September 19, 2019

LAA in Old Lyme Presents Fall Lecture Series; First Talk on NYC’s Central Park Sculptures Tomorrow at 7pm

Georgia O’Keefe, whose ‘Ram’s Head with Hollyhock Oil’ is shown above, is one of the artists whose work Bob Potter will explore to determine how the American West has inspired artists during the 20th century in a lecture slated for Oct. 10.

OLD LYME — This fall the Lyme Art Association, at 90 Lyme St. in Old Lyme presents three lectures for art lovers. Each lecture will begin at 7 p.m. with refreshments served at 6:30 p.m.

The schedule of Thursday lectures is as follows:
Sept. 19
The Sculpture of Central Park

Connecticut sculptor Wendy Swain will give a virtual tour of the amazing sculptures to be found in New York City’s Central Park, providing information on the history of the park, as well as the sculptors and sculptures.

Oct. 3
The Art of America: Westward Ho! 

Bob Potter will explore  19th century America through the artworks of George Caleb Bingham, John James Audubon, Albert Bierstadt, and others.

Oct. 10
The Art of America: The New West 

The American West has inspired artists for centuries with its vast landscapes of natural beauty. Bob Potter will continue exploring how the American West has inspired artists during the 20th century through the art of Georgia O’Keeffe, Ansel Adams, Richard Diebenkorn, and Ed Ruscha.

There is a $5 fee for members to attend each lecture or $10 for non-members. Parking is free and the venue is handicap accessible.

The Lyme Art Association was founded in 1914 by the American Impressionists and continues the tradition of exhibiting and selling representational artwork by its members and invited artists, as well as offering art instruction and lectures to the community. The Lyme Art Association is located at 90 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, CT, in a building designed by Charles Adams Platt and located within the town’s historic district. Admission is free with contributions appreciated. Gallery hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 10 to 5 pm, or by appointment.

For more information on exhibitions, purchase of art, art classes, or becoming a member, call 860-434-7802 or visit www.lymeartassociation.org

Share

Old Lyme’s Christ the King Church Hosts Harvest Festival & Rummage Sale, Saturday

Bargain hunters stand patiently in line at last year’s King’s Rummage Sale.

OLD LYME — Autumn arrives officially in Connecticut on Sept. 23, and Christ the King Church in Old Lyme is celebrating the new season with its family-friendly Harvest Festival Saturday, Sept. 21, from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

At the huge King’s Rummage Sale held during the Harvest Festival, you’ll find housewares and kitchen items, books and CDs, holiday decorations, jewelry, bicycles and exercise equipment, furniture, rugs, artwork, toys, and more.

Find a bargain (or two!) at the King’s Rummage Sale in Old Lyme, Sept. 21 and 22.

At the Harvest Festival, kids of all ages can try their luck at Games like Soccer Kick, Hockey Shot, and Bust-a-Balloon; get creative with Paint-a-Pumpkin; or simply have their face painted.

There will be games galore at Christ the King’s Harvest Festival.

The Silent Auction offers exciting items like artwork, gift certificates, and themed baskets to bid on.  Local musicians will provide entertainment for you to enjoy while you have lunch or snacks prepared by the Men’s Club.  You can pick out a homemade goodie at the Bake Sale — and choose some autumn color for your home at the Fall Plants & Produce stand.

All the fun of the fair will be happening at Christ the King’s Harvest Festival, Sept. 21.

Admission to Christ the King’s Harvest Festival is free.  Proceeds from the 2019 Harvest Festival will be directed towards the cost of refinishing the hardwood floors in the church.

The Harvest Festival and Rummage Sale take place at Christ the King Church, 1 McCurdy Road, Old Lyme.

The Rummage Sale, Bake Sale, and Plant Sale will continue after the Masses Sunday morning (Sept. 22) from 9 a.m. to 12 noon (with steep discounts on Rummage Sale items, while supplies last.)  Visit www.christthekingchurch.net for directions. And follow the church on Facebook (@ChristtheKingChurchOldLyme) for regular updates.

For more information, call 860-434-1669.

Share

Intake for Lyme Public Hall Tag & Bake Sale Continues Today

Lyme Public Hall. Photo submitted.

LYME — A Tag Sale and Bake Sale will be held at the Lyme Public Hall on Saturday, Sept. 21, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The sale will feature housewares, furniture, jewelry and unexpected treasures, as well as a bake sale with home-made pies and other tasty treats.

Intake for the Lyme Public Hall sale will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. beginning Monday, Sept. 16 through Thursday, Sept. 19. There will also be evening drop-off on Thursday, Sept. 19, from 6 to 8 p.m.

Donations of baked goods and produce can be dropped off before 9 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 21.

The Hall welcomes furniture, tools, small appliances, jewelry, housewares, linens, toys, sporting goods and gift items.

Large appliances, upholstered or particles board furniture, consumer electronics (TVs, computers, fax machines, etc) and large exercise equipment will not be accepted. In addition, no clothing, records or books will be accepted for sale.

Proceeds will benefit the maintenance of the Lyme Public Hall building, the Lyme Local History Archives, and programs for the public.

The Lyme Public Hall is located at 249 Hamburg Road (Route 156) in Lyme, Connecticut.

For more information, call (860)574-4143 or email wdenow@comcast.net.

Share

Jake Kulak & the LowDown, Winners of $10,000 “Foxwoods Battle of the Bands,” to Perform at 5th Annual ‘Cruise Blues & Brews’ Festival, Saturday

Jake Kulak (center) and the Lowdown (Jason LaPierre at left and Jeremy Peck at right) will be performing at the ‘Cruise Blues & Brews’ Festival at Chester Fairgrounds, Sept. 21. The band recently won the $10,000 grand prize in Foxwood’s ‘Battle of the Bands.’

CHESTER — The blues-rock power trio, Jake Kulak and the LowDown just won the “Battle of the Bands” $10,000 grand prize, sponsored by the Foxwood Resort Casino. The band has been wowing audiences all over the state. They have also won the CT Blues Society Band Challenge, they were voted Best Blues Band in the CTNOW’s Best of Hartford Reader’s Poll and they were nominated as Best New Act of the Year at the New England Music Awards.

Jake Kulak and the LowDown will be one of the seven top CT Blues Bands performing at the 5th Annual Cruise Blues & Brews Festival, Sept. 21, at the Chester Fairgrounds. Other bands that will be appearing include: Ninety Nine Degrees, Clayton Allen Blues Band, Ramblin’ Dan and the Other Cats, Cobalt Rhythm Kings, Blues on the Rocks, and Vitamin B-3.

Ramblin’ Dan Stevens is another of the featured blues musicians at the ‘Cruise, Blues & Brews ‘Festival on Saturday, Sept. 21, at Chester Fairgrounds.

The Cruise Blues & Brews Festival will also feature hundreds of antique and unique cars on display, a food court with a variety of food trucks, locally brewed craft beer on tap, a marketplace of vendors, a kid’s play area full of activities, trophies, games and prizes.

All proceeds from Cruise Blues & Brews Festival support the At-Risk Boys Fund at the Community Foundation of Middlesex County. Established in 2013, The At-Risk Boys fund has awarded over $80,000 in grants to organizations throughout Middlesex County. These grants have helped hundreds of boys and young men achieve success and a better life.

The 5th Annual Cruise Blues & Brews Festival will be held Saturday, Sept. 21, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (rain or shine), at the Chester Fair Grounds.  Admission is a $10 suggested donation, and kids are free. Tickets can be purchased at the gate during the Festival.

To learn more about this fun-filled festival, visit www.cruisebluesandbrews.com

Share

Lyme-Old Lyme Junior Women’s Club Hosts New Member’s Social, Friday; All Ages 18+ Welcome

The Lyme Old Lyme Junior Women’s Club (LOLJWC) is hosting their annual New Member’s Social at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 20, at Kokomo’s in Old Lyme. The Club will be providing appetizers at the event.

The LOLJWC welcomes all women over the age of 18 (no upper age limit) from Lyme, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook, Westbrook, Essex, and Deep River, or anyone who feels connected to those communities to join the club. This event is an opportunity to meet veteran club members and the club board and to socialize with other new members.

The Club is a non-profit organization that is dedicated to serving their community through volunteerism and philanthropic giving to a variety of organizations and causes. Recent service projects have included the installation of the new Cross Lane Playground, BINGO Night Fundraiser for the Lyme Ambulance Association, Annual Scholarships for local high school seniors, Birthday Bags for the Soup Kitchen, and hosting a blood drive, among others.

The LOLJWC’s primary mission is to provide local women with a supportive network of like-minded women dedicated to engaging with their community through service. Annual dues are $45 per member. 

For more information, contact the LOLJWC board at loljrwomensclub@gmail.com

Share

Old Lyme Historical Society Presents its 2019 Board of Trustees

Board members of the Old Lyme Historical Society for the coming year gathered for a photo recently in the OLHS building on Lyme Street. Photo by James Meehan.

The Old Lyme Historical Society (OLHS) has announced its 2019-20 board of trustees. They are pictured in the photo above:

Back Row: John Pote, Nicholas Westbrook, Ross W. Higgins, Mark Lander, Jill Pilgrim, Mark Terwilliger, Mary Ellen Jewett, Cynthia Taylor, Michaelle Pearson, Robert DiNapoli and James Meehan.

Middle Row: Skip Beebe, Kevin Cole, Alison Mitchell, Sandra Joncus and Ted Freeman.

Front Row: Dawn McCarthy, Edith Twining, Ann Marie Jewett, Katie Balocca and Elaine Stiles.

Missing from photo: Tim Griswold, Matthew LaConti, Todd Machnik and Andi Williams.

The OLHS officers for the coming year are:

Co-Chairs
Michaelle Pearson and John Pote
Treasurer
Ann Marie Jewett
Recording Secretary
Katie Balocca
Corresponding Secretary
Cynthia Taylor
Share

Old Lyme’s Suzanne Thompson Discusses Shared Solar on her WLIS/WMRD Radio Show, Listen Anytime

Suzanne Thompson’s guest this week on her CT Outdoors radio show is David Desiderato, Connecticut Fund for the Environment’s Shared Solar Coordinator.

OLD LYME — What is Shared Solar and did you know that it is coming to Connecticut? It’s a way for people who don’t have the right roof or location for solar panels to reduce their electricity costs by participating in a shared solar project.
Find out how you and your community can participate in this new program on CT Outdoors with Suzanne Thompson of Old Lyme.  Thompson’s guest this week is David Desiderato, Connecticut Fund for the Environment’s Shared Solar Coordinator.
Listen Saturday, Aug. 17, 1-1:30 p.m. or Sunday, Aug. 18, 7-7:30 a.m., on WLIS 1420 AM/Old Saybrook and WMRD 1150 AM/Middletown, streaming at http://www.wliswmrd.net.  Or play back on your PC or Mac anytime from http://www.wliswmrd.net, click the On Demand icon, look for pop-up screen from radiosecurenetsystems.net, and scroll to CT-Outdoors-81319—Shared-Solar-Toolkit. 
You also can learn more on CFE’s website, http://www.ctenvironment.org, and download your Shared-Solar-Toolkit at Shared Solar Toolkit – CFE/Save the Sound
Share

Death of Milton Allen Announced; Memorial Service to be Held in Old Lyme, Aug. 24

Milton Nicholas Allen  1927- 2019

Milton Nicholas Allen, born in New York City on April 15, 1927, died in Essex, Connecticut on May 29, 2019. He and his wife, to whom he was married for 35 years, had moved to Essex in 2016. They had previously lived in Old Lyme, Connecticut from 1988.

Milton attended Princeton University at the age of 17 where he was elected President of the Class of ‘48. He took a wartime leave of absence from Princeton the next year when he became old enough to attend the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in 1949 with Distinction. Upon graduation he was selected to represent the United States Navy and became a Rhodes Scholar Finalist. Milton then served in active duty for the Navy as a Lieutenant and Submarine Commander until 1954 when he retired to pursue a career in business.

His civilian life began as Assistant to the President of Connecticut General Life Insurance Company in Hartford, prior to the same role for The Sherwin-Williams Company in Cleveland. He was also a Partner at Robert Heller & Associates (Management Consultants). In 1969 he started his own computer service, software and consulting business, which he led as CEO and Chairman until its sale in 1990. Manufacturing Decision Support Systems (MDSS Inc.) was the first online management information systems and services company. It served manufacturing, distribution, insurance and transportation companies across the US.

Milton was a Director of Progressive Corporation for over 20 years, as well as a Director of Day- Glo Color Corp., DeSantis Coatings Inc., Premier Electric Company, Lighting International Corp., AGA Burdox Gas Inc., Daro Industries, Actron Corp., Mueller Electric Company, and the Women’s Federal Savings Bank.

Contributing to the communities in which he lived was very important to him. In addition to his quiet philanthropy and mentoring of leaders, in Cleveland he was a Director of Laurel School, The Cleveland Playhouse, The Cleveland Institute of Music, the Center for Venture Development and Case Western Reserve University School of Management. He was also Chairman of the Goodrich-Gannett Neighborhood Center, Chairman of the Cleveland Council for Independent Schools and Chairman of the Switzer Foundation.

After moving back east, Milton was a Director and then Chairman of The Ivoryton Playhouse in Connecticut, The Putney School and Yellow Barn music school in Vermont, and Chairman of Hubbard Brook Environmental Research. He also served as a Director of the Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library in Old Lyme.

In addition to his business, and various commercial and not for profit roles, for which he was known for his integrity, insight and calm leadership, Milton was committed to his family, his friends and his lifetime love of music and the water.

Milton is predeceased by his wife, Liesa Bing Allen, his older brother, Homer Nicholas Allen and his twin brother, Winston Nicholas Allen. He is survived by his younger brother Gordon Nicholas Allen of Madison, Florida, his three children from a previous marriage, Peter Milton Allen of Palo Alto, California, Thomas Hughes Allen of New York City and Jane Scarlett Allen of Sydney, Australia, as well as five grandchildren, Alexandra Elizabeth Scarlett Allen, Jonathan Thomas Allen, Olivia Sophie Allen, George Dexter Allen and Eloise Scarlett Allen-Bowton.

A Memorial Service to honor his life will be held August 24, 2019 at 2pm at The First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, 2 Ferry Road, Old Lyme, CT. All are welcome.

Share

Opinion: Vote Tuesday in Old Lyme’s Referendum on Sewers, Then Respect the Result

OLD LYME — Tomorrow Old Lyme voters will go the polls to decide whether the Town of Old Lyme should bond $9.44 million to fund the installation of sewers on three streets in Sound View. The facts of the proposal have been widely reported, for example, Mary Biekert of The Day authored a comprehensive article on the subject published Saturday on TheDay.com at this link.

As a community newspaper that cares passionately about the community we serve, we never endorse politicians and rarely choose sides in town referenda. Therefore, we will not be making any recommendation on how you should vote tomorrow, but we will, however, take the opportunity to make a few comments.

This sewer issue has polarized the town with the residents of Sound View understandably not wishing to pay the whole installation cost of sewers saying that is unfair and the cost should be divided between all town residents.  Meanwhile, most townspeople, excluding the Sound View residents, do not see why they should pay for someone else’s sewers when no one would pay to fix their septic system if it failed.

It is important to remember that the Town is under a state mandate to install the sewers and so doing nothing is not an option. The volunteers on the Old Lyme Water Pollution Control Authority (WPCA)  have dedicated an incredible number of hours to this project and our impression is that they have no political agenda. Rather, they are simply hard-working individuals trying to solve an extremely challenging problem and we salute their efforts. If the referendum fails tomorrow, there seems to be a fairly general consensus that the costs will rise in any subsequent plan.

Some have argued that the Town, that is, all Old Lyme residents, should be paying for the work in the streets since they are town-owned and the Sound View residents should only be paying for the hook-ups to their houses. This sounds logical but does not seem to follow the precedent set elsewhere in the state, nor significantly in the four other beach associations in Old Lyme that have already signed on for sewers to be installed at their own expense.

We have enormous sympathies for the residents of Sound View, who — if the referendum passes — will have to pay a median cost of over $31,000 to pay off the loan that the Town is taking out on their behalf. This can be paid in full right away or financed over 20 years at 2 percent interest. The key question is what is a home worth after sewers have been installed?  The assumption is that the sewers will increase the value of any house by more than the homeowner has paid. No one other than the owner benefits from that increase in value, but we also recognize many of the houses in Sound View are never sold but passed down from one generation to the next.

Finally, we are intensely distressed by the deep rift opening up once again in our community over the sewer issue. We recall the green ribbons of yesteryear when residents publicly displayed their support of the first school building project brought to referendum by Region 18 to the anger of those who were not in favor of the proposal. Those were difficult days with palpable mistrust and resentfulness on both sides. 

But back then, there was no social media to fuel the argument and too much has been said on the sewer issue on this virtual town square, some of it inaccurate and/or laced with political venom. This mounting tension spilled over into last Monday’s Special Town Meeting at which  procedural confusion sparked some most unfortunate behavior.

There is no place for this in our beloved town so, regardless of how you are going to vote tomorrow, let us quietly and respectfully take our differing opinions to the ballot box … and then treat the result in the same manner.

Share

Death of Suzanne Brown Announced; Memorial Service to be Held in Old Lyme, Aug. 25

Suzanne Brown

ESSEX — Suzanne “Suzie” Brown, our mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, and friend, passed away Aug. 5, 2019, from complications after a fall in her home. She joins her beloved husband, Templeton “Temp” Brown of 58 years. We will celebrate them both by living their example of truth, love, and commitment.

Suzie celebrated beauty in life by picnicking in the countryside, arranging flowers from her garden, traveling the world, and savoring languages, cuisine, literature, colors, and the natural world. She cherished her family. We all have cultivated deep artistic roots because she showed us how to appreciate beauty in everything around us, every day of her life.

Suzie lived in Winnetka, Ill. for over three decades, and then returned to her childhood state of Connecticut to begin a new adventure with our dad, Temp, in Lyme. She had a wonderful group of friends, old and new, first from her many years in Illinois, and then more recently centered in Lyme and at the Essex Meadows Senior Retirement Community, in Essex. Suzie loved and appreciated the connections she made in Essex Meadows with her neighbors, staff, care-team, and her dear friend, Len Lonnegren.

Suzie will be remembered forever by her family, daughter Lisa Brown and her husband Mark Lellman; grandson Matt Lellman; and granddaughters, Leah Lellman (husband Josh Hisley) and Heidi Lellman (husband Jake Bonnerup); and great-grandson, Theo Bonnerup; daughter Suzanne Butz and her husband Ted Butz; grandsons Teddy Butz and Robert Butz (wife Jen Butz); and great-granddaughter, Hayden Butz; and daughter Maren Brown and her wife Patricia Morrison.

A Memorial Service will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 25, at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme.

In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts can be made to the Lyme Land Trust, which was dear to both mom and dad’s deep appreciation of preserving nature for future generations to enjoy.

Share

Kidz Connection Presents its ‘Outdoor Summer Theater on the Lawn Season Finale’ in Clinton, Aug. 23-25

Join a cast of 43 aspiring advanced musical theater actors as they get groovy with the beloved tracks of ABBA in this fun full length musical production on the lawn at Kidz Konnection Shoreline Theater Academy, Clinton.

Don’t miss this entirely free event to be held Friday, Aug. 23, at 6 p.m., Aug. 24, at noon and 6 p.m. and Aug. 25, at 4 p.m.  Bring your picnics, lawn chairs/blankets and get ready for some summer close-out fun!

For more information, contact kidzkonnectionct@gmail.com/860-227-2363 or go to kidzkonnectionct.org.

Share

‘A Farmers’ Market’ Opens Saturdays for the Season at Tiffany Farms

Bill Hurtle and Jen Tiffany are preparing to open ‘The Farmers Market at Tiffany Farms’ on June 15.

LYME — It was looking as though Lyme Farmers Market, which has for more than 15 years been a perennially popular destination for both local and regional shoppers, was going to be absent from the landscape this year.

In an exciting turn of events, Jennifer Tiffany and her husband Bill Hurtle have reincarnated the market with a new name and location, and will open for business on June 15.  Tiffany explained in an exclusive interview with LymeLine.com that Bill has fostered the idea of running a farmers market for many years. He hails from Long Island and was used to seeing the numerous farm stands at the side of the road there and longed to do something similar in Lyme.

But there was no inclination to follow through with the plan in any major sense while Lyme Farmers Market was still bustling just up the road on Ashlawn Farm in Lyme.

A view of the iconic Tiffany Farms where the new market is planned.

Their first iteration of Bill’s dream happened last summer when Tiffany started hanging buckets of flowers on the feed bunk by the ‘Ladies in Waiting’ sign at the corner of Sterling City Rd. and Hamburg Rd., where the Holstein cows known as the “Ladies of Lyme” used to congregate. But someone said they thought it was a memorial for the cows which are no longer kept at the farm.

As a result, Tiffany says, they “dragged out“ Tiffany Farm’s old silage cart and placed it on the same corner and Tiffany’s daughter, Lisa Simiola, fashioned a nameplate out of wood calling it “From the Farm.” Tiffany and Hurtle then added farm produce to the flower selection  on the stand, all of which was successfully sold on the honor system.

However, when Tiffany read online that Lyme Farmers Market would not be opening this year, she and Bill saw an opportunity.  Jen is passionate about the current plight of farmers — “they’re a dying breed,” she notes sadly — and wants people to understand that her and Bill’s overarching intent in starting the new farmers market is to help and support farmers.  

Tiffany stresses that this venture is absolutely not a money-making one on their part — they both have full-time jobs so it’s “not their bread and butter,” she explains.  Rather, she sees it a way not only to support farmers, but also to bring life and beauty back to the iconic farm and regenerate the sense of community vibrancy previously associated with Lyme Farmers Market.  Any income from the market will be plowed back into the operation to help fund the overheads.

Opening Day for ‘The Farmers Market at Tiffany Farms’ is Saturday, June 15, and the market will be open from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and Tiffany stresses, “All Department of Agriculture, Markets, Department of Health and CT Grown guidelines will apply.”  She is “envisaging the same look as [Lyme Farmers Market at] Ashlawn,” which means there will be neither entertainment nor what she describes as “flea-market-type stuff.”  The aim is a “very classy ” market in Tiffany’s words, focused on Connecticut-grown or-produced items such as dairy, beef, vegetables, herbs, jellies and syrups.

Aerial view of Tiffany farms showing where the Farmer’s Market will be located.

The field generously made available for the market by Susan B. Tiffany — the current owner of Tiffany Farms — is a “secluded area where my grandfather kept draft ponies,” notes Tiffany, adding the layout of the market will involve keeping cars and vendors separate. She and Hurtle are hoping to have a minimum of 10 vendors and says they will be “elated” if the number reaches 20.

The list of vendors who have already signed up for Opening Day includes:

  • Four Mile River Farm
  • Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm
  • Upper Pond Farm (also representing Ashlawn Farm)
  • Sweet Pea Cheese and House of Hayes
  • T.A.L.K. Seafood
  • Fat Stone Farm
  • Dondero Orchards
  • Deep River Farm
  • Wave Hill Breads
  • Beaver Brook Bakery
  • From the Farm

Vendors are still welcome to apply for a spot at “The Farmers Market at Tiffany Farms.”  Vendor applications are available by calling Jennifer Tiffany at 860-434-6239 or 860-575-4730 or emailing jtiffany01@msn.com

Editor’s Note: The Farmer’s Market enjoyed a wonderful Opening Day June 15 with more than 500 people visiting the market. Congratulations to Jen and Bill on such a successful and well-deserved start to their new enterprise.  We heartily commend them for having the courage to take on this venture, the total belief in its mission, and the passion to make it happen.

 

Share

Common Good Gardeners Need Your Help! Listen For More Info on WLIS/WMRD

Old Lyme resident Linda Clough (foreground), who is Common Good Gardens President, is Suzanne Thompson’s guest on this week’s edition of CT Outdoors.

Do you have some time to spare in August to help the Common Good Gardens (CGG) volunteers harvest vegetables for Shoreline Soup Kitchens and Pantry (SSKP)? Join them in the garden behind Grace Episcopal Church, 336 Main Street, Old Saybrook, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday mornings, 9 to 10:30 a.m. (or come earlier on hotter days!)

Come learn about organic, no till gardening, at Common Good Gardens, founded in 2002 by passionate gardeners who wanted to use their expertise to benefit others.

Learn more on CT Outdoors with Suzanne Thompson on WLIS 1420 AM/Old Saybrook & WMRD 1150 AM/Middletown. Listen today, Sunday, Aug. 4, 7 to 7:30 a.m. Or play back on your PC or Mac anytime from http://www.wliswmrd.net, click the On Demand icon, look for pop-up screen from radiosecurenetsystems.net, and scroll to CT-Outdoors-73019—Common-Good-Gardens.

Planting Manager Karen Selines harvesting broccoli that will be delivered to soup kitchen pantries in Old Saybrook, Niantic and Old Lyme.

Thompson’s guest this week, Linda Clough, explains how CGG volunteers grow and harvest 8,000 pounds of produce on their half-acre lot, plus collect 10,000 pounds of produce donated by local farmstands, to help SSKP provide nutritious food and fellowship for people in need along the Shoreline.

Share

Old Lyme Joyfully Celebrates the Magic of Midsummer Festival

Smile, please! Ryan Catucci of Old Lyme snaps a photo of his daughter Olivia, age 3, and five-year-old son Jameson, who had seized the opportunity to step inside a classic painting on the grounds of the Lyme Art Association during Saturday’s Midsummer Festival. All photos by Suzanne Thompson.

OLD LYME — Oh, what a day!  The 33rd Old Lyme Midsummer Festival was deemed a roaring success judging by the huge crowds drawn to the town yesterday to celebrate the event.

The day began with LYSB’s 5K run …

…and then moved to vintage cars photographed by the young …

…and the not so young!

The Bohemian Fair at the Florence Griswold Museum sported tents in a variety of shades …

… while the gardens drew scores of admirers.

There were tall folks …

… and smaller folks, here working on the community sculpture at Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds …

… and four-legged folks!  This is Boomer, who won the Best Trick contest in the Parading Paws competition, posing for a photo!

Photo by Kim Monson.

Sales of art by alumni at Lyme Academy of Fine Arts were brisk …

Photo by Kim Monson.

… while artists took their time to draw or paint the delightfully-clothed model.

In front of the Lyme Art Association, the Old Lyme Land Trust hosted a wonderful display of native pollinator plants and …

… another of live reptiles!  The latter was presented by the Denison Pequotsepos Nature Center.

Members of the Halls Road Improvement Committee were on hand to discuss the various proposals that are still in the development stage for making Halls Road an altogether better place.  Howard Margules is seen here hard at work.

Old Lyme Emergency Services Technicians were on hand to answer questions or spring into action …

… as were board members of the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce. From left to right, Jean Wilczynski, President Rich Shriver, Heather Gagnon and Dan Henderson.

Kristen Thornton (right) of the Florence Griswold Museum helped youngsters create all sorts of wonderful arts and crafts. Her ‘customers’ included Faye Casey (left), who, with her father James Casey (center), had come all the way from Brooklyn,NY, to attend the Festival.

Lyme-Old Lyme Junior Women’s Club was ready to sign up new members …

… and The Moonshiners Trio was one of many bands that entertained as part of the Lymestock Music Festival down on the banks of the Lieutenant River.

Big bubbles were the order of the day at the Children’s Museum booth and Jolee Caldwell of Ivoryton clearly excelled at the task.

The range and quality of vintage cars on display at the Lyme-Old Lions Classic Car Show were nothing short of amazing —

… as were the ladies collecting the fees! Hard at work are, from left to right, Bev Pikna, Lesley Chick at the cash register, and Marianne Szreders.  All funds raised at the Car Show are used to fund scholarships awarded annually to Lyme-Old Lyme High School seniors.

A magician entertained in the Hartmann Education Center …

… and the ladies of Lyme Garden Club had all sorts of goodies for sale!

The Mystic Aquarium stand was a very popular feature and there were so many more.
Day slowly turned into night and then the whole event …

Photo by Katy Klarnet.

…ended with a bang!

So now, to conclude, all we can say is, oh, what a day … and night!

Share

Final Concert in ‘Summer Sounds’ Series Features ‘Ticket to Ride’ at Senior Center, Aug. 1

Beatles Tribute Band Ticket to Ride will be performing at the Lymes’ Senior Center, Thursday, Aug. 1, in the final free concert of the Summer Sounds series, starting at 7 p.m., which will be held rain or shine. All are welcome. Bring your chairs, blankets, dinner, etc. — the performances will be held out on the lawn (weather permitting) or inside if the weather is inclement.

A free ice cream social will follow the concert.

The concert series is sponsored by the following companies and organizations:

Signature Sponsors
Essex Printing (Centerbrook CT.)
Homecare Services of CT. (Niantic CT)
LymeLine.com

Gold Sponsors
All Pro Automotive (Old Lyme CT)
Audiology Concierge (Old Saybrook CT)
VNA of Southeastern CT (Waterford CT)
Reynolds Subaru and Reynolds Boats (Lyme CT)
Old Lyme Visiting Nurses Association, INC (Old Lyme CT)
Senior Health Insurance (Clinton CT)
Stone Ridge Active Retirement Living (Mystic CT)
Friends of the Lymes’ Senior Center (Old Lyme CT)

Silver Sponsors
Care Partners of CT (Wethersfield CT)

The Ice Cream Social Sponsors are:
Old Lyme Republican Town Committee (two Concerts)
Old Lyme Democratic Town Committee
Friends of the Lymes’ Senior Center

Share

Summertime Reminders from Old Lyme’s Recycling Committee to Reuse, Reduce, Recycle

The Old Lyme Recycling and Solid Waste Committee offers these reminders, tips and suggestions to increase the recycling rate in Old Lyme, reduce your waste and keep our environment healthy.

When planning that backyard barbecue or beach visit, avoid single use plastic and all foam products. Use reusable plates, containers and cutlery. Look for the least amount packaging used in your purchases

Just like at home, use the green recycle bin and the blue trash bin at the beach. Do not bag recycling items.

Use reusable shopping bags instead of plastic throwaways. Plastic bags can be recycled at the Old Lyme Library, Big Y, Wal-Mart and many other locations.

Start a compost pile for food items and lawn clippings. These are not recyclable. Glass and plastic containers with food waste in them are not recyclable.

Textile items and construction debris (wood, asphalt shingles) do not belong in either the blue or green bins.

Old Lyme’s recycling rate is 27 percent, about equal with the state average. The statewide goal for 2024 is 60 percent.

Trash hauler fees are going up; the more that can be recycled, the more can be saved in fees. Recycling reduces trash and saves money.

Check out RecycleCT.com and the link on the town website. Click on this link on the Town website to see What’s In / What’s Out in terms of recycling.

Share

$5K Reward Offered for Finding Lost Dog From Lyme, Possibly Spotted Recently Outside Coffee’s

This beautiful dog, Dexter, is still missing.

Dexter, a 10-year-old dark brown (with white spots) German Shorthaired Pointer mix, has been missing for several weeks now. Dexter is generally friendly, but he may be frightened and disoriented at this point.

A possible sighting of Dexter in a blue SUV was made at Coffee’s Country Market on Boston Post Rd. on Friday, July 5. It could have been a different dog, but the woman who reported it said it looked very much like Dexter.

Another photo of Dexter, who is missing.

The last definite sighting of Dexter was near Hamburg Cove on May 22, when he was wearing a collar with nametags and rabies vaccination tag. He also has a microchip.

Please share this and if you have any information on Dexter’s whereabouts, call Richard Gordon at 617-549-2776 or Andrew Barker at 617-669-7195. A $5,000 reward is being offered for his safe return.

Share

Sound View Celebrates the Fourth With a Grand Parade

Sound View held its 26th annual Independence Day parade yesterday and yet again, the sun shone brightly for the occasion.

Joann Lishing led the parade proudly holding the Stars and Stripes and — as always — beaming broadly.  She was followed by the Silver Coronet Band and then local members of the VFW.

State Representative Devin Carney (R-23rd), pictured in the red shirt above, participated in the event as did Old Lyme Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal (also wearing red and walking behind State Rep. Carney in the photo above.)

The remaining participants in the huge parade were the myriad of appropriately decorated bicycles and their riders, golf carts bedecked in red, white and blue and their passengers, a girl on stilts, emergency vehicles and their personnel, and anyone else who wanted to join the parade!

Participants gathered at the north end of Hartford Ave. and then marched south towards Long Island Sound, back up Portland Ave. and across to Swan Ave. The final segment of the parade was the return trip up Hartford Ave. to the Shoreline Community Center.

Visit this link to view a video taken by Carol Mirakian of the parade.

Visit this link to view a gallery of photos of the parade taken by Dana Jensen and published on TheDay.com.

Share

Beach Donuts on Sale Weekends in Sound View, Proceeds Benefit Shoreline Community Center

Photo by Leon Ephraïm on Unsplash.

OLD LYME — The original, freshly made, “Beach Donuts” will be on sale Saturdays, Sundays, and Labor Day through Sept. 2, at the Shoreline Community Center on Hartford Ave., in Sound View from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m.or until sold out.

All sale profits go to support the Shoreline Community Center and the staff are all volunteers.

For more information, call Shirley at 860-434-2871.

Share

Exhibition of Artwork by Christian Brechneff on View at Cooley Gallery

This “Bat Flower” is one of the paintings by Christian Peltenburg-Breshneff, which will be on display at The Cooley Gallery in Old Lyme.

Over the past three decades, Christian Peltenburg-Brechneff of Lyme has traveled the world to visit some of the most glorious private gardens to paint en plein air.

He has created a luscious visual record of 28 of them in a charming, gift-sized book of watercolors and gouaches. Into the Garden chronicles this long-term pilgrimage of a visionary painter, opening these exquisite private gardens to the public for the very first time.

The Cooley Gallery at 25 Lyme Street is hosting an exhibition of paintings from the book and additional works.  An Opening Reception for the exhibition will be held Saturday, July 6, from 4 to 7 p.m. and Brechneff will be on hand to sign copies of Into the Garden.

All are welcome.

Share