October 1, 2022

Eastern CT Symphony Hosts ‘Conduct Us’ Event in New London, Tomorrow

On Sunday, try your hand at conducting an orchestra! Photo by Kazua Ota on Unsplash.

NEW LONDON — On Sunday, Oct. 2 from 12:30 – 1:30 p.m., members of the Eastern Connecticut Symphony Orchestra (ECSO) will be located at Hygienic Arts waiting to perform — all they need is a conductor!

The general public will have a chance to conduct In the Hall of the Mountain King, Blue Danube WaltzToreador Song from Carmen, Can-Can from Orpheus in the Underworld, and William Tell Overture (The Lone Ranger Theme.)

An open invitation is offered to step up to the podium and try your hand at conducting the orchestra. The ECSO Music Director and Conductor Toshiyuki Shimada will be there to give guidance and encouragement to volunteer maestros.

Hygienic Art is located at 79 Bank St. in New London. This unique experience is free and open to the public in the outdoor Frank Loomis Palmer Amphitheater.

Pack a lunch or enjoy takeout from the many eateries on Bank Street and come enjoy a wonderful fall afternoon with the ECSO. Families and children are welcome and encouraged.

“Conduct Us” started when the ECSO participated in the international Make Music Day movement, which brings free, community-wide, outdoor musical celebrations to hundreds of cities worldwide.

Founded in 1946 by Norwegian immigrant, Victor Norman, the ECSO is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization serving the eastern Connecticut region, including New London, Norwich, Waterford, Groton, Mystic, Old Lyme, and East Lyme.

Recent concerts in Norwich, Willimantic, and Stonington reflect their renewed dedication to serving a broader area.

The ECSO’s mission is to inspire, educate, and connect its communities through live orchestral music.

Visit www.ectsymphony.com for more information and follow ECSO on social media (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube) @ectsymphony.

‘Twinkle Point’ Wee Faerie Village Opens Today at Florence Griswold Museum with Superhero Visits

The Botanical Gardens by Bettina Rowlands of Broad Brook, Conn. is one of the whimsical Wee Faerie Houses on display.

OLD LYME — Since 2009 over 175,000 visitors have immersed themselves in the spirit of imagination and whimsy that comes from visiting at least two dozen faerie-sized installations across the Museum’s campus on a perfect autumn day, and this year will be no exception.

This year’s theme is Twinkle Point, an amusement park tailored for fairy folk. Artists and faerie aficionados have worked for months on roller coasters, carousels, arcades, and shops – everything one finds at an amusement park – only tiny.

The exhibition is open from Saturday, Oct. 1, through Sunday, Oct. 30.

This Jungle Themed River Ride by Jessica Zeedyk of Cromwell is sure to delight visitors to the 2022 Wee Faerie Village.

The 27 creative installations, including those made by six schools and four new participants, are sure to have visitors in awe of their craftsmanship and whimsy. 

The Museum will also offer a full roster of faerie-related programs and special events, as follows:

Saturday, Oct. 1 from 11am to 2pm
Superhero Saturday at Twinkle Point
This event is free with Museum admission.
Come meet Captain America and Black Panther, superheroes keeping the park at Twinkle Point safe, serene, and awesome. Pose for photos and get hi-fives from these super friends of the Wee Faeries.

Sunday, Oct. 2 from 11am to 2pm
Painting Demonstration
This event is free with Museum admission.
Enjoy a plein air painting demonstration by Impressionist artist Dmitri Wright, one of Connecticut’s leading teaching artists in the contemporary Impressionist style. Ask questions and learn about the process from an accomplished local artist.

Peek if you dare inside the Haunted House by Dee Dee Charnok of Essex!

Saturday, Oct. 8 at 10:30am-12:30pm and 1-3pm.
Mind-Blowing Balloon Art
This event is free with Museum admission.
Come meet April, the balloon twisting artist who can conjure anything from her palette of colorful balloons. Ask for a wand, a sword, or a cartoon character, and watch it appear before your very eyes.

Saturday, Oct. 15 from 11am to 4pm
Ahoy! Ahoy! Pirate Day at Twinkle Point
This event is free with Museum admission.
Come meet the Free Men of the Sea, arrr-fully good re-enactors who bring the myths and history of pirates and privateers to life. Flintlock pistol demonstrations on the hour beginning at 12 noon. 

Sunday, Oct. 16 from noon to 3pm
Splish! Splash! A Day at Mermaid Cove
This event is free with Museum admission.
Twinkle Point unveils its latest “living” sculpture of a mermaid to adorn Mermaid Cove. Marvel at the remarkable stillness of this mermaid before she disappears once again to her watery depths.

See what you can see in the House of Mirrors by Michele Mergy of Old Lyme and Dawn Bisharat of Madison, Conn.!

Saturday, Oct. 22 from 11am to 4pm
Maggie’s Magical Potions & Tea Shop
This event is free with Museum admission.
Learn about the many herbs that have magical healing powers and taste some delicious blends of tea. Make your own blend as well as purchase delicious baked goods.

Saturday, Oct. 29 from 11am to 2pm
BOO-HA-HA! Awesome Halloween Magic
This event is free with Museum admission.
Enjoy magic and spooky jokes with Joe Howard, entertainer extraordinaire—stilt walking, magic, and comedy to delight all ages.

Sunday, Oct. 30, 11am to 4pm
Halloween at Twinkle Point
This event is free with Museum admission.
Dress up in costumes and visit the Education Center for treats.

Lyme Art Association hosts ‘Palate to Palette’ Signature Fall Fundraiser, Oct. 20; Combines Tastings, Silent Art Auction

OLD LYME — The Lyme Art Association is hosting its signature fundraising gala, Palate to Palette, on Thursday, Oct. 20, from 6 to 9 p.m. at their galleries in Old Lyme.

This fun event features sumptuous fine food from top regional restaurants and caterers, and a silent auction of brand-new artwork specially created by LAA member artists, and a live auction of works by some of the organization’s most recognized artists.

All proceeds help support the Lyme Art Association’s exhibitions and special projects, and ensure that this wonderful community of artists and art lovers continues to thrive.

Tickets are $75 per person. To purchase tickets, visit: https://lymeartassociation.org/palate-to-palette-2022/

Old Lyme’s PGN Library to Host Bulb, Plant Swap Today

OLD LYME — Today, Saturday, Oct. 1, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., the Old Lyme-Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library hosts its first Annual Community Plant & Bulb Swap.

Fall is the perfect time to divide your perennials and bulbs, so pot or bag the ones you have to swap and then label them. But note that you do not need to have plants to swap to participate.

A Master Gardener will be available to answer questions

It is requested that no invasive plants are brought to swap.

This event, which is co-sponsored by Duck River Garden Club of Old Lyme, will be held rain or shine either on the Library Lawn or in the Community Room as the weather dictates.

Old Lyme Committee’s Survey on Vision for Sound View Area Open for Final Week, All Welcome to Respond

An August 2022 aerial view of Shore Road in Old Lyme looking west. Photo by Baxter Real Estate Media.

OLD LYME —  Old Lyme’s year-round and seasonal residents as well as business owners are being asked to participate in a survey to build a vision for the Shoreline Gateway area of the town. The survey, which is available at this link and also in paper form, is being conducted by the Old Lyme (OL) Shoreline Gateway Committee.

The committee was formed in February 2022 when the OL Economic Development Commission recommended its creation to the OL Board of Selectmen.

The survey will be used by the Committee to build a vision — and potentially a master plan – for the “gateway” to the town’s beach communities, a key area for its summer business season.

The Shoreline Gateway is defined as Old Lyme’s Shore Rd. (Rte. 156) from Otter Rock Rd. to Breen Ave., plus Hartford Ave. 

The Gateway area is currently a mix of single family residences and summer cottages, as well as small businesses. There are currently a number of commercial properties for sale, including some in blighted conditions.

The committee is solely focused on the commercially-zoned properties, including those in the Sound View Village District on Hartford Ave.

The survey asks year-round and seasonal OL residents, and business owners about their experiences and perceptions of the Gateway area as well as their vision for its future.

“This is an opportunity for people to have their opinions heard, and to help reach a consensus that will meet the future needs of the town’s residents, businesses, and the local environment,” said OL Selectwoman Martha Shoemaker, who co-chairs the committee with OL Selectman Matthew Ward.

She continued, “We are building an inclusive process as we preserve this important and historical area while positioning it for future generations to enjoy.” 

Asked by LymeLine whether there could be confusion on the committee’s mission due to its focus o commercially-zoned properties in an area that includes residential housing, Shoemaker agreed, “The zoning for the area is confusing as it allows for some mixed use.” She continued, “We are also hoping to incorporate the Sound View Village District into the area at the top of Hartford Avenue from Cross Lane to the Police Station.  Even in that small stretch we have some residential properties.”

Shoemaker noted, “Now that we have Eric Knapp, Land Use Coordinator, on board at Town Hall we can look at zoning issues within these areas,” stressing, “We do not want the residents on the south side of 156 (Shore Rd.) to think that we are thinking of changing their current zoning codes – that stays as is.”

When it was created, the board of selectmen appointed a variety of interested community members to the committee including beach association members, and townspeople with expertise in areas such as zoning, community beautification, small business development, and housing.

The committee began meeting in April 2022 and, in addition to its development of the community survey, has begun to assess the area’s current zoning and has looked at improvements made by other beachside communities.

The Shoreline Gateway Survey closes Friday, Oct. 7, 2022.

For more information, contact the Selectman’s Office at 860-434-1605 or visit this link

Editor’s Notes: i) Printed copies of the survey will be available at the Old Lyme Memorial Town Hall beginning Wednesday, Sept. 7. The online survey is at this link.

ii) This article is based on a press release issued by the Old Lyme Shoreline Gateway Committee.

Fun, Food, Finds at Christ The King’s ‘Harvest Festival,’ This Morning

All the fun of the fair will be happening Saturday at Christ the King’s Harvest Fun Day.

OLD LYME — Volunteers at Christ the King Church in Old Lyme are gearing up for the return of the annual Harvest Festival, a family-friendly event offering something for everyone. This year’s festival continues on Sunday, Sept. 18, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Don’t be late! Bargain hunters have formed a line before the doors are even open in previous years.

What will you find at Christ the King’s Harvest Festival?

Find treasures galore at the King’s Rummage Sale.

Bargains and treasures at the huge King’s Rummage Sale; a great selection of fall plants and produce from Smith’s Acres; themed baskets, original artwork, and more in the Silent Auction; delicious homemade goodies in the Bake Sale; and an assortment of games and crafts to keep the kids entertained.

There will be a large selection of games at the Harvest Festival for children to enjoy.

Come hungry so you can enjoy lunch served up by the Men’s Club — and live entertainment from talented local musicians.

If you can’t get there Saturday, you can still check out the Plant Sale, Rummage Sale, and the Silent Auction on Sunday
morning, Sept. 18, with Rummage Sale items at half-price.

Terrific treasures can be found at the King’s Rummage Sale.

As always, admission to Christ the King’s Harvest Festival is free.

Christ The King’s Rummage Sale is always a great place to look for bargains.

Christ the King Church is located at 1 McCurdy Road in Old Lyme. Visit www.christthekingchurch.net for directions, and follow the church on Facebook (@christthekingchurcholdlyme) for updates.

For more information, visit www.christthekingchurch.net or call 860-434-1669.

Lyme Resident Skip Hine’s New Book Not Only Tells a Story, But Also Captures a Career

This cover of Skip Hine’s book, above, depicts his photo of the Tuileries Gardens in Paris. All the photos in this article are by Hine and included in the book. They are published with his permission.

LYME — Every picture tells a story ….

Thumb through Skip Hine’s wonderful book cleverly titled Memories In Hine Sight, subtitled My Life With a Camera, and Rod Stewart’s immortal words will immediately come to mind.

Hine is an authentic, engaging, charismatic guy — I chatted with him on the phone for around an hour and a half and thoroughly enjoyed every minute. We would probably still have been talking hours later if regular life had not interceded.

The book is a fascinating insight into the life of a professional photographer over the past 50 years. Hine notes, “People don’t appreciate or understand how many people are involved in a shoot,” deftly describing the latter as, “The magic behind the curtain.”

Hine’s photo of a model named Andes was used by both Estee Lauder and Manpower.

Hine says the book has, “No real beginning or end.” You can start reading it, put it down, dip back into it.” And that is true — it does not have to be read sequentially, though the first chapter titled, The Journey Begins definitely helps set the scene.

Stressing “It is not a ‘How to’ book, but rather a ‘How I did it’ book,” Hine says with intense feeling, “It is about my life.” He hopes that as people read the book, they “Feel as though I am there chatting to them at the kitchen counter,” and in my opinion, he absolutely achieves that aim.

He did not have an easy childhood losing both his parents at a young age. Subsequently cared for by family members, he soon was sent to boarding school and interestingly, regards that time as critical to his later success as a photographer. Hine notes that going away to school, “Opened up a whole new world for me — I had to grow up fast.”

Not only did he make “friends for life,” during his boarding school days, but also his love affair with the camera started at Pomfret School in northeastern Connecticut.

Hine shares in his book a wonderful backstory about this photo of TV personality Dick Cavett.

So how did an intrinsically shy man end up photographing presidents and playboys, movie stars and CEO’s, supermodels and sports icons, actors and politicians — to name but a few — in locations all across the globe? Did he have a golden key that simply opened doors when he left Rochester Institute of Technology as a shy young man with a BFA in hand that majored in Photographic Illustration?

The short answer is no.

He grafted for many years in New York City, in his words, “Always chasing the next job,” and taking some jobs for which he, “Barely got paid at all.” All the while, however, he focused on honing his craft, and offering both complete flexibility and absolute reliability.

Hine’s first job was working as an assistant for Klaus Lucka — a job he was given for a day, which turned into 18 months. He credits Lucka with being the single most important influence in his career. Hine explains, “It was just him and me. He instructed me to take notes and record the lighting of every shoot. He taught me design,” adding pointedly, ” He really made me passionate about what I was doing.”

As a photographer’s assistant, Hine’s responsibilities involved going with Lucka wherever his boss went, working all day, and then ending up every evening in the studio processing film so that the photos were ready for the client by 9 a.m. He continued working in this capacity for a number of other photographers until he made the leap to set up his own business.

After he went out on his own, Hine says he started calling art directors to let them know he was available for jobs. In his words, “Naively, I expected them to call.”

He then states pragmatically, but with a chuckle, “… they didn’t.”

It is hard to believe that the set for this photo was created in Hine’s studio. He explains how and why that was done in his book.

On the one hand Hine admits, “I have been really, really fortunate,” but, on the other, I would add it is clear he has worked incredibly hard to achieve such major success in his career. When work did not come to him in those early days, a friend suggested he should try doing the photography for corporate annual reports. He laughs and then says, “At that time, I had never seen an annual report!” but he worked through Yellow Pages and finally secured a contract.

His corporate accounts have included Pfizer, Newsweek, the Rockefeller Group, Sports Illustrated, and the US Olympic Committee and his advertising accounts feature names like the National Football League, Johnson & Johnson, Radio City Music Hall, American Express and Colgate Palmolive. The full list of his clients over his career is too extensive to print even in the book.

He clearly loved the world of photography, sometimes taking a solo role, other times working as part of a team with art directors, hairdressers, fashion designers and more, all on set at the same time, and sharing their thoughts. He says ebulliently, “I loved the camaraderie … everybody had input,” but his often challenging role was “Trying to put it all together.”

Skip and Deb Hine have lived in Lyme, Conn. for some 30 years.

Hine has owned a house in Lyme, Conn. for some 40 years, which he shares with his wife Deb, who is both his biggest fan and maybe his harshest critic. She worked closely with him on the book and he commented cheerfully that their discussions about the text were always “spirited.”

In his book, Hine shows photo after photo but tells a story about each one. He talks variously about the photo’s location, how he came to be given the contract for it, some of the obstacles he face in obtaining the image, details of the lighting on occasion, and includes often amusing and sometimes deeply personal side notes. He sums up his vast array of photos with the words, “I’m a picture-maker not a picture-taker.”

This evocative photo appears in the ‘Personal Work’ section of Hine’s book.

He tells an endearing story about how he had spent a day photographing President Gerald Ford and then in the evening found himself “standing in line for a regular piece of $2 pizza.” The juxtaposition of those two events clearly made him smile. Perhaps it also reminded him that his father had sold insurance all his life in Hartford, Conn., whereas he (Hine) had ended up taking photos and traveling the world.

On Wednesday, Sept. 14, Hine will discuss his book at the Old Lyme-Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library at an author presentation starting at 6:30 p.m. There is no charge to attend but registration at this link is encouraged for planning purposes. During the talk, Hine will share many more tales from behind the camera and insights into the glamorous (… and not always quite so glamorous!) world of photography in which he has been immersed for more than 50 years.

That world has changed dramatically in recent years with the arrival of Photoshop, LightRoom and other such software programs, which facilitate post-processing of photos in a way that Hine could never have conceived when he set out on his career.

Taking this photo for Bausch and Lomb’s Renu advertising campaign set many challenges for Hine, including finding a wreck in less than 33 ft. of water. The office of famed oceanographer Robert Ballard, who also lives in Lyme, assisted with that problem and helped find one in the Cayman Islands.

Asked what his advice would be right now to someone wishing to pursue a career similar to his, Hine says surprisingly, “Don’t be a photographer!” He goes on to explain what he means, saying, “Learn how to design. Learn your fonts. Ad[vertising] agencies want one-stop shopping these days. Make yourself as versatile as you can.” He concludes, “Photography is a part of the business these days … [it is] not the business.”

Apart from sheer hard work, determination, and remarkable skill, perhaps versatility is the key to Hine’s own exceptional career. He has moved with the times, believed in himself, and simply kept doing what he does best — and his book encapsulates that story in a truly wonderful way.

It is a delight to read … and a joy to view.

Lyme-Old Lyme Food Share Garden Celebrates Donations Totaling Over One Ton This Season

A small selection of a recent day’s harvest from the Lyme-Old Lyme Food Share Garden.

Second Annual LOLFSG Open House Slated for Saturday, Sept. 24, All Welcome

OLD LYME — The Lyme-Old Lyme Food Share Garden (LOLFSG) celebrated a milestone this week!

Following a much-needed rain event, mid-week volunteers harvested kale, tomatoes, string beans, peppers, eggplants, and more.  In doing so, the garden reached a total donation threshold of more than 2000 pounds of produce in its first growing season.

The LOLFSG President Jim Ward commented, “This incredible accomplishment is due to the dedication of volunteers and community support.”

Ward noted that the realistic LOLFSG goal for the 2023 season is to double production and is already looking forward to a “Two-Ton Tuesday.”

To celebrate the successful inaugural growing season and to learn more about the garden, all are invited to visit the 2nd Annual LOLFSG Open House on Saturday, Sept. 24, at the garden from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.

The garden is located at Town Woods Park behind the Field House and playground.

Old Lyme HS Class of 1970 Seeks Classmates for (Belated) 50th Reunion, Final Day for Reservations is Today

OLD LYME — The Old Lyme High School Class of 1970 is hosting its (belated) 50th Reunion over the weekend of Sept. 30 through Oct. 2.

The Class is still seeking missing classmates and asks ‘Are you or a friend among them?’

The Class of 1970 is holding three separate reunion events Friday through Sunday, Sept. 30, and Oct. 1, and 2. Reservations with payment are due by Sept. 10. 

The Class hopes to locate the following people, who were members of the graduating class. Organizers would also like to locate anyone, who was ever part of this class but did not necessarily graduate with it. 

The missing classmates are:

  • Alfred Arpin
  • Sidney Biddle Barrows
  • James Bowers
  • Nancy Bowes
  • Darlene Brooks
  • Charles Carlson
  • Bob Chapman
  • Robert Cornish
  • George Grabel
  • Jerri Husch
  • Charles King
  • Michael Leahy
  • Jeffrey Maynard
  • David Morgan
  • Paul O’Connell
  • Charles Rasmussen
  • Bev Roberts
  • Kim Robinson
  • Mark Robinson
  • Harold Saunders
  • Tom Schull
  • Jeffrey Shalett
  • Jan Smith
  • Dale Stone
  • Ethel Swaney
  • Mary Karen Thruelsen
  • David Tubek

The events are a Friday evening cocktail party with heavy hors d’oeuvres, Saturday dinner, and Sunday brunch.

For more information, contact micheledickey@sbcglobal.net

 

Last Day for Intake for (Christ The) King’s Rummage Sale is Today; Sale Takes Place Sept. 17, 18

Furniture donations are welcome for the King’s Rummage Sale.

OLD LYME — The end of summer is fast approaching. Are you cleaning closets, organizing cupboards, or clearing out clutter?  Are you moving or downsizing and don’t know what to do with all the stuff you’ve accumulated? 

Christ the King Church in Old Lyme does not want you to send your gently-used household items to the dump. They suggest you upcycle your goods by donating them to the King’s Rummage Sale at Christ the King Church’s Harvest Festival. 

Donations are being accepted through Saturday, Sept. 10, from 9 a.m. to noon (except Labor Day Weekend), at Christ the King Church, 1 McCurdy Rd., Old Lyme (Parish Hall entrance).

All donated items should be in good condition: working, clean, and saleable. No clothes, shoes, or textbooks can be accepted. (Visit www.christthekingchurch.net/kings-rummage-sale for a complete list of items that cannot be accepted.

Email CTKHarvestFestival@gmail.com or call the parish office (860-434-1669) if you have large or upholstered items to donate.

Book donations will be gratefully received.

The annual Harvest Festival takes place at Christ the King Church (1 McCurdy Rd., Old Lyme) on Saturday, Sept. 17,  from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., and features the rummage sale, a silent auction, a bake sale, kids’ games and crafts, great food, live music, and an autumn plant sale.

The rummage sale, bake sale, and plant sale will continue Sunday morning, Sept.18, from 9 a.m. to noon (with rummage sale items half price, while supplies last.)

Ceramics are a popular donation item for the Rummage Sale.

Follow the church on Facebook @christthekingchurcholdlyme for updates.

For more information, visit www.christthekingchurch.net or call 860-434-1669.

Almost Full Auditorium for Aug. 27 Old Lyme Regional Wastewater System Update

OLD LYME — More than 150 residents attended yesterday’s meeting to review the current status of the proposed Regional Wastewater System. The meeting was held in the Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School auditorium.

Senator Richard Blumenthal addressed the audience via a video link as he was on his way to a prior commitment in Bridgeport, Conn.

State Senator Paul Formica (R-20th) spoke in person to the audience.

The slide presentation titled ‘Project Overview and Update’ that was given at yesterday’s meeting can be viewed at this link.

The pre-submitted Q & A (Questions & Answers) that were presented at the meeting can be viewed at this link.

The General Information & News section of the Miami Beach Association website also has important updates  regarding the project.

Editor’s Note: We are trying to determine if the whole meeting was recorded so that we can also share that link.

Sen’s Blumenthal, Murphy to Attend Presentation on Old Lyme’s Regional Wastewater System, Saturday

Senator Richard Blumenthal (File photo)

Senator Chris Murphy (File photo)

OLD LYME — A presentation will be held on the Old Lyme Regional Wastewater System on Saturday, Aug. 27, at 10 a.m. in the Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School.

This is an informational meeting to review the status of the sewer project. Questions regarding the project can be submitted in advance to chairman@oldcolonybeach.org for review by the committee. A panel will then select questions to be answered at the meeting and at the end of the presentation, the selected questions will be answered.

There will be no open Q&A after the presentation.

The meeting will start with the introduction of the four Wastewater Pollution Control Association entities involved with the project.

Then the following Distinguished Guests will make comments:

    • Senator Richard Blumenthal (D)
    • Senator Chris Murphy (D)
    • State Senator Paul Formica (R-20th)
    • Old Lyme First Selectman Timothy Griswold (R)

State Rep. Devin Carney (R-23rd) is unable to attend.

The next agenda item will be a PowerPoint presentation regarding the project.

The final item will be a review of the selected questions regarding the project, which were submitted in advance. questions

To attend this session virtually, visit https://oldlymect.webex.com/oldlymect/j.php?MTID=m7bb8ab96d52e54ddb27ed079eb689dfc or dial +1-408-418-9388 and enter access code: 2343 721 4416.

Hamburg Fair Attracts Huge Crowds, Hailed Great Success

All photos by Steven Frischling,

LYME — The Hamburg Fair returned after a two-year absence to shrieks of delight, the sounds of music, and games galore.

The fair was hailed a huge success on all three days.

This family-friendly event showcased many agricultural fair traditions while highlighting top local music talent and entertainment.

Visitors enjoyed Milestone Midway Carnival rides and games.

The fun continued late into the evening …

… and many enjoyed sliding!

All the bands and musicians were well-received and people danced enthusiastically late into the night. Here are more photos of the great event (below.)

Monkeypox Cases Rise to 73 in CT, One Case in Nine-Town Ledge Light Health District

Wyoming Remains Only US State Without a Single Case, Highest Number of Cases in NY State

LYME/OLD LYME — The number of cases in the state has risen to 73 as of this morning, Aug. 19, per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data.

On Aug. 16, Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) Director of Health Stephen Mansfield confirmed to LymeLine.com by email, “We are aware of one case within our jurisdiction.” The LLHD jurisdiction comprises nine southeastern Connecticut towns, which include both Lyme and Old Lyme.

Wyoming is now the sole state, which has reported no cases.

On Aug. 4, the White House declared monkeypox a public health emergency.

On July 23, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the monkeypox outbreak a public health emergency of international concern.

The CDC’s 2022 US Map & Case Count includes an ongoing, updated count of monkeypox cases throughout the country. There are 14,115 cases in the US at time of publication of this article.

The states with the highest number of cases at time of publication (Aug. 19) are New York (2,744), California (2,663), Florida (1,372), Texas (1,079), Georgia (1,066), and Illinois (888).

Connecticut’s first case was announced July 5.

“Monkeypox spreads through close prolonged contact with an infected person. This might include coming into contact with skin lesions, or body fluids, sharing clothes or other materials that have been used by an infected person, or inhaling respiratory droplets during prolonged face-to-face contact,” according to Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) Commissioner Manisha Juthani, MD.

She added, “Residents who are concerned about fever, swollen glands, and a new rash, should contact their health care provider.

For those seeking treatment or additional information on the vaccine and antivirals, contact your health care provider or call the DPH Epidemiology Program at (860) 509-7994 or (860509-8000 after hours.

For more information about monkeypox, visit the CDC monkeypox webpage and/or the CT DPH monkeypox webpage.

Editor’s Note: Parts of this article are based on a press release issued July 14 by CT DPH and sent to LymeLine.com by Ledge Light Health District.

‘The Farmers Market at Tiffany Farms’ is Open Today, New Addition This Year is ‘Community Outreach’ Tent

View of the Farmer’s Market at Tiffany Farms.

LYME — ‘The Farmers Market at Tiffany Farms’ in Lyme will open today from 9 a.m. through 12:30 p.m. with fresh farm produce, baked goods, seafood, maple syrup, and more on sale.

Jen Tiffany stands proudly in front of the 2020 Farmers Market that she and her husband Bill Hurtle will host again this summer at Tiffany Farms.

This Farmers Market, which evolved from the Lyme Farmers Market of yesteryear, is a perennially popular destination for both local and regional shoppers.

Jennifer Tiffany and her husband Bill Hurtle run the market and are excited this year to introduce “Community Service” and “Hospitality” tents.  

For the Community Outreach tent, Tiffany explains, “We will be compiling a list of approximately 20 different organizations and providing one group per week with the market venue as a form of outreach.”

She stresses, “The idea is to not promote sales of their product or enhance collection of donations. It’s quite simply to provide the selected group a platform giving them the opportunity to spread their cause — in other words, to say, “Here we are and this is what we are all about.”

The hospitality tent, Tiffany explains, will be a resting spot for those who just need to sit a spell, noting, “We had some very faithful, strong-willed but physically-challenged visitors attending the market last year and this tent will be out of respect for them.”

A view of the iconic Tiffany Farms where the Farmers Market will be held.

Tiffany notes, “All Department of Agriculture, Markets, Department of Health and CT Grown guidelines will apply.”  She aspires to the same look as [Lyme Farmers Market at] Ashlawn,” with the aim being to offer a “very classy ” market, focused on Connecticut-grown or-produced items such as dairy, beef, vegetables, herbs, jellies and syrups.

Aerial view of Tiffany farms showing where the Farmer’s Market will be located.

The list of full-time vendors this year includes:

  • Chatfield Hollow Farm

  • Dondero Orchards

  • Falls Brook Farm

  • Fat Stone Far

  • From the Farm

  • Maple Breeze Farm

  • Marna Roons

  • TALK Seafood

  • Tiffany Farms Pasture Raised Beef

  • Traveling Italian Chef

  • Upper Pond Farm

  • Wave Hill Breads

Guest Vendors include:

  • Confections by Toni-Marie
  • Mostly Nuts
  • Simply Sweet by Elana

Monkeypox Cases Rise to 48 in CT

Wyoming Now the Only US State Without a Single Case, Highest Number of Cases in NY State

LYME/OLD LYME — The number of cases in the state has risen to 48 as of this morning, Aug. 9, per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data.

On July 26, Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) Director of Health Stephen Mansfield confirmed to LymeLine.com by email that there are still no cases of monkeypox in the nine towns, which comprise the LLHD. These towns include both Lyme and Old Lyme. We are currently seeking an update on the situation.

Wyoming is now the sole state, which has reported no cases.

On Aug. 4, the White House declared monkeypox a public health emergency.

On Saturday, July 23, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the monkeypox outbreak a public health emergency of international concern.

The CDC’s 2022 US Map & Case Count includes an ongoing, updated count of monkeypox cases throughout the country. There are 8,934 cases in the US at time of publication of this article.

The states with the highest number of cases at time of publication (Aug. 9) are New York (1,960), California (1,310), Florida (936), Texas (702), Illinois (672), Georgia (625), and the District of Columbia (303).

Connecticut’s first case was announced on July 5.

“Monkeypox spreads through close prolonged contact with an infected person. This might include coming into contact with skin lesions, or body fluids, sharing clothes or other materials that have been used by an infected person, or inhaling respiratory droplets during prolonged face-to-face contact,” said Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH)  Commissioner Manisha Juthani, MD.

She added, “Residents who are concerned about fever, swollen glands, and a new rash, should contact their health care provider.

Diagnostic testing for monkeypox is now available from commercial laboratories, including LabCorpMayo Clinic, and Quest, and providers can order testing from these laboratories as they would order other diagnostic tests. Testing is available through the State Public Health Laboratory, Monday-Friday.

Although anyone can get and spread monkeypox, the current cases are primarily spreading among social networks of gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men. For those who have multiple or anonymous sex partners, their likelihood of monkeypox exposure is high.

Due to the state’s current low case count, Connecticut has not received a substantial allotment of the monkeypox vaccine from the federal government at this time. More doses are expected in the coming weeks.  

Vaccination may be recommended for those who:

• Are close personal contacts of people with monkeypox (post-exposure prophylaxis)
• May have been exposed to the virus
• May have increased risk of being exposed to the virus, such as people who perform laboratory testing to diagnose monkeypox

“At the present time, our top priority is ensuring access to post-exposure prophylaxis and then expanding to a larger pool of atrisk persons when our vaccine supply allows us to do so,” explained Commissioner Juthani.

For those seeking treatment or additional information on the vaccine and antivirals, contact your health care provider or call the DPH Epidemiology Program at (860) 509-7994 or (860509-8000 after hours.

For more information about monkeypox, visit the CDC monkeypox webpage and/or the CT DPH monkeypox webpage.

Editor’s Note: Parts of this article are based on a press release issued July 14 by CT DPH and sent to LymeLine.com by Ledge Light Health District.

Vendor, Partner, Food Truck Applications Now Open for High Hopes Holiday Market, Event to be Held Nov. 13 in Old Lyme

The High Hopes Holiday Market will be held this year on Sunday, Nov. 13.

OLD LYME — The High Hopes Holiday Market will be back again in-person on Sunday, Nov. 13, 2022, at the organization’s location at 36 Town Woods Rd. in Old Lyme.

For one afternoon, the High Hopes arena in Old Lyme will be transformed into a marketplace with something for everyone.

Vendor applications are now open at this link. Applications are due by Friday, Aug. 26, and vendors will be notified of their status by Friday, Sept. 2.

For further information, e-mail Trudy Burgess or call her at 860.434.1974 x 123.

Old Lyme’s Solid Waste & Recycling Committee Takes Important Message ‘On The Road’ at Midsummer Festival

“No plastic bags in green bins” (Suzanne Thompson, Old Lyme Solid Waste & Recycling Committee Member)

OLD LYME — Did you read that green slip which arrived in the mail with your 2022-23 Old Lyme property tax invoice?

It notes that the Town of Old Lyme has a new waste and recycling hauling contract with CWPM Inc. but perhaps more significantly, it emphasizes the need for residents to be vigilant regarding what they place in their green recycling bin.

The green slip was the work of Old Lyme’s Solid Waste & Recycling Committee, which has recently been reconstituted under co-chairs Maryellen Basham and Jim Ward, with members including Leslie O’Connor, Karen Taylor, Fred Behringer, and Suzanne Thompson.

We asked Thompson why the committee had conceived the idea of sending out the green slip to all property owners. She explained, “Old Lyme residents have an opportunity to hold down our waste handling costs and  reduce our impact on the environment by putting the correct items in their green recycling bins.”

She stressed that this means quite simply and unambiguously, “No plastic bags in green bins.”

Thompson adds, “The committee also encourages residents to home compost their vegetable peelings instead of tossing them into the blue trash bin.”

In an effort to expand their message further, Thompson notes that the committee is taking their message “out on the road,” with a stand at the Midsummer Festival on Saturday (July 30.)  The committee will be one of the participant organizations in the Hands On-M!nds On feature along the Artist’s Trail at the Florence Griswold Museum, which is anticipated to draw many visitors.

The committee will offer a variety of games and activities to educate and inform Festival-goers of all ages about recycling and solid waste management.

Committee member Behringer and his daughter are currently hard at work designing an interactive quiz game related to ‘Going Green’ with regard to recycling and more, which will be available for people to play when they stop by at the stand.

Thompson says enthusiastically, “Come and see us on the Trail, have some fun … and learn a lot!”

She adds that more tips and methods to reduce waste will be coming soon from the committee and the Town of Old Lyme. LymeLine.com will continue to support the committee’s efforts by publishing this information as it becomes available.
Editor’s Note: Visit this link to read updated Old Lyme Transfer Station information, which includes a valuable recycling guide titled, ‘What’s In, What’s Out.’ 

All-New Art Store Opens at Lyme Academy Today; Offers Art Supplies, Gifts, Collectibles

A view of the eclectic interior of ‘de Gerenday’s Fine Art Materials and Curiosities’ at Lyme Academy of Fine Arts. All photos by Caryn B. Davis.

OLD LYME — The Lyme Academy of Fine Arts has announced the opening of de Gerendays Fine Art Materials and Curiosities, a new shop on the Academy’s campus in Old Lyme that offers a variety of art supplies and giftable objects from around the globe.

The official opening of the store will take place during Old Lyme’s Midsummer Festival on Saturday, July 30, with a ribbon-cutting at 10 a.m. All are welcome to join the celebration. The store will then be open all day through 5 p.m.

During the Festival, the Academy will feature an art show and sale by Lyme Academy alumni along with art demonstrations, live musical performances, food, drinks and more. 

Modeled after the most famous and storied art stores in Paris and London, such as Sennelier and L. Cornelissen, this destination shop is as photogenic as it is substantial.

Almost every type and color of paint imaginable is on offer at the newly-opened store inside Lyme Academy of Fine Arts.

Artists will find a vast array of the finest quality oil, acrylic and watercolor paints, brushes of all sizes, fine linen papers, canvas on rolls, and sculpting tools, all chosen by the professional artists, who comprise the faculty of the Lyme Academy.

In addition to supplies for artists, a unique collection of curiosities” adds a sense of old-world charm and sophistication to the store. These include an extensive number of new and rare art books, taxidermy, architectural salvage, tapestries, and one-of-a-kind decorative items for the home.

The Academys Executive Director, Mora Rowe, utilized her background in fashion and design to develop her vision for the interior display and carefully curated items for the unique store.

A highlight of the store is the collection of plaster casts of classical European figurative sculptures (see above) available for purchase. These casts were sourced from notable collections in Italy and France and are used for both teaching and study by faculty and students attending the Academy.

Visitors to the store will find a variety of items for artists and non-artists ranging in price from $5 upwards. Consigned pieces of art, Italian leather journals, candles and jewelry are also for sale in the store.

Furthering a commitment to local artisans, Hardenco, a boutique denim manufacturer located in New Hartford, Conn. was commissioned to produce high quality, Lyme Academy logo-decorated artist aprons and zippered bags for the shop.  

It is part of our mission to create a store at which both artists and people, who appreciate art, can shop,” says Rowe, adding, “Our goal was to include some items that would be artistic in nature, allowing for their use by either artists for still life paintings or individuals and interior designers sourcing products for unique home décor.

Rowe notes, “Additionally, we have ensured that there is something for everyone who visits the store. Whether you are a local artist in need of a new canvas, or a community member looking for a gift, de Gerendays will be top of your list as a place to shop, while also supporting the Academy.”   

Special orders, drop-shipping, online shopping and gift certificates are available.

In keeping with the Lyme Academy’s pursuit of excellence in arts education, we feel it is important that the materials and tools we offer reflect our values,” says Co-Artistic Director Jordan Sokol.

He explains, “We spent many months hand-selecting each brand to ensure the quality of every product. We are thrilled to have the convenience of the store right here at the Academy as many of the artists attending classes and workshops are often in the studio for up to 12 hours a day.”

Sokol notes, “You won’t find many of these products in art supply chains or on Amazon.”

Fine art brands sourced for the store include Michael Harding, Old Holland, Rublev, Artefex, Raymar, Holbein, Winsor & Newton, Chelsea Classical Studio, Silver Brush, Trekell, Robert Simon, Isabey, Raphael, New Wave, Strathmore, Fabriano, Arches, Stonehenge, Staedtler, Derwent, Sennelier, Apollon, Centurion and more. 

The shops name honors Laci de Gerenday, the husband of the Academys founder, Elisabeth Gordon Chandler, who was himself a successful sculptor and administrator at Lyme Academy.

The opening of this art store marks one of many planned ventures by the new staff, faculty, and board of the Academy to welcome the Old Lyme community to the campus, support the town’s thriving local art scene, and re-establish Lyme Academy as a premier destination site for artists and art enthusiasts from all over the world.

Editor’s Notes: i) de Gerendays is accessible by the South Campus entrance located at 84 Lyme Street in Old Lyme, Conn. and is currently open to the public Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

ii) The mission of the Lyme Academy of Fine Arts is to teach the foundational skills of drawing, painting, and sculpture in the figurative tradition. By its commitment to training students in these skills and an engagement with contemporary discourse, the Academy will empower a new generation of artists. Through its programs, the Academy is committed to enriching the cultural life of the community. Learn more by visiting www.lymeacademy.edu.

Monkeypox Cases Rise to 28 in CT, None in Lyme or Old Lyme to Date

Four States Remain Without a Single Case, Highest Number of Cases in NY State

LYME/OLD LYME — The number of cases in the state has risen to 28 as of this morning, July 29, per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data.

On July 26, Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) Director of Health Stephen Mansfield confirmed to LymeLine.com by email that there are still no cases of monkeypox in the nine towns, which comprise the LLHD. These towns include both Lyme and Old Lyme.

The number of states with no cases remains at four:- Vermont, Montana, Wyoming and Alaska.

On Saturday, July 23, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the monkeypox outbreak a public health emergency of international concern. The decision was announced after the WHO convened its second emergency committee on the issue, July 21.

The CDC’s 2022 US Map & Case Count includes an ongoing, updated count of monkeypox cases throughout the country. There are 3,591 cases at time of publication of this article.

The states with the highest number of cases at time of publication (July 29) are New York (1,247), California (799), Illinois (396)), Florida (346), Georgia (330), Texas (315) and the District of Columbia (214).

Connecticut’s first case was announced on July 5.

“Monkeypox spreads through close prolonged contact with an infected person. This might include coming into contact with skin lesions, or body fluids, sharing clothes or other materials that have been used by an infected person, or inhaling respiratory droplets during prolonged face-to-face contact,” said Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH)  Commissioner Manisha Juthani, MD.

She added, “Residents who are concerned about fever, swollen glands, and a new rash, should contact their health care provider.

Diagnostic testing for monkeypox is now available from commercial laboratories, including LabCorpMayo Clinic, and Quest, and providers can order testing from these laboratories as they would order other diagnostic tests. Testing is available through the State Public Health Laboratory, Monday-Friday.

Although anyone can get and spread monkeypox, the current cases are primarily spreading among social networks of gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men. For those who have multiple or anonymous sex partners, their likelihood of monkeypox exposure is high.

Due to the state’s current low case count, Connecticut has not received a substantial allotment of the monkeypox vaccine from the federal government at this time. More doses are expected in the coming weeks.  

Vaccination may be recommended for those who:

• Are close personal contacts of people with monkeypox (post-exposure prophylaxis)
• May have been exposed to the virus
• May have increased risk of being exposed to the virus, such as people who perform laboratory testing to diagnose monkeypox

“At the present time, our top priority is ensuring access to post-exposure prophylaxis and then expanding to a larger pool of atrisk persons when our vaccine supply allows us to do so,” explained Commissioner Juthani.

For those seeking treatment or additional information on the vaccine and antivirals, contact your health care provider or call the DPH Epidemiology Program at (860) 509-7994 or (860509-8000 after hours.

For more information about monkeypox, visit the CDC monkeypox webpage and/or the CT DPH monkeypox webpage.

Editor’s Note: Parts of this article are based on a press release issued July 14 by CT DPH and sent to LymeLine.com by Ledge Light Health District.