July 21, 2019

Celebrate Robert F. Schumann Artists’ Trail Opening at FloGris Museum Tomorrow


Tomorrow, Monday, July 22, at 11 a.m. the public is invited to celebrate the opening of the Robert F. Schumann Artists’ Trail at the Florence Griswold Museum. This event offers those who attend the opportunity to be among the first to experience the natural, artistic, and historic highlights of the Museum’s site via this half-mile, ADA-accessible pathway.

The Artists’ Trail has 242 trees, 452 shrubs, 1,705 bulbs, 2,642 groundcovers, and 8,808 meadow grasses. There are 21 bird boxes that will provide habitat for Big Brown Bats, Little Brown Bats, Barred Owls, Eastern Screech Owls, Wood Ducks, American Kestrels, Songbirds, Eastern Bluebirds, Great Blue Herons, and Ospreys (most of the structures are at capacity already!).

Tomorrow you can meet landscape architects Stimson Associates and the Mountain View landscaping team, participate in a creative activity, and enjoy refreshments on the veranda.

In 2017, the Robert F. Schumann Foundation awarded the Museum a $1 million dollar grant for the implementation of a new vision for the 12-acre property.

Stephen Stimson Associates Landscape Architects studied archival photographs, paintings by the Lyme Art Colonists, and previous research from archeological digs onsite to create a Master Landscape Plan, including the Artists’ Trail.

Late in 2018, Mountain View Landscape broke ground along the riverbank to prepare a rainwater garden. They also installed 19th-century repurposed granite to create tiered access to the hillside.

Since mid-March the crew has been working steadily to cut paths that will become four distinct walks (riverfront, garden, hedgerow, and woodland) that highlight the ecology of migratory bird habitats and native plans as well as locations of historical significance to the Griswold family and the Lyme Art Colony. They outlined the footprint of the original studio of Impressionist artist Childe Hassam with granite blocks, designated the historic orchard with black locust posts, and built an overlook on the Lieutenant River. And so much more …

Behind-the-scenes, staff has been working on way-finding and interpretive materials that will help guide visitors through the natural, artistic, and historic highlights of our site.

Schumann was a devoted trustee and patron of the Museum for nearly two decades. The Museum seeks to honor Schumann’s legacy as an avid birder, conservationist, and philanthropist by dedicating the Artists’ Trail in his honor.

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Last Chance to See State Rep. Devin Carney Stars in Saybrook Stage’s ‘Romantic Comedy’ at the Kate Today, 2pm

Jason Carmichael (Devin Carney) contemplates the situation while Phoebe (Shannon Keagan) sleeps on his lap in this scene from ‘Romantic Comedy’ which runs at the Kate from July 18-21.

What better way to spend a summer night than watching a funny, heartwarming romantic comedy?

Step back into the world of the 60s and 70s and laugh at the way things used to be. Witty writing and clever comedic timing makes a production of Romantic Comedy the perfect summer night out. This fast-paced, hilarious play by Bernard Slade (author of Same Time, Next Year) will be brought to life by the Saybrook Stage Company at the Kate from July 18 through July 21, and is sure to provide a night of laughter and love.

This light-hearted, period piece first opened on Broadway in 1979 and tells the story of arrogant, self-centered and sharp-tongued Jason Carmichael, successful co-author of Broadway romantic comedies. But real-life romance doesn’t come easy for Jason and comedy ensues when he finds himself confronted with two momentous events — he is about to marry a society belle and his longtime collaborator is retiring.

Enter Phoebe Craddock, naïve Vermont schoolteacher and budding playwright – and Jason’s world is turned upside down. The two embark on a fresh, new journey of collaboration and take the theater world by storm. Fame and success are theirs for over a decade and then real-life suddenly changes for both of them – but for better or worse?

Can two writers of romantic comedies make real-life just as exciting? Can everyday life measure up to the perfection of on-stage romances and fairy-tale happy endings?

This is a special summer as the Kate celebrates its 10-year-anniversary and Saybrook Stage is delighted to celebrate along with the entire community.

This production will feature our own State Representative and the Kate Board Member Devin Carney. Carney will bring the leading role of Jason Carmichael to life — he is excited to be portraying such a dynamic, funny character while supporting both local theatre and the Kate. He has been in other Saybrook Stage productions over the years including The Farnsworth Invention and Twelve Angry Men.

The Saybrook Stage Company is delighted to be returning to the Kate for their 18th production, having performed Other Desert Cities this past January.

Visit www.thekate.org or call 860.510.0453 and reserve your tickets now. Also, visit www.SaybrookStage.org for more information about the Saybrook Stage Company.

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2019 Summer Senior Studio Exhibition on View at Lyme Academy Through Aug. 8

“Vanitas Under Stained Glass’ by McKenzie Graham is a signature work in the 2019 Summer Senior Studio Exhibition that opens tonight at Lyme Academy.

Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts of the University of New Haven hosts an opening reception from 5 to 8 p.m. this evening in the Chauncey Stillman Gallery for its 2019 Summer Senior Studio Exhibition.  All are welcome.

The seniors whose work is featured in the exhibition have completed accelerated studies for a Bachelor of Fine Arts or a Post-Baccalaureate degree and will graduate in August 2019. This will be the final exhibition of student portfolios submitted for degrees before the Lyme Academy ceases to be a degree-granting college subsequent to the University of New Haven’s withdrawal.

The Senior Studio experience at the College allows students to refine their vision and develop a skill set in order to create a body of work that exemplifies their individual interests, talents, and artistic sensibilities.

The 2019 Senior Studio Exhibition reflects the culmination of this project.  Students will be present at the opening reception and available to discuss their work.

The exhibition will be on view in the gallery through Aug. 8.  Admission is free Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The sponsor of the exhibition is Saybrook Point Inn/Fresh Salt.

Lyme Academy of Fine Arts is located at 84 Lyme St. in Old Lyme.

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CT Audubon Hosts Coastal Creatures Program Tomorrow Morning

Children investigate the contents of their Touch Tanks!

Photo credit: CT Audubon

OLD LYME — The Roger Tory Peterson (RTP) Estuary Center presents a program titled Coastal Creatures tomorrow, Wednesday, July 17, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. and again on Saturday, July 20, from 9 to 11 a.m.

Get up close and personal with crabs, fish and more. See and touch live animals from Long Island Sound and estuary at the RTP Estuary Center on Halls Rd. in Old Lyme.

Open to all ages. Admission is $25 member; $30 non-members;$15 children ages 2-15.

July 17 – Register here

July 20 – Register here

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‘The Cartells’ Play in ‘Summer Sounds’ Concert Tonight at Senior Center

‘The Cartells’ will play at Lymes’ Senior Center, Thursday, July 19.

The Cartells will be performing at the Lymes’ Senior Center, Thursday, July 18, in the second free concert of the Summer Sounds series, starting at 7 p.m., which will be held rain or shine. All are welcome. Bring your chairs, blankets, dinner, etc. — the performances will be held out on the lawn (weather permitting) or inside if the weather is inclement.

The Lyme-Old Lyme Lions Club will be selling hotdogs, hamburgers and drinks before the concert starting at 5:30 p.m. with proceeds benefitting their scholarship fund.

A free ice cream social will follow all concerts.

The remaining concerts in the Summer Sounds series are:
July 25 at 7 p.m.- Rock Solid Alibi (50’s, 60’s, & 70’s)
Aug. 1 at 7 p.m.- Ticket to Ride (Beatles Tribute Band)

The concert series is sponsored by the following companies and organizations:

Signature Sponsors
Essex Printing (Centerbrook CT.)
Homecare Services of CT. (Niantic CT)
LymeLine.com

Gold Sponsors
All Pro Automotive (Old Lyme CT)
Audiology Concierge (Old Saybrook CT)
VNA of Southeastern CT (Waterford CT)
Reynolds Subaru and Reynolds Boats (Lyme CT)
Old Lyme Visiting Nurses Association, INC (Old Lyme CT)
Senior Health Insurance (Clinton CT)
Stone Ridge Active Retirement Living (Mystic CT)
Friends of the Lymes’ Senior Center (Old Lyme CT)

Silver Sponsors
Care Partners of CT (Wethersfield CT)

The Ice Cream Social Sponsors are:
Old Lyme Republican Town Committee (two Concerts)
Old Lyme Democratic Town Committee
Friends of the Lymes’ Senior Center

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A Clarification on the Sewer Payment Issue

Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder

We have received numerous inquiries this morning regarding who is responsible for paying what in regard to the sewers.

To clarify the situation in advance of tonight’s meeting, we followed up with First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder, who said categorically, “The Town [of Old Lyme] has to borrow the money, but the repayment will be based on revenues from the project … [which will be] paid by the users.”  She noted, however, that “There is always the chance that someone is going to challenge the amount charged to them.”

Asked whether the mill rate for the residents of Old Lyme would be increased to fund the loan, Reemsnyder responded, “The bonding should not impact the mill rate.”

She added that a vote is planned tomorrow morning at an Old Lyme Board of Selectmen Special Meeting to set the date of Aug. 5 for a Special Town Meeting at which the referendum will be officially called for Aug. 13.

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$5K Reward Offered for Finding Lost Dog From Lyme, Possibly Spotted Recently Outside Coffee’s

This beautiful dog, Dexter, is still missing.

Dexter, a 10-year-old dark brown (with white spots) German Shorthaired Pointer mix, has been missing for several weeks now. Dexter is generally friendly, but he may be frightened and disoriented at this point.

A possible sighting of Dexter in a blue SUV was made at Coffee’s Country Market on Boston Post Rd. on Friday, July 5. It could have been a different dog, but the woman who reported it said it looked very much like Dexter.

Another photo of Dexter, who is missing.

The last definite sighting of Dexter was near Hamburg Cove on May 22, when he was wearing a collar with nametags and rabies vaccination tag. He also has a microchip.

Please share this and if you have any information on Dexter’s whereabouts, call Richard Gordon at 617-549-2776 or Andrew Barker at 617-669-7195. A $5,000 reward is being offered for his safe return.

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Play Beach Blanket Bingo at White Sand Beach, Aug. 7

Play Beach Blanket Bingo Wednesday evening, Aug. 7, from 6 to 8 p.m. at White Sand Beach.

Hosted by Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB), the price for this fun, family evening is $5 per person or $20 per family. All are welcome.

A pizza dinner is included and prizes will be awarded to Bingo! winners.

Bring your beach blanket, bug spray … and your appetite!

This event is open to all Lyme and Old Lyme families.

Check the LYSB website or Facebook page after 5 p.m. for possible weather postponements.

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Lyme-Old Lyme HS, MS Students Receive Prestigious CABE Leadership Awards

Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) Principal James Wygonik congratulates Theodore Wayland and Maggie Wisner, who are both 11th grade students at LOLHS, on receiving CABE Student Leadership Awards. The presentation took place at the June 5 Board of Education meeting.

Maggie Wisner and Theodore Wayland, 11th grade students at Lyme-Old Lyme High School, and Izzadora Reynolds and Cooper Munson, 8th grade students at Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School, were recently recognized by the Connecticut Association of Boards of Education (CABE) with a Student Leadership Award.

Students are nominated to receive this award by their school principal. Students nominated exhibit the following leadership skills:

  • Willingness to take on challenges
  • Capability to make difficult decisions
  • Concern for others
  • Ability to work with others
  • Willingness to commit to a project
  • Diplomacy
  • Ability to understand issues clearly
  • Ability to honor a commitment

Superintendent Ian Neviaser and the Lyme-Old Lyme Board of Education recognized these students at the June 5 Board of Education meeting.

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Newly-Independent Lyme Academy Plans Its Re-Birth With Exciting Schedule of Fall Classes

File photo of the Chandler Academic Center at the now independent and renamed Lyme Academy of Fine Arts.

As of the end of last month, the renamed Lyme Academy of Fine Arts in Old Lyme became an independent entity once again with all ties to the University of New Haven (UNH) severed. Moreover, contrary to a number of rumors circulating around town, the Academy is not about to close, but rather is entering an exciting new phase in its evolution.

On Thursday, the Lyme Academy Board of Trustees Chairman Steven Tagliatella and the newly-appointed Interim Director of the Academy, Frank Burns, met with The Day to discuss the future of the institution. Also present was Kim Monson, an instructor of sculpture, anatomy and drawing at the school, who has been deeply involved in plans to retain the institution as a viable concern.

Lyme Academy College alumna and instructor Kim Monson who has been intimately involved in efforts to keep the Academy as a fully operational institution and is now designing the fall programs.

Monson was authorized to speak to LymeLine.com after the meeting to share an overview of its content. She explained that the overarching message that Tagliatella gave was that the Academy is most definitely not about to shutter its doors, nor to become a generic “Art Center.” She explained that the upcoming academic year is being treated in many ways as a ‘rebuilding’ year during which the Academy will determine the optimum way to move forward. A new program of serious art classes will begin in late September and Monson stressed there is also a strong desire to re-engage the local community in terms of its role as both students and donors.

A vibrant summer program is currently running at the Academy (visit this link for details) and the curriculum is currently being finalized for regular ‘core’ classes to start in late September. These will all adhere firmly to the original mission of the school as defined by its founder, the late Elisabeth Gordon Chandler, who believed passionately in what Monson describes as “observational training.”

Designed by Monson, these core classes comprising six hours per week for six weeks will be offered in Drawing, Painting, Sculpture and Printmaking. They will be modeled on the format followed by the Arts Student’s League in which students work with a model for the first part of the class followed by time with their instructor when he/she gives feedback.  Monson commented that this is the format followed by Lyme Academy College when she studied there as an undergraduate.

There will also be a Portfolio Prep course held over weekends between late September and November for students aged 14 and up.  Classes will include Art of the Cast (Drawing), The Skull- Sculpture), and Shades of Gray (Value Painting.)

Finally, a number of Masterclasses are planned in subjects including Animal Sculpture and Stone Carving.

Publicity postcard for the upcoming 2019 Senior Studio Summer Exhibition, which opens with a reception, July 19.

Marketing will be key to the success of the Academy’s re-birth and an agency is in the process of being hired.  This agency will be responsible for creating a new, engaging website and all ongoing marketing operations related to the fall classes.

Several of the current faculty are being retained by UNH including Randy Melick, Nancy Gladwell and Roland Becerra, who all predate the UNH take-over. The Academy is looking to retain an MFA-qualified faculty in general.

Monson’s enthusiasm for these new programs is palpable — on a personal basis, she said that she is thrilled to see the Academy “return to its roots.” She also mentioned that there are plans to upgrade the academy’s digital studio — a move she feels will enhance the Academy’s already outstanding art teaching spaces even further. Monson added that partnerships with other art colleges are still being explored.

In terms of the wider spectrum of facilities, Monson described the objective as being “how to best utilize the campus … in order to fulfill Elisabeth’s mission.” The townhouses built across the street from the Academy have been returned to the developer with the expiry of the current lease and the administrative space in the Chandler building will be offered for rent.

The Academy’s Board of Trustees will serve as an active board once again rather than in the advisory capacity in which they acted under UNH’s tenure. Monson paraphrased Tagliatella in describing how the board now felt about their task going forward, saying it was as if, “a weight had been lifted.” After a year of uncertainty about where the academy was going, the path forward is now clear, and perhaps more importantly, Monson noted, the message from the meeting was that there is an overwhelming determination to achieve success.

The first event being held under this new administration is the Opening Reception for the 2019 Summer Senior Studio Exhibition next Friday, July 19, from 5 to 8 p.m. in the Chauncey Stillman Gallery at the Academy.The public is welcome to attend and view the work of the 29 graduating students, who have completed an accelerated program in order to complete their BFA’s while the College still held its accreditation.

Editor’s Note: Visit this link to read an article by Mary Biekert of The Day, who was present at the meeting with Lyme Academy officials, and describes its content in more detail. The article was published on theday.com yesterday and printed in The Day today.

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Reemsnyder, Nosal Officially Announce Re-Election Campaign 

Incumbents First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder (right) and Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal have just announced their re-election campaign. (File photo)

Yesterday, Democratic First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder and Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal officially announced they will be running for re-election. Bonnie Reemsnyder has served on the Board of Selectmen since 2003 and was elected First Selectman in 2011. Mary Jo Nosal joined Reemsnyder as a member of the Board of Selectmen in 2011.

“Since first being elected, our number one priority has always been finding innovative ways to improve our town while not putting an unfair burden on taxpayers,” Reemsnyder stated, “and this year, we were proud to be able to sustain a low tax base while actually expanding services and building infrastructure through planning and grants. We continue to build towards a future of financial stability and while we are proud of our accomplishments so far, we know there is still work to be done.”

“I don’t think people fully appreciate the work that Bonnie and Mary Jo do for the town of Old Lyme,” Old Lyme resident Pamelia Parker stated. “Bonnie and Mary Jo have spent their entire time in office advocating for policies that will preserve the character of our town while adapting to a changing state. Going back to their fight to prevent the train coming through our historical district, they have shown time and again that they listen to our concerns and are proactive in providing a voice to everyday people. I love living in Old Lyme and I’m supporting this team because they have shown they have the work ethic and vision to lead us to a better future.”

Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal took the opportunity to speak about their past two years in office. “Keeping taxes low, securing over $1 million in state funding to fix our roads, and supporting our schools and nonprofits are all accomplishments that represent our values and vision as a team,” Nosal commented. “Old Lyme is a special place and the opportunity to continue to serve the people of this town is an honor.”

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Sen. Needleman Joins Gov. Lamont for Signing of Invasive Species Bill

State Senator Norm Needleman (standing, fifth from right) joins a coalition of political and regional leaders as Governor Ned Lamont signs legislation into effect better protecting Connecticut waterways from invasive species.

AREAWIDE – Today, State Senator Norm Needleman (D-33rd) joined Governor Ned Lamont for the signing of legislation designed to fight invasive species and preserve Connecticut’s lakes, ponds and rivers. This step is intended to protect Connecticut’s natural wildlife and environment while also benefitting the beautiful bodies of water that draw so many from the state and beyond.

The 33rd Senate District includes the Town of Lyme.

“Too many bodies of water around Connecticut experience significant environmental damage by invasive species. A simple weed or piece of algae stuck to a boat’s hull can, in time, create a massive threat to a lake or river’s ecosystem, rapidly multiplying. That can harm fishing and recreation, even making the body of water unusable,” said Sen. Needleman. “There’s a reason this legislation received overwhelming support from both environmental groups and lake and boating associations – it will help protect our state against these dangerous threats, keeping our waterways clear. It’s great to see this issue receive the attention it deserves.”

The legislation in question will create a boat stamp, with proceeds helping to fund removal of invasive species from state waterways. Connecticut residents will be charged $5, while out-of-state residents will be charged $25. The collected funds will be deposited into the Connecticut Lakes, Rivers and Ponds Preservation Fund to support programming on eradicating invasive species, education and public outreach programs to better educate the public, and grants to study better management of bodies of water.

The bill passed the House and Senate on bipartisan votes of 131-10 and 34-2, and in March, dozens of residents supported it at a public hearing. Towns in the 33rd District including East Hampton, Lyme and Old Lyme have experienced growth of invasive weeds and algae in their waterways and bodies of water.

The new law takes effect January 1, 2020.

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Sound View Celebrates the Fourth With a Grand Parade

Sound View held its 26th annual Independence Day parade yesterday and yet again, the sun shone brightly for the occasion.

Joann Lishing led the parade proudly holding the Stars and Stripes and — as always — beaming broadly.  She was followed by the Silver Coronet Band and then local members of the VFW.

State Representative Devin Carney (R-23rd), pictured in the red shirt above, participated in the event as did Old Lyme Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal (also wearing red and walking behind State Rep. Carney in the photo above.)

The remaining participants in the huge parade were the myriad of appropriately decorated bicycles and their riders, golf carts bedecked in red, white and blue and their passengers, a girl on stilts, emergency vehicles and their personnel, and anyone else who wanted to join the parade!

Participants gathered at the north end of Hartford Ave. and then marched south towards Long Island Sound, back up Portland Ave. and across to Swan Ave. The final segment of the parade was the return trip up Hartford Ave. to the Shoreline Community Center.

Visit this link to view a video taken by Carol Mirakian of the parade.

Visit this link to view a gallery of photos of the parade taken by Dana Jensen and published on TheDay.com.

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Beach Donuts on Sale Weekends in Sound View, Proceeds Benefit Shoreline Community Center

Photo by Leon Ephraïm on Unsplash.

OLD LYME — The original, freshly made, “Beach Donuts” will be on sale Saturdays, Sundays, and Labor Day through Sept. 2, at the Shoreline Community Center on Hartford Ave., in Sound View from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m.or until sold out.

All sale profits go to support the Shoreline Community Center and the staff are all volunteers.

For more information, call Shirley at 860-434-2871.

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Exhibition of Artwork by Christian Brechneff on View at Cooley Gallery

This “Bat Flower” is one of the paintings by Christian Peltenburg-Breshneff, which will be on display at The Cooley Gallery in Old Lyme.

Over the past three decades, Christian Peltenburg-Brechneff of Lyme has traveled the world to visit some of the most glorious private gardens to paint en plein air.

He has created a luscious visual record of 28 of them in a charming, gift-sized book of watercolors and gouaches. Into the Garden chronicles this long-term pilgrimage of a visionary painter, opening these exquisite private gardens to the public for the very first time.

The Cooley Gallery at 25 Lyme Street is hosting an exhibition of paintings from the book and additional works.  An Opening Reception for the exhibition will be held Saturday, July 6, from 4 to 7 p.m. and Brechneff will be on hand to sign copies of Into the Garden.

All are welcome.

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A Perfect Day for a Parade! Lyme’s Fourth of July Celebration Continues a Long Tradition

Looking across Hamburg Cove in Lyme, the Esther and William Irving Bridge.stands serene.  All photos by Michele and Mike Dickey.

Lyme was blessed yet again with perfect weather this Fourth of July and, although the traditional Independence Day parade has been held for more than 60 years, there was still a sense of eager anticipation as people gathered near the bridge on Cove Rd. for this beloved annual event founded by the late Dr. William Irving and his wife, Esther, and now commemorated with the plaque on the bridge, pictured below.

Back to the parade, and even the dogs seem eager to get started …

At 10 a.m., the firing of a single musket echoed through the cove …

… and the parade kicked off led by this valiant flag-bearer on foot …

Following immediately behind the flag-bearer was Grand Marshal Don Gerber riding in a 1948 Ford Deluxe convertible owned by Manon Zumbaum. Gerber is a local resident since childhood, who was selected for the honorary position in recognition of his long history of volunteer service to the Town.

Gerber served the Lyme Volunteer Fire Company as a member, engineer or assistant chief during the late 1970s and 1980s.. He has served as chairman of the Planning & Zoning Commission for nearly 10 years; as chairman of the Conservation Commission (acting as the Inland Wetland and Watercourse Agency) for 10 years; and as chairman of the Building Committee for the Lyme Public Safety Complex.

He was a member of the Camp Claire Board of Directors for nearly 10 years and has been a member of the Lyme Republican Town Committee for 35 years. He also played an important role in the Town’s recent acquisition of the Johnston Property.

Camp Claire was well represented not only with campers …

… but also by a float of the “Camp Claire Voyager.”

It was indeed a new day for this parade, for there was nary a bike nor trike in sight — young participants eschewed them for scooters …

… and even two hover boards joined the merry throng!

The Lyme Garden Club strutted their stuff …

… as did the Cub Scouts of Lyme Pack 32 and also ambulance and emergency service personnel ..,

… along with Bruce and Tammy Noyes on their World War II Army vehicle.

A cavalcade of old cars brought up the rear, and then the parade was over … all in less than 15 minutes!

Editor’s Note: This article has been corrected to reflect the correct dates of Don Gerber’s service in the Lyme Fire Department. Out apology for the error.

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Don’t Miss the Best 10-Minute Parade in America … or at Least Connecticut! Happening in Lyme Today

The Grand Marshal rode in this grand automobile one year — tomorrow it will be a different vehicle! (File photo.)

Editor’s Note: (i) We are delighted to publish this article which we received from Lyme Selectman John Kiker. The author, Sadie Frankel, serves as an unofficial student reporter for the Town of Lyme.
(ii) Visit this link to read our related story titled,
Town of Lyme Hosts Annual July 4 Parade, Don Gerber to Serve as Grand Marshal.

LYME — July 4th is a day of festivities all around the country and there is no exception in the small town of Lyme, Conn. These celebrations include barbeques, people of all ages sporting red, white, and blue, and the well-known 4th of July parade on Cove Road.

The parade was originally established by the late pediatrician, Dr. William Irving, a resident of Cove Road, who began the parade in 1958 as a way to demonstrate patriotism and celebrate America on the birthdate of our country. It is said that it was his son who sparked the idea, bored and wondering why Lyme didn’t already have a parade.

No one quite knows quite when this parade will kick off each year as it is not a town-sponsored event, nor is it arranged by a specific group or association. It begins whenever everyone gets there, or as Dr. Irving was often quoted as saying, “somewhere precisely between 10 and 11 a.m.”

Dr. Irving organized the parade each year and ensured all appropriate groups were contacted for their participation. He served as the parade’s grand marshal until 2008, when he stepped down after 50 years.

Marchers come complete with candy, balloons … and smiles! Photo by Katie Reid.

People marching in the parade hold balloons and buckets full of candy, ready to toss the sweets to the youngsters, who are watching the parade pass.

The parade has evolved over time into a true community experience, where Lyme residents come together and celebrate their country through cheering, candy and music. Participants change yearly, but always consist of dedicated townspeople, who wish to spend the holiday with their friends, families and neighbors.

There is no order in which people march – spots are determined by who shows up first. Among the participants is always Camp Claire, with children and staff of all ages from the summer camp just down the road dressed in red, white, and blue, marching with enthusiasm. The Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts also are a regular presence with their pack leaders in uniform waving flags.

Photo by Michele Dickey.

Next come the counselors and campers from Camp Claire, pictured above, as they proudly carry their banner and wave to spectators, while cheerfully singing, “It’s a Grand Old Flag.”

Volunteers from the town’s fire department and ambulance association, pictured below, walk to show their support. Members of the Lyme Corgi Club proudly march along with their dogs to celebrate. Various old-fashioned vehicles can be seen driving the parade route from Cove Road to the fairgrounds.

Photo by Katie Reid.

Any Lyme citizen of any age is welcome to walk, drive, scoot, bike, glide, fly, swim, hover, skip, slip-n-slide or march in the 0.4-mile parade to show their national and town spirit.

Along with the parade, Irving also created other celebratory July 4th traditions, some of which persist to this day. Second Selectman Parker Lord leads the ceremonial firing of the muskets to mark the beginning of the parade – a shot heard ‘round the town announcing the beginning of the procession.

The traditional firing of muskets signals the start of the Lyme Fourth of July Parade. Photo by Michele Dickey.

After the parade ends, the Lyme Parks and Recreation Department sponsors a barbeque at the Grange, where people from the town mingle and eat. This tradition has only begun within the past 10 years but has become a staple of the annual observance.

Dr. Irving, after each parade, would go to Cove Road Bridge and throw in tea bags in honor of the progress made since the colonists performed the historic act, which became known as the Boston Tea Party. This tradition is no longer observed; it stopped in 2015 when Dr. Irving passed away. A well-loved and much-missed member of the Lyme community, Dr. Irving’s memory lives on in the annual Cove Road parade.

About the Author: Sadie Frankel is a student at Lyme-Old Lyme High School where she is active in many school activities, including the theater, school newspaper, model UN and robotics program. She has been accepted to The School of the New York Times this summer for a journalism program.

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Former Lyme Pastor Takes Top Honors at NY Book Festival Awards, Also Wins ‘Mom’s Choice Foundation’ Gold Medal

Award-winning author Steve Burt displays two of his acclaimed books.

LYME — Retired pastor Steve Burt, who served the First Congregational Church of Lyme from 2007 through 2012, has won the Mom’s Choice Foundation’s gold medal for Young Adult Fiction for his novel about a girl who helps gargoyles in Wells, Maine. The Bookseller’s Daughter also won the grand prize at the 2019 New York Book Festival Awards.

Burt was profiled in Connecticut Magazine as “The Sinister Minister” after winning the Bram Stoker Award, the world’s top horror writing prize. His most recent novel, The Bookseller’s Daughter, continues his mission to encourage young adults and adults alike not only to accept the unbelievable, but to love it.
 
It started with his FreeKs trilogy—FreeK Camp, FreeK Show, and FreeK Week—which won 24 awards. The thrillers bring 11 “different” teens to the Bridgton/Sebago Lake area to a “special” camp that will help them develop their psychic and paranormal abilities in a safe setting.
Atlanta levitates. Charlie has precognitive dreams. Caroline communicates with earthbound spirits who need her help. Harley travels out-of-body by astral projection. Together with their friends and an odd trio of mentors—three former circus sideshow performers—the teens quickly develop their gifts under pressure, unravel mysteries, and confront villains. Maine’s western mountains and lakes have never been so much fun.
 
Now the Rev. Dr. Burt has given readers The Bookseller’s Daughter, his 26th book, a mystery/thriller about Keegan, a 17-year-old who works at Annie’s Book Stop in Wells, Maine. After the theft of a rare Wells-related Civil War memoir from another local bookstore, Keegan is approached by a hooded figure seeking her help locating a graveyard. (Fact: tiny 7 x 8-mile Wells really does boast an amazing 201 cemeteries.)
The visitor is after the forgotten 202nd, which may contain the remains of a gargoyle. The quest will date back to the Civil War and World War 1, ending in the backwoods of southern Maine. It’s a risky partnership that could cost Keegan not only her own life but the lives of her mother and her best friend.
 
Burt’s books can be found online at Amazon. Barnes & Noble, and Books-a-Million.
More information about Burt’s other books can be found on his website at www.SteveBurtBooks.com.
Dr. Burt will be signing at Books in Boothbay, Maine’s largest gathering of authors, on July 27.
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Weekly Recycling Starts in Old Lyme, July 1

There is no curbside collection on the following holidays:

  • Christmas Day (Dec. 25)
  • New Year’s (Jan. 1)
  • Memorial Day (last Monday in May)
  • July 4th
  • Labor Day (first Monday in September)
  • Thanksgiving Day (fourth Thursday in November)

For these six holidays, curbside collection advances to the following day.

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High Hopes Appoints New Board Chair, Trustees

Newly-appointed High Hopes Board Chair Jacqueline Kangley of Hadlyme leads a rider on the organization’s grounds. Photo credit: Michael Fanelli .

OLD LYME — High Hopes Therapeutic Riding, Inc. has appointed Jacqueline Kangley of Hadlyme as its new chair of the board of trustees for a two-year term.

Kangley was introduced to therapeutic riding by her Essex Elementary School classmates and has been a volunteer at High Hopes since 2004. She has been a Trustee since 2015 and currently volunteers in the therapeutic riding program and serves on the Program, Marketing Advisory, Event, and Development Committees.

She has co-chaired the ‘Concert in the Barn’ and served on many Auction, Décor, and other Benefit Committees. She is a past recipient of the Sally H. Aubrey Award, and the 2018 Path Intl. Region 1 Volunteer of the Year for her outstanding contribution to High Hopes.

“High Hopes is a unique, vibrant community with an important mission. For over 15 years, I’ve watched participants, instructors, volunteers, and horses work together to improve each others’ lives in very measurable ways. I am grateful to be a part of the High Hopes team and value this opportunity to help guide the organization,” said Kangley of her appointment.

As her first order of business Kangley thanked John Catlett as well as outgoing trustees Seymour Smith and Katherine Gibson. Catlett is stepping down as Chair but will continue as a trustee at the Old Lyme non-profit. Kangley said, “Under John’s leadership, High Hopes has ushered in its 45th year with a strong respect for its past and a clear vision for the future. He has overseen the launch of the ‘Share Hope’ Endowment Campaign, the implementation of a new strategic plan, and encouraged an active, engaged board.”

Kangley concluded, “John, Seymour, and Katherine exemplify the dedication and commitment of the over 650 volunteers who help keep High Hopes running. Thank you for all they have done to support High Hopes’ mission.”

Handing over the gravel, Catlett commented: “Jackie is an outstanding choice to lead High Hopes as it begins to implement its latest Strategic Plan and transitions to the public phase of its endowment campaign. Jackie’s long involvement with the organization gives her a deep understanding of High Hopes and positions her well to take on this important role. I’m sure she will help lead the organization to an even stronger position to help impact the lives of those who depend so much on High Hopes.

Two new trustees were also welcomed to the Board, Sarah Kitchings Keenan and Margaret (Mac) Mummert. Each will serve for a three-year term.

Sarah and her husband Christopher reside in Essex with their three children, Ryan, Maggie, and Ashley. Her son, Ryan, has been an active High Hopes participant for five years; both of her daughters have attended the High Hopes Unified Summer Camp. Sarah has served as a member of the High Hopes Development Committee and is currently Treasurer of the Essex Elementary School Foundation.

Mac Mummert of Lyme.

Lyme resident Mac Mummert and her husband, Earl, are veterinarians and have owned four small animal practices. Her special interests include internal medicine and oncology. She has served in many local civic organizations including the Lyme Garden Club, the Child and Family Agency and is a Past President of the SE Connecticut Professional Women’s Network.

Mummert has also served on the vestry of St. Ann’s Episcopal Church and was District Commissioner of the Connecticut Valley Pony Club. Mac has two children, Brian and Anya. Anya has been a participant at High Hopes since she was five and now works as a volunteer twice weekly.

High Hopes Therapeutic Riding, Inc. is a 501(c)3 non-profit based in Old Lyme, CT. Established in 1974, High Hopes serves over 1500 people each year with a unique range of therapeutic riding, carriage driving, and equine earning programs. Ninety-six percent of the organization’s workforce are volunteers who find their own lives enriched by our training, and the power of the horse-human interaction.

Participants include children, teens, adults, and seniors. Horses can build physical strength, emotional resilience, and cognitive development. Families in crisis learn how to trust; veterans deal with PTSD; teens at risk of substance abuse learn self-respect and children in wheelchairs feel the freedom of movement.

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