s words, “… is essentially a second chance. That is a five-boat race and … four of those boats [will] go into the six-boat final.”

He concludes, “The US will row in that repechage trying be in the top four and [thus] get into the final.” The other two spots in the final have already been secured by Germany and The Netherlands. The US had a marginally faster time than The Netherlands in their respective heats, but the US did not win its heat.

The repechage will be held Wednesday, July 28, at 10:48 a.m. in Tokyo, which will be 9:48 p.m. EST on TUESDAY, July 27.

Editor’s Note: Fuchs holds the men’s lightweight course record for Head of the Charles, and competed on seven US World Championship teams. He has coached at the Olympic and World  championship levels and serves on the Executive Council of FISA, the international governing body for  the sport of rowing.

 

 

Old Lyme BOS Declared July 24 as ‘Austin Hack & Liam Corrigan Day’ in Honor of Our Hometown Olympic Heroes

Austin Hack

Liam Corrigan

OLD LYME — The Old Lyme Board of Selectmen declared  Saturday, July 24, as ‘Austin Hack & Liam Corrigan Day.’

Both Hack and Corrigan, who graduated from Lyme-Old Lyme High School in 2010 and 2015 respectively, are competing in the 2020 Olympic Games, which opened this morning in Tokyo.

Both are members of the US Men’s Eight team, which rows its first heat at 11 p.m. this evening, EST, which is 12 noon in Japan. This is a recent time change from the originally announced schedule — the 7:30 p.m. included in the proclamation below has now been superseded

The proclamation reads as follows:

GO AUSTIN AND LIAM!

GO TEAM USA!

 

July 22 COVID-19 Update: New Case in Old Lyme Takes Cumulative Total to 344, Lyme Holds at 112; Statewide Numbers Worse

This map, updated July 22, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone. Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.) Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper. Details in italics are the same for each of the maps included in this article.

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Thursday, July 22, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health  (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 21, shows that Old Lyme has reported one new confirmed COVID-19 case. This takes Old Lyme’s cumulative total of confirmed cases to 344, while Lyme’s holds steady at 112.

This same report issued Thursday, July 22 also includes the latest average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks (see map above) and shows further distressing results, reflecting national trends. The Hartford Courant reported July 21 that Connecticut’s COVID-19 positivity rate spikes again, reaching highest level in more than two months.

Two towns, Franklin and Salem, are now in the Red Zone (indicating the highest rate of COVID-19 new cases), which is up one from last week, and Andover remains in the (second highest rate) Orange Zone (down from two towns last week.)

Eight towns Yellow Zone (indicating the lowest but one rate of COVID-19 new cases), which is up from two last week. They are Clinton, East Hampton, Manchester, Newington, Stonington, Westbrook, Windsor and Windsor Locks.

In this most recent report, all the remaining 158 towns in Connecticut, including Lyme and Old Lyme, are in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone for two-week new case rates. It is the tenth week in succession for Old Lyme in that Zone, while Lyme is in the Gray Zone for an 18th straight week.

The Gray category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is less than five or less than five reported cases.
The Yellow category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between five and nine reported cases.
The Orange category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between 10 and 14.
The Red category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town exceeds 15.

In all cases, this rate does not include cases or tests among residents of nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.

The map below is from July 15, when one town, Franklin, was in the Red Zone (indicating the highest rate of COVID-19 new cases) and another two, Salem and Andover, were in the (second highest rate) Orange Zone. New Hartford and Griswold were in the Yellow Zone (indicating the lowest but one rate of COVID-19 new cases.)

This map, updated July 15, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

The map below is from July 8, when New Hartford was the sole town in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated July 8, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

The map below is from July 1, when Marlborough and Prospect were in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated July 1, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

The map below is from June 24, when Somers, Prospect and Bolton were in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated June 24, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

This is the June 17 map, when just one town, Bolton, was in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated June 17, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

For comparison, the map below is from June 3 and shows one town, Waterbury, in the Orange Zone and 21 towns in the Yellow Zone, down from 48 the previous week. The towns in the Yellow Zone were: Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Bloomfield, Brooklyn, Coventry, Cromwell, Derby, East Hartford, East Haven, Granby, Hamden, Hartford, Manchester, New Britain, New Haven, New London, Putnam, Rocky Hill, Shelton, Waterford and Windsor.

This map, updated June 3, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the previous two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

Below is the map from May 27 that showed one town in the Red Zone, Putnam, and 10 towns in the Orange Zone.

This map, updated May 27, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme were still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

Compare the maps above with the one we published Dec. 18, 2020 to see the remarkable progress that has been made with controlling the spread of the virus through expansion of vaccination rates and improved mitigation strategies.

Map of Connecticut dated Dec. 17, 2020 showing both Lyme and Old Lyme now in the CT DPH-identified ‘Red Zone.’ This is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is over 15.

In their final report dated July 9, Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) issued their latest weekly report of COVID data for the municipalities within their District. LLHD has announced this report will no longer be issued.

At that time, seven towns in the nine-town district (which includes Lyme and Old Lyme) reported less than five new cases in the past two weeks. Both Groton and New London reported six cases apiece. The previous week, all nine  towns reported less than five new cases in the past two weeks..

Ledge Light Director of Health Stephen Mansfield noted, “Information regarding vaccination opportunities and other relevant information can be found at https://llhd.org/coronavirus-covid-19-situation/covid-19-vaccine/

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/

Vaccination rates in Lyme and Old Lyme are also extremely encouraging with 81.95 percent of the population in Lyme having received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and the equivalent number for Old Lyme being 73.72 percent.

Percentages for the fully vaccinated are 78.54 for Lyme and 69.94 for Old Lyme.

These rates remain among the higher percentages in the state.

They’ve Started … the Olympics, that is! Old Lyme’s Hack, Corrigan Begin Their Quest for Gold TONIGHT!

Team USA marches proudly into the Olympic stadium in Tokyo earlier today. Old Lyme natives Austin Hack and Liam Corrigan are among them.

LYME/OLD LYME — The Opening Ceremony of the 2020 Olympic Games (not a typo, that’s what they are still being called!) has just ended and the Games themselves are now officially underway. Two athletes from Old Lyme were there at the Opening Ceremony and are now making final preparations to compete in the Games.

Barbara and Greg Hack stand alongside the Old Lyme Rowing Association’s boat named after their son, Austin, who competed in the 2016 Olympics in Rio and is now competing in the 2020 Olympics (being held in 2021) in Tokyo, Japan.

Austin Hack and Liam Corrigan, who graduated respectively in 2010 and 2015 from Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS), will both be rowing in the US Men’s Eight. Austin’s parents, Barbara and Greg, still live in Old Lyme and Brian Corrigan and Joan Rivington, Liam’s parents, moved last year from Old Lyme to Lyme.

Joan Rivington, Liam Corrigan’s mother, stands at right in this photo of OLRA crew members. Corrigan is the stroke in the US Men’s Eight competing in the Tokyo Olympics. From left to right are Sophie Marsh, Barbara Hallwood and Trish Lynch. Photo by Doug Turney.

In late-breaking news, Barbara Hack contacted us this morning to let us know there has been a change in the rowing schedule. The Men’s Eight was slated to start their quest for gold tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. EST but that has now been changed to today on EST.

Austin Hack

Liam Corrigan

Barbara said by email, “The schedule has been changed due to weather and the men’s 8+ will now be rowing TONIGHT in the heats.” She added that the new start time tonight is,  ““High noon” (as Austin put it) in Tokyo,” which is 11 p.m. EST, since Japan is 13 hours ahead of EST.

Asked last night how she was feeling on the eve of the Olympics, Barbara responded, “I’m feeling so many things right now!  Pride, of course, that Austin was chosen again to represent the US in the Olympics, [Austin was the stroke for the Men’s Eight in the 2016 Olympics held in Rio de Janeiro] and a little bit of nervousness knowing that their first race is right around the corner.”

She continued, “But mostly I’m excited!  It’s such a fantastic group of guys with a unique chemistry together.  They’ve put in the hard work under world-class coaches Mike Teti and Tim McLaren, and they have a lot of confidence in their speed.”

Concluding, “They are so ready to show the world what they can do, and I have every faith that they can accomplish their goal of a podium finish in the final!” Barbara ended with the wish we all share, “Go USA!!”

 

July 20 COVID-19 Update: New Confirmed Case in Each Town Takes Cumulative Totals to 112 in Lyme, 343 in Old Lyme

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

LYME/OLD LYME —The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Monday, July 19, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health  (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Sunday, July 18, shows that both Lyme and Old Lyme have reported one new confirmed COVID-19 case each.

This takes Old Lyme’s cumulative total of confirmed cases to 343, and Lyme’s to 112.

These numbers have just been updated in today’s report issued this afternoon (Tuesday, July 20) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Monday, July 19, and reflect the same numbers.

The Hartford Courant published the following article at 3:52 p.m. this (Tuesday) afternoon: Connecticut’s COVID-19 positivity rate spikes again, reaching highest level in more than two months, which opens, The state reported 218 new COVID-19 cases Tuesday out of 8,055 tests, for a positivity rate of 2.7% — highest on any day since May 11.

There is no change in the number of fatalities reported in either Lyme (0) or Old Lyme (3).

The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male. Details of the third, which was reported in 2021, have not been made available.

July 15 COVID Update: Two New Cases in Lyme Take Cumulative Total to 111, Old Lyme Holds at 342; Statewide Data Shows Increase in Cases

This map, updated July 15, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone. Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.) Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper. Details in italics are the same for each of the maps included in this article.

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Thursday, July 15, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health  (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 14, shows that Lyme has reported two new confirmed COVID-19 cases. This takes Lyme’s cumulative total of confirmed cases to 111, while Old Lyme’s holds steady at 342.

The report issued Thursday, July 15, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks (see map above) shows rather distressing results, somewhat reflecting the national situation.

One town, Franklin, has re-entered the Red Zone (indicating the highest rate of COVID-19 new cases) and another two, Salem and Andover, have re-entered the (second highest rate) Orange Zone.

New Hartford remains in the Yellow Zone (indicating the lowest but one rate of COVID-19 new cases) but has been joined by Griswold. Last week, the sole town in the Yellow Zone was New Hartford.

In this most recent report, all the remaining 163 towns in Connecticut, including Lyme and Old Lyme, are in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone for two-week new case rates. It is the ninth week in succession for Old Lyme in that Zone, while Lyme is in the Gray Zone for a 17th straight week.

The Gray category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is less than five or less than five reported cases.
The Yellow category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between five and nine reported cases.
The Orange category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between 10 and 14.
The Red category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town exceeds 15.

In all cases, this rate does not include cases or tests among residents of nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.

The map below is from July 8, when New Hartford was the sole town in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated July 8, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

The map below is from July 1, when Marlborough and Prospect were in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated July 1, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

The map below is from June 24, when Somers, Prospect and Bolton were in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated June 24, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

This is the June 17 map, when just one town, Bolton, was in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated June 17, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

For comparison, the map below is from June 3 and shows one town, Waterbury, in the Orange Zone and 21 towns in the Yellow Zone, down from 48 the previous week. The towns in the Yellow Zone were: Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Bloomfield, Brooklyn, Coventry, Cromwell, Derby, East Hartford, East Haven, Granby, Hamden, Hartford, Manchester, New Britain, New Haven, New London, Putnam, Rocky Hill, Shelton, Waterford and Windsor.

This map, updated June 3, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the previous two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

Below is the map from May 27 that showed one town in the Red Zone, Putnam, and 10 towns in the Orange Zone.

This map, updated May 27, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme were still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

Compare the maps above with the one we published Dec. 18, 2020 to see the remarkable progress that has been made with controlling the spread of the virus through expansion of vaccination rates and improved mitigation strategies.

Map of Connecticut dated Dec. 17, 2020 showing both Lyme and Old Lyme now in the CT DPH-identified ‘Red Zone.’ This is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is over 15.

In their final report dated July 9, Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) issued their latest weekly report of COVID data for the municipalities within their District. LLHD has announced this report will no longer be issued.

Seven towns in the nine-town district (which includes Lyme and Old Lyme) now report less than five new cases in the past two weeks. Both Groton and New London reported six cases apiece. Last week, all nine  towns reported less than five new cases in the past two weeks..

Ledge Light Director of Health Stephen Mansfield prefaces the report with the comment, “We are happy to see low numbers throughout our jurisdiction, and encourage everyone to get vaccinated!”

He adds, “Information regarding vaccination opportunities and other relevant information can be found at https://llhd.org/coronavirus-covid-19-situation/covid-19-vaccine/

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/

Vaccination rates in Lyme and Old Lyme are also extremely encouraging with 81.65 percent of the population in Lyme having received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and the equivalent number for Old Lyme being 73.56 percent.

Percentages for the fully vaccinated are 78.2 for Lyme and 69.55 for Old Lyme.

These rates remain among the higher percentages in the state.

UPDATED: Lyme Selectmen Approve Equality Resolution

LYME — Latest Comment Posted 7/16: UPDATED 7/12, 11:30pm, with Lyme Selectman’s comments (in red): According to the published minutes of the Lyme Board of Selectmen’s (BOS) meeting held Tuesday, July 6, the board approved a motion to adopt, “a Resolution supporting equality.”

The Lyme Sustainability Committee had proposed adoption of the Resolution, “both for its affirmative value along with the points awarded for such a resolution adoption as the committee moves forward to gaining state recognition as a Sustainable Community.”

Selectman John Kiker (D) proposed the motion and Selectman Parker Lord (R) seconded it.

Asked by email how he felt about the Lyme BOS approving the Resolution, Selectman Kiker responded, “The resolution is a public reaffirmation of the Town’s longstanding policies and values, which moves us closer to our goal of becoming a SustainableCT community.”

He continued, “Lyme has long had policies in place prohibiting discrimination of any kind, and strives to live up to the promise of those policies,” concluding, “Lyme is a welcoming, inclusive community that believes in the founding American principle that all people are created equal.”

The following is the full text of the Resolution that was passed:

RESOLUTION SUPPORTING EQUALITY FOR ALL 

WHEREAS, racism and racial prejudice have been a part of our nations long history; and 

WHEREAS, racism causes persistent discrimination and disparate outcomes in many areas of life, including housing, education, employment, health status and criminal justice; and 

WHEREAS, our nation was founded on the principal that All Men (and Women) Are Created Equal; and 

WHEREAS, discrimination against any group of people is contrary to our belief in, and our value of, equality; and 

WHEREAS, discrimination in any form carries a social and economic cost; and 

WHEREAS, Lyme considers itself a welcoming and inclusive community

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Board of the Selectmen of the Town of Lyme hereby

Reaffirms our value and belief that All People are Created Equal

Disavows any words or actions that would discriminate against any group of people, including, but not limited to, discrimination based upon race, religion, ancestry, gender, sexual orientation or identity, disability, or economic status

Declares that the Town and its government will act in ways to prevent and remove discrimination and will not accept discrimination in any form from its employees and volunteers

Supports efforts in the community and schools that will educate on issues of equality

Supports efforts to reduce economic inequality in the Town of Lyme.

Editor’s Note: More to follow on this developing story.

Lymes’ Senior Center Building Committee Meets This Evening in Old Lyme; All Welcome, Remote Access Offered

OLD LYME — The Lymes’ Senior Center Building Committee will host a meeting this evening, Wednesday, July 14, at 5 p.m. at the Senior Center on Town Woods Rd.

The public is welcome to attend and, if remote access via Zoom is required, email John Kiker at johnkiker@gmail.com for the link information.

Th agenda for the meeting can be viewed at this link.