May 14, 2021

Town of Lyme Holds Annual Budget Meeting Outdoors, Wednesday: Major Issue is Size of Town’s Open Space Fund

LYME — The Town of Lyme will hold its Annual Budget Meeting Wednesday, May 19, at 5 p.m., in person and outside Lyme Town Hall at 480 Hamburg Rd. in Lyme.

Due to COVID restrictions, attendees are requested to bring a folding chair or umbrella if needed. Masks must be worn, and social distancing is required.

The proposed budget can be viewed at this link.

The following agenda items will be discussed and may be voted on:

  1. Acknowledge receipt of the Town of Lyme Annual Reports for the Fiscal Years ending June 30, 2019 and June 30, 2020.
  2. Consider and act on an Ordinance to repeal and replace Town of Lyme Code 157-23(c) to adjust the process for applying for mooring permits in the waters of the Town of Lyme.
  3. Consider and act on an Ordinance concerning the appointment of the Treasurer.
  4. Consider and act on a Resolution accepting North Lyme Cemetery and the assets of the North Lyme Cemetery Association.
  5. Consider and act on a Resolution to require the Board of Finance to set a minimum goal of $1,000,000 for the Open Space Reserve Fund.
  6. Consider and act on estimates of the Board of Finance for the Fiscal Year ending June 30, 2022.

Concern have been raised both directly with LymeLine.com, via email announcements, and on social media regarding the decision by the Lyme Board of Finance to reduce the Town’s Open Space Reserve Fund by 50 percent from $1 million to $500,000.

On April 27, around 60 people attended the board of finance’s virtual Public Hearing on the budget to express their concerns verbally, while a number of others wrote letters that were read into the record.

A subsequent board of finance Special Meeting held April 29, confirmed the reduction in the size of the fund. Since then several groups have been actively spreading awareness of the change to their members and other townspeople.

First Selectman Steven Mattson has introduced a Resolution requiring the board of finance to set a minimum goal of $1 million for the Open Space Reserve Fund. This Resolution will be voted on during Wednesday’s meeting.

 

Old Lyme’s Annual Town Budget Meeting to be Held In Person Monday, No Virtual Option on Offer

OLD LYME — The Town of Old Lyme will hold its Annual Town Budget Meeting in person only on Monday, May 17, at 7:30 p.m. in the Meeting Hall at the Old Lyme Memorial Town Hall at 52 Lyme St., The following agenda items will be discussed:

  1. To adopt the Budget for the fiscal year July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2022, as recommended by the Board of Finance.
  2. To adopt a proposal that taxes in the Town of Old Lyme on Real Estate and Personal Property shall be paid in two (2) semi-annual installments, the first payment being due on July 1, 2021 and the second payment on January 1, 2022.  Any tax in these categories under $100.00 will be due in full in one payment in July, 2021, as are vehicles on Supplemental List due in July, 2022 in one payment.

A vote will likely then be taken to approve both items.

May 13 COVID-19 Update: Lyme, Old Lyme in Lowest Zone for 2-Week New Case Rates, No New Cases in Either Town, Vaccination Rates High in Both Towns

This map, updated May 13, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are now in the (lowest) Gray Zone. (Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.) Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper.

LYME/OLD LYME — The report issued Thursday, May 13, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks shows another huge improvement for the state as whole with the number of towns remaining in the Red Zone (indicating the highest COVID-19 new case rates) falling to 26 from last week’s number of 54.

Both Lyme and Old Lyme are now in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone for two-week new case rates. It is the first week for Old Lyme in that Zone but Lyme is in the Gray Zone for a ninth straight week. Fifty one towns are in this zone increasing from 29 last week.

Neither Lyme nor Old Lyme reported any new cases in the May 13 report meaning Lyme holds steady at 107 cases and Old Lyme at 341.

Overall, the number of towns in each zone is shown below with the previous week’s number in parentheses:

  • 51 (29) towns are now in the (lowest case rate) Gray Zone
  • 51 (31) are in the (lowest but one) Yellow Zone
  • 41 (55) are in the (second highest case rate) Orange Zone.

Lyme and Old Lyme join 49 other towns in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone: Andover, Ashford, Avon, Bethany, Bethlehem, Bozrah, Bridgewater, Canaan, Chaplin, Chester, Clinton, Colchester, Colebrook, Cornwall, Darien, Deep River, East Granby, East Haddam, Eastford, Ellington, Essex, Franklin, Granby, Griswold, Guilford, Hampton, Kent, Lyme, Middlefield, Norfolk, North Canaan, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook, Pomfret, Portland, Preston, Roxbury, Salisbury, Scotland, Sharon, Southbury, Sterling, Union, Warren, Washington, Westbrook, Weston, Westport, Willington, Woodbridge and Woodbury.

The 51 towns in the Yellow (second lowest rate) Zone are: Bethel, Branford, Brookfield, Brooklyn, Canterbury, Canton, Cheshire, Columbia, Coventry, Durham, East Hampton, East Lyme, Easton, Fairfield, Farmington, Glastonbury, Greenwich, Haddam, Harwinton, Killingworth, Ledyard, Lisbon, Madison, Mansfield, Milford, Monroe, Montville, New Canaan, New Fairfield, New Hartford, Newington, Newtown, North Branford, Orange, Oxford, Redding, Ridgefield, Rocky Hill, Simsbury, Somers, Stonington, Suffield, Thompson, Tolland, Trumbull, Vernon, West Hartford, Wethersfield, Wilton, Winchester and Woodstock.

The Orange (second highest rate) Zone now has 41 towns : Ansonia, Barkhamsted, Beacon Falls, Berlin, Bloomfield, Bolton, Bristol, Burlington, Cromwell, Danbury, East Windsor, Enfield, Groton, Hebron, Lebanon, Litchfield, Manchester, Marlborough, Middlebury, Middletown, Naugatuck, New Milford, North Haven, Norwalk, Plainfield, Plainville, Putnam, Salem, Shelton, South Windsor, Southington, Stafford, Stamford, Torrington, Voluntown, Wallingford, Waterford, Watertown, Windham, Windsor and Windsor Locks.

  • The Gray category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is less than five or less than five reported cases.
  • The Yellow category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between five and nine reported cases.
  • The Orange category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between 10 and 14.
  • The Red category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town exceeds 15.

In all cases, this rate does not include cases or tests among residents of nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.

This report is issued daily, but only updated weekly on Thursdays. The most recent report was updated Thursday, May 13; the next updated report will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 20.

Old Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

The May 13 Daily Data Report for Connecticut for data as at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 12, shows that Old Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 330 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 11 probable casesmaking a TOTAL of 341 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Old Lyme residents tested is 5,241, an increase of four over the previous day’s number of 5,237.

Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 99 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases, making a TOTAL of 107 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Lyme residents tested is 1,406, which represents an increase of six over the previous day’s number of 1,401.

Vaccination Rates

Lyme is ahead of Old Lyme in terms of the percentage of its total population that have received a first dose, with 75.99 (74.65) percent vaccinated compared with 67.08 (65.56) percent in Old Lyme. The previous week’s percentages are shown in parentheses.

The percentages for both towns for the age cohort 65+ are very encouraging with Lyme now having 100 percent of seniors 65 and above fully vaccinated while 98.17 (97.69) percent of the same age cohort are fully vaccinated in Old Lyme.

The percentages for the age cohort 45-64, however, similarly show Lyme with 64.62 (53.91) fully vaccinated while Old Lyme has 59.72 (57.66) percent in that category.

Regarding the age 15-44 cohort, Lyme is in the lead again with 48.8 (37.71) percent fully vaccinated while Old Lyme stands at 43.87 (33.99) percent.

Three Fatalities in Old Lyme Since Pandemic Began, None in Lyme

According to the report mentioned above, there have now been THREE fatalities in Old Lyme. Asked Tuesday, Feb. 9, for details of this third fatality, Ledge Light Health Department Director of Health Stephen Mansfield responded, “We have not been notified of any recent deaths in Old Lyme. Keep in mind that that report is compiled by the Connecticut Department of Public Health; deaths are not reportable to local health districts.”

He added, “I can’t speak for their data sources.”

The two fatalities from Old Lyme previously reported in 2020 were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

No fatalities have been reported in Lyme.

35th Youth Art Show on View at Lyme Academy Tomorrow

This unnamed work by seventh grader Madeleine Trepanier is featured in the Youth Art Show on view Saturdays at Lyme Academy of Fine Art.

OLD LYME — The 35th Youth Art Show is on view to the public again tomorrow, Saturday, May 15, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Sill House Gallery at Lyme Academy of Fine Arts located at 84 Lyme Street.

The show will be open for the final time and the same time period next Saturday, May 22. There will be no weekday viewing opportunities.

All are welcome and admission is free.

Masks must be worn when visiting the gallery and social distancing practiced.

The show, which celebrates the creativity of Lyme and Old Lyme youth, is the result of a 35-year collaboration between Lyme Academy of Fine Arts, Lyme-Old Lyme Schools and Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau.

Featuring work by more than 100 students in Lyme-Old Lyme Schools from Grade 6 through Grade 12, the show includes many pieces that have recently won impressive awards in state and local competitions.

For more information, contact Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau at 860-434-7208 or visit www.lysb.org

Deadline for Applications to Summer Sculpture Showcase is Today; Exhibition in Old Lyme to Open June 19


OLD LYME —
Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds located at 80 Lyme St. in Old Lyme, is accepting submissions until this Friday, May 14, for their Summer Sculpture Showcase 2021, which will be on display from June 19, through Oct. 30, 2021.

The 2021 Summer Sculpture Showcase offers a unique opportunity for established sculptors to exhibit their work in locations tailored to accentuating art. This year Studio 80 has announced the expansion of their Showcase in a new collaboration with the neighboring Lyme Academy of Fine Arts.

Both Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds and the Lyme Academy of Fine Arts attract artists from a broad range of artistic communities, which will provide for an exhibition of diverse sculptures.

Keeping in line with the Academy’s mission to educate artists through the traditional forms of representational and figurative art and along with the Sculpture Grounds’ mission to nurture interactions between art, nature and community, Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds is excited to present an exhibition that nurtures relationships within the artistic community both institutions mutually serve.

 

Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds and Lyme Academy of Fine Arts are thoroughly invested in the vibrant Old Lyme arts scene and anticipate this exhibition will attract art-loving visitors from near and far. Both institutions are committed to the important public mission to enrich the cultural life of the region for the education, enrichment, and enjoyment of our community.

Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds is a vibrant community environment dedicated to arts education and appreciation on the Connecticut shoreline. Our mission is to create a bond between art, nature & community by inspiring and promoting participation in the arts.

Visit this link to view the full prospectus.

Open Space Coordinator Seeks Volunteers to ‘Nip the Knotweed,’ This Morning

Japanese Knotweed

LYME — On Friday, May 14, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., Lyme’s Open Space Coordinator is looking for volunteers to help the Town remove invasive Japanese knotweed from a few areas in Lyme.

Volunteers are encouraged to bring their own work gloves, clippers or loppers and bottled water.
The plan is to cut the knotweed down to the ground and bag the plant material using the “method of 3s,” which involves undertaking three chops this growing season (May, mid-July and August), then repeating the process for three years to eliminate the knotweed for good without herbicide. The cuttings must be carefully disposed of since each little piece will regrow into a new plant.

Interested volunteers should send an email to openspace@townlyme.org to register and receive more information and directions.

A brochure explaining how to eliminate knotweed at home can be found by clicking on this link: https://bit.ly/2RKt2sa

CTK Men’s Club Hosts Food Drive Next Week to Benefit Shoreline Soup Kitchens, Starts Sunday

Members of the Christ The King Church Men’s Club take a break from their work preparing for next week’s Food Drive.

OLD LYME — Christ the King Men’s Club is holding a Food Drive to benefit the Shoreline Soup Kitchens and Food Pantries from Sunday, May 16, through Sunday, May 23.

The Club is offering three ways to donate as follows:

  1. Place donation into the food drive box inside the Christ the King Church entrance at 1 McCurdy Drive, Old Lyme.  Visit www.Christthekingchurch.net for details. 
  2. Stop into Nightingales Acoustic Café on 68 Lyme Street to make your donation. Visit www.musicnowfoundation.org for cafe hours. 
  3. Text Mark Gilbert at 860-598-0813 or call Peter Gallagher at 869-598-9060 to have your donation picked up from your Lyme/Old Lyme home or place of business. 

Suggested items to donate are cereal, canned goods, pastas, rice, and … more cereals!

Forgot to shop? Cash/check donations are always welcome.

The Club wishes to extend special thanks to Coffees Country Market, Foodworks Natural Market and Nightingales Acoustic Café for their generous support of this food drive.

Deadline Today to Buy Tickets for Musical Masterworks’ Final Virtual Concert of Season Featuring Tessa Lark

Violinist Tessa Lark

OLD LYME — Musical Masterworks presents its final concert video of its 30th Season, which will be filmed from the stage of the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme in early May.

The concert video will feature the music of Handel, Ives and a grand finale for the season with Mendelssohn’s Piano Trio in D Minor.

The musicians will be Tessa Lark on violin, Gilles Vonsattel on piano, and Edward Arron on cello.

Tickets are on sale through May 14. The link to the virtual concert will be made available to ticket buyers on May 15.  The video can be enjoyed for three weeks and watched as many times as one wishes until June 5. 

Ticket holders are able to experience Musical Masterworks as never before with the audio-video production team creating an intimate concert experience, providing a virtual front row seat to the performers’ artistry.

To purchase individual video tickets ($40 each), or student tickets ($5 each), visit Musical Masterworks at www.musicalmasterworks.org or email admin@musicalmasterworks.org

Musical Masterworks looks forward to returning in October 2021 with its 31st season.

May 12 COVID-19 Update: No New Cases in Either Lyme, Old Lyme; Old Lyme Holds at 341 for 4th Day, Lyme at 107

LYME/OLD LYME —The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Wednesday, May 12, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health(CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 11, shows that no new COVID-19 cases were recorded in either Lyme or Old Lyme compared with the previous day. Lyme and Old Lyme held at their previous day’s cumulative case totals of, respectively, 107 and 341.

This is the fourth reporting day in succession that there has been n change in the number of cumulative cases in Old Lyme and the second day in succession for Lyme.

The next new report will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 13, when the weekly reports of two-week case rates and vaccination rates will also be issued.

Old Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

The May 12 Daily Data Report for Connecticut for data as at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 11, shows that Old Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 330 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 11 probable casesmaking a TOTAL of 341 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Old Lyme residents tested is 5,237, an increase of three over the previous day’s number of 5,234.

Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 99 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases, making a TOTAL of 107 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Lyme residents tested is 1,401, which represents no change over the previous day’s number of 1,401.

Editor’s Note: We inadvertently published this article initially with May 11 in the headline. This is the same article with the correct date in the headline.

Drive-Thru Vaccination Clinic (+ Ice- Cream!) for 12 to15-Year Olds in Old Saybrook Sunday, Monday, Tuesday

LYME/OLD LYME/OLD SAYBROOK — It is time to vaccinate 12-, 13-, 14-, and 15-year-old children against COVID-19.

Visit www.VaccinateMy Kid.com and choose a date and time for your child’s appointment. Pfizer vaccines will be administered.

Drive-through vaccination clinics are being held at Old Saybrook Middle School (OSMS) from 3:30 to 8 p.m. on the following weekday dates:

  • Friday, May 14
  • Monday, May 17
  • Tuesday, May 18

Weekend clinics are being held at OSMS from 10 a.m. to 2p.m. on the following dates:

  • Sunday, May 16
  • Saturday, May 22
  • Sunday, May 23

You will not need to exit your car for your child to receive the vaccine. Parents, who are not yet vaccinated, may also receive a vaccine at the same time as their child on any day.

After you and/or your child has been vaccinated, you can even choose an ice-cream to enjoy!

The OSMS is located at 60 Sheffield St., Old Saybrook.

 

Op-Ed: Since Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Have Been Open All Year, Why Has OL Park & Rec. Summer Camp Been Cancelled?

Editor’s Note: This op-ed was submitted by Melissa Chapps of Old Lyme. It was updated May 10, at 1:40 p.m.

Being the only school district in the region to offer full-time, in-person learning, from the start of the school year, Old Lyme chose to be “all in”. In doing so, we have been the leader in how it is possible to safely reopen. We have been the model, not only to our neighboring towns, but to the State as a whole. We were the example for other towns to follow. We understood that this was vital for our children’s educational, social, and emotional development and pledged to do whatever it took. Hence with the tremendous effort of our entire community – our citizens, administrators, teachers, parents, and, most importantly, our children – we have gone above and beyond to make it happen.

Thus, with Connecticut recording not only its lowest COVID-19 positivity rate in weeks, but also the highest vaccination rates in the country, we were going into summer with a sense of confidence and optimism. The State is reopening, school sports have resumed, restaurant and social gathering restrictions lifted, masks mandates eased. Our new normal was emerging. And after such a challenging year, and the State’s emphasis on local, affordable summer programs, and making the accessibility of such options a top priority, children were looking forward to summer day camps …well, that is, except if you live in Old Lyme.

After being the leader all school year, and after our children proving that they can succeed indoors, Old Lyme now says that the risk of COVID-19 exceeds the benefits of offering its Parks and Recreation Summer Day Camp. The reality of it is they never seriously gave it much consideration to begin with. 

This lack of endeavoring was most evident in the recent Old Lyme’s Parks and Recreation Commission meeting as constituents were turned away and told that they could not physically attend a meeting that was listed as public on the town website, with the location listed as Meeting Hall on the town calendar, and verbally told by the Selectmen’s office that they could appear in person. We were shut out, left to watch from the windows, directed that we could only call in, as the Commission met inside, unmasked, in a room filled with empty chairs. To say we were bewildered was an understatement.

We were there for our children to show support in the reinstatement of the Summer Day Camp. And while we are thankful that the Commission insinuated that they are now open to entertaining ideas, it is marked by great skepticism. The fact that the Summer Day Camp program was not a top priority months ago is a shame and a true let-down by our leadership. We never imagined that our town, which proudly stood as a model all school year, would stop now, as the entire rest of the State paves the way. Our communal efforts thrown to the wayside. As parents, the thought that Old Lyme would not run its Summer Day Camp never even crossed our minds. The idea that we would abandon our “all in” philosophy just because the school year is over was unfathomable. That should have been reason enough to make sure it happened. 

While the Commission asserts that the risk of COVID-19 is far too great for the Summer Day Camp, these same concerns are obsolete when it comes to sports. The fact that so much energy has been, and continues to be, focused solely on ensuring the safe resumption of sport programs and the “fair” usage of our town facilities, from lacrosse to soccer to rowing, is hypocritical. The notion and seemingly justification, of having 225 children playing lacrosse, albeit not all together at the same time, but instead having contact with other children, from other communities, in the playing of such games, while advocating for the equal distribution of playing fields, even calling out other town’s “unwillingness”, thus necessitating us to play throughout the region, and then coming back into our schools and our community is “safer” than running our Summer Parks and Rec Day Camp is nonsensical.

And that is just one sport – it does not even take into account all the hundreds of contacts from all the other sports, from players to spectators, and consequential other points of contact from restaurants to stores, wherein the numbers in totality are virtually immeasurable. But then the Commission has the audacity to imply that contact tracing is only an impediment to the Summer Day Camp – this defies logic. It shows a true lack of rationale and undermines what is even of the Commission’s stated concern. 

The Commission then tried to briefly, and selectively, talk COVID facts, again with only reference to its effects on the Summer Day Camp, as if sport programs are somehow immune. They brought up outdated and inaccurate data, while mentioning recent articles in the paper about other towns, the same towns that we play all our sports in and vice versa. Perhaps they did not realize that in doing so they are not only undermining their agenda against the cancellation of the Summer Day Camp, but they are belittling our remarkable accomplishments, for yes, our neighboring towns have struggled, but this should only strengthen the call for our local Summer Day Camp.

And perhaps they are not aware that many of us actually work on the frontlines and know the real data firsthand. They also failed to examine the toll COVID-19 has had on our children’s mental and emotional health – and how the research overwhelming demonstrates that the continuation of social and enrichment programs, such as the Summer Day Camp, is so desperately needed throughout the summer.

As such, we would like to offer some viable options to implement to ensure the successful and safe reopening of our Summer Day Camp. We can look at the actions our schools and of our children who have proven they can do it – and no, we do not have to worry about them “hugging” as one Commission member tried to use as an excuse. Our children have exemplified all school year they have what it takes to make this possible. We can also look to how our neighboring towns, who once looked to us, are running their programs. We present these options as a starting point and welcome the Commission to build upon them:

  • Push back start date and end date by 1 week
  • Reduce/Limit the number of attendees
  • Restrict residency in that Old Lyme Parks and Rec. Summer Day Camp would be for Old Lyme residents only, and Lyme Parks and Rec. would have to run their own program separately for their residents
  • Use cohorts wherein children are grouped together by grade groups with limited number of children per group
  • Utilize all the town facilities, not just the high school, but all schools and parks
  • Have a large pavilion-style tent for rainy days activities while splitting/rotating gymnasium usage at said locations
  • Require that all employees must be vaccinated
  • Utilize and collaborate with the Ledge Light Health District for contact tracing and inquire about PPE needs and availability
  • Require not only that all children wear masks, but they must provide backups
  • Increase enrollment cost – even though our surplus from last year should cover much of any added expense
  • Ask for volunteers and community involvement of participating families; The residents of Old Lyme have a strong communal foundation, and many would happily give their time and/or resources, donate PPE and cleaning supplies, and more – this is supported by the over 130 signatures collected in support of running our Summer Day Camp 

In closing, we think it is important to note that we are in no way trying to suggest that sport programs should not run, but instead we are trying to uphold equality for all programs. The Parks and Recreation Summer Day Camp was the only safe, affordable, and consistent program for the children within the community, to stay within the community all summer long. And the only sustainable option of those children who do not play sports. By sending our children to different weekly camps throughout the region, it is not only significantly more costly, but we are also expanding our exposure and putting our children, their families, and the community at undue risk

As a community we should stand together and acknowledge the social, emotional, and psychological impact that all our local programs have on our youths. They need this now more than ever. 

It is our hope that we can work together for the betterment and empowerment of our collective community.

Let us be “all in” together.

May 11 COVID-19 Update: No New Cases in Either Lyme, Old Lyme; Lyme Holds at 107, OL at 341

LYME/OLD LYME —The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Tuesday, May 11, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health(CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Monday, May 10, shows that no new COVID-19 cases were recorded in either Lyme or Old Lyme compared with the previous day. Lyme and Old Lyme held at their previous day’s cumulative case totals of, respectively, 107 and 341.

These Daily Reports are not issued by CT DPH on Saturdays or Sundays and therefore Monday’s data includes new cases from both weekend days. The next new report will be issued in the afternoon of Wednesday, May 12.

Old Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

The May 11 Daily Data Report for Connecticut for data as at 8:30 p.m. Monday, May 10, shows that Old Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 330 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 11 probable casesmaking a TOTAL of 341 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Old Lyme residents tested is 5,234, an increase of eight over the previous day’s number of 5,226.

Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 99 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases, making a TOTAL of 107 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Lyme residents tested is 1,401, which represents no change over the previous day’s number of 1,401.

Two-Week New Case Rates Zones: Old Lyme in Yellow, Lyme in Gray

The report issued Tuesday, May 11, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks shows another major improvement for the state as whole with the number of towns remaining in the Red Zone (indicating the highest COVID-19 new case rates) falling to 54 from last week’s number of 97.

During a news conference held Thursday, May 6, Gov. Ned Lamont attributed the decrease in infections to the continuing roll-out of the coronavirus vaccine.

Both Lyme and Old Lyme remain in the zones in which they were placed last week with Old Lyme still in the Yellow (second lowest new case rate) Zone while Lyme remains in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone.

Old Lyme is now one of the 31 towns in the Yellow Zone. Last week, there were 18 towns in this Zone, so this is encouraging news as more towns fall out of the Orange (second highest) Zone.

Lyme is in the Gray Zone for two-week new case rates, recording an eighth straight week in the lowest zone. Twenty-two towns were in this zone last week and, in more good news, this number has increased to 29 this week.

In both cases, the increased total in each Zone reflects a decreased new case rate. (Four zones are specified by the CT DPH — see details below.)

Overall, the number of towns in each zone is shown below with the previous week’s number in parentheses:

  • 29 (22) towns are now in the (lowest case rate) Gray Zone
  • 31 (18) are in the (lowest but one) Yellow Zone
  • 55 (32) are in the (second highest case rate) Orange Zone.

All the remaining 54 towns are in the Red Zone — last week’s number was 97.

Lyme joins 21 other towns in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone: Andover, Bozrah, Bridgewater, Canaan, Chaplin, Chester, Colebrook, Cornwall, Deep River, East Granby, Essex, Franklin, Hampton, Kent, Lisbon, Lyme, Middlefield, Norfolk, Pomfret, Roxbury, Salisbury, Scotland, Sharon, Union, Warren, Washington, Weston, Westport and Willington.

Old Lyme joins 30 other towns in the Yellow (second lowest rate) Zone: Avon, Brooklyn, Clinton, Colchester, Columbia, Darien, Durham, East Haddam, East Hampton, East Lyme, Easton, Glastonbury, Granby, Griswold, Killingworth, Ledyard, Marlborough, New Fairfield, New Hartford, Newington, Portland, Preston, Rocky Hill, Somers, Southbury, Stonington, Tolland, West Hartford, Woodbridge and Woodbury

The Orange (second highest rate) Zone now has 55 towns : Ashford, Beacon Falls, Berlin, Bethany, Bethel, Bethlehem, Bloomfield, Bolton, Branford, Brookfield, Canterbury, Canton, Cheshire, Coventry, Danbury, Ellington, Fairfield, Farmington, Goshen, Greenwich, Groton, Guilford, Haddam, Harwinton, Lebanon, Litchfield, Madison, Mansfield, Montville, New Canaan, New Milford, North Canaan, North Haven, North Stonington, Old Saybrook, Oxford, Redding, Ridgefield, Salem, Simsbury, South Windsor, Sprague, Stafford, Suffield, Thompson, Vernon, Voluntown, Waterford, Westbrook, Wethersfield, Wilton, Winchester, Windsor, Windsor Locks and Woodstock.

  • The Gray category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is less than five or less than five reported cases.
  • The Yellow category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between five and nine reported cases.
  • The Orange category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between 10 and 14.
  • The Red category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town exceeds 15.

In all cases, this rate does not include cases or tests among residents of nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.

This report is issued daily, but only updated weekly on Thursdays. The most recent report was updated Thursday, May 6; the next updated report will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 13.

More Detail on Two-Week Case Rates: Old Lyme Down, Lyme Up

LLHD Director of Health Stephen Mansfield

On Thursday, May 6, Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) also issued their latest weekly report of COVID data for the municipalities within their District.

Ledge Light Director of Health Stephen Mansfield prefaces the report with the comment, “Although the number of new cases remain relatively stable, our contact tracers continue to report clusters, especially those associated with social gatherings and sporting events.”

He stresses, however, “Although we are making great strides with our COVID vaccination program, it is still imperative that we remain diligent in our mitigation strategies.”

The latest Average Daily Case Rate announced Thursday, May 6, (from 4/18 to 5/01) have stayed constant in Old Lyme but decreased in Lyme.

The two-week case rates are as follows:

  • Old Lyme from 9.7 to 9.7
  • Lyme from 9.2 to 6.1

The same report shows that the case numbers in Week 1 and Week 2 respectively and recorded for the period 4/18 to 5/01  (compared with the previous two-week case rate shown in parentheses) are as follows:

  • Lyme had(1) case in Week 1 and(2) in Week 2
  • Old Lyme had(3) cases in Week 1 and(7) in Week 2

This data was updated May 6. The next Ledge Light Weekly Data Report for its District will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 13.

Vaccination Rates

Lyme is ahead of Old Lyme in terms of the percentage of its total population that have received a first dose, with 74.65 (72.06) percent vaccinated compared with 65.56 (63.89) percent in Old Lyme. The previous week’s percentages are shown in parentheses.

The percentages for both towns for the age cohort 65+ are very encouraging with Lyme now having 100 percent of seniors 65 and above fully vaccinated while 97.69 (92.85) percent of the same age cohort are fully vaccinated in Old Lyme.

The percentages for the age cohort 45-64, however, show the numbers reversing with Old Lyme having 57.66 percent fully vaccinated marginally ahead of Lyme at 53.91 percent.

Regarding the age 15-44 cohort, Lyme comes back into the lead again with 37.71 percent fully vaccinated while Old Lyme stands at 33.99 percent.

The state changed its reporting format for vaccination rates on April 15 and their new data does not align precisely with the former data. The detailed data below was partly updated April 29. One change is that the state is now reporting 65 and above as one group, whereas it was previously split into 65-74 and 75 and above. We will present new vaccination rate tables shortly.

Old Lyme
Total population:  7,306
Estimated population age 65-74:  1,067
Estimated population age 75 and above:  794

DateTotal pop. 1st dose given1st dose given as % of total pop. 1st dose given age 65-741st dose given as % of age 65-74 pop. 1st dose given age 75 & above1st dose given as % of age 75 & above pop.
3/12,11528.95%83578%73092%
3/82,62635,94%94588.57%76496.22%
3/153,07042.02%1,02796.25%797100.38%
3/243,24144.36%99893.53%75394.84%
3/313,55348.63%1,00193.81%75595.09%
4/74,17057.08%1,078101.08%76396.1%
4/154,80665.78%1,104103.47%77597.61%
4/294,66863.89%

Lyme
Total population:  2,316
Estimated population age 65-74:  372
Estimated population age 75 and above:  274

DateTotal pop. 1st dose gven1st dose given as % of total population 1st dose given age 65-741st dose given as % of age 65-74 pop.1st dose given age 75 & above1st dose given as a % of age 75 & above pop.
3/160526.12%24466%22281%
3/876733.12%28175.54%22983.58%
3/1580134.59%26972.31%20675.18%
3/241,13549.01%36297.31%279101.82%
3/311,25954.36%372100.00%289105.47%
4/71,51065.2%414111.29%295107.66%
4/151,73975.09%430115.59%298108.76%
4/291,66972.06%

Three Fatalities in Old Lyme Since Pandemic Began, None in Lyme

According to the report mentioned above, there have now been THREE fatalities in Old Lyme. Asked Tuesday, Feb. 9, for details of this third fatality, Ledge Light Health Department Director of Health Stephen Mansfield responded, “We have not been notified of any recent deaths in Old Lyme. Keep in mind that that report is compiled by the Connecticut Department of Public Health; deaths are not reportable to local health districts.”

He added, “I can’t speak for their data sources.”

The two fatalities from Old Lyme previously reported in 2020 were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

No fatalities have been reported in Lyme.

Connecticut Hospital Occupancy

At the request of several readers, we have added a new report showing the respective rates of hospital occupancy at local hospitals. The data for this report is obtained from the Connecticut Hospital Occupancy Report published weekly by the CT DPH and extracted from the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) facility-level data for hospital utilization aggregated on a weekly basis (Friday to Thursday).

The most recent report is dated Feb. 19 and covers the two-week period from 2/12 to 2/18. No subsequent updates have been issued.

Hospital Name% Adult In-patient Occupancy % Adult ICU Occupancy
Data from 1/8 - 1/14
Backus84.424.2
Lawrence & Memorial90.891.4
Middlesex78.289.9
Yale-New Haven87.982.6
Statewide80.860.9
Data from 1/15 - 1/21
Backus83.224.2
Lawrence & Memorial84.090.7
Middlesex83.388.7
Yale-New Haven91.487.9
Statewide79.960.8
Data from1/22 - 1/29
Backus66.10.0
Lawrence & Memorial90.690.0
Middlesex77.286.3
Yale-New Haven84.425.8
Statewide81.262.3
Data from1/29 - 2/5
Backus8622
Lawrence & Memorial8893
Middlesex6661
Yale-New Haven9189
Statewide79.360.7
Data from 2/1 - 2/11
Backus83.822.2
L & M87.687.9
Middlesex68.881.5
Yale-New Haven91.788.3
Statewide80.261.0
Data from 2/12 - 2/18
Backus79.122.4
L & M84.182.1
Middlesex74.488.1
Yale-New Haven90.883.6
Statewide77.959.8

Editor’s Note: The state issues a COVID-19 metric report daily around 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, which includes current data up to the previous evening. In light of the ongoing rise in Coronavirus cases, we publish a new weekday update reporting confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases in Lyme and Old Lyme. 

Big Y Withdraws Application for Gas Station/Convenience Store on Halls Rd., But Another Similar Application May be Planned Nearby

The site of the proposed Big Y Express at the western end of Halls Rd. in Old Lyme.

OLD LYME — In a letter dated May 10, addressed to Rachel Gaudio, Chairman of Old Lyme’s Inland Wetlands & Watercourses Commission, Ryan Scrittorale, PE, Project Manager at Benesch requested the commission to withdraw the application made on behalf of his client, Big Y Foods, Inc. for the “development at 99 Halls Rd. and 25 Neck Rd.”

The proposal was for a 2,100 sq. ft. convenience mart and a gas station on a site surrounding Essex Savings Bank that is currently vacant and partially cleared. The application stated that the fuel system consists of six dispensers under a protective canopy and two double wall fiberglass underground fuel tanks with electronic monitoring.

Scrittorale’s letter states, “Big Y Foods, Inc. has prided itself on being a Neighborhood Supermarket and is vested in the community of Old Lyme.”

5/12 UPDATE: We are now hearing via a social media post that a Letter of Intent has been signed for the purchase of 100 Halls Rd. with a view to submitting a proposal to construct a gas station/convenience store on that site  We contacted the person, who wrote the post, to verify it. The person does not wish to be identified in this article but states their  source is ‘reliable.’

100 Halls Rd is immediately opposite the 99 Halls Rd./25 Neck Rd. discussed above. If traveling up Halls Rd. from Lyme St., 100 Halls Rd. is the blue building on the left-hand-side of Halls Rd. where it meets Neck Rd. The Big Y proposal was for the right-hand-side of Halls Rd. at the same location. 

We will publish more information as we obtain further details.

 

Old Lyme EDC Recommends Declaration of Zoning Approval Moratorium on Halls Rd. Projects

OLD LYME — The following resolution was approved by seven members present at the Old Lyme Economic Development Commission’s regular monthly meeting held Wednesday, May 5. One member, Margaret Jane DeRisio, abstained citing a possible conflict of interest.

The Old Lyme Economic Development Commission (EDC) is tasked with supporting and encouraging a vibrant and sustainable business climate in Old Lyme, scaled to the resources and needs of the town. We seek the optimum development of business opportunities in Old Lyme. The mix of businesses in a particular area such as Halls Road can have a significant impact on the climate for all businesses there, current and future. Planning, therefore, becomes important. 

Because Halls Road connects the northbound and southbound halves of Exit 70 on I-95, its current commercial-only zoning makes it most attractive (in the current business climate) to regional and national chains whose businesses are aimed at highway traffic, and not at the needs of our small town. 

For decades Old Lyme’s planning documents have explicitly said the town should give preference to businesses that support the needs of the town and discourage those aimed at servicing I-95 traffic. They have sought to prevent Halls Road from becoming a series of truck stops and fast-food venues. 

Halls Road has only a limited space that can ever be developed. The town should do what it can to ensure that this limited area is developed in such a way as to best serve the needs of the town and its businesses, present and future. Each new development has an impact on the range of possible future developments. If the Halls Road plan calls for mixed use in a walkable, bicycle-friendly, town-center environment, then each new development in that area must support that long-term goal. Any step in a contrary direction (e.g. toward truck stops, warehouses, factories, big-box stores, etc.) works to prevent the accomplishment of the long-term goal, and should be prohibited or strongly discouraged in this area. These contrary developments are not just sub-optimal uses of a limited resource (buildable land). Their presence significantly reduces the chance of getting the investments we do seek in that area: a mix of smaller-scale market-rate housing combined with shops and restaurants that serve the population of Old Lyme. 

The Halls Road plan is near completion. The next phase includes changing the zoning along Halls Road to reflect the goals of the plan. This will give future investors a clear sense of what types of development are encouraged along Halls Road and which types are not. Clarity is good for business. If Old Lyme does the planning and zoning work correctly, it will attract the kinds of investment we want, and help transform Halls Road into a sustainable, mixed-use, commercial area more in keeping, both visually and functionally, with the small town feel of Old Lyme. Bad developments today obstruct more and better investments in the future. Today, investors interested in mixed-use developments like those envisioned in the town’s plan cannot consider Halls Road because it is zoned “commercial-only.” They are not allowed to compete with truck stops or storage warehouses for the limited property there.

We think it would be wise to declare a moratorium on zoning approvals for projects along Halls Road, effective immediately, pending the completion of the Halls Road plan and any new zoning regulations based on it. It is not fair to our town or to investors to move forward with projects while the rules are in flux. We cannot support near-term projects that would work to prevent or degrade future developments of higher long-term value.

Lyme-Old Lyme High School, Middle School Announce Q3 Honor Rolls

Lyme-Old Lyme High School
Q3 Honor Roll    2020-21

HIGH HONORS
Grade 12:
Kaylee Armenia, Olivia Bartlett, Maxwell Bauchmann, Ava Berry, Emma Boardman, Kyuss Buono, Keenan Burr, Kate Cheney, Hunter Collins, Emerson Colwell, Megan Cravinho, Patrick Dagher, George Danes, Bianca Dasilva, Emily DeRoehn, Corah Engdall, Isabella Flagge, Sadie Frankel, Fiona Frederiks, Samuel Koenigs, Paige Kolesnik, Avery Lacourciere, Grace Lathrop, Mackenzie Machnik, Madelyn Maskell, Elle McAraw, Brendan McTigue, Marina Melluzzo, Riley Nelson, Sophia Ortoleva, Connie Pan, Olivia Papanier, Anwyn Paynter, Jenny Pelaez Cajamarca, Gavin Porter, Aidan Powers, Ezra Pyle, Julie Rudd, Hayden Saunders, Tait Sawden, Jesper Silberberg, Tessa St.Germain, Lian Thompson, McKenzey Thompson, Kelly Walsh, Alison Ward, Ellery Zrenda.

Grade 11:
Nicholas Adeletti, Nihad Bicic, Hannah Britt, Mackenzie Bussolotti, James Creagan, Lauren Creagan, Henry Cutler-Stamm, Eleanor Dushin, Lauren Enright, Victoria Gage, Nicolette Hallahan, Austin Halsey, Andrew Hedberg, Fiona Hufford, Julia Johnston, Nevin Joshy, Kian Kardestuncer, Robyn King, Michael Klier, Felse Kyle, William Larson, Reese Maguire, Abigail Manthous, Stephanie Mauro, Elle Myers, Bella Orlando, Jacob Ritchie, Margaret Rommel, Alexander Roth, Frank Sablone, Calvin Scheiber, Abigail Sicuranza, Abby Speckhals, Drew St.Louis, Nikolai Stephens-Zumbaum, Maverick Swaney, Madison Thompson, Alexandra Tinniswood, Evan Visgilio, Aidan Ward, Melanie Warren, Ellie Wells, Paige Winchell, Jenna Woods.

Grade 10:
Olivia Alpha, William Barry, Callie Bass, Livie Bass, Jillian Beebe, Jordan Beebe, Cooper Bowman, Gillian Bradley, Jamie Bucior, Gretchen Burgess, Hayley Cann, Liam Celic, Alexander Chrysoulakis, Grace Colwell, William Danes, Anna Davis, Jacob Derynioski, John Eichholz, Alexis Fenton, Ethan Hale, Willa Hoerauf, Arber Hoxha, Jonah Lathrop, Ford Macadam, Amy Magalhaes, Marielle Mather, Kennedy McCormick, Madalyn McCulloch, Madeleine Morgado, Cooper Munson, Alexander Olsen, Alain Pecher-Kohout, Kelsey Pryor, Izzadora Reynolds, Santiago Rodriguez, Benjamin Roth, Eli Ryan, Alyssa Spooner, Samantha Tan, Tova Toriello, Kaitlyn Ward, Harry Whitten.

Grade 9:
Emma Bayor, Oliver Berry, Alis Bicic, Natalie Buckley, Jackson Bullock, Sarah Colangelo, Ella Curtiss-Reardon, Eric Dagher, Eva D’Onofrio, Mulanga Drysile, Amelia Gage, Marcia Geronimo, Calla Gilson, Sydney Goulding, Alexis Grasdock, Justin Green, Douglas Griswold, Abby Hale, Ella Halsey, Sedona Holland, Agatha Hunt, Beatrice Hunt, Sabina Jungkeit, Emmerson Kaye, Grady Lacourciere, Griffin McGlinchey, Elaina Morosky, Delaney Nelson, Isabelle O’Connor, Ronald Olin, Jack Porter, Luisa Raby, Sydney Siefken, Hannah Thomas, Louisa Warlitz, Mason Wells, Tyler Wells, Duohui Yan.

HONORS
Grade 12:
Paige Alpha, Colbe Andrews, Juliette Atkinson, Sonia Bair, Rachel Barretta, Sadie Bowman, Jackson Cowell, John Cox, Francette Donato, Samantha Gray, Schuyler Greenho, Emma Griffith, Aryn Jones, Regan Kaye, Gabriel Lavoie, Owen Macadam, Emma McCulloch, Emma Meekhoff, Michael Milazzo, Lauren Pitt, Jacob Quaratella, Kassidy Standish, Jake Stewart, Katelyn Zbierski.

Grade 11:
John Almy, Evan Clark, Ryan Clark, John Conley, Grace Coverdale, Caroline Crolius, Elise DeBernardo, Elizabeth Duddy, Samantha Geshel, Aiden Goiangos, Shawn Grenier, Liam Grethel, Jackson Harris, Zoe Jensen, Cora Kern, Evan Morgan, Samuel Mullaney, Emily Nickerson, Brendan O’Brien, Michael O’Donnell, Lauren Presti, Adeline Riccio, Aidan Russell, McLean Signora, Daniel Stack, Victoria Stout, Olivia Turtoro, Aden Wilson, Ryan Zbierski.

Grade 10:
Sophia Adkins, Whitney Barbour, Ava Brinkerhoff, Sarah Burnham, Jennifer Cajamarca, Luke Celic, Nicholas Cox, Matthew Grammatico, Aidan Kerrigan, Theodore Lampos, Karleigh Landers, Monique Lavoie, Jacob Lopez-Bravo, Calvin Monte, Jaden Reyes, Rhyleigh Russell, Jenna Schauder, Anders Silberberg, Ned Smith, Malcolm Speirs.

Grade 9:
Jedidiah Arico, Elliot Bjornberg, Ava Cummins, Macklin Cushman, Lucas DaSilva, Alexis Frascarelli, Nyla Goulis, Katherine Gryk, Leland Hine, Jair Lata Yanza, Luke Legein, Matthew Mazzalupo, Katherine Mullaney, Dylan Paynter, Grace Phaneuf, Ava Roth, Cailin Ruhling, Kylie-Jean Sevigny, Haley Shaw, Madeleine Soriano, Gabriel Tooker, Kalea VanPelt, Keara Ward, Summer Wollack.

Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School
Quarter 3 Honor Roll   2020-21

HIGH HONORS
Grade 8:
Christopher Anderson, Emma Arelt, Quinn Arico, Natalie Barndt, Micah Bass, Molly Boardman, Justin Bonatti, Mark Burnham, Nathan Burres, Chase Calderon, Andrew Clougherty, Tabitha Colwell, Chloe Datum, Andrea DeBernardo, Zoe Eastman-Grossel, Caeli Edmed, Anna Eichholz, Ella Evans, Grace Ferman, Benedict Frazier, Hoshena Gemme, Ava Gilbert, Abigail Griffith, Henry Griswold, Jonathan Harms, Nicolas Hatch, Kaela Hoss, Rowan Hovey, Shyla Jones, Simon Karpinski, Olivia Kelly, Ella Kiem, Mia Klewin, Peter Kuhn, Ada LaConti, James Lahot Straub, Elise Leonardo, Evan LeQuire, Andrew Liu, Abigail O’Brien, Kanon Oharu, Mutia Quarshie, Drea Simler, Audrey Spiegel, Kathleen Walsh.

Grade 7:
Charlotte Antonino, Zoe Brunza, Alec Butzer, Trevor Buydos, Makayla Calderon, Tyler Cann, Colman Curtiss-Reardon, Christopher Dagher, James Dahlke, Sophia D’Angelo, Rose Dimmock, William Donnelly, Jonathan Farrell, Gabrielle Field, Chase Gilbert, Alexander Glaras, Scarlette Graybill, Christopher Kachur, Thomas Kelly, Katherine King, Jade Lawton, Maya LeQuire, Jayden Livesey, Emily Looney, Elise Marchant, Samuel Masanz, Bridget McAdams, Carter McGlinchey, Ryan Miller, Nina Nichols, Ryan Olsen, Ryan Ortoleva, Louis Patana, Isabella Presti, Jacob Prokopets, Taylor Quintin, Jenna Salpietro, Sophia Shaposhnikova, Luca Signora, Emma Singleton, Addison Spooner, Carson St.Louis, Andrew Taylor, Meredith Thompson, Margaret Thuma, Lucian Tracano, Madeleine Trepanier, Connor Vautrain, Elisabeth Viera, Warren Volles, Edith Williams, Oliver Wyman, Stella Young, Carl Zapatka, Katherine Zhang.

Grade 6:
Collin Anderson, Lucia Arico, Addison Arndt, Zak Avelange, Phineas Barrett, Zachary Belval, Mia Bonatti, Ceciley Buckley, Morgan Buerger, Marla Bulas, Brooke Burgess, William Burgess, Ryan Burres, Anna Bussmann, Brennan Butzer, Lillian Calabrese, Aidan Carpentino, Chase Catalano, Isaac Chartier, Amirah D’Lizarraga, Elliot Dunn-Sims, Samson Edmed, Edward Fiske, Lauren Fulara, Kaedin Gerster, Harrison Goulis, Charles Halsey, Owen Holth, Carolyn Hu, Kalonji Joyce, Elsa Jungkeit, Josephine Kiem, Allisondra Krol, Callahan Lacourciere, Alexa Legein, Olivia Lovendale, John Morosky, Emelia Munster, Grace Osborne, Mia Palmer, Ainsley Rinoski, Cameron Russell, Kevork Shegirian, Nicholas Sokolowski, Carli Teixeira, Magdalena Tooker, Ethan Trepanier, Bowen Turick, Kaylyn Vernon, Ivy Wilson, Charles Zelek.

HONORS

Grade 8:
Oliver Avelange, Shane Eastman-Grossel, Samantha Fiske, Bronwyn Kyle, Brenden Landry, Colette Marchant, Andrew Sicuranza, Madeline Supersano.

Grade 7:
Julia Clark, Anne-Marie Hinckley, Harrison Kleefeld, William Landon, Sebastian Lopez-Bravo, Ian Maeby, Daniela Marin Yanza, Quenten Patz, Tanner Snurkowski, Charlotte Spiegel, John Turick.

Grade 6:
Johanna Coker, Taiyo Gemme, Samuel Gilbert, Gavin Goulis, Skylar Graybill, Logan Landry, Matilda Miller, Eva Oulahan-Smith, Arthur Riccio, Collin Swaney, Brody Ziolkovski.

In It Together: Understanding Critical Connections Between Drug Use/Abuse and Mental Illness


LYME/OLD LYME —
As we recognize both National Prevention Week this week (May 9-15) and National Mental Health Awareness Month during the whole month of May, the Lyme-Old Lyme Prevention Coalition is actively working to educate the community about substance abuse, our youth, and the role of prevention. 

Understanding how substance use and abuse before the age of 25 has a profound impact on our youth is a critical step in preventing adolescent alcohol and drug use.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), drug addiction is classified as a mental illness because addiction changes the brain in fundamental ways, disturbing a person’s normal hierarchy of needs and desires, and substituting new priorities connected with procuring and using drugs. The resulting compulsive behaviors that override the ability to control impulses, despite the consequences, are similar to hallmarks of other mental illnesses.

In fact, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), which is the definitive resource of diagnostic criteria for all mental disorders, includes criteria for drug use disorders, distinguishing between two types: drug abuse and drug dependence.

Drug dependence is synonymous with addiction.

By comparison, the criteria for drug abuse hinge on the harmful consequences of repeated use, but do not include  compulsive use, tolerance (i.e., needing higher doses to achieve the same effect), or withdrawal (i.e., symptoms that occur when use is stopped), which can be signs of addiction.

Many people, who regularly abuse drugs, are also diagnosed with mental disorders and vice versa. The high prevalence of this comorbidity has been documented in multiple, national population surveys since the 1980s. Data shows that persons diagnosed with mood or anxiety disorders are about twice as likely to suffer also from a substance use disorder (abuse or dependence) compared with respondents in general.

The same is true for those diagnosed with an antisocial syndrome, such as antisocial personality or conduct disorder. Similarly, persons diagnosed with substance use disorders are roughly twice as likely to suffer also from mood and anxiety disorders.

Adolescence – A Vulnerable Time

Although substance abuse and addiction can happen at any time during a person’s life, drug use typically starts in adolescence. Photo by Gras Grun on Unsplash.

Although substance abuse and addiction can happen at any time during a person’s life, drug use typically starts in adolescence, a period when the first signs of mental illness commonly appear. It is therefore not surprising that comorbid disorders can already be seen among youth.

Significant changes in the brain occur during adolescence, which may enhance vulnerability to drug use and the development of addiction and other mental disorders. Drugs of abuse affect brain circuits involved in learning and memory, reward-comprehension, decision-making, and behavioral control, all of which are still maturing into early adulthood. 

One of the brain areas still maturing during adolescence is the prefrontal cortex – the part of the brain that enables us to assess situations, make sound decisions, and keep our emotions and desires under control. The fact that this critical part of an adolescent’s brain is still a work-in-progress puts them at increased risk for poor decision-making (such as trying drugs or continuing abuse.)

Thus, introducing drugs while the brain is still developing may have profound and long-lasting consequences. This is especially true as we see a rise in marijuana use and the extremely high amounts of THC found in today’s cannabis market.  

The more we learn, the better we understand the abilities and vulnerabilities of teens, and the significance of this stage for life-long mental health. The fact that so much change is taking place beneath the surface may be something for parents, family members, and others to keep in mind during the ups and downs of adolescence. 

Research has shown that prevention programs involving families, schools, communities, and the media are effective in reducing drug abuse.

For more information about the work of the Lyme-Old Lyme Prevention Coalition, visit www.lysb.org.   

The Lyme-Old Lyme Prevention Coalition also hosts a Community Podcast:  L-OL:In it Together where you can find episodes related to prevention. Find links to the show at www.lysb.org/podcast.             

(Source: NIDA)

Alli Behnke

About the Author: Alli Behnke, MSW, MA is the Prevention Coordinator at Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau. She has been a Social Worker for 20 years working in the fields of prevention, therapy, youth leadership, and health coaching. Alli believes strongly in providing accurate information, education, and tools for success when empowering the Lyme/Old Lyme Prevention Coalition and REACH Youth Coalition to work together on strengths-based campaigns. The Coalitions address substance abuse and other risky behaviors challenging our youth and families. Contact her at abehnke@lysb.org or visit  www.lysb.org to become involved in this important community work.

May 10 COVID-19 Update: Lyme’s Cumulative Case Total Increases by One to 107, No Change in Old Lyme at 341

LYME/OLD LYME —The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Monday, May 10, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health(CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Sunday, May 9, shows that Lyme increased by one new COVID-19 case since the previous day to 107 while Old Lyme held at its previous day’s cumulative total of 341.

These Daily Reports are not issued by CT DPH on Saturdays or Sundays and therefore Monday’s data includes new cases from both weekend days. The next new report will be issued in the afternoon of Monday, May 10.

Lyme – Cumulative Cases Up One

Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 99 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases, making a TOTAL of 107 cases.

This represents an INCREASE of ONE in the cumulative number of confirmed cases and NO CHANGE in the number of probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Lyme residents tested is 1,401, which represents an increase of four over the previous day’s number of 1,397.

Old Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

The May 10 Daily Data Report for Connecticut for data as at 8:30 p.m. Sunday, May 9, shows that Old Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 330 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 11 probable casesmaking a TOTAL of 341 cases.

This represents an NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Old Lyme residents tested is 5,226, an increase of 24 over the previous day’s number of 5,202.

Two-Week New Case Rates Zones: Old Lyme in Yellow, Lyme in Gray

The report issued Monday, May 10, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks shows another major improvement for the state as whole with the number of towns remaining in the Red Zone (indicating the highest COVID-19 new case rates) falling to 54 from last week’s number of 97.

During a news conference held Thursday, May 6, Gov. Ned Lamont attributed the decrease in infections to the continuing roll-out of the coronavirus vaccine.

Both Lyme and Old Lyme remain in the zones in which they were placed last week with Old Lyme still in the Yellow (second lowest new case rate) Zone while Lyme remains in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone.

Old Lyme is now one of the 31 towns in the Yellow Zone. Last week, there were 18 towns in this Zone, so this is encouraging news as more towns fall out of the Orange (second highest) Zone.

Lyme is in the Gray Zone for two-week new case rates, recording an eighth straight week in the lowest zone. Twenty-two towns were in this zone last week and, in more good news, this number has increased to 29 this week.

In both cases, the increased total in each Zone reflects a decreased new case rate. (Four zones are specified by the CT DPH — see details below.)

Overall, the number of towns in each zone is shown below with the previous week’s number in parentheses:

  • 29 (22) towns are now in the (lowest case rate) Gray Zone
  • 31 (18) are in the (lowest but one) Yellow Zone
  • 55 (32) are in the (second highest case rate) Orange Zone.

All the remaining 54 towns are in the Red Zone — last week’s number was 97.

Lyme joins 21 other towns in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone: Andover, Bozrah, Bridgewater, Canaan, Chaplin, Chester, Colebrook, Cornwall, Deep River, East Granby, Essex, Franklin, Hampton, Kent, Lisbon, Lyme, Middlefield, Norfolk, Pomfret, Roxbury, Salisbury, Scotland, Sharon, Union, Warren, Washington, Weston, Westport and Willington.

Old Lyme joins 30 other towns in the Yellow (second lowest rate) Zone: Avon, Brooklyn, Clinton, Colchester, Columbia, Darien, Durham, East Haddam, East Hampton, East Lyme, Easton, Glastonbury, Granby, Griswold, Killingworth, Ledyard, Marlborough, New Fairfield, New Hartford, Newington, Portland, Preston, Rocky Hill, Somers, Southbury, Stonington, Tolland, West Hartford, Woodbridge and Woodbury

The Orange (second highest rate) Zone now has 55 towns : Ashford, Beacon Falls, Berlin, Bethany, Bethel, Bethlehem, Bloomfield, Bolton, Branford, Brookfield, Canterbury, Canton, Cheshire, Coventry, Danbury, Ellington, Fairfield, Farmington, Goshen, Greenwich, Groton, Guilford, Haddam, Harwinton, Lebanon, Litchfield, Madison, Mansfield, Montville, New Canaan, New Milford, North Canaan, North Haven, North Stonington, Old Saybrook, Oxford, Redding, Ridgefield, Salem, Simsbury, South Windsor, Sprague, Stafford, Suffield, Thompson, Vernon, Voluntown, Waterford, Westbrook, Wethersfield, Wilton, Winchester, Windsor, Windsor Locks and Woodstock.

  • The Gray category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is less than five or less than five reported cases.
  • The Yellow category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between five and nine reported cases.
  • The Orange category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between 10 and 14.
  • The Red category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town exceeds 15.

In all cases, this rate does not include cases or tests among residents of nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.

This report is issued daily, but only updated weekly on Thursdays. The most recent report was updated Thursday, May 6; the next updated report will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 13.

More Detail on Two-Week Case Rates: Old Lyme Down, Lyme Up

LLHD Director of Health Stephen Mansfield

On Thursday, May 6, Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) also issued their latest weekly report of COVID data for the municipalities within their District.

Ledge Light Director of Health Stephen Mansfield prefaces the report with the comment, “Although the number of new cases remain relatively stable, our contact tracers continue to report clusters, especially those associated with social gatherings and sporting events.”

He stresses, however, “Although we are making great strides with our COVID vaccination program, it is still imperative that we remain diligent in our mitigation strategies.”

The latest Average Daily Case Rate announced Thursday, May 6, (from 4/18 to 5/01) have stayed constant in Old Lyme but decreased in Lyme.

The two-week case rates are as follows:

  • Old Lyme from 9.7 to 9.7
  • Lyme from 9.2 to 6.1

The same report shows that the case numbers in Week 1 and Week 2 respectively and recorded for the period 4/18 to 5/01  (compared with the previous two-week case rate shown in parentheses) are as follows:

  • Lyme had(1) case in Week 1 and(2) in Week 2
  • Old Lyme had(3) cases in Week 1 and(7) in Week 2

This data was updated May 6. The next Ledge Light Weekly Data Report for its District will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 13.

Vaccination Rates

Lyme is ahead of Old Lyme in terms of the percentage of its total population that have received a first dose, with 74.65 (72.06) percent vaccinated compared with 65.56 (63.89) percent in Old Lyme. The previous week’s percentages are shown in parentheses.

The percentages for both towns for the age cohort 65+ are very encouraging with Lyme now having 100 percent of seniors 65 and above fully vaccinated while 97.69 (92.85) percent of the same age cohort are fully vaccinated in Old Lyme.

The percentages for the age cohort 45-64, however, show the numbers reversing with Old Lyme having 57.66 percent fully vaccinated marginally ahead of Lyme at 53.91 percent.

Regarding the age 15-44 cohort, Lyme comes back into the lead again with 37.71 percent fully vaccinated while Old Lyme stands at 33.99 percent.

The state changed its reporting format for vaccination rates on April 15 and their new data does not align precisely with the former data. The detailed data below was partly updated April 29. One change is that the state is now reporting 65 and above as one group, whereas it was previously split into 65-74 and 75 and above. We will present new vaccination rate tables shortly.

Old Lyme
Total population:  7,306
Estimated population age 65-74:  1,067
Estimated population age 75 and above:  794

DateTotal pop. 1st dose given1st dose given as % of total pop. 1st dose given age 65-741st dose given as % of age 65-74 pop. 1st dose given age 75 & above1st dose given as % of age 75 & above pop.
3/12,11528.95%83578%73092%
3/82,62635,94%94588.57%76496.22%
3/153,07042.02%1,02796.25%797100.38%
3/243,24144.36%99893.53%75394.84%
3/313,55348.63%1,00193.81%75595.09%
4/74,17057.08%1,078101.08%76396.1%
4/154,80665.78%1,104103.47%77597.61%
4/294,66863.89%

Lyme
Total population:  2,316
Estimated population age 65-74:  372
Estimated population age 75 and above:  274

DateTotal pop. 1st dose gven1st dose given as % of total population 1st dose given age 65-741st dose given as % of age 65-74 pop.1st dose given age 75 & above1st dose given as a % of age 75 & above pop.
3/160526.12%24466%22281%
3/876733.12%28175.54%22983.58%
3/1580134.59%26972.31%20675.18%
3/241,13549.01%36297.31%279101.82%
3/311,25954.36%372100.00%289105.47%
4/71,51065.2%414111.29%295107.66%
4/151,73975.09%430115.59%298108.76%
4/291,66972.06%

Three Fatalities in Old Lyme Since Pandemic Began, None in Lyme

According to the report mentioned above, there have now been THREE fatalities in Old Lyme. Asked Tuesday, Feb. 9, for details of this third fatality, Ledge Light Health Department Director of Health Stephen Mansfield responded, “We have not been notified of any recent deaths in Old Lyme. Keep in mind that that report is compiled by the Connecticut Department of Public Health; deaths are not reportable to local health districts.”

He added, “I can’t speak for their data sources.”

The two fatalities from Old Lyme previously reported in 2020 were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

No fatalities have been reported in Lyme.

Connecticut Hospital Occupancy

At the request of several readers, we have added a new report showing the respective rates of hospital occupancy at local hospitals. The data for this report is obtained from the Connecticut Hospital Occupancy Report published weekly by the CT DPH and extracted from the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) facility-level data for hospital utilization aggregated on a weekly basis (Friday to Thursday).

The most recent report is dated Feb. 19 and covers the two-week period from 2/12 to 2/18. No subsequent updates have been issued.

Hospital Name% Adult In-patient Occupancy % Adult ICU Occupancy
Data from 1/8 - 1/14
Backus84.424.2
Lawrence & Memorial90.891.4
Middlesex78.289.9
Yale-New Haven87.982.6
Statewide80.860.9
Data from 1/15 - 1/21
Backus83.224.2
Lawrence & Memorial84.090.7
Middlesex83.388.7
Yale-New Haven91.487.9
Statewide79.960.8
Data from1/22 - 1/29
Backus66.10.0
Lawrence & Memorial90.690.0
Middlesex77.286.3
Yale-New Haven84.425.8
Statewide81.262.3
Data from1/29 - 2/5
Backus8622
Lawrence & Memorial8893
Middlesex6661
Yale-New Haven9189
Statewide79.360.7
Data from 2/1 - 2/11
Backus83.822.2
L & M87.687.9
Middlesex68.881.5
Yale-New Haven91.788.3
Statewide80.261.0
Data from 2/12 - 2/18
Backus79.122.4
L & M84.182.1
Middlesex74.488.1
Yale-New Haven90.883.6
Statewide77.959.8

Editor’s Note: The state issues a COVID-19 metric report daily around 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, which includes current data up to the previous evening. In light of the ongoing rise in Coronavirus cases, we publish a new weekday update reporting confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases in Lyme and Old Lyme. 

May 7 COVID-19 Update: One New Case in Old Lyme Takes Cumulative Total to 341, Lyme Holds at 106

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

LYME/OLD LYME —The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Friday, May 7, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health(CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Thursday, May 6, shows that Old Lyme increased by one new COVID-19 case since the previous day to 341 while Lyme held at its previous day’s cumulative total of 106.

These Daily Reports are not issued by CT DPH on Saturdays or Sundays and therefore Monday’s data includes new cases from both weekend days. The next new report will be issued in the afternoon of Monday, May 10.

Old Lyme – Cumulative Cases Up One

The May 7 Daily Data Report for Connecticut for data as at 8:30 p.m. Thursday, May 6, shows that Old Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 330 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 11 probable casesmaking a TOTAL of 341 cases.

This represents an INCREASE of ONE in the cumulative number of confirmed cases and NO CHANGE in the number of probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Old Lyme residents tested is 5,202, an increase of nine over the previous day’s number of 5,193.

Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases 

Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 98 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases, making a TOTAL of 106 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day, and represents the third consecutive reporting day with this number.

The total number of Lyme residents tested is 1,397, which represents an increase of two over the previous day’s number of 1,397.

Two-Week New Case Rates Zones: Old Lyme in Yellow, Lyme in Gray

The report issued Thursday, May 6, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks shows another major improvement for the state as whole with the number of towns remaining in the Red Zone (indicating the highest COVID-19 new case rates) falling to 54 from last week’s number of 97.

During a news conference held Thursday, May 6, Gov. Ned Lamont attributed the decrease in infections to the continuing roll-out of the coronavirus vaccine.

Both Lyme and Old Lyme remain in the zones in which they were placed last week with Old Lyme still in the Yellow (second lowest new case rate) Zone while Lyme remains in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone.

Old Lyme is now one of the 31 towns in the Yellow Zone. Last week, there were 18 towns in this Zone, so this is encouraging news as more towns fall out of the Orange (second highest) Zone.

Lyme is in the Gray Zone for two-week new case rates, recording an eighth straight week in the lowest zone. Twenty-two towns were in this zone last week and, in more good news, this number has increased to 29 this week.

In both cases, the increased total in each Zone reflects a decreased new case rate. (Four zones are specified by the CT DPH — see details below.)

Overall, the number of towns in each zone is shown below with the previous week’s number in parentheses:

  • 29 (22) towns are now in the (lowest case rate) Gray Zone
  • 31 (18) are in the (lowest but one) Yellow Zone
  • 55 (32) are in the (second highest case rate) Orange Zone.

All the remaining 54 towns are in the Red Zone — last week’s number was 97.

Lyme joins 21 other towns in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone: Andover, Bozrah, Bridgewater, Canaan, Chaplin, Chester, Colebrook, Cornwall, Deep River, East Granby, Essex, Franklin, Hampton, Kent, Lisbon, Lyme, Middlefield, Norfolk, Pomfret, Roxbury, Salisbury, Scotland, Sharon, Union, Warren, Washington, Weston, Westport and Willington.

Old Lyme joins 30 other towns in the Yellow (second lowest rate) Zone: Avon, Brooklyn, Clinton, Colchester, Columbia, Darien, Durham, East Haddam, East Hampton, East Lyme, Easton, Glastonbury, Granby, Griswold, Killingworth, Ledyard, Marlborough, New Fairfield, New Hartford, Newington, Portland, Preston, Rocky Hill, Somers, Southbury, Stonington, Tolland, West Hartford, Woodbridge and Woodbury

The Orange (second highest rate) Zone now has 55 towns : Ashford, Beacon Falls, Berlin, Bethany, Bethel, Bethlehem, Bloomfield, Bolton, Branford, Brookfield, Canterbury, Canton, Cheshire, Coventry, Danbury, Ellington, Fairfield, Farmington, Goshen, Greenwich, Groton, Guilford, Haddam, Harwinton, Lebanon, Litchfield, Madison, Mansfield, Montville, New Canaan, New Milford, North Canaan, North Haven, North Stonington, Old Saybrook, Oxford, Redding, Ridgefield, Salem, Simsbury, South Windsor, Sprague, Stafford, Suffield, Thompson, Vernon, Voluntown, Waterford, Westbrook, Wethersfield, Wilton, Winchester, Windsor, Windsor Locks and Woodstock.

  • The Gray category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is less than five or less than five reported cases.
  • The Yellow category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between five and nine reported cases.
  • The Orange category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between 10 and 14.
  • The Red category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town exceeds 15.

In all cases, this rate does not include cases or tests among residents of nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.

This report is issued daily, but only updated weekly on Thursdays. The most recent report was updated Thursday, May 6; the next updated report will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 13.

More Detail on Two-Week Case Rates: Old Lyme Down, Lyme Up

LLHD Director of Health Stephen Mansfield

On Thursday, May 6, Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) also issued their latest weekly report of COVID data for the municipalities within their District.

Ledge Light Director of Health Stephen Mansfield prefaces the report with the comment, “Although the number of new cases remain relatively stable, our contact tracers continue to report clusters, especially those associated with social gatherings and sporting events.”

He stresses, however, “Although we are making great strides with our COVID vaccination program, it is still imperative that we remain diligent in our mitigation strategies.”

The latest Average Daily Case Rate announced Thursday, May 6, (from 4/18 to 5/01) have stayed constant in Old Lyme but decreased in Lyme.

The two-week case rates are as follows:

  • Old Lyme from 9.7 to 9.7
  • Lyme from 9.2 to 6.1

The same report shows that the case numbers in Week 1 and Week 2 respectively and recorded for the period 4/18 to 5/01  (compared with the previous two-week case rate shown in parentheses) are as follows:

  • Lyme had(1) case in Week 1 and(2) in Week 2
  • Old Lyme had(3) cases in Week 1 and(7) in Week 2

This data was updated May 6. The next Ledge Light Weekly Data Report for its District will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 13.

Vaccination Rates

Lyme is ahead of Old Lyme in terms of the percentage of its total population that have received a first dose, with 74.65 (72.06) percent vaccinated compared with 65.56 (63.89) percent in Old Lyme. The previous week’s percentages are shown in parentheses.

The percentages for both towns for the age cohort 65+ are very encouraging with Lyme now having 100 percent of seniors 65 and above fully vaccinated while 97.69 (92.85) percent of the same age cohort are fully vaccinated in Old Lyme.

The percentages for the age cohort 45-64, however, show the numbers reversing with Old Lyme having 57.66 percent fully vaccinated marginally ahead of Lyme at 53.91 percent.

Regarding the age 15-44 cohort, Lyme comes back into the lead again with 37.71 percent fully vaccinated while Old Lyme stands at 33.99 percent.

The state changed its reporting format for vaccination rates on April 15 and their new data does not align precisely with the former data. The detailed data below was partly updated April 29. One change is that the state is now reporting 65 and above as one group, whereas it was previously split into 65-74 and 75 and above. We will present new vaccination rate tables shortly.

Old Lyme
Total population:  7,306
Estimated population age 65-74:  1,067
Estimated population age 75 and above:  794

DateTotal pop. 1st dose given1st dose given as % of total pop. 1st dose given age 65-741st dose given as % of age 65-74 pop. 1st dose given age 75 & above1st dose given as % of age 75 & above pop.
3/12,11528.95%83578%73092%
3/82,62635,94%94588.57%76496.22%
3/153,07042.02%1,02796.25%797100.38%
3/243,24144.36%99893.53%75394.84%
3/313,55348.63%1,00193.81%75595.09%
4/74,17057.08%1,078101.08%76396.1%
4/154,80665.78%1,104103.47%77597.61%
4/294,66863.89%

Lyme
Total population:  2,316
Estimated population age 65-74:  372
Estimated population age 75 and above:  274

DateTotal pop. 1st dose gven1st dose given as % of total population 1st dose given age 65-741st dose given as % of age 65-74 pop.1st dose given age 75 & above1st dose given as a % of age 75 & above pop.
3/160526.12%24466%22281%
3/876733.12%28175.54%22983.58%
3/1580134.59%26972.31%20675.18%
3/241,13549.01%36297.31%279101.82%
3/311,25954.36%372100.00%289105.47%
4/71,51065.2%414111.29%295107.66%
4/151,73975.09%430115.59%298108.76%
4/291,66972.06%

Three Fatalities in Old Lyme Since Pandemic Began, None in Lyme

According to the report mentioned above, there have now been THREE fatalities in Old Lyme. Asked Tuesday, Feb. 9, for details of this third fatality, Ledge Light Health Department Director of Health Stephen Mansfield responded, “We have not been notified of any recent deaths in Old Lyme. Keep in mind that that report is compiled by the Connecticut Department of Public Health; deaths are not reportable to local health districts.”

He added, “I can’t speak for their data sources.”

The two fatalities from Old Lyme previously reported in 2020 were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

No fatalities have been reported in Lyme.

Connecticut Hospital Occupancy

At the request of several readers, we have added a new report showing the respective rates of hospital occupancy at local hospitals. The data for this report is obtained from the Connecticut Hospital Occupancy Report published weekly by the CT DPH and extracted from the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) facility-level data for hospital utilization aggregated on a weekly basis (Friday to Thursday).

The most recent report is dated Feb. 19 and covers the two-week period from 2/12 to 2/18. No subsequent updates have been issued.

Hospital Name% Adult In-patient Occupancy % Adult ICU Occupancy
Data from 1/8 - 1/14
Backus84.424.2
Lawrence & Memorial90.891.4
Middlesex78.289.9
Yale-New Haven87.982.6
Statewide80.860.9
Data from 1/15 - 1/21
Backus83.224.2
Lawrence & Memorial84.090.7
Middlesex83.388.7
Yale-New Haven91.487.9
Statewide79.960.8
Data from1/22 - 1/29
Backus66.10.0
Lawrence & Memorial90.690.0
Middlesex77.286.3
Yale-New Haven84.425.8
Statewide81.262.3
Data from1/29 - 2/5
Backus8622
Lawrence & Memorial8893
Middlesex6661
Yale-New Haven9189
Statewide79.360.7
Data from 2/1 - 2/11
Backus83.822.2
L & M87.687.9
Middlesex68.881.5
Yale-New Haven91.788.3
Statewide80.261.0
Data from 2/12 - 2/18
Backus79.122.4
L & M84.182.1
Middlesex74.488.1
Yale-New Haven90.883.6
Statewide77.959.8

Editor’s Note: The state issues a COVID-19 metric report daily around 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, which includes current data up to the previous evening. In light of the ongoing rise in Coronavirus cases, we publish a new weekday update reporting confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases in Lyme and Old Lyme. 

May 6 COVID-19 Update: Case Rates Fall Statewide; Lyme, Old Lyme Stay in Same Lower Rate Zones; No Change in Daily Cumulative Case Counts in Either Town

This map, updated May 6, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. The Town of Old Lyme is now in the Yellow (second lowest) Zone, while Lyme stays in the (lowest) Gray Zone. (Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.)  Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper

LYME/OLD LYME — The report issued Thursday, May 6, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks shows another major improvement for the state as whole with the number of towns remaining in the Red Zone (indicating the highest COVID-19 new case rates) falling to 54 from last week’s number of 97.

During a news conference held Thursday, May 6, Gov. Ned Lamont attributed the decrease in infections to the continuing roll-out of the coronavirus vaccine.

Both Lyme and Old Lyme remain in the zones in which they were placed last week with Old Lyme still in the Yellow (second lowest new case rate) Zone while Lyme remains in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone.

Old Lyme is now one of the 31 towns in the Yellow Zone. Last week, there were 18 towns in this Zone, so this is encouraging news as more towns fall out of the Orange (second highest) Zone.

Lyme is in the Gray Zone for two-week new case rates, recording an eighth straight week in the lowest zone. Twenty-two towns were in this zone last week and, in more good news, this number has increased to 29 this week.

In both cases, the increased total in each Zone reflects a decreased new case rate. (Four zones are specified by the CT DPH — see details below.)

Overall, the number of towns in each zone is shown below with the previous week’s number in parentheses:

  • 29 (22) towns are now in the (lowest case rate) Gray Zone
  • 31 (18) are in the (lowest but one) Yellow Zone
  • 55 (32) are in the (second highest case rate) Orange Zone.

All the remaining 54 towns are in the Red Zone — last week’s number was 97.

Lyme joins 21 other towns in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone: Andover, Bozrah, Bridgewater, Canaan, Chaplin, Chester, Colebrook, Cornwall, Deep River, East Granby, Essex, Franklin, Hampton, Kent, Lisbon, Lyme, Middlefield, Norfolk, Pomfret, Roxbury, Salisbury, Scotland, Sharon, Union, Warren, Washington, Weston, Westport and Willington.

Old Lyme joins 30 other towns in the Yellow (second lowest rate) Zone: Avon, Brooklyn, Clinton, Colchester, Columbia, Darien, Durham, East Haddam, East Hampton, East Lyme, Easton, Glastonbury, Granby, Griswold, Killingworth, Ledyard, Marlborough, New Fairfield, New Hartford, Newington, Portland, Preston, Rocky Hill, Somers, Southbury, Stonington, Tolland, West Hartford, Woodbridge and Woodbury

The Orange (second highest rate) Zone now has 55 towns : Ashford, Beacon Falls, Berlin, Bethany, Bethel, Bethlehem, Bloomfield, Bolton, Branford, Brookfield, Canterbury, Canton, Cheshire, Coventry, Danbury, Ellington, Fairfield, Farmington, Goshen, Greenwich, Groton, Guilford, Haddam, Harwinton, Lebanon, Litchfield, Madison, Mansfield, Montville, New Canaan, New Milford, North Canaan, North Haven, North Stonington, Old Saybrook, Oxford, Redding, Ridgefield, Salem, Simsbury, South Windsor, Sprague, Stafford, Suffield, Thompson, Vernon, Voluntown, Waterford, Westbrook, Wethersfield, Wilton, Winchester, Windsor, Windsor Locks and Woodstock.

  • The Gray category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is less than five or less than five reported cases.
  • The Yellow category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between five and nine reported cases.
  • The Orange category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between 10 and 14.
  • The Red category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town exceeds 15.

In all cases, this rate does not include cases or tests among residents of nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.

This report is issued daily, but only updated weekly on Thursdays. The most recent report was updated Thursday, May 6; the next updated report will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 13.

More Detail on Two-Week Case Rates: Old Lyme Down, Lyme Up

LLHD Director of Health Stephen Mansfield

On Thursday, May 6, Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) also issued their latest weekly report of COVID data for the municipalities within their District.

Ledge Light Director of Health Stephen Mansfield prefaces the report with the comment, “Although the number of new cases remain relatively stable, our contact tracers continue to report clusters, especially those associated with social gatherings and sporting events.”

He stresses, however, “Although we are making great strides with our COVID vaccination program, it is still imperative that we remain diligent in our mitigation strategies.”

The latest Average Daily Case Rate announced Thursday, May 6, (from 4/18 to 5/01) have stayed constant in Old Lyme but decreased in Lyme.

The two-week case rates are as follows:

  • Old Lyme from 9.7 to 9.7
  • Lyme from 9.2 to 6.1

The same report shows that the case numbers in Week 1 and Week 2 respectively and recorded for the period 4/18 to 5/01  (compared with the previous two-week case rate shown in parentheses) are as follows:

  • Lyme had(1) case in Week 1 and(2) in Week 2
  • Old Lyme had(3) cases in Week 1 and(7) in Week 2

This data was updated May 6. The next Ledge Light Weekly Data Report for its District will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 13.

Old Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

The May 6 Daily Data Report for Connecticut for data as at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 4, shows that Old Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 329 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 11 probable casesmaking a TOTAL of 340 cases.

This represents an NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Old Lyme residents tested is 5,193, an increase of three over the previous day’s number of 5,190.

Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases 

Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 98 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases, making a TOTAL of 106 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day, and represents the third consecutive reporting day with this number.

The total number of Lyme residents tested is 1,395, which represents no change over the previous day’s number.

Vaccination Rates

Lyme is ahead of Old Lyme in terms of the percentage of its total population that have received a first dose, with 74.65 (72.06) percent vaccinated compared with 65.56 (63.89) percent in Old Lyme. The previous week’s percentages are shown in parentheses.

The percentages for both towns for the age cohort 65+ are very encouraging with Lyme now having 100 percent of seniors 65 and above fully vaccinated while 97.69 (92.85) percent of the same age cohort are fully vaccinated in Old Lyme.

The percentages for the age cohort 45-64, however, show the numbers reversing with Old Lyme having 57.66 percent fully vaccinated marginally ahead of Lyme at 53.91 percent.

Regarding the age 15-44 cohort, Lyme comes back into the lead again with 37.71 percent fully vaccinated while Old Lyme stands at 33.99 percent.

The state changed its reporting format for vaccination rates on April 15 and their new data does not align precisely with the former data. The detailed data below was partly updated April 29. One change is that the state is now reporting 65 and above as one group, whereas it was previously split into 65-74 and 75 and above. We will present new vaccination rate tables shortly.

Old Lyme
Total population:  7,306
Estimated population age 65-74:  1,067
Estimated population age 75 and above:  794

DateTotal pop. 1st dose given1st dose given as % of total pop. 1st dose given age 65-741st dose given as % of age 65-74 pop. 1st dose given age 75 & above1st dose given as % of age 75 & above pop.
3/12,11528.95%83578%73092%
3/82,62635,94%94588.57%76496.22%
3/153,07042.02%1,02796.25%797100.38%
3/243,24144.36%99893.53%75394.84%
3/313,55348.63%1,00193.81%75595.09%
4/74,17057.08%1,078101.08%76396.1%
4/154,80665.78%1,104103.47%77597.61%
4/294,66863.89%

Lyme
Total population:  2,316
Estimated population age 65-74:  372
Estimated population age 75 and above:  274

DateTotal pop. 1st dose gven1st dose given as % of total population 1st dose given age 65-741st dose given as % of age 65-74 pop.1st dose given age 75 & above1st dose given as a % of age 75 & above pop.
3/160526.12%24466%22281%
3/876733.12%28175.54%22983.58%
3/1580134.59%26972.31%20675.18%
3/241,13549.01%36297.31%279101.82%
3/311,25954.36%372100.00%289105.47%
4/71,51065.2%414111.29%295107.66%
4/151,73975.09%430115.59%298108.76%
4/291,66972.06%

Three Fatalities in Old Lyme Since Pandemic Began, None in Lyme

According to the report mentioned above, there have now been THREE fatalities in Old Lyme. Asked Tuesday, Feb. 9, for details of this third fatality, Ledge Light Health Department Director of Health Stephen Mansfield responded, “We have not been notified of any recent deaths in Old Lyme. Keep in mind that that report is compiled by the Connecticut Department of Public Health; deaths are not reportable to local health districts.”

He added, “I can’t speak for their data sources.”

The two fatalities from Old Lyme previously reported in 2020 were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

No fatalities have been reported in Lyme.

Connecticut Hospital Occupancy

At the request of several readers, we have added a new report showing the respective rates of hospital occupancy at local hospitals. The data for this report is obtained from the Connecticut Hospital Occupancy Report published weekly by the CT DPH and extracted from the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) facility-level data for hospital utilization aggregated on a weekly basis (Friday to Thursday).

The most recent report is dated Feb. 19 and covers the two-week period from 2/12 to 2/18. No subsequent updates have been issued.

Hospital Name% Adult In-patient Occupancy % Adult ICU Occupancy
Data from 1/8 - 1/14
Backus84.424.2
Lawrence & Memorial90.891.4
Middlesex78.289.9
Yale-New Haven87.982.6
Statewide80.860.9
Data from 1/15 - 1/21
Backus83.224.2
Lawrence & Memorial84.090.7
Middlesex83.388.7
Yale-New Haven91.487.9
Statewide79.960.8
Data from1/22 - 1/29
Backus66.10.0
Lawrence & Memorial90.690.0
Middlesex77.286.3
Yale-New Haven84.425.8
Statewide81.262.3
Data from1/29 - 2/5
Backus8622
Lawrence & Memorial8893
Middlesex6661
Yale-New Haven9189
Statewide79.360.7
Data from 2/1 - 2/11
Backus83.822.2
L & M87.687.9
Middlesex68.881.5
Yale-New Haven91.788.3
Statewide80.261.0
Data from 2/12 - 2/18
Backus79.122.4
L & M84.182.1
Middlesex74.488.1
Yale-New Haven90.883.6
Statewide77.959.8

Editor’s Note: The state issues a COVID-19 metric report daily around 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, which includes current data up to the previous evening. In light of the ongoing rise in Coronavirus cases, we publish a new weekday update reporting confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases in Lyme and Old Lyme. 

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Proposed Budget Passes Easily in Both Towns

LYME/OLD LYME — UPDATED 5/7: The Lyme-Old Lyme Schools proposed $34.87 million budget for 2021-22 was approved by a wide margin of 273 votes Tuesday, with a combined total of 328 Lyme and Old Lyme residents voting for the budgets and only a total of 55 across both towns voting against it.

The percentage of total voters supporting the budget was 85.6 and the number rejecting it was 14.4 percent.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser commented to LymeLine in an electronic message after the result had been announced, “Thank you to the Lyme and Old Lyme communities for their ongoing support of our schools. We could not achieve the level of success that we have without the support of our communities.”

He added, “Support for this budget will allow us to continue providing a top-notch education to the students of Lyme and Old Lyme.”

The results by town were as follows:
Old Lyme
For: 249
Against: 50

Lyme
For: 79
Against: 5

The town numbers above reflect voter turnout in Old Lyme at 4.99 percent based on a total number of 5,992 registered voters, while in Lyme the equivalent percentage was 4.24 based on 1,979 voters.