September 28, 2020

Letter to the Editor: Carney Deserves Re-election, No One Works Harder for Lyme-Old Lyme Community

To the Editor:

Rep. Devin Carney is a champion for Lyme and Old Lyme at the State Capitol. Among his many accomplishments, he has worked to defeat the high-speed train from decimating our community,  helped secure funding for Old Lyme’s library and open space in Lyme, and supported local parents in their fight to stop state-mandated school regionalization.

Locally, Devin is active in Old Saybrook Rotary, which provides scholarships to Lyme–Old Lyme students; he’s a member of the Lyme–Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce; and he serves on the Old Lyme Zoning Board of Appeals.  No one works harder for our community!

Over his six years in office, Devin has amassed a successful record of fighting for his constituents; he knows his district and he knows his way around the capitol. There is still work to be done, and with his committee assignments and House leadership status, Devin Carney is the right person to continue representing the 23rd District in Hartford. He has my vote and I hope he can count on yours.

Sincerely,

Ellen Cole,
Old Lyme.

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Our Policy Regarding Letters to the Editor

LYME/OLD LYME — We look forward to receiving your Letters to the Editor regarding the upcoming election and so thought it would be helpful to republish our policy regarding Letters.

Letters must not exceed our 450-word limit.

Letter writers must supply their name, home town, and telephone number for verification purposes.  They also should note any political memberships/affiliations.

We will publish a maximum of one letter every two weeks from each individual letter-writer.

We will publish letters and op-ed’s related to the Nov. 3 election through midnight Saturday, Oct. 31.  The only letters which will be published Sunday, Nov. 1 and Monday, Nov. 2, will be those directly related to letters previously published.

No letters related to the election will be published Nov. 3.

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Letter to the Editor: It’s Time for Change, Rubino Will Promote Climate of Equality as State Rep.

To the Editor:

I met Dave Rubino last year while working on a local election in Old Lyme.  You learn a lot about a person when you are knocking on doors and phone calling together.  I was immediately drawn to his passion to serve the people.  As a Human Rights Lawyer, who has work in the US and overseas, he has a breadth of knowledge and experience about creating a climate of equality that we desperately need in our country right now.

I realize we don’t have term limits, but I only wish we did.  I do believe that even the best intentioned politician loses their passion after a certain amount of time in office.  Although well meaning, I do believe Devin Carney has lost his edge for serving the people and putting his heart into his responsibilities as the State Representative.  It is through the ballot box that we can enact term limits and bring a fresh perspective to and energy for our district state representative. seat.  The year 2020 is a time for change.  I trust Dave Rubino and I plan to support him with my vote on Election Day.  I hope you will join me!

Sincerely,

Kathleen Tracy,
Old Lyme.

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Letter to the Editor: An Open Letter to the USPS (Excluding Old Lyme P.O.) — Stop Messing With My Mail

To the Editor:

To Whom it Should Concern at the USPS

Please stop messing with my mail!

Let me remind you: Title 39 of the U.S. Code states that the Postal Service shall have as its basic function the obligation to provide postal services to bind the Nation together through the personal, educational, literary, and business correspondence of the people. It shall provide prompt, reliable, and efficient services to patrons in all areas and shall render postal services to all communities.

Unfortunately, your recent “transformative” initiative has had “unintended” consequences that impacted overall service levels.

Is it possible that these consequences, “unintended” or not; have resulted in an unacceptable degradation of the Postal Service, — which is also relied upon by many Americans for prescription refills, pension checks, and, we thought mail-in absentee ballots in November?

You have already warned many states that those transformative misadventures will likely make USPS compliance with state-mandated deadlines impossible to meet.

This may be another moment in history where “failure is not an option”. God help us if that is not also your goal.

Note that I am not suggesting that this is a local issue at USPO/Old Lyme.

Sincerely,

Thomas D. Gotowka,
Old Lyme.

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Letter to the Editor: Old Lyme Land Trust’s Assessment of Bucky Brook Beaver Situation Challenged

To the Editor:

I recently read the statement provided to you by the Old Lyme Land Trust in February. I find it odd that no one from your organization met with Dave Berggren to confirm the lowering level of the pond after one dam was removed.  What’s more egregious is that when I took the Bucky Brook path just yesterday I found 4 beaver dams as well as the beaver’s lodge and how the volunteers did not see these is beyond me and they should be ashamed to have suggested otherwise.

The entire Bucky Brook needs to be dredged as well as the beavers removed.

I have video documentation of all the beaver dams if you want to see.

Sincerely,

Lee Detwiler,
Jenkintown, PA.

 

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Letter to the Editor: An Open Letter to the Old Lyme Community … with Two Challenges

Editor’s Note: We published this letter July 22. We have received comments almost daily related to it — the publication date shown reflects the date of the most recent comment. PLEASE NOTE THAT AS OF JULY 31, 2020 COMMENTS ON THIS ARTICLE ARE NOW CLOSED.

To the Editor:

An Open Letter to the Old Lyme Community 

Several weeks ago a group of two or three hundred residents of Old Lyme marched from Town Hall to the First Congregational Church. On that day, people of varying political perspectives and social backgrounds joined together to give voice to the pain, indignation, and yes, hope, that meaningful change could be enacted to address the systemic racism that continues to plague our country. It was a heartening moment, one that was reenacted a week later in Lyme, thanks to the leadership of several thoughtful and passionate students from the Lyme-Old Lyme High School. Both events were the occasion for our community to acknowledge its limitations, even while articulating our broad aspirations, that toward which we hope and strive. 

Foremost among our limitations is the scarcity of people of color in our two towns, a fact made overwhelmingly clear by the rallies themselves. The faces gathered on the church lawn and on the ball field in Lyme were predominantly white. Foremost among our aspirations is the will to address that painful evidence of de facto segregation, and to make our town more welcoming and open to people of all races and backgrounds. To do that, we’ll have to ask, and hopefully answer, difficult questions about what makes our schools, our houses of worship, our public spaces, our town boards and committees, and yes, our housing, so overwhelmingly homogenous, so overwhelmingly white. 

Two years ago Old Lyme went through a series of public hearings about an affordable housing project that would have been built under the direction of HOPE Partnership. During those hearings, many residents voiced a variety of concerns about the location of that project, while also saying that they were broadly supportive of affordable housing – just not there. 

Now is the time to reopen that discussion. Now is the time to trust that what was spoken during those hearings, a broad affirmation of the need for affordable housing in Old Lyme (and Lyme), was actually the case. Now is the time to trust that the pain, outrage, and hope that brought so many of us together last month might actually translate into a meaningful gesture to address the de facto segregation of so many of Connecticut’s towns, including our own. Now is the time to come together as a community, and to finally construct the affordable housing that we so desperately need if we are to be the welcoming and open community we wish to be. 

In a recent conversation with HOPE Partnership, they shared that the organization expended over $100,000 as a result of costs incurred in Old Lyme two years ago. This included land deposits, architects fees, engineering fees, and legal fees. That loss has severely impaired their ability to continue their mission of building affordable housing along the Connecticut Shoreline – though it’s surely worth noting that Madison has recently approved a HOPE project, with another currently underway in Essex. Still, among the consequences of the Old Lyme incident is that HOPE has not been able to hire a new executive director after their previous director left. HOPE Partnership is one of the foremost agencies working to address the systemic inequities of our region, inequities that have profound implications for the racial injustices that have weighed heavily on our hearts over the last months. 

And so here are two challenges. First, can we in Old Lyme come together to collectively raise the $100,000 it will take to replenish the losses HOPE experienced two years ago, helping to restore their capacity to pursue their mission? Through the generosity of two anonymous sources, the First Congregational Church is able to seed that effort with $25,000. That’s a start, but the gap remains. Might some of the other organizations in town be willing to contribute to that effort? Might individuals, with contributions both large and small, be willing to help meet that goal? It would go a long way toward binding the wounds that still exist from two years ago. And it would be a meaningful way to address the systemic injustices that our nation is finally confronting. 

If you’re willing, you can contribute to HOPE Partnership at: 

HOPE Partnership Inc. 90 Main Street, Suite 105B Centerbrook, CT 06409 

We also understand that not everyone is in a position to help financially during this time, particularly because of COVID-19 and its aftershocks. Moral support is also deeply appreciated. You can show that in the form of a letter or short note to HOPE, which would go a long way toward encouraging those who have volunteered their time and labor to construct affordable homes in our region. 

The second challenge is this: we need to find a site where affordable housing can be built, and we need to get out of the way and allow the project to move forward. We are encouraged that the recently formed Old Lyme Affordable Housing Committee is working to identify sites in town that might be suitable, and we support those efforts. 

It won’t single-handedly solve the inequities and injustices that plague our country and our region. But it will create an opening, one that suggests that we’re listening, that we’re responding, and that we care. 

In hope … 

Sincerely,

Rev. Dr. Steven R. Jungkeit, Old Lyme.
Rev. Laura Fitzpatrick-Nager, Old Lyme.
Rev. Carleen Gerber, Old Lyme.

Editor’s Note: All three authors are Ministers of the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme.

PLEASE NOTE THAT AS OF JULY 31, 2020 COMMENTS ON THIS ARTICLE ARE NOW CLOSED.

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Letter to the Editor: Parks & Rec. Leaders Challenged Over Use of Old Lyme Ballfields by Private Entity That Brought in Hundreds of Out-of-Towners

To the Editor:

Old Lyme Parks and Rec. Commission has dedicated much of their energy over the last few years, and particularly the last few months, to limiting the activities in Hains Park. Most recently, this has been executed under three guiding principles: limit the use of public property by private entities, limit the use of Old Lyme property by out-of-town people, namely residents of Lyme, CT and control the spread of COVID-19.

On June 27, lifeguards and parking attendants were stationed at Hains Park to control the influx of out of towners, and ensure social distancing, at taxpayer expense. On that particular Saturday, 3 out of town visitors were identified and barred entry, out of a total of 8 park users. Meanwhile, across town, at Cross Lane, chaos reigned. A private entity had commandeered our ball fields and brought in hundreds of ball-players from as far as the COVID epicenter of Westchester County.

Inquiries have not yet revealed a completed Parks Usage Form, as required by Parks and Recreation posted rules. No social distancing practices were detectable. The Emergency Management Director had not been notified, as has been required in May at Hains Park. Parking was so renegade as to impede the egress of Old Lyme emergency vehicles, stationed at that facility. When the situation was brought to the attention of a Park and Rec employee on Saturday, alternative parking was recommended, but the event was allowed to continue on Sunday without any mitigations.

This inconsistency brings into question the integrity of Parks and Recreation leadership. It is time that Old Lyme taxpayers are served by leadership who actually cares about parks and recreation.

Sincerely,

Candace Fuchs,
Old Lyme.

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Letter to the Editor: Sen. Formica Clarifies His Support of Expanding CT’s Absentee Ballot Rules

To the Editor:

I was disappointed to see David Collins write columns in The Day, (“Can Connecticut GOP block safe voting,” June 11 and “The two sides of Sen. Formica’s mouth on early voting,” June 26), which ignore many facts and try to paint all Connecticut Republicans as wanting to risk people’s lives in a public health emergency as a way of suppressing votes. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Contrary to what is stated in Collins’ columns, I absolutely believe that in the current environment there is a need for vulnerable populations and those with preexisting conditions to vote by absentee ballot, and if Collins had called me before writing columns attacking me, I would have explained my perspective in detail. In this unique situation, I support no-excuse absentee ballots for all people, with proper safeguards in place to ensure every legal vote is counted.

As much as I would like to see every person be able to vote by absentee ballot, there is also a state constitutional question as to whether any legislature or governor has the ability to change the laws on absentee ballots because of the restrictions contained in the Connecticut Constitution. That document can only be changed by Connecticut voters through a ballot question, not by the legislature, governor or any state official.

The Connecticut Constitution does not allow for no-excuse absentee ballots, and states that the legislature may define laws for voting absentee only if a person is, “unable to appear at the polling place on the day of election because of absence from the city or town of which they are inhabitants or because of sickness or physical disability or because the tenets of their religion forbid secular activity.”

The question of what the legislature can do within these limits is currently being discussed amongst legislators and being looked at by the courts. We are awaiting an answer.

Collins wrongly jumps to conclusions about me based on a vote that took place last year long before the COVID-19 pandemic on a proposal to allow for early in-person voting, a different issue. I voted against a referendum on early in-person voting because there was no provision for a safe and secure method for which the early voting was to occur. Instead, the bill asked for a modification to the Constitution and left the safety and security provisions to be defined later. I thought it would have been fairly simple to outline the way early voting would occur with proper protections — in a town clerk’s office during a preset time period for example — and thought that was an important piece missing from the legislation.

While Collins’ intent seems to be designed to lump me and my Republican colleagues in with the division of Washington D.C., I have always worked with people on both sides of the aisle to reach solutions that help Connecticut residents. This issue is no different.

Our job as lawmakers is to make sure we have policies that protect everyone’s rights, including access to voting, the integrity of their vote and upholding the Constitution. If we can address the constitutional question and get clarity from the court as to what the legislature can legally do in regard to absentee ballots, I would vote for no-excuse absentee ballots for all, with proper safeguards during this difficult time.

Sincerely,

State Sen. Paul Formica,
Hartford & East Lyme.

Editor’s Note: State Senator Paul Formica represents the residents of the 20th Senatorial District, which includes Old Lyme along with Bozrah, East Lyme, Montville, New London, Old Saybrook, Salem, and Waterford. He serves as Deputy Senate Republican Leader, Ranking Member of the Appropriations Committee and the Energy and Technology Committee, and Co-Chair of the bipartisan Tourism Caucus. 

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Letter to the Editor: Is Cancellation of Lyme’s ‘Hamburg Fair’ Perhaps Premature? More Planning, Less Politics, ‘a Dose of Courage’ are Needed

Updated with new comment May 17:

To the Editor:

I can understand cancelling a major commercial event 100 days out.  Vendor contracts, insurance, etc. are complicated expensive things requiring major financial commitments months in advance.  The Hamburg Fair is 100+ days away, is this really the time to cancel an event that is managed by able and fabulous local volunteers?

Who doesn’t believe in safety first?  Some people don’t, we see them in the news taunting politicians demanding zero safety buffer in terms of distance and masks for example.  Obviously that’s the wrong approach in an airborne virus.  We all have been bench testing the tried and true distancing, mask and gloves method when we shop for the basics and mail things at the post office and it works.

There is extremism on the other end of the safety argument too.  I am saddened and frustrated that our local politicians aren’t rising to the challenge of this horrible virus and figuring out proven ways (thank you post office and grocery stores) to try to bring some semblance of our previous lives incrementally back.

At some point as the virus wears down, which it is, it will be more dangerous to drive to the Hamburg Fair than to attend it.  I challenge our local brain trust to work harder at opening up some non-unsafe, easily manageable human interaction services such as recycling, burn permits, and other low hanging fruit services to demonstrate to the populace that there is a light at the end of this virus tunnel.  Better planning, less political thinking and a dose of courage are the tools out of this nightmare.

Sincerely,

Andrew Gibson,
Lyme.

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Letter to the Editor: Closing White Sand Beach, Hains Park is Wrong: Old Lyme Residents are Responsible, Respectful

To the Editor:

I feel that closing White Sands (sic) Beach and Hains Park is wrong.  These are not public beaches; they are restricted for use by Old Lyme residents/property owners only, hence the requirement for a parking hang tag that residents can buy at the town hall. Certainly, we can maintain a safe distance from each other.

I have been isolating from family, friends and the general public since March 14th.  I follow guidance from the CDC and watch the news every day.  I worked for the CT Department of Public for over 20 years as a regulator, inspecting nursing homes, child care facilities, camps, mental health and substance abuse facilities, and I am very familiar with infection control.

Now that the weather is warming up and many places to recreate are closed, the beach is a safe place to commune with nature, listen to the waves, get some vitamin D, exercise, and ease anxiety.  Better than hiking or picnicking in the woods where there are ticks.

Now that the OL beaches are closed until further notice, I am grieving another loss of sanctuary – the freedom to exercise my solitary spiritual practice, to walk on the sand and wade in the water.

It is easier to maintain social distancing outside, than to do so in grocery stores, pharmacies, liquor stores, hospitals, etc.

I believe that Old Lyme residents are responsible, respectful and thoughtful people, and I believe that we can use our beaches safely during this very scary, challenging time.

Sincerely,

Susan Kneen Way,
Old Lyme.

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Letter to the Editor: Kudos to Lamont for Banning Short-term Rentals, But Now Close the Beaches

To the Editor:

Compliments go to Governor Ned Lamont for executive order 7T, prohibiting rentals with durations less than 32 days.

Putting the health of her full-time residents who work in the state’s hospitals and businesses, volunteer in her communities and fill her schools, ahead of the economic bounty of beach visitors who clog the roads and beaches, Governor Raimondo (RI) took bolder moves and closed the state’s beaches. Governor Raimondo proudly withstood the disdain of Governor Cuomo (NY), but came out stronger and bolder.

Confirmed COVID19 cases in RI are 1.6 per 1000 residents. Connecticut (currently at 2.7 cases per 1000 residents) also needs the protection from an onslaught of summer visitors, afforded by executive order 7T. Statistical models show that incomplete restraints now will result in revisiting another onslaught of coronavirus in September whose scope would obviate Spring efforts to ‘Flatten the curve’. Moreover, national sentiment shows we would rather suffer a few more weeks of confinement and economic lethargy, than revisit another onslaught of coronavirus in September.

We should respect the dedication of our healthcare workers by elevating social distancing over economic gain . Stand by Governor Lamont and executive order 7T by enforcing the order and closing beaches.

Sincerely,

Candace Fuchs,
Old Lyme.

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Letter to the Editor: ‘Tis the Season for … Vandalism in Old Lyme? What on Earth are the Perpetrators Thinking?

To the Editor:

A view from my porch: some sorrow and anger.

It’s the holiday season, right? “Peace on earth to men and women of goodwill”, right? However, as I looked out from my porch window this morning, there was something that was clearly amiss.  One of my neighbor’s beautiful flower pots was missing and lay smashed and broken near my driveway on Library Lane. This was not a small pot, but probably weighed, filled with soil, a few hundred pounds. So, it took some vandalistic effort. Then, as I walked down the street, I saw that those vandals had also seriously damaged five mail boxes,  and even one of those little green men that alerts drivers that children are playing nearby.

Give me a break, people(?). Where’s your head at?

Sincerely,

Thomas D. Gotowka,
Old Lyme.

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Letter to the Editor: A Note of Thanks From Author Gencarella to Book Reviewer Kloman

To the Editor:

It is a certain if unusual pleasure to see a review of one’s book in print. That privilege is more poignant when the reviewer is a neighbor one admires. And in the case of the recent review of my book, Connecticut: Spooky Trails and Tall Tales (October 28, 2019) and my previous Wicked Weird and Wily Yankees (June 3, 2018) in LymeLine, the honor is made all the more special in being penned by Felix Kloman, who is a writer of stellar books and essays and who had the good sense to marry an equally impressive author, Ann Blair Kloman. I appreciate any attention my books receive, but I will cherish Felix’s complimentary reviews forever. For me they are far more valuable than Captain Kidd’s treasure itself.

My one quibble is that in both cases Felix broke the cardinal law of a positive book review: He wrote essays that are more engaging and enjoyable to read than the source materials they detail. Of course, he can’t help but to write charming prose; that much is apparent from his contributions to Lyme Line since his first column appeared a few years ago. Many things make Lyme special, including its inspiring confederation of thoughtful writers, and Felix is first among that pantheon. To have his approval for my books means the world.

As he noted, Felix and I are literally neighbors, and his and Ann’s welcome of my family convinced us of the wisdom of our move to Lyme. But he and I also share a connection that, as coincidences go, deserves some ink. When Felix learned that I was a folklorist by profession, he inquired if I knew the late George Carey. Sadly, I did not know him personally, but I regard his work highly and consider him a model public intellectual. Carey, I learned, was an old friend of Felix’s. Both men are expert sailors and their friendship grew over many trips on the sea and shared summers in Maine.

George Carey was a professor of folklore at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, where I now have the honor of carrying that title. I am gainfully and happily employed in no small measure thanks to Carey’s trailblazing work at UMass and beyond. The universe often surprises me, but when I leave my job and drive home, two hours away, to check a mailbox perched next to one of Professor Carey’s close friends, I cannot help but think that it also smiles upon us.

It was, then, with trepidation that I left a copy of my new book in Felix’s mailbox. Much rested on it for me. I am not wont to seek the approval of others, but I make an exception for Felix. How could I not? He is not only a thoughtful writer and a model intellectual, but he is that all-too-rare creature: a good reader. His assessment that he relished the folklore stories in the book has made the entire venture in writing it worthwhile.

In his review of my first book, Felix noted that I frequently employed the euphemism “passing” for those who died. He generously noted it as a moment for smiling rather than for criticism and saw comparison with an immortal scene from Monty Python, the “Dead Parrot” sketch. That sketch was a defining contribution to my teenage years. It ignited an interest in humor that informed my decision to study folklore in the first place. Felix was sagacious and gracious in observing how well it penetrated my consciousness. His invocation of that sketch perfectly complemented the work I aimed to do in telling tales of New England eccentrics.

But more importantly, in learning that Felix and I share an admiration for such comedy—true, unabated comedy in the face of life’s absurdities—I am strengthened in my conviction that I am blessed with the best of neighbors. Thank you, Felix, for your kind words and for reminding me that life is made better not only when the universe smiles at us, but when we smile together in solidarity. Your name means “the lucky one,” but I am the one with the good fortune of knowing you.

Sincerely,

Stephen Olbrys Gencarella,
Lyme.

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Letter to the Editor: A Post-Election Message To The People of Old Lyme, ‘We Must Go Forward Together’

To the Editor:

The election is behind us and Old Lyme still has a government. I am certain that Bonnie Reemsnyder will ensure a smooth and gracious transition to Mr. Griswold and our re-elected incumbent selectwoman, Mary Jo Nosal, and selectman, Chris Kerr.

Mr.Griswold inherits a fiscally strong Old Lyme that sits on a well-maintained infrastructure. Clearly, the RTC was able to keep the Port Authority issue in front of voters; and that probably made the difference.

So, now that we are past this contentious election, I’ll close with the words of Winston Churchill, who told Parliament and the British people: “We must go forward together”.

Sincerely,

Thomas D. Gotowka,
Old Lyme.

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Letter to the Editor: Lyme Board of Finance Needs Tyler, House’s Experience

To the Editor:

We need Susan Tyler’s and Bob House’s experience on our Board of Finance in Lyme.  

They are highly qualified, dedicated individuals with deep, professional expertise in budgeting and economic analysis – skills that can greatly benefit this important board.

One look at their qualifications will convince you they’re exactly the people we need working on behalf of our town.  (See our website at LymeDTC.org for their profiles.)

Let’s put these two excellent candidates into office. 

Be a voter on Nov. 5.  

Elect Susan Tyler and Bob House as Board of Finance Alternates.

Sincerely,

John Kiker,
Lyme.

Editor’s Note: The writer is Chair of the Lyme Democratic Town Committee and an uncontested candidate (D) for the Lyme Board of Selectmen.

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Letter to the Editor: Realtor Tinnerello Looks to Join Zoning Commission; Offers Open Door With Transparency, Collaboration, Honesty

To the Editor:

I am running for Zoning in Old Lyme and would like to share my letter to residents:

As a resident and realtor in Old Lyme I have decided to run for Zoning Commission. As a realtor, I understand the balancing act between the town’s interests and private property rights. Old Lyme characteristics make us long-time environmentalists- water, beaches, wetlands, woods. Zoning should honor these unique assets without stifling planned growth and development.

I am a results-oriented problem solver who can manage complex issues. I have experience with managing many stakeholder viewpoints which often require compromise. I intend to make thoughtful decisions while always keeping an eye on the long-term effects they have on our town’s character and charm. If elected to the Zoning Commission I believe we should provide new leadership standards, like having neighborhood discussions when there is major change pending, such as sewers or affordable housing. Let our existing boards collaborate with residents and notify abutters when there is an application pending. Transparency will always be at the forefront of my decision-making process.

As a realtor, I am out every day listening to the concerns of property owners, business owners, conservationists and others whose lives are affected by our rules and regulations. People move here for the quiet, beauty and charm. They leave overcrowded suburban communities for the quality of life and character Old Lyme offers. Zoning plays a  large role in setting that tone. We can modernize and protect our community without changing the town’s identity. If I am elected, I will work hard to strike a balance between maintaining the character of the community and allowing for growth of the tax base from both residential and business development in order to manage an appropriate Real Estate tax on the homeowners of Old Lyme. As a newcomer to Zoning, I realize that I will need to work hard to educate myself on all aspects of important town issues. I will reach out to individuals who have knowledge and expertise on these matters. I am, and will always be, open to your suggestions and thoughts. I will have an open-door policy for communication with ALL Old Lyme residents.

For years, people have trusted me with buying and selling their homes. I have earned their trust by listening, communicating and always being honest. I’ve raised my family in Old Lyme because I love our community and I will not let you or our town down!

I am asking for your vote this Tuesday, November 5th!

Sincerely,

Tammy Tinnerello,
Old Lyme.

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Letter to the Editor: Old Lyme ZBA Alternate Dix Seeks Election as Full ZBA Member, Offers Wide Range of Both Professional, Personal Experience

To the Editor:

Serving effectively on the Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) requires substantial knowledge and experience.  The review of variance applications is a highly regulated process defined by state statute, zoning regulations, and case law.  Every ZBA decision can be appealed in court and overturned if all legal requirements are not met, and any appeal of a ZBA decision results in significant legal costs to the town.  Thus, to gain the knowledge and experience necessary to support informed decision-making and to reduce the risk of costly appeals, most new ZBA members first serve as Alternates before transitioning to full Members.   

I currently serve as a ZBA Alternate, and I have enhanced my knowledge and experience by attending two Land Use courses:  an introductory UConn course, and a full-day course that is offered every two years by the CT Bar Association entitled “CT Land Use Law for Municipal Land Use Agencies, Boards, and Commissions”

I am also a practicing professional engineer with an undergraduate degree in planning and relevant professional Land Use experience, including the planning of an Open Space Planned Unit Development (PUD) on a 120-acre farm in Michigan that is recognized as a model for maximizing preservation and utilization of natural resources within a development. 

Old Lyme faces many Land Use challenges, including its being a shoreline community facing sea level rise.  I feel my experience and training will enable me to bring a valuable perspective to the ZBA, and help the ZBA balance the need to provide relief to property owners that can demonstrate a legal hardship and the need to protect the town’s comprehensive plan that is intended to protect the greater good of the community.

With my experience serving as a ZBA Alternate, I understand the importance of electing ZBA members with relevant Land Use experience, training, and a demonstrated commitment to our community. 

Please allow me to continue to serve on the Old Lyme ZBA by electing me a Full ZBA Member on Tuesday, Nov 5th.  Thank you.

 Sincerely,

Stephen P. Dix,
Old Lyme.

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Letter to the Editor: Tooker Has One of Best Collection Rates in State, Vote For Her to Continue as Old Lyme Tax Collector

To the Editor:

The choice in the election for Old Lyme’s tax collector is clear, Judy Tooker deserves re-election. Judy has dutifully served Old Lyme during her tenure and has a collection rate of about 99% – one of the best in Connecticut. Old Lyme depends on these taxes to fund its schools, town services, and public safety. As an Old Lyme taxpayer, it makes me feel good knowing Judy is so consistent, efficient, and hard working.

Judy is also a lifelong resident of Old Lyme who has built strong relationships with so many people and organizations in town. This goodwill is due to her many years of service and her dedication to our community. She is always out supporting local organizations such as the Old Lyme Fire Department and the Lyme’s Senior Center and her entire family lives in Old Lyme. She is engaged with all aspects of the town, including our schools.

Her commitment to ensuring Old Lyme’s success is apparent to many in town. There is no reason to change course now. Put politics aside in this race and vote for the only candidate with the experience, knowledge, relationships, and strong record. Vote for Judy Tooker.

Sincerely,

Lisa Knepshield,
Old Lyme.

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Letter to the Editor: Old Lyme BOF Alternate Burrows is ‘Deeply Committed’ to This Community, Seeks Fourth Term as Alternate

To the Editor:

I, Adam Burrows, have served three terms as an alternate member of the Old Lyme Board of Finance. I now seek a fourth term. I believe that the role of the Board of Finance is to wisely use the local, state, federal and other dollars available to the town to maintain appropriate services and to support those projects that reflect the current and projected needs of our community. This requires careful development of a reasonable budget for the local taxpayers to review and approve at the annual town meeting. 

My deep commitment to Old Lyme has developed over many years. I was the principal of Old Lyme Center School from 1985 to 2005 and was one of the founding members of the Lyme/Old Lyme Education Foundation and served as president for three years. Our family has resided in Old Lyme for 25 years. JoAnn, my wife, is a retired Region #18 teacher. We have three children. Heather resides with her husband in Wallingford. Meredith resides in Willow Grove, Penn. with her husband and two daughters, Eleanor and Eliot. Adam, our son, is a 2008 graduate of Lyme/Old Lyme High School. 

I would greatly appreciate your vote on Nov. 5. 

Sincerely,

Adam Burrows,
Old Lyme.

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Letter to the Editor: Old Lyme Planning Commission Alternate Klose Seeks Full Seat, Brings Unique Perspective as Planner/Engineer Who Understands Town

To the Editor:

I attended a meeting of the Halls Road Improvements Committee this past February and came to recognize the need for economic development and growth in Old Lyme.  Shortly thereafter I began to make a contribution by joining the town’s Planning Commission as an alternate. I am now seeking your vote as a regular member of this Commission.

I feel qualified for the position as I am a Civil and Land Development Engineer working mostly in residential, commercial and retail design. Having lived in Old Lyme for over three years, I now understand the need for development as well as the concerns of our residents. I am confident that as member of the engineering/planning industry I can provide a unique perspective on ways to develop our town that do not detract from its charm and the New England shoreline character most of us cherish. 

I love Old Lyme and want to help encourage sustainable and purposeful development that promotes economic growth while also reinforcing why Old Lyme is such a great place to live!  If this resonates with you, please vote for me on November 5, at Cross Lane Firehouse. Polls are open from 6am-8pm.

Sincerely,

Alexander Klose,
Old Lyme.

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