April 5, 2020

Lyme, Old Lyme Churches Offer Online Services for Palm Sunday

LYME/OLD LYME — In light of the COVID-19 outbreak and in order to comply with the Governor’s Executive Order requiring no public gatherings of more than five people, the churches in Lyme and Old Lyme are again planning online services for this Palm Sunday weekend.

Christ The King added a livestream version of their 5 p.m. mass last Saturday and will be continuing that practice going forward. Christ The King is also livestreaming daily masses at 12 p.m.

Details of this weekends services are as follows:

Christ The King Church:

To view the live stream of the 5 p.m. mass on Saturday, join a Zoom Meeting at:

Meeting ID: 223 857 915
Password: 634317

and for the 10:30 a.m. mass on Sunday, join a Zoom Meeting at:

https://zoom.us/j/225302077?pwd=M2RQZWhIVnlINmFNSXdBTTl6a3k1dz09

Meeting ID: 225 302 077
Password: 364282

A new link for Daily Masses will be posted as soon as it’s available.

First Congregational Church of Old Lyme:

Here is the link for today’s Palm Sunday service. 
View an update from Senior Associate Minister Laura Fitzpatrick-Nager at this link.

First Congregational Church of Lyme:

Email Pastor Susan Olson at pastorsusanolson@gmail.com or Emily Bjornberg for the URL to view the Sunday, April 5 online service, which will also be streamed onto Facebook live at: https://www.facebook.com/lymechurchct

Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church:

Online services are available at this link.

South Lyme Union Chapel:

Worship services are cancelled until further notice.

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Register Now for ‘Race Against Hunger Virtual 5K’ to Benefit Connecticut Food Bank

WALLINGFORD/OLD LYME/LYME — Connecticut Food Bank and JB Sports are teaming up to host a virtual 5K to help feed Connecticut residents struggling with hunger during this critical time. The Race Against Hunger Virtual 5K will run from April 13 through April 19 and is presented by Stop & Shop.

Event proceeds will help Connecticut Food Bank as it faces increased operational costs to source, transport, and distribute food. In recent weeks, demand for food across Connecticut Food Bank’s network of 600 partners and programs has grown due to job losses and to increased need to have food on hand to sustain households that may need to shelter in place for extended periods.

Race Against Hunger is a virtual event perfectly suited for a time when people are encouraged to avoid crowded public settings. Participants can register and run or walk at any time between April 13 and April 19 at a location of their choosing. Participants complete their run or walk and send in their results and the event coordinator will compile a results database. 

Participants of Race Against Hunger may register any time before April 19 and run at any point between April 13 and April 19. JB Sports and Connecticut Food Bank ask participants to follow current health recommendations and avoid running or walking closer than six feet from anyone during their virtual run or walk.  

“The COVID-19 pandemic has created unprecedented economic challenges for our communities,” said Beverly Catchpole, Senior Director of Development for Connecticut Food Bank. “We invite people to join our virtual 5K and help us continue to meet the growing need among our neighbors.”

Race Against Hunger is organized by Connecticut Food Bank and JB Sports.

“As we try to navigate through the challenges that coronavirus has brought to our lives, it is more important now than ever that we work together to help our neighbors whose lives have been impacted,” said Rudy DiPietro, Senior Vice President of Sales & Operations at Stop & Shop. “We are proud to be teaming up with Connecticut Food Bank in the Race Against Hunger to ensure all of our neighbors have access to food and nourishment.”

JB Sports, one of the top event management companies in Connecticut, also coordinates the Faxon Law New Haven Road Race and PLR Shamrock & Roll 5K.

Race Against Hunger is presented by Stop & Shop, with additional support from Webster Bank, Prudential, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield, ConnectiCare, IRIS, Barrett Outdoor Communications, 99.1PLR, Star 99.9, WEBE 108, WICC 600, 95.9 The FOX and 94.3 WYBC.

To learn more about Race Against Hunger, visit www.jbsports.com or email kaitlin@jbsports.com

Editor’s Notes:
i) Connecticut Food Bank is committed to alleviating hunger in Connecticut by providing food resources, raising awareness of the challenges of hunger, and advocating for people who need help meeting basic needs. Connecticut Food Bank partners with the food industry, food growers, donors, and volunteers to distribute nutritious food to people in need. The Connecticut Food Bank distributes food through a network of 600 partners and programs in Fairfield, Litchfield, Middlesex, New Haven, New London, and Windham counties – where nearly 270,000 people struggle with hunger. Last year, Connecticut Food Bank distributed food to help provide 22.5 million meals. Visit us on the web at www.ctfoodbank.org, like us on Facebook and follow @CTFoodBank on Twitter and Instagram

ii) A neighborhood grocer for more than 100 years, today’s Stop & Shop is refreshed, reenergized and inspired, delivering new conveniences for customers. Committed to helping its communities enjoy better food and better lives, Stop & Shop has a longstanding history of giving back to the neighborhoods it serves with a focus on fighting hunger and helping children to enjoy a healthy lifestyle. The Stop & Shop Supermarket Company LLC is an Ahold Delhaize USA Company and employs nearly 60,000 associates and operates over 400 stores throughout Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York and New Jersey. To learn more about Stop & Shop, visit www.stopandshop.com

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Lyme, Old Lyme Leaders, Emergency Services Urge Residents, Visitors to ‘Stay Safe, Stay Home’

LYME/OLD LYME — The boards of selectmen of both Lyme and Old Lyme and their respective Emergency Management Services are urging ALL RESIDENTS OF LYME AND OLD LYME AND ALL VISITORS TO OUR TOWNS to follow the guidelines from both the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the State of Connecticut.

The Lyme Board of Selectmen state in their most recent Public Health Update, “The main public health goal going forward continues to be slowing the spread of the virus.  The best way to do that is to practice social distancing and to follow the other public health recommendations that have been issued. ”

They continue, “We must all take our public health experts’ advice to heart and limit any unnecessary person-to-person contact until further notice.  These efforts are essential to help reduce the spread of the virus and limit the number of people who may become infected.”

Old Lyme Emergency Services Director David Roberge spoke to LymeLine by phone yesterday and had the same message, saying, “People must follow the CDC Guidelines and practice social distancing, wash hands frequently, and stay home whenever possible, especially when you feel unwell.”  He added that people should cover their nose and mouth with a disposable tissue or  elbow when they cough or sneeze and not touch eyes, nose, or mouth if your hands are not clean.

The consistent advice from both towns is, in the words of the Governor, “Stay Safe, Stay Home.”

 

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Saint Ann’s Offers Online Link to This Morning’s Service

Saint Ann’s Church, Old Lyme

OLD LYME — In keeping with Coronavirus restrictions on public gatherings, Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church of Old Lyme  is offering an online service this morning. This practice will continue until restrictions are lifted.

Readers can view it at this link.

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First Congregational Church of Old Lyme Offers Online Version of This Morning’s Service

The First Congregational Church of Old Lyme..

OLD LYME — The First Congregational Church of Old Lyme is practicing social-distancing measures as required by state mandate to limit the spread of the Coronavirus and so is holding its Sunday worship services online for as long as necessary.

Watch this morning’s service at this link and/or read a written version of the sermon titled, “Chaos & Trust: Learning To Walk in the Time of Corona” at this link.

To see the Order of Worship for the service, visit this link.

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No Church? No Problem … Christ The King Plans to Livestream This Morning’s 10:30am Mass

Chrict the King Church in Old Lyme will live stream its 10:30 a.m. Mass Sunday morning.

OLD LYME — An Executive Order from Governor Lamont aimed at preventing the spread of Coronavirus is stopping the parishioners of Christ the King Church from gathering in their church in Old Lyme this Sunday morning (March 22) to celebrate mass. Undeterred, church members have come up with a novel way to enable all worshippers to celebrate mass together in their separate locations.

Father Joe and Father Walter will concelebrate mass Sunday morning at 10:30 a.m. and the service will be livestreamed via the Zoom app. Music will be provided live by Christ the King Music Directot Bill Thomas from his home.

Parishioners can log on from their homes to watch, listen, and participate using a computer, tablet or smartphone. The free Zoom app must be downloaded first and then the following information used to log into the mass:

Zoom Meeting: https://zoom.us/j/620789800?pwd=bUpEZmRSdWNpeFRBSXZmSW5RZWtoZz09
Meeting ID: 620 789 800
Password: 078561

As this is the first time an attempt has been made to livestream a mass at Christ the King, patience is respectfully requested if any glitches should occur.

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Closures & Cancellations: Latest News

We are being inundated with closures and cancellations, and so will run all the new ones together in this post and then prepare a summary at the end of the day.

Ivoryton Playhouse: Opening of Forbidden Broadway Comes to Ivoryton scheduled for Wednesday, March 18, has been postponed.

Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, “The Kate”: All performances through April 30 are postponed.

South Lyme Union Chapel: Lenten Soup Night, scheduled for Monday, March 16, from 5 to 7 p.m. is cancelled

SECWAC (Southeast Connecticut World Affairs Council): March 20 and 26 programs cancelled.

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Mystic Seaport Museum to Close Temporarily Through End of Month

Photo by Mystic Seaport. The Charles W. Morgan in full sail.

MYSTIC, CT(Press Release) Mystic Seaport Museum announced today it is temporarily closing to the public beginning tomorrow, March 13, to support the State of Connecticut’s efforts to stem the outbreak of COVID-19. All programs, classes, and events during that period are also cancelled. The Museum anticipates reopening March 30, subject to further evaluation of the situation.

Steve White, president of the Museum, stated: “Out of an abundance of caution we are taking this preemptive move to close to the public to protect the health of our community and of our employees and volunteers. We have been following the precautionary measures recommended by federal and local health authorities to ensure the cleanest environment possible. While we do not know of any exposure to COVID-19 connected with the Museum, we believe a temporary closure is the proper course of action in line with Gov. Ned Lamont’s request to minimize public gatherings and encourage employees to work from home to help stop the spread of this deadly virus. We look forward to welcoming visitors back to the Museum at the conclusion of this period.”

Individuals or groups with program reservations during this time will be contacted to reschedule or process refunds.

The Museum is implementing its emergency operations protocol, and will continue to monitor the situation and take appropriate additional action as necessary.

Editor’s Note: Mystic Seaport Museum, founded in 1929, is the nation’s leading maritime museum. In addition to providing a multitude of immersive experiences, the Museum also houses a collection of more than two million artifacts that include more than 500 historic vessels and one of the largest collections of maritime photography. Mystic Seaport Museum is located one mile south of Exit 90 off I-95 in Mystic, CT. For more information, please visit www.mysticseaport.org and follow Mystic Seaport Museum on FacebookTwitterYouTube, and Instagram.

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First CT Resident Testing Positive for Coronavirus Lives in Wilton

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

WILTON, CT — At 1 p.m. Sunday afternoon, Gov. Ned Lamont announced that the Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) State Laboratory has confirmed the first presumptive positive case of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) involving a Connecticut resident. The patient is a resident of Wilton who is 40-50 years of age, who according to the governor, most likely became infected with the virus that causes COVID-19  during …

Read the full story by Heather Borden Herve and published this afternoon on Good Morning Wilton at this link.

Good Morning Wilton is a fellow member of Local Independent Online News (LION) publishers.

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Connecticut Launches Coronavirus Infoline for General Questions From the Public

Regularly and thoroughly cleaning your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or washing them with soap and water is one of the most important ways of reducing your chances of being infected or spreading COVID-19. Photo by Allie Smith on Unsplash.

Connecticut Residents Can Call 2-1-1 or text CTCOVID to 898211

HARTFORD, CT – (Press release) Governor Ned Lamont announced yesterday (March 7) that the State of Connecticut is partnering with United Way of Connecticut to launch an information hotline for questions from the public regarding issues related to the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19). People who have questions can call 2-1-1 or text “CTCOVID” to 898211.

Answers to many of the questions people may have can already be found by visiting the state’s coronavirus information website at ct.gov/coronavirus. People are encouraged to review that website for answers to their questions first before calling the hotline.

This information hotline is only intended to be used by individuals who are not experiencing symptoms but may have general questions related to COVID-19. Anyone experiencing symptoms is strongly urged to contact their medical provider to seek treatment.

“We understand people have specific questions but we want to stress that this call center is only intended for general information. Anyone looking for specific medical advice regarding symptoms they may be experiencing is strongly urged to seek medical treatment,” Governor Lamont said.

The 2-1-1 hotline is available 24 hours a day. Multilingual assistance and TDD/TTY access for those with a hearing impairment is also available.

Editor’s Note: The World Health Organization (WHO) has a section of its website titled Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak where you can find information and guidance from WHO regarding the current outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) that was first reported from Wuhan, China, on 31 December 2019. The WHO suggests readers should visit the section for daily updates.

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A la Carte: The Irrestible Magic of Maple-Apple Blondies

Wow, three days of watching movies at The Garde:- The Farewell (wonderful) and Jojo Rabbit (which I was wary of seeing but, at the end, fell in love with it).  Then I saw Bombshell, but I liked the television adaptation about Roger Ailes/Fox better (The Loudest Voice). The Showtime movie made Russell Crowe (as Ailes) even more of an animal.

It was a busy week, but I found time to get to Shop-Rite and bought a rotisserie chicken, lots of vegetables (two big heads of cauliflower, which I cut into florets to parboil and freeze), green grapes, bananas and apples, along with pork cutlets and hot Italian sausage. When I got home, I wanted something sweet, so I made these blondies, below.

I tasted just one and will take the rest to a meeting. Nothing decadent is left in the house, except four pints of Haagen Dazs and Ben & Jerry’s.

Maple-Apple Blondies

From 100 Best Apple Recipes (Better Homes & Gardens, Meredith Co., 2019)

Yield: 36 bars

Nonstick cooking spray
¾ cup butter
2 medium apples, peeled, cored and chopped (about 1 and ¾ cups)
1 cup packed light brown sugar
½ cup granulated sugar
½ cup pure maple syrup
2 eggs
2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon baking soda
1 recipe for maple icing

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a 13- by 9-inch pan with foil, extending the foil over edges. Lightly coat foil with cooking spray. In a medium saucepan, melt 1 tablespoon of the butter over medium heat. Add apples and cook about 12 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally. Remove apples from saucepan and set aside.

In the same saucepan, melt remaining butter over medium heat. Remove from heat and stir in both sugars and maple syrup until smooth. Stir in eggs and vanilla until combined. Stir in flour, baking powder, salt and baking soda. Stir in cooked apples. Spread batter in prepared pan.

Bake 25 to 30 minutes or until evenly browned and edges are puffed. Cool in pan on a wire rack. Spread maple icing over bars. Let stand until icing is set. Use edges of foil to lift uncut bars out of pan. Cut into 36 bars. 

Maple Icing

In a small bowl, stir together 2 cups powdered sugar, ¼ cup maple syrup and 2 tablespoons melted butter. Stir in enough milk (about 2 tablespoons) to make a thin spreading consistency.

About the author: Lee White has been writing about restaurants and cooking since 1976 and has been extensively published in the Worcester (Mass.) Magazine, The Day, Norwich Bulletin, and Hartford Courant.  She currently writes a cooking column called A La Carte for LymeLine.com and also for the Shore Publishing and Times newspapers, both of which are owned by The Day. 

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Save The Date for East Lyme’s 2020 ‘Touch-a-Truck,’ May 16

Touch A Truck is for one and all, big and small.
Spend some time with us, have yourselves a ball.

EAST LYME — On Saturday, May 16, the Thames West Auxiliary of Child and Family Agency of Southeastern Connecticut and the East Lyme Parks & Recreation Department will co-sponsor the 13th Annual Touch A Truck. This family event will take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at McCook Point Park in Niantic, Conn., with a rain date of Sunday, May 17.

Fire engines, food, and face painting will all be on offer! This year, the event celebrates Armed Forces Day (May 16) with an emphasis on vehicles from the National Guard, Submarine Base, and Coast Guard. In addition, music performances in the Band Pavilion will feature patriotic music.

The main event is, of course, trucks! Children will be able to climb, steer, blow horns, and just imagine in a wonderful array of trucks. This unique event will feature vehicles from the military, law enforcement, fire departments, commercial companies, and industrial companies.

In addition, Roaming Railroad will provide tours around the park. Six Food Trucks will return to provide an array of food choices for snacks and lunch. Also, the Rotary Club of Niantic will be on hand to present Amber Alert, a program allowing parents to take steps to safeguard their children. There will also be face-painting, hair-beading, games, and crafts. 

The suggested donation is $5 per person (age 2 and up) to benefit the Child and Family Agency (CFA) of Southeastern CT, Inc., a private non-profit that has been working to support children and families for over 200 years. CFA provides a continuum of care beginning with early childhood development centers, outpatient and home-based behavioral health services, as well as school-based health centers and after-school programming. Last year CFA served over 10,000 children and families in over 40 Connecticut communities.

Visit the CFA website to learn more about the Agency, to volunteer, or to donate.

To learn more about Touch A Truck 2020 or to register a vehicle, visit the CFA website, their Facebook page ‘Touch A Truck East Lyme, CT’ or call Child & Family Agency at 860-443-2896, Ext. 1407.

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‘Survivors of Suicide Loss’ Meet 1st, 3rd Thursdays at LYSB in Old Lyme

OLD LYME — The Brian Dagle Foundation hosts Survivors of Suicide Loss  tomorrow, Thursday, Feb. 6, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau building, 59 Lyme St., Old Lyme. The group meets on the first and third Thursday of each month at the same location.

This group of survivors offer support, healing, and hope so that together they can survive their loss. The group provides an atmosphere of acceptance for exploring feelings that are often not understood by others. It offers a chance to share helpful resources and to provide and receive support through the long grief process.

All are welcome and admission is free. Call Ann Irr Dagle to register at 860-625-5280 or email her at bdtmemorialfoundation@gmail.com

This group is led by an American Foundation of Suicide Prevention trained facilitator, who is also a survivor of suicide loss.For more information, visit the Brian Dagle Foundation’s website.

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Are You Eligible for Earned Income Tax Credit? Find Out With Free Tax Help From VITA

HARTFORD/ LYME-OLD LYME — Workers may get a larger tax refund this year because of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). But to get it, you must file a tax return and claim it.

This year, IRS is promoting EITC and providing information on other refundable tax credits for which you may be eligible. This includes the Child Tax Credit (CTC), the Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC), the Credit for Other Dependents (ODC) and the American Opportunity Tax Credit (AOTC).

If your 2019 income is up to $56,000, the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program in Connecticut provides free tax preparation services, including filing for the EITC and other credits for individuals and families with 2019 incomes up to $56,000, persons with disabilities and limited-English-speaking taxpayers. Appointments at VITA locations across the state are now open.

The Village for Families & ChildrenUnited Way of Central and Northeastern ConnecticutHuman Resources Agency of New Britain and the Connecticut Association for Human Services have opened tax filing sites in Litchfield, Hartford, Tolland, Windham, Fairfield, New Haven, Middlesex and New London Counties.

To schedule an appointment at a VITA location, visit 211CT.org and click on “Tax Help” or dial 2-1-1 and press 3 then 6.

Experienced VITA volunteers are ready to help you with tax preparation in numerous locations across Connecticut. File photo.

VITA volunteers – trained by the Internal Revenue Service – ask you the needed questions to find out if you qualify for EITC and other refundable tax credits. They also prepare and e-file (electronically file) your tax return at no cost to you.

“Our community volunteers help you get EITC and the maximum refund you’re due. Our goal is to help you get it and get it right. This is money you can save or use to pay off bills, buy that car to get to work or make a down payment on a home. Let us help make your life a little easier,“ said Laura O’Keefe, director of family financial stability at The Village for Families and Children.

EITC can mean up to a $6,431 refund when you file a return if you have qualifying children. Workers without a qualifying child could be eligible for a smaller credit up to $519. According to the Internal Revenue Service, the average amount credited for 2019 was $2,476.

In 2019, 25 million workers received more than $63 billion in EITC refunds. In Connecticut, 216,000 workers received $485 million in Earned Income Tax Credits, averaging $2,243 per person.

The IRS estimates four of five eligible taxpayers claim and get the EITC. EITC and other income tax credits lifted an estimated 9 million people out of poverty last year, including 5 million or more than half of them children. (Source: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Policy Basics: The Earned Income Tax Credit, June 21, 2019)

Bring the following to make sure VITA volunteers get you the right amount of credit you deserve:

  • A valid driver’s license or other photo id card
  • Social security cards, a social security number verification letter for all persons listed on the return
  • Birth dates for all persons listed on return
  • All income statements: Forms W-2 and 1099, Social Security, unemployment, and other statements, such as pensions, stocks, interest and any documents showing taxes withheld
  • All records of expenses, such as tuition, mortgage interest, or real estate taxes
  • Copies of last year’s state and federal tax returns, if you have
  • Bank routing numbers and account numbers to direct deposit any refund
  • Dependent child care information: name and address of who you paid and either the caretaker’s SSN or other tax identification number
  • If you purchased coverage through the Health Insurance MarketplaceForm 1095-A, Health Insurance Marketplace Statement
  • Both spouses to sign forms to e-file a joint tax return

In addition to face-to-face tax assistance, free online self-preparation and tax help is available for people who make up to $66,000 at www.myfreetaxes.com.

For more than a decade, VITA coalitions have been helping working families become financially secure. Free tax preparation is one way for hard-working families to keep more money in their wallets by obtaining the tax refunds and credits they have earned.

Last year, volunteers at 175 VITA locations across Connecticut brought $73,222.366.00 in total refunds and credits to filers.

The 2019-2020 VITA and MyFreeTaxes program partners are: CT Association for Human Services; Human Resources Agency of New Britain; Internal Revenue Service; The Village for Families & Children; and Connecticut United Ways.

Editor’s Note: This article is taken from a Press Release. For further information, contact one of the following:
Laura O’Keefe, Director of Family Financial Stability, The Village for Families & Childrenlokeefe@thevillage.org, 860-236-4511 ext. 3836
Maura Cook, Director of Community Engagement and Marketing, United Way of Central and Northeastern CTmcook@unitedwayinc.org; 860-493-1131
Juan Berrios, Community and Financial Services Program Manager, HRA of New Britainjberrios@hranbct.org; 860-225-8601
Takima Robinson, VITA/Asset Building Program Manager, CT Association for Human Servicestrobinson@cahs.org, 860-951-2212 x229

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Facts & Figures from Old Lyme EMS; Falls Dominate List of Reasons for Ambulance Call-Outs

You’ve seen their ambulances around town but do you know how many calls they respond to in a month?

OLD LYME — The Old Lyme EMS Ambulance Service responded to 74 calls in November 2019 and 70 in December 2019.

CATEGORYNOVEMBER 2020DECEMBER 2020
Falls815
Injury/Trauma20
Diabetic10
Breathing Issues 56
Abdominal pain22
Chest Pain33
Cardiac Arrest03
Stroke/CVA00
Altered Mental Status04
Traffic accident/MVA1610
Medical Device - alarm61
Hazardous Material (Fumes, etc.)00
Stand-by (Fire, etc.)31
Lift Assistance00
Fire - EMS for patients/firemen21
Cold exposure00
Convulsion/Seizure21
Unconscious/Fainting33
Allergic Reaction00
Overdose11
Psychiatric/Behavioral Health74
Pain/Sick912
Other43
TOTAL7470

Following Up On Falls — Why They Happen, How to Avoid Them, What to Do If they Happen

Falls came in as the number one reason for ambulance call-outs in December and number two in November.

Falls can be caused by a myriad of reasons including falling out of a bed, off of a ladder, or down stairs; or slipping on a wet floor, snow/ice, or toys; or a medical reasonsuch as a changed or new medication resulting in a loss of balance.

If you have a walking frame, always use it to avoid falls.

Many falls are preventable if people would simply take a second to ask themselves if they should take the risk of going up the ladder, or call someone to help instead. Similarly, taking a few steps without a walker or cane when you normally use one, or making a snap decision to run out and get the mail in the snow without putting on the proper boots to avoid a slip can have disastrous consequences.

The amount of time it takes to think about a quick action like those mentioned is much shorter than the time it will taketo recover from an injury. Ask yourself if the risk is worth it or would it better to wait?

Although falls happen at any age, records show that 32,000 seniors fall each year causing detrimental injuries to themselves. With aging bodies, these injuries can be both life-altering and extremely costly to treat.

Whatever the injury, when you call 911, you can be assured that Old Lyme EMT’s (Emergency Medical Technician) and EMR’s (Emergency Medical Responders) are trained to the National Education Standards. Moreover, every EMT or EMR in the United States is trained to the exact same level by means of monthly mandatory and elective training sessions. (Our training will be the subject of another article.)

After a fall, if you are in a safe place, it is best not to move. Emergency Medical Service providers will evaluate the mechanism of injury, including

  • CMS (Circulatory, Motor and Sensory)-evaluation
  • obtaining vital signs to rule out any possible medical reasons for the fall
  • asking the patient or witness(es) full details of the fall/injury, recent pertinent medical issues and medication list.

Another way to avoid falls is to use the facilities provided by stores andbusinesses to assist you.

Once on the scene, it should take about 10 minutes in total to evaluate the reason for fall, take vitals, and stabilize any injuries for transport.

There may be times when a patient has hit his/her head and experienced a severe injury or bleed. This is when the 911 dispatcher will also send a paramedic to the scene — typically a paramedic from the Middlesex Health Medical Center in Westbrook.

Emergency Medical Technicians and EMR’s make up the body of a volunteer ambulance organization for BLS (Basic Life Support) whereas Paramedics provide ALS (Advanced Life Support.)

The paramedic will perform an advanced evaluation. Paramedics are ‘advanced’ EMT’s, who are able to run an EKG, intubate the airway, start an IV, administer medications, and more.

If paramedics find it necessary to stay with the patient for advanced care and transport with the EMT/EMR’s, they take over the care of the patient supported by BLS assistance frm the EMT/EMR’s.

An Important Reminder About ‘Lift Assists’

There may be a time when a patient has fallen and — whether elderly or not — is unable to get up. Under those circumstances, you can call 911 and request a ‘Lift Assist.’ An ambulance crew will respond to the scene, evaluate the patient’s vitals and ensure the patient is stable other than needing to be assisted and helped to their requested place, e.g. bed, chair, wheelchair.

There is no charge for this assistance — it is a community service. In the event additional manpower is required, 911 dispatchers will put out a call requesting additional EMS crew and/or volunteer firemen.

After evaluating a patient, if it is felt that the patient requires more than just a ‘Lift Assist,’ transportation will be provided.

If you have an interest in joining OLEMS to receive training as an EMR or EMT, call 860-434-0089 or stop by the Cross Lane Fire/EMS building Monday through Friday from 6 a.m.to 5 p.m. for more information. (The office will be manned unless the day crew is out on a call.)

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Start the New Year with a Twist … of Yoga! Classes at Saint Ann’s Thursday Mornings, All Welcome

OLD LYME — Yoga With A Twist is an all-level gentle Yoga Class. It is appropriate for first-time yoga students and those who are more experienced. The class will include breath work, stretching and moving with the combined objectives of strengthening the body, and improving balance and overall well-being.  Chairs will be available for those who do not want to practice on the mat.   

The instructor is Deb Novack, who believes that Yoga is for everyone and no matter what your limitations are, you will feel an improvement the first time you come to class. Dhe is a Hatha-style Yoga Teacher, who incorporates meditation, breathing techniques, restorative and yin poses and shapes, into her teahing.  

Novack is excited about, and experienced in, introducing new people to the healing modality of Yoga and meditation.

Class will be held at Saint Ann’s Church, 82 Shore Rd., Old Lyme, Conn. in the Griswold Room on Thursdays from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. beginning on Jan. 9.  Bring a Yoga mat and any props you like working with (e.g., blocks, straps, blankets, etc.). Chairs will be available for use.

This is a community event and all are welcome.

The suggested donation is $10 and no reservation is required.  

Contact Deb Novack with any questions at debnovack1@yahoo.com or contact the Parish Office at Saint Ann’s #860-434-1621.

Saint Ann’s is an Episcopal parish in Old Lyme, which is under the direction of the Provisional Priest-in-Charge, the Rev. Dr. Anita L. Schell. Saint Ann’s is located at 82 Shore Road (Rt. 156), two miles off I95, Exit 70. Convenient parking is adjacent to the church and the Sanctuary has ADA access. For more information, visit www.saintannsoldlyme.org .

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Upcoming Events at Lyme Public Library Through March

LYME — The following programs, which are scheduled at Lyme Public Library, 482 Hamburg Rd, are free and open to all at. Registration at 860-434-2272 is appreciated.

Lyme Library Cookbook Club: The Hungry Fan’s Game Day Cookbook
Saturday, Jan. 11
1 p.m.

Just in time for the NFL Playoffs. Choose a recipe from this cookbook or share one of your own favorites.  The Cookbook Club will meet again Feb. 8, and March 14.

Backyard Birding with the CT Audubon Society Roger Tory Peterson Estuary Center
Saturday, Jan. 18
2 p.m.

Fine tune bird-watching and identifying skills. If time and weather permit, attendees may go outside. Bring your binoculars.

Beyond Bicept: The Real Story of Rosie the Riveter, presented by Dr. Amanda Goodheart Parks
Saturday, Jan. 25
2 p.m.

Trace the journey from propaganda poster to feminist icon.

Prudence Allen: Secretary to Coretta Scott King. Sharing Stories of Time Spent with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr and his Family
Saturday, Feb. 15
2 p.m.

Raised in Connecticut, Prudence Allen supported equal rights for all, marched in civil rights marches in the 1960s, and joined Dr King and his family. She will share memories and stories of her time.

Endre (Andy) Sarkany, Childhood Survivor of the Holocaust
Tuesday, March 24
7 p.m.

Sarkany speaks to students about his personal experiences during the Holocaust, living under the brutality of the Soviet regime in Hungary, and finding a home in the United States.

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A View from My Porch: The Second Renaissance of Miss ElizabethTashjian (Connecticut’s “Nut Lady”)

Editor’s Note: We are delighted to welcome a new columnist to our LymeLine family today. Tom Gotowka will write an occasional piece under the title, “A View From My Porch,” and we are going to let him introduce both his column and himself in his own words.  We hope you enjoy Tom’s offerings — as always, let us know your thoughts!

Author’s Note: “A View from My Porch” is a new column that will cover a range of subjects that I believe will be of community interest. It might be literature and the arts, an event, or even something to do with healthcare. I may occasionally stray into a political issue, but this column will not be partisan political (Other publications have that more than covered.) In reality, all I see from my porch is my wife’s studio, a red barn, a network of beautiful gardens, and a salt marsh, but, of course, “a view” is so much more than what one actually sees.

To give you a sense of the experiences that “qualify” me to write this column, my entire adult career has been in healthcare. I’ll sit on the Navy side at the Army/Navy football game. I always sit on the crimson side at any Harvard/Yale contest. I enjoy reading historic speeches and consider myself a scholar of the period from FDR through JFK. A child of AM Radio, I probably know the lyrics of every rock and roll or folk song published since 1960.

My first few columns will take a fresh look at some of Old Lyme’s cultural and historic icons. As such, this first essay is titled “The Second Renaissance of Miss ElizabethTashjian”. The second column covers Naval hero Ezra Lee.

Eliazabeth Tashjian appeared several times on ‘The Tonight Show’ with Johnny Carson.

The Second Renaissance of Miss ElizabethTashjian (Connecticut’s “Nut Lady”)

Connecticut College’s exhibition, “Revisiting the Nut Museum: Visionary Art of Elizabeth Tashjian,” has just closed. I posit that this gallery display of her paintings, drawings, and sculptures, together with the recent Florence Griswold Museum Samuel Thorne Memorial Lecture by Professor Christopher Steiner, “Performing the Nut Museum,” represent the culminating events in this “second Renaissance.” Let me walk you through the facts that led me to this conclusion.

I was introduced to Elizabeth Tashjian more than a quarter century ago (holy cow!) by Colin McEnroe, who now hosts his own show on CT Public Radio and writes a weekly column for Hearst Communications. My wife and I were not yet residents of Old Lyme. This essay begins with a synopsis of her life. However, the crux of this column is my assertion that she became masterful at managing the media, and playing the role of quirky, eccentric artist.

Miss Tashjian was born into privilege in Manhattan in 1912, the daughter of wealthy Armenian immigrants. Her parents divorced when she was 7 years old, and she continued living in Manhattan with her mother. She showed great promise as a concert violinist and pursued music early — and before pursuing her interest in art. She studied at the New York School of Applied Design for Women and the National Academy of Design.

Elizabeth and her mother moved into a 19th century Gothic Revival mansion on Ferry Road in Old Lyme in 1950. Her mother died in 1959 and she continued living there alone. Her father pre-deceased her mother and left no estate.

Nuts were always her passion. This began during her classical arts training in New York City, where she created many paintings of nuts and nutcrackers. These themes would continue throughout her life. She was an active member of Lyme Art Association and frequently displayed her works there.

In 1972, she opened the Nut Museum, which was housed in the dining room on the ground floor of her home. The Nut Museum collection was largely comprised of her own artwork, including over 100 paintings, 20 aluminum sculptures, nut jewelry, and a Nativity scene made completely of nuts. Her art has been described as “visionary”, “avant-garde”, “surrealist”, and/or “outsider.”

She remained unmarried throughout her life. I could not find any reference to any real employment, which allowed her to concentrate wholly on her art. Like her mother, she became a Christian Science healer in mid-life, which may have provided some modest income.

Susan Campbell, writing in the Hartford Courant, described her visit to the Nut Museum: “The first time I met Elizabeth Tashjian, she swooped down the stairs of her Old Lyme mansion to greet me, and I was immediately in her thrall. I remember there was a cape.”

In 1981, Tashjian appeared on Johnny Carson’s “Tonight Show” for the first time. She and Carson “clicked” and her success with him led to many other television appearances, including Letterman, Leno, and others. Her TV appearances usually included one of her songs (e.g., “Nuts Are Beautiful” or the “March of the Nuts.”)

She did not have the same rapport with the other hosts that she had developed in her two appearances with Carson. She often brought a 35-pound coco de mer nut with her to these appearances. The coco de mer, or “nut of the sea” is native to the Seychelles and has an unfortunate resemblance to a woman’s buttocks. She told Carson that “the existence of such a sexually provocative nut utterly refuted Darwin’s “Origin of Species.” Professor Steiner (see below) said “it was arguable whether she was exploited by the media, or exploited it.” His suspicion was that she was the joker, not the joke.

She became known as the “Nut Lady”, which she hated. Preferring words like enthusiast, advocate, culturalist, or visionary.

Miss Tashjian became increasingly reclusive from the mid-1990s through the turn of the century; and her health began to fail. Fortunately, she had found a “champion” in Christopher Steiner, a professor of art history and museum studies at Connecticut College, who was determined to protect her artistic legacy. He remained her supporter and advocate for the rest of her life.

By 2002, she was nearly indigent, in serious debt, and very frail. I won’t provide the terrible details; but she fell into a coma, was declared incompetent, and a ward of the State. The Courts put her house on the market to pay her debts. Despite refusing medical treatment because of her religious beliefs, she recovered, but was confined, apparently against her will, to a nursing home where she died in 2007.

The contents of the Nut Museum had been removed by Professor Steiner while her home was being sold. He had successfully petitioned the Old Lyme Probate Court to recognize the historic and artistic significance of the collection. Unfortunately, Tom Selleck and Henry Winkler were not yet pitching reverse mortgages as financial salvation for the indigent elderly.

And so, begins her “second Renaissance.”  In 2004, the Lyman Allyn Museum in New London launched a show of her work at which she was the guest of honor. Documentary filmmaker Don Bernier completed “In a Nutshell: A Portrait of Elizabeth Tashjian,” a feature-length video about the artist highlighting the diverse roles she assumed during her lifetime, which debuted at Connecticut. College.

Her obituary appeared in the New York Times Food Section in 2007: under the heading,“Elizabeth Tashjian, 94, an Expert on Nuts, dies,” which would have certainly appealed to her sense of irony.

The New Yorker carried “The Nut Lady Returns” in 2005.

The Armenian Weekly provides a detailed account of the Connecticut College exhibition.

Lee Howard’s recent article in The Day, “Reimagining the Nut Lady and her Art,” provides a friend’s perspective:

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It’s the Most Wonderful Time of Year … Lyme Academy Celebrates the Season with the Lyme-Old Lyme Community

Photo by Douglas Hampton Dowson of Hampton Dowson Photography of Lyme.

OLD LYME — This past Friday evening saw the start of a new and wonderful tradition for Old Lyme when the Lyme Academy of Arts held their first community tree-lighting event and illuminated the towering tree in front of the Elisabeth Gordon Chandler Center pictured above. Despite the rain, a large crowd of all ages turned out for the event including a number of local dignitaries pictured below.

Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

Gathered for a photo are from left to right, State Rep. Devin Carney (R-23rd), Interim Business Director of Lyme Academy of Fine Arts Frank Burns, Old Lyme First Selectman Tim Griswold, Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce President Rich Shriver, Lyme Academy of Fine Arts Board of Trustees member Bob Potter, and ‘The Nutcracker’ played by Bob’s wife Jeanne Potter.

Photo by Douglas Hampton Dowson of Hampton Dowson Photography of Lyme.

The crowd stood patiently in the rain outside the Chandler Center listening to speeches from

Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

State Rep. Devin Carney (R-23rd),

Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

Old Lyme First Selectman Tim Griswold, and

Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

Lyme Academy of Fine Arts Board member Bob Potter.

Photo by Douglas Hampton Dowson of Hampton Dowson Photography of Lyme.

Then the crowd moved to the Stobart Barn to hear the Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School Band perform seasonal numbers under the direction of conductor Carrie Wind.  This is the 21st year that the band has participated in holiday festivities organized by town organizations.

Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

Rick Kaye snaps a shot of the LOLMS Band …

Photo by Douglas Hampton Dowson of Hampton Dowson Photography of Lyme.

… who played beautifully …

Photo by Douglas Hampton Dowson of Hampton Dowson Photography of Lyme.

… under the stellar direction of long-time Middle School Band Director Carrie Wind, pictured above, who addressed the audience with her usual verve!

Photo by Douglas Hampton Dowson of Hampton Dowson Photography of Lyme.

Inside the Chauncey Stillman Gallery, these smiling elves were helping children write letters to Santa …

Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

… while willing parents helpde their children make ornaments.  In the photo above, Brittany Sterling of Old Lyme assists her son Graham in his creation.

Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

… and meanwhile, the band played on merrily!

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Enjoy ‘The Magic of Christmas’ at Flo Gris Museum in Old Lyme Through New Year

There are now four palette trees to hold the more than 200 hand-painted palettes on display in this year’s ‘Magic of Christmas.’

OLD LYME — The holiday season is always something special to celebrate at the Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme, Conn. – after all, Miss Florence was born on Christmas Day, 1850. The Museum will be decked out in its holiday finery for the Magic of Christmas celebration from Nov. 29, 2019 through Jan. 5, 2020.

This year marks the 200th painted palette to be added to Miss Florence’s Artist Trees. Since 2004 noted artists from across the country have donated works to this one-of-a-kind holiday icon – so many that now four trees are needed to hold the works of art. The idea of contemporary artists creating paintings on artists’ palettes is a nod to the Museum’s history as the center for the Lyme Art Colony, and alludes to the door and wall panels the artists painted throughout Miss Florence’s boardinghouse over a century ago. The palette artists’ styles and subject matter are as varied as the individuals.

This palette by Kenney Mencher of Palo Alto, Calf., is one of the 2019 additions to the Palette Trees.

Oils, acrylics, watercolors, ceramics, glass, and collage are used to transform the palettes into traditional holiday scenes, delightful landscapes, and more than a few surprises! The palettes are displayed on four trees in the Krieble gallery, along with the current exhibition, “Nothing More American:” Immigration, Sanctuary, and Community—An Exhibition by Matthew Leifheit.

To commemorate the milestone of the 200th palette, the Museum published Miss Florence’s Artist Trees: Celebrating a Tradition of Painted Palettes, which showcases each of the works of art on its own page.

In the historic rooms of the Florence Griswold House, the special installation by artist Jennifer Angus, Silver Wings and Golden Scales, has been held over by popular demand. Visitors to the House will be able to delight in this dream-like scenario of Miss Florence’s home transformed into the site of an insect-themed masquerade party through Jan. 12, 2020.

Angus evokes the bohemian spirit of the Lyme Art Colony through her artistic compositions of preserved exotic insects, including textile-inspired wallcoverings, an elegant cape for Miss Florence, and whimsical vignettes. Through her art, Angus brings to visitors not only the beauty of insects, but their critical importance to our ecology as well. Upstairs, two artists, Betsy Barry and Carol Maynard have created Fantasy Trees, designed to delight and inspire.

All ages can enjoy the beautiful Palette Christmas Trees at the ‘Magic of Christmas’ exhibition

Many special events and programs are held in conjunction with the Magic of Christmas. Christmastime Teas are among the most popular events. Delectable scones with clotted cream, assorted tea sandwiches, and cookies prepared by Gourmet Gallery, a caterer known for their delicious flavors and impeccable presentations, are accompanied by “Miss Florence’s Tea,” a special blend from Sundial Gardens in Higginum.

Miss Florence’s Tea is a special blend of superior Ceylon and China black tea enhanced with a touch of delicate spices. The tea celebrates the camaraderie and creativity of the Lyme Art Colony with each cup. Teas are held Dec. 3 through 28 on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday from 3 to 5pm and Saturdays from 12 to 2pm and 3 to 5pm.

Other events and programs include special events for families, including a visit from Frozen sisters Elsa and Anna and hands-on crafts for children and adults.

Unique gifts from The Shop and memberships to the Museum make thoughtful holiday and hostess gifts.

Located on a 12-acre site in the historic village of Old Lyme, the Florence Griswold Museum is known as the Home of American Impressionism. In addition to the restored Florence Griswold House, where the artists of the Lyme Art Colony lived, the Museum features a modern exhibition gallery, education center, landscape center, extensive gardens, and a restored artist’s studio.

The Museum is located at 96 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, CT, exit 70 off I-95 and is open year-round Tuesday through Saturday from 10am to 5pm and Sunday 1 to 5pm. The Museum is closed Christmas and New Year’s Day.

Admission is $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $8 students, and free to children 12 and under. On Saturdays between November 30 through January 5, admission is only $5 when visitors bring in a non-perishable donation for the Shoreline Soup Kitchens and Pantries.

For more information, visit the Museum’s website at www.FlorenceGriswoldMuseum.org or call 860-434-5542 x 111.

Magic of Christmas Activities

Sunday, Dec. 1 at 2pm
Book Event
Director of Education and Outreach David D.J. Rau speaks about the publication Miss Florence’s Artist Trees: Celebrating a Tradition of Painted Palettes, which was published this October to commemorate the milestone of the 200th palette added to Miss Florence’s Artists Trees this year. Please reserve your space in advance, $25 includes book. Register online at FlorenceGriswoldMuseum.org

Sundays, Dec. 1 through Jan. 5, 1-4pm
Joy in the Making
Each Sunday visitors can experience the joy of making a hand-made card or ornament during the weekly drop-in creative programs. Fun for all ages. This event is free with Museum admission and children 12 and under are free.

Dec. 1-24
Daily Specials in the Museum Shop
One day you might save on all books or art supplies, the next, maybe everything sparkly or all snowmen. Check FlorenceGriswoldMuseum.org for a calendar of items and days.

Dec. 3 through 28
Christmastime Teas
Tuesday through Saturday enjoy an elegant tea of savories and sweets overlooking the wintery splendor of the Lieutenant River. Catered by Gourmet Galley. Guests enjoy a 10% discount in The Shop. $40. Reservations required, please call 860-434-5542 x 111 for information and reservations.

Elsa and Anna are always popular performers at the Museum.

Saturday, Dec. 7
Elsa and Anna perform at the Museum
Visitors can enjoy holiday crafting between visits from the beloved sisters. Shows at noon, 1pm, and 2pm. This program is included with Museum admission, and visitors 12 and under are always free.

Thursday, Dec. 12, 5:30 to 7pm
Art•Bar Happy Hour
Combine creativity and cocktails! Enjoy an evening of Christmastime crafting. All materials provided. Get friends together or come make new ones! For adults 21+. $25. Register online at FlorenceGriswoldMuseum.org

Sunday, Dec. 15 at 2pm
Gallery Talk
Director of Education and Outreach David D.J. Rau speaks about Miss Florence’s Artist Trees in the Gallery. This event is free with Museum admission.

Sunday, Dec. 29 from 1 to 4pm
Miss Florence’s Birthday Party
Visitors share in this hands-on-creative celebration of Miss Florence’s Christmas Day birthday. Enjoy a piece of birthday cake while making an assortment of fun craft projects. Fun (and free!) balloon sculptures by April’s Balloon Creations. This program is included with Museum admission, and visitors 12 and under are always free.

Faith Leitner will play her harp Sunday, Dec. 29, in the Florence Griswold Museum to celebrate “An Ode to the New Year.”

Sunday, Dec. 29, from 1 to 4pm
Ode to the New Year: Harp Music by Faith Leitner
The harp was Miss Florence’s favorite instrument. Visitors can see the one her father brought back for her from England in the Florence Griswold House. Accomplished harpist Faith Leitner will perform in the gallery. A beautiful way to end the year! This program is included with Museum admission, and visitors 12 and under are always free.

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