August 2, 2021

Lymes’ Senior Center Directors Host Special Meeting, Wednesday; Point One Architects to Lead Workshop Related to Feasibility Study

A workshop to support the feasibility study of the Lymes’ Senior Center on Town Woods Rd. in Old Lyme is planned on Wednesday.

LYME/OLD LYME — The Lymes’ Senior Center Board of Directors will hold a Special Meeting Wednesday, Aug. 4, at 1 p.m. The public is welcome to join the meeting either in person at the Lymes’ Senior Center or virtually — see  instructions for the latter below.

The main purpose of the meeting is for Point One Architects to lead the second workshop related to the feasibility study for the expansion/renovations of the Center.  Workshop participants will include the board of directors and invited stakeholders.

All Covid-19 protocols will be met including social distancing and the wearing of masks.

The agenda is follows:

  1. Call to order /attendance of board and public
  2. Guests – Point One Architects

III. Minutes of June, 2021 meeting – tabled until next regular meeting

  1. Treasurer’s report – Tabled until next regular meeting
  2. Communications – Thank you note
  3. Committee Reports – none

VII. Old Business – none

VIII. New Business

  • Welcome Point One Architects for the second workshop for the feasibility study.  Participants include the Board of Directors and invited stakeholders to conduct this workshop agenda:
  1. Review Workshop I Results
  2. M.E.P. Findings (Mechanical/Electrical/Plumbing)
  3. Diagrams
  4. Pro’s and Con’s Discussion
  5. Public Comment –

X.  Adjournment – Any additional meetings needed before September 2021 will be called as special meetings.

Instructions for joining the meeting via Zoom:

Visit this link: https://zoom.us/j/93808736678?pwd=Q2tjdUJTK1V6YjB3cVVtUWNmeUN1Zz09
Meeting ID: 938 0873 6678
Passcode: 095877
One tap mobile
+13126266799,,93808736678#,,,,*095877# US (Chicago)
+19292056099,,93808736678#,,,,*095877# US (New York)
To find your local number, visit https://zoom.us/u/acVzDIdz3X

LYSB Hosts Free ‘Big Truck & Vehicle Fair’ in Old Lyme, Wednesday; All Welcome

Clamber over fire-trucks like this one at LYSB’s ‘Big Truck & Vehicle Fair.’

OLD LYME — Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB) hosts a ‘Big Truck & Vehicle Fair,’ Wednesday, Aug. 4, from 5 to 7 p.m. on the Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School driveway behind LYSB. Attendees are requested to park at the high school or on Lyme Street.

This free, family event will feature emergency vehicles, construction trucks and more. It is being held in collaboration with the Old Lyme Police and Fire Departments.

Construction vehicles will be on display at Wednesday’s ‘Big Truck & Vehicle Fair.’

There will be opportunities to meet First Responders and explore all the vehicles on display. Musical entertainment will be offered along with Del’s Lemonade.

If readers are interested in participating with their own trucks, contact lysb@lysb.org or 860-434-7208.

Lyme Art Association Celebrates 100th Anniversary with Lyme Street ‘Paint-Out’, Tea Day, ‘Centennial Frolic’; Saturday

‘Tea Day’ by Edward Volkert, 1930, and printed courtesy of the family of Edward Volkert, hints at the festivities to be held on the Lyme Art Association’s ‘Centennial Day,’ Aug. 7.

OLD LYME — In 1921, after years of discussion, planning, and fundraising, the early members of the Lyme Art Association (LAA) achieved their goal: a purpose-built gallery to display their art. This year, the LAA will be marking that milestone with special exhibitions, events, and activities.

Centennial Day, Aug. 7, 2021 is 100 years (plus one day) from the opening day of the first exhibit in the Lyme Art Association Gallery. The impetus for the incorporation of Lyme Art Association back in 1914 was to plan and build a gallery perfect for the display of the works of the Lyme Impressionists, who formed the Lyme Art Colony.

The Lyme Art Association on Lyme Street is celebrating the centennial of its founding with three related events being held throughout the day on Saturday, Aug. 7, culminating in a 1920s-themed fundraising “Frolic’ from 5 to 7 p.m.

The opening of the gallery seven years later on Aug. 6, 1921, represented the culmination of years of planning, fundraising, delays, more fundraising, and construction.

The gallery’s opening was celebrated enthusiastically by the community, praised by national journals, and of course, was the pride and joy of the artists themselves and Miss Florence Griswold, who served as the first gallery manager.

On Saturday, Aug. 7, the Lyme Art Association is celebrating the 100th anniversary of the construction of the LAA gallery and the start of a continuous connection with the Old Lyme and Lyme communities with three related events:

  • Wet Paint on Lyme Street will place member artists throughout the Old Lyme village at their easels painting en plein air, thus evoking the early artists with whose presence the community was quite familiar. The artists will work at varying times during the day and then sell their paintings on the LAA lawn at 4:30 p.m. This will be an opportunity to see many LAA artists painting in their own styles.

Tea Day is a family-friendly event being held from 1 to 4 p.m., which will harken back to the LAA’s early fundraisers of tea parties held on the front lawn for the townspeople and artists. Beverages and baked goods will be sold while crafts, games, and other fun activities will be offered. Costumed historical interpreters will be on hand to share stories of the artists, who founded the LAA along with planning and building the gallery. Join today’s LAA for a contemporary take on an event from years gone by.

Lyme Art Colony Annual Frolic, 1928

  • The Centennial Frolic will take place from 5 to 7 p.m. with a 1920s-themed fundraiser (1920s attire encouraged!) for the  Second Century Skylight Project. This event will celebrate the next 100 years of the LAA’s historic gallery in the spirit of their founders.The artists of the Lyme Art Colony marked the end of every summer with a “Frolic,” which often included elaborate costuming (see photo above.)This event is open to donors to the Skylight Project (visit this page on the LAA website or call 860- 434-7802 to donate) and will include beverages and appetizers. Help save the skylights and “frolic” like the LAA founders!

A Century of Inspiration, the Lyme Art Association’s summer exhibition will explore the connections between the current Association’s artists and the original Lyme Art Colony artists.

The best work of LAA members, inspired by some of the same landscapes and subject matter that early Lyme artists painted, will be hung along with pieces by the founding artists. Displays exploring the founding, growth, and changes in the LAA will be presented, taking visitors all the way through the century that saw so much change in both the Association and the world at large.

This work titled, ‘Return of the Laurel,’ (oil) is one of the featured paintings in the new exhibit at the LAA.

Lyme Art Association Executive Director Laurie Pavlos explained, “Artists who visited Old Lyme in the early 1900s found its beauty and rural atmosphere an antidote to some of the more unpleasant changes that industrialization and urbanization were causing. They also found a wonderful camaraderie and encouragement in each other as well as their patron and landlady, Florence Griswold.”

Pavlos continued, “In many respects, as much as things have changed, they have stayed the same. Miss Florence is gone, but many Lyme Art Association artists are still inspired by the same combination of local beauty, camaraderie and encouragement, which are important aspects of our mission, along with the extensive educational opportunities we offer.”

For more information about the Skylight Campaign and/or the Frolic, visit lymeartassociation.org.

The Century of Inspiration exhibit runs from July 30 through Sept. 16. The LAA gallery is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. through 5 p.m. and also by appointment.

Guest Column: Pandemic Surprise—Drive-Ins are Making a Comeback

Editor’s Note: We are delighted to welcome back Linda Ahnert as a guest columnist today. A resident of Old Lyme, she is the former Arts Editor at the popular but now-shuttered weekly, print newspaper, the ‘Main Street News.’ She is also a long-time docent at the Florence Griswold Museum and has volunteered for numerous local art organizations.

One of the unpredictable responses to the COVID-19 pandemic is that the drive-in movie theaters of yesteryear are making a come-back. Photo by Charlie Deets on Unsplash.

Linda Ahnert

When I was young, one of the pleasures of summertime was going to a drive-in movie.  The school year ended in June and a fun-filled expanse of summer vacation stretched before us. 

Those were the days, my friends, when we spent hours at the beach or pool.  In the late afternoon, the Good Humor man jangled his bells and all the kids in the neighborhood came running.  In the evenings, we collected lightning bugs in jars and then released them all at once.  And on weekend nights, families would pile into their Chevrolets and head to the drive-in for a double feature.  

Over the years, these outdoor theaters had been going the way of the dinosaur and practically vanishing from the scene. But with the onset of the pandemic in 2020 when people were searching for safe entertainment, drive-ins are becoming popular once again. 

If you were a kid or a parent in the 1950s and 60s, you certainly remember the “good old days” of drive-in movies.  A neighbor of mine, who grew up in Old Lyme, recalls going to the Waterford Drive-In.  Several women “of a certain age,” who grew up in the Hartford burbs but still spend each summer at the Connecticut shore, remembered the Clinton Drive-In as well as the Blue Hills (in Bloomfield) and a few that were on the Berlin Turnpike in Newington. 

Whether you watched outdoor movies parked in a car along the Boston Post Rd. or on the Berlin Turnpike, it was still the same experience.  After supper, Dad would drive his nuclear family to the drive-in.  (I remember that in families with very young children, the kids were often in their PJ’s, the easier to put them to bed after the show.) 

Dad pulled alongside a pole with an attached speaker and then hooked the speaker over the car window.  Voilà, you had a sound system.  Then everyone waited in anticipation as dusk settled and, yes, there were always a few impatient jokesters who started to honk their horns to get the show going.  Finally, it would be dark enough, the screen would light up … and it was magic time.  

Growing up in Fairfield and Hartford Counties, I have fond memories of the Candlelight Drive-In in Bridgeport where we saw “The King and I” and the Farmington Drive-In where our family watched “Gigi.” A number of people I talked to also recalled specific movies that they saw. 

One woman remembered other recreational activities at the drive-in.  By the time she was dating, drive-ins had become known as “passion pits” where teenagers indulged in their own steamy love scenes.  So when she and her boyfriend went to the local drive-in, they would lie to her mother about where they were going.   

An important part of the drive-in experience was intermission.  After the first feature ended, “It’s Intermission Time, Folks!” or “Time Out for a Delicious Snack in our Sparkling Refreshment Building” would flash before our eyes.  Then, as we walked through the rows of cars to the flat-topped concession stand, images of talking hot dogs and tasty beverages flitted across the screen.  Who could resist those silly ads? 

There was also a ticking clock on the screen counting down the number of minutes before the next movie began.  Ten minutes till showtime!  

Drive-ins were at their peak during the 1950s and 60s because it was the perfect time and the perfect place.  In post-World War II America, the drive-in theater brought together a few of our favorite things—cars and movies.  What better way to be entertained than sitting in the comfort of the family car?  There was also the practical consideration that, in those baby boom years, parents didn’t have to worry about a sitter.  The drive-in was a family entertainment center.

By the 1950s, of course, small black and white screens in living rooms were also becoming the rage.  Before you knew it, there was color TV, then cable TV, premium movie channels, VCRs, and DVDs.  Today many homes are equipped with wide-screen televisions and the 21st century family doesn’t even have to leave the living room to watch a movie.  

 Yes, movie technology has come a long way and today’s kids have grown up with digitally-sharp images and stereo surround-sound. Now living in the age of the coronavirus, a new generation can experience that old-fashioned thrill of watching a flick on a starry summer night.  Drive-ins offer an evening’s entertainment (and getting out of the house) while remaining socially distant. 

Here in Connecticut, there are three al fresco cinemas dating from the 1950s era that are still open—the Mansfield Drive-In, the Southington Drive-In, and the Pleasant Valley Drive-In located in Barkhamsted. And it was recently announced that a brand-new drive-in, which will operate year-round, will open in Wethersfield this September.    

Most drive-ins today have converted to FM radio to broadcast the audio. But some of us will never forget that memorable message on the screen at the end of a Saturday night at the movies—“Please remember to replace the speaker on the post when you leave the theater.” 

Editor’s Note:

Halls Rd. Improvement Committee Hosts Open House at Old Lyme Town Hall, Saturday; Members Will Present New Plans, Discuss Next Steps

The boards showing the plans are on display in the front foyer of the Town Hall for members of the public to review at their leisure.

Editor’s Note: We have been asked by the Halls Rd. Improvement Committee to share this June 2021 update with our readers.

OLD LYME — Phase II of the Halls Road Plan has been completed by our consultants the BSC Group. This includes maps and descriptions of the new public right of way improvements, and a look at a range of private development opportunities that will be enabled by the new Village District zoning.

Two key drawings from the final Halls Road Plan are on display in the foyer of Memorial Town Hall and can be viewed during open hours.

Committee members and BSC team will be at Town Hall for another Open House on Sunday, Aug. 8, from 1 to 3:30 p.m. to discuss the plan and answer questions.

The Master Plan Booklet is also available online at this link.

This phase represents the formal conceptual plan for the future Halls Road Village District. BSC will complete additional detailed work in support of the plan (as described below) in the coming weeks.

The Town of Old Lyme is responsible for improvements to the public right of way.

The formal Halls Road Plan will aid the town in securing grants to help offset the costs of construction. The changes in zoning – creating a mixed-use Village District along Halls Road with a supporting set of Design Guidelines – are tools to guide future private development and investment along Halls Road.

Under the current contract, BSC Group will also help with next steps in regulatory approvals, grants, zoning, and design guidelines. 

Visit the Old Lyme Town Hall to review the boards showing the Halls Rd. plans n person.

Next Steps for Public Right of Way Improvements:

  • Obtain approvals from CT DOT and other agencies. (BSC)
  • Provide a comprehensive list of available grants for Public Right of Way construction. (BSC)
  • Provide grant writing assistance to apply for grants. (BSC)
  • Apply for grants. (Town)

Next Steps in Guiding Future Private Investment in the Halls Road Village District:

  • Provide recommended zoning language changes to describe a new mixed-use Village District for the Halls Road area. (BSC)
  • Help those responsible to finalize zoning language for the new Village District. (BSC)
  • Create architectural Design Guidelines to supplement Village District zoning. (BSC)

‘The Farmer’s Market’ at Tiffany Farms in Lyme is Opens Saturdays for the Season

View of The Farmer’s Market at Tiffany Farms in Lyme.

LYME —‘The Farmer’s Market at Tiffany Farms’ in Lyme open Saturday, June 26, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Vendors this season include

  • Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm
  • Biscotti and Beyond
  • Bittersweet Farms
  • Chatfield Hollow Farm
  • Confections by Tonie Marie (new – confections!)
  • Dondero Orchards
  • Fat Stone Farm (returning!)
  • From the Farm
  • Long Table Farm
  • Maple Breeze Farm
  • Marna Roons. (New – macaroons!)
  • Sankow Beaver Brook Farm
  • TALK Seafood
  • Tiffany Farms Pasture Raised Beef (started in September and was a HUGE success!)
  • Traveling Italian Chef
  • Wave Hill Breads

Jennifer Tiffany, who runs the market with her husband Bill Hurtle, told LymeLine by email, “We have a well-rounded list of returnees in addition to a couple of new vendors to fill our sweet tooth cravings!”

Bill Hurtle and Jen Tiffany who are preparing to open ‘The Farmers Market at Tiffany Farms’ on June 15.

Social distancing is requested and masks are optional.

“The Heart Seen ‘Round Lyme” looks out at the community from the silo at Tiffany Farms.

This year’ tag-line for the market is “Keeping the trade alive as stewards of the land.”

Editor’s Note: We wish Jen and Bill the very best in this venture throughout the season, which lasts until mid-October.

Visit this link to read an article we published in 2019 about the inaugural season at The Farmer’s Market.

 

July 29 COVID-19 Update: Old Lyme Back in Yellow Zone for Two-Week Case Rate; One New Case in OL Takes Cumulative Total to 351, Lyme Holds at 112

This map, updated July 29, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Lyme is still in the (lowest) Gray Zone, but Old Lyme has moved into the Yellow Zone. Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.) Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper. Details in italics are the same for each of the maps included in this article.

‘New London County has moved into the category of “substantial transmission”’ (Deidre S. Gifford, MD, MPH, Senior Advisor to the Governor for Health and Human Services, and Acting Connecticut Department of Public Health Commissioner)

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Thursday, July 29, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health  (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 28, shows the latest average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks (see map above.)

The picture is distressing, reflecting national trends, with four towns now in the Red (highest case rate) Zone and four in the Orange (second highest) Zone. See detailed description of the zones in italics below.

The towns in the Red Zone are Harland, Salem, Bozrah and Sprague. The towns in the Orange Zone are Easton, East Hampton, Ledyard and Thompson.

Old Lyme has reentered the Yellow (second lowest) Zone along with more than 50 other Connecticut towns. All remaining towns in the state, including Lyme, are in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone. This is the 19th straight week that Lyme is in the Gray Zone.

This same report issued Thursday, July 29, also shows that Old Lyme has reported one new confirmed COVID-19 case. This takes Old Lyme’s cumulative total of confirmed cases to 351, while Lyme’s holds steady at 112.

In breaking news, Ledge Light Director of Health Stephen Mansfield sent out a statement at 8:10 a.m. this morning from Deidre S. Gifford, MD, MPH, Senior Advisor to the Governor for Health and Human Services, and Acting Connecticut Department of Public Health Commissioner, which states, “According to new guidance released by CDC this week, all individuals over the age of 2 years—whether vaccinated or unvaccinated—in counties with substantial transmission of COVID-19 should wear masks in public indoor spaces.

As of today, Hartford, New Haven and New London Counties have moved into the category of “substantial transmission” per the CDC classification system.  The Connecticut Department of Public Health strongly recommends that individuals who live in, work in, or are visiting towns located in Hartford, New Haven or New London County follow this recommendation.”

Mansfield said yesterday in a different communication, “The increase in COVID transmission in New London County is cause for concern.”

  • The Gray category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is less than five or less than five reported cases.
  • The Yellow category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between five and nine reported cases.
  • The Orange category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between 10 and 14.
  • The Red category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town exceeds 15.

In all cases, this rate does not include cases or tests among residents of nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.

The map below is from July 22, when two towns, Franklin and Salem, were in the Red Zone (indicating the highest rate of COVID-19 new cases), which is up one from the previous week, and Andover remained in the (second highest rate) Orange Zone (down from two towns last week.)

Eight towns were in the Yellow Zone (indicating the lowest but one rate of COVID-19 new cases), which is up from two last week. They were Clinton, East Hampton, Manchester, Newington, Stonington, Westbrook, Windsor and Windsor Locks.

This map, updated July 22, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone. 

The map below is from July 15, when one town, Franklin, was in the Red Zone (indicating the highest rate of COVID-19 new cases) and another two, Salem and Andover, were in the (second highest rate) Orange Zone. New Hartford and Griswold were in the Yellow Zone (indicating the lowest but one rate of COVID-19 new cases.)

This map, updated July 15, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

The map below is from July 8, when New Hartford was the sole town in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated July 8, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

The map below is from July 1, when Marlborough and Prospect were in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated July 1, 2021 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

The map below is from June 24, when Somers, Prospect and Bolton were in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated June 24, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

This is the June 17 map, when just one town, Bolton, was in the Yellow Zone.

This map, updated June 17, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

For comparison, the map below is from June 3 and shows one town, Waterbury, in the Orange Zone and 21 towns in the Yellow Zone, down from 48 the previous week. The towns in the Yellow Zone were: Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Bloomfield, Brooklyn, Coventry, Cromwell, Derby, East Hartford, East Haven, Granby, Hamden, Hartford, Manchester, New Britain, New Haven, New London, Putnam, Rocky Hill, Shelton, Waterford and Windsor.

This map, updated June 3, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the previous two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

Below is the map from May 27 that showed one town in the Red Zone, Putnam, and 10 towns in the Orange Zone.

This map, updated May 27, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme were still in the (lowest) Gray Zone.

Compare the maps above with the one we published Dec. 18, 2020 to see the remarkable progress that has been made with controlling the spread of the virus through expansion of vaccination rates and improved mitigation strategies.

Map of Connecticut dated Dec. 17, 2020 showing both Lyme and Old Lyme now in the CT DPH-identified ‘Red Zone.’ This is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is over 15.

Vaccination rates in Lyme and Old Lyme are encouraging with 82.47 percent of the population in Lyme having received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and the equivalent number for Old Lyme being 74.17. percent.

Percentages for the fully vaccinated are 79.23 for Lyme and 70.79 for Old Lyme.

These rates remain among the higher percentages in the state.

Information regarding vaccination opportunities and other relevant information can be found at https://llhd.org/coronavirus-covid-19-situation/covid-19-vaccine/

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/

Old Lyme Rowers Just Miss a Medal for Team USA in Men’s Eight Olympic Final

The Olympic Men’s Eight+ final at the 1500 meter mark with New Zealand, who won the gold medal, in Lane 2 and Team USA in Lane 1. Germany in Lane 3 took silver followed by Great Britain in Lane 5, who won the bronze medal.

OLD LYME /TOKYO — Old Lyme’s Austin Hack and Liam Corrigan along with the remaining members of the US Men’s 8+ came in fourth in the closely-contested Olympic final Thursday evening — just missing out on a medal.

New Zealand took the gold with a winning time of 5:24:64 a but a photo finish followed for silver between Great Britain and Germany. The decision went in Germany’s favor and they were declared silver medalists with a time of 5:25:60 and Team GB took the bronze with 5:25:73.

The remaining results were:

  • US: 5:26:75
  • Netherlands: 5:27:96
  • Australia: 5:36:23

Editor’s Note: Austin and Liam, you may not have won a medal but the residents of Lyme and Old Lyme are so proud of you now … and will remain so for years to come!

Old Lyme’s Hack, Corrigan Race for Gold in US Men’s Eight TONIGHT in Tokyo

The whole of Lyme and Old Lyme will be cheering on “our” boys, Austin Hack and Liam Corrigan, tonight as they race for gold in Tokyo! This photo is taken from the repechage and includes Hack in the upper left, second boat from the top.

Austin Hack

Liam Corrigan

OLD LYME — Lyme-Old Lyme High School graduates Austin Hack (2010) and Liam Corrigan (2015) race for gold in the US Men’s Eight+ final in the Tokyo Olympics at 9:25 p.m. TONIGHT, Thursday, July 29, (which is tomorrow at 10:25 a.m. Tokyo time.)

The other five teams that qualified for the final are:

  • New Zealand
  • Great Britain
  • Netherlands
  • Germany
  • Australia

 

Lyme DTC Endorses Slate of 14 Candidates for November Elections; Mattson, Kiker Running for Reelection to BOS

Lyme First Selectman Steve Mattson (right) and Lyme Selectman John Kiker, both Democrats, are both running for reelection in November 2021.

LYME – The Lyme Democratic Town Committee (DTC) has announced that, at a local Democratic caucus and committee meeting held July 27, a slate of 14 Democratic candidates was nominated and endorsed to run in the Nov. 2 municipal elections.  

Lyme First Selectman Steven Mattson and Selectman John Kiker received unanimous endorsements  for reelection – as did the other 12 Lyme residents who will be running for public office in November. 

In announcing the candidate slate, Lyme DTC Nominating Committee Chairperson Liz Frankel said,  “For the upcoming election, in addition to Steven and John, who have done a superb job of leading Lyme, we have recruited a select group of individuals who are not only highly qualified, but also extremely interested in serving the town we all love and cherish.” 

Four of the candidates – Anne Littlefield, Jim Miller, Laura Mooney and Alan Sheiness – are running  for public office for the first time, motivated by their love of the town and desire to be of service. 

Endorsed Lyme Democratic candidates for the November 2021 election are, from left to right, John Kiker, Alan Sheiness, Mary Stone, Bob House, Anna James, Toni Phillips, Phyllis Ross, Steve Mattson. Missing: Fred Harger, Ann Littlefield, Jim Miller, Laura Mooney.

Running for election this year will be: 

  • Bob House for Board of Finance 
  • Alan Sheiness for Board of Finance 
  • Jim Miller for Board of Finance Alternate 
  • Mary Stone for Library Board of Directors 
  • Laura Mooney for Library Board of Directors 
  • Phyllis Ross for Planning & Zoning Commission 
  • Mary Stone for Planning & Zoning Commission Alternate 
  • Anne Littlefield for Planning & Zoning Commission Alternate 
  • Anna James for Board of Education 
  • Fred Harger for Zoning Board of Appeals 
  • Toni Phillips for Zoning Board of Appeals Alternate 

Running for reelection will be: 

  • Steven Mattson for First Selectman 
  • John Kiker for Selectman and Zoning Board of Appeals 

The Lyme DTC’s mission is to support and strengthen the Democratic Party in the Town of Lyme  and the State of Connecticut. 

Editor’s Note: This article is based on a press release issued this afternoon, July 28, by the Lyme DTC.

Live Jazz Jam at Sound View in Old Lyme, Thursdays; Next Session Aug. 12

Photo by dimitri.photography on Unsplash.

OLD LYME —  Live jazz sessions will be held on the following Thursdays at the Shoreline Community Center, 39 Hartford Ave., Old Lyme, starting at 7 p.m.

  • Aug. 12
  • Aug. 26

Piano, guitar, bass and drum musicians will be dropping by to jam all evening.  You can bring refreshments, enjoy the music, and even dance! All are welcome.

This is a fundraiser for the community center with a requested donation of $5.

Parking is available across the street from the community center.

For more information, call Rob at 860-710-1126.

These events are sponsored by the Sound View Beach Association, Inc.

After 10 Years Service, Nosal Explains Her Decision Not to Seek Reelection to Old Lyme BOS; Will Run For Zoning Commission

“It has been a privilege to serve the residents of Old Lyme as a Selectwoman for the past 10 years.” (Mary Jo Nosal)

Old Lyme Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal is not seeking reelection. (File photo)

OLD LYME — Mary Jo Nosal has served as Old Lyme Selectman for the past 10 years, but when the Old Lyme Democratic Town Committee (OL DTC) announced their slate of candidates for the upcoming November election, her name was against neither the position of Selectman nor First Selectman.

Asked by phone why that was the case, she said simply, “It’s time after 10 years for new ideas.”

She added, “It has been a privilege to serve the residents of Old Lyme as a Selectwoman [for that time.]”

Additionally in an e-mailed statement, Nosal said, “I chose not to run for the Board of Selectmen as I believe it is time for … other qualified individuals to serve.”
Commenting on the OL DTC’s selection of Martha Shoemaker  and Jim Lampos for the top spots, Nosal stated, “I support the exceptionally qualified and enthusiastic candidates endorsed by the OL DTC. Martha Shoemaker for First Selectman and Jim Lampos for the Board of Selectmen are experienced, eminently qualified and know Old Lyme. They will work hard for the community.”
Although not running for the board of selectmen, Nosal’s name is on the slate as a candidate for the Old Lyme Zoning Commission. Asked about that decision, she explained, “I am ready, if elected, to focus my energies on the Zoning Commission.”
Noting in her statement that there is, “Important work facing the Old Lyme Zoning Commission,” she said, “I believe my experience will bring value to the Zoning Commission.”

 

Old Lyme DTC Announces Candidates for November Election; Shoemaker To Challenge Griswold as First Selectman with Lampos as Running Mate

Martha Shoemaker will challenge Time Griswold (R) for the position of First Selectman in November. Photo from Region18.org website.

OLD LYME — The Old Lyme Democratic Town Committee (OL DTC) announced their slate of candidates for the November election in a press release this afternoon.

The announcement was released by Christine Giaquinto, OL DTC Chairman, and read as follows:

‘After thoughtful consideration, the OL DTC is proud to endorse the following candidates for the November 2021 municipal election. All of these candidates are qualified and ready to lead the Town of Old Lyme as we look to the future. They all believe in transparency and accountability in government and they will listen, communicate and advocate for good, equitable and fiscally responsible policy.
First Selectman – Martha H. Shoemaker
11/16/2021-11/21/2023
Selectman – Jim Lampos
11/16/2021-11/21/2023
Board of Assessment Appeals – George C. Finley
11/16/2021-11/18/2025
Board of Finance – Anna S. Reiter
11/16/2021-11/16/2027
Board of Finance – Bradley Mock
11/16/2021-11/16/2027
Board of Finance – Kim Russell Thompson
11/16/2021-11/18/2025 (to fill a vacancy for 4 years)
Board of Finance alternate – Sarah E. Michaelson
11/16/2021-11/21/2023
Board of Finance alternate – Katherine Thuma
11/16/2021-11/21/2023
Planning Commission – Rob McCarthy
11/15/2022-11/16/2027
Planning Commission – Jim Lampos
11/16/2021-11/17/2026
Regional Board of Education – Martha H. Shoemaker
12/1/2021-12/1/2025
Regional Board of Education – Alexander Lowry
12/1/2021-12/1/2025
Regional Board of Education – Jason L. Kemp
12/1/2021-12/1/2025
Regional Board of Education – Marisa Calvi-Rogers
12/1/2021-12/1/2025
Zoning Board of Appeals – Kip Kotzan
11/16/2021-11/17/2026
Zoning Board of Appeals – Russell Fogg
11/15/2022-11/16/2027
Zoning Board of Appeals alternate – Kathleen Tracy
11/16/2021-11/21/2023
Zoning Commission – Maria Martinez
11/16/2021-11/17/2026
Zoning Commission – Mary Jo Nosal
11/15/2022-11/16/2027

US Men’s 8 with Old Lyme’s Corrigan, Hack, Advance to Olympic Final After Photo Finish in Repechage

This photo shows the finish of the men’s 8+ repechage when it was certain New Zealand had won but second place was yet to be determined after a photo finish. Great Britan was finally given second place and the US third.

TOKYO/OLD LYME — The Men’s Eight Repechage in the Tokyo Olympics turned into a thrilling race that ended with a photo finish for second place between Team US and Team Great Britain.

Ultimately, the US Men’s Eight — with Old Lyme’s Austin Hack and Liam Corrigan as crew members — was deemed to have crossed the line behind Great Britain placing the US boat in third place and Great Britain in second.

New Zealand won the race in a time of 5:22:04.

The US Men’s Eight came in third in the repechage to secure a place in the Olympic final.

The other results were:

Great Britain: 5:23:32
USA: 5:23:43
Australia: 5:25:06
Romania: 5:27:14

The top four boats all advance to the final, for which Germany and the Netherlands have already qualified. Meanwhile, Romania is eliminated.

Due to the weather conditions, all the times recorded in the repechage were significantly faster than those in the heats, for example, Germany’s winning time in its heat was 5:28:95.

The race took place at 12:50 p.m. Tokyo time on Wednesday, July 29, which was 11:50 p.m EST on Tuesday, July 28.

July 26 COVID-19 Update: Three New Cases in Old Lyme Take Cumulative Total to 350, Lyme Holds at 112

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

LYME/OLD LYME —The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Monday, July 26, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health  (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Sunday, July 25, shows that Old Lyme has reported three new confirmed COVID-19 cases.

Three new cases were also reported in Old Lyme on Friday, July 23, meaning a total of six new cases were reported between Friday and Monday inclusive.

There are no new cases in Lyme.

This takes Old Lyme’s cumulative total of confirmed cases to 350, while Lyme’s hold at 112.

The Hartford Courant reported in an article dated Friday July 23, “The delta variant accounts for 69% of COVID-19 cases recently tracked in Connecticut, researchers at the Yale School of Public Health say, as the state continues to see an increase in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations.

Experts say the new variant poses a particular risk to unvaccinated people, who make up the vast majority of people currently hospitalized with COVID-19.

Vaccinated people may face greater risk of infection due to the delta variant as compared to previous strains, research shows, but are unlikely to experience severe illness.” Click on the link above to read the full article.

There is no change in the number of fatalities reported in either Lyme (0) or Old Lyme (3).

The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male. Details of the third, which was reported in 2021, have not been made available.

Visit this link for our July 22 update, which includes statewide data.

Watch Old Lyme’s Hack, Corrigan Tonight in US Men’s 8+ as They Race for Place in Final

Austin Hack (third from right) looks to left at the end of Heat 1 in the US 8+ Olympic championship.

TOKYO/OLD LYME — All Olympic rowing events in Tokyo scheduled for today have been postponed to Wednesday and Thursday due to the arrival of Typhoon Nepartak.

The Men’s 8+ repechage — in which the US boat that includes team members Austin Hack and Liam Corrigan from Old Lyme will participate — was already scheduled for Wednesday, July 28, but its time has been changed. It will now be rowed at 12:50 p.m. Tokyo time, which is 11:50 p.m. EST,  TONIGHT, Tuesday, July 27. (Note: Tokyo time is 13 hours ahead of EST.)

Joan Rivington, mother of Liam Corrigan

Five boats will be in the Men’s 8+ repechage — Australia, Great Britain, New Zealand, and Romania will join the US.

The first four boats in the repachage will then join Germany and The Netherlands in the final. Germany and The Netherlands qualified directly for the final by winning their respective heats.Watch Old Lyme’s Hack, Corrigan in Repechage.

We asked Joan Rivington, who lives in Lyme and is the mother of Liam Corrigan, how she was feeling about the upcoming race,

She responded by email, “That is a great question. I have a million emotions running through me but I think my biggest emotion right now is pure joy watching my son and his boat mates being able to compete in Tokyo after working so hard to get there.”

We are sure Lyme and Old Lyme are sharing her joy and so we say again loudly, “Go, Team USA!”

Old Lyme’s Shoreline Community Center Looks to Install Solar Panels Through Innovative Fundraiser

Trinity Solar workers are seen here installing solar panels on a house in Sound View.

Trinity Solar to Donate $100 to Shoreline Community Center’s Planned Solar Installation for Every Homeowner, who has Appointment to Learn More About Solar

OLD LYME — When some of the board members of the Sound View Beach Association, Inc. (SVBA) recently had solar panels installed on their homes, they became aware that there were additional benefits in addition to the ell-documented ones of saving money on their electric bills while also having a positive impact on the environment. 

Gail Fuller, who currently serves as SVBA President, explains, “We discovered a fundraising opportunity that would make possible the installation of solar panels on the roof of the Shoreline Community Center.” The Center is located on Hartford Ave. and sponsored by the SVBA. 

The Center’s bills for electricity in the summer total around $400 a month, which is a financially challenging amount for a small, non-profit organization. To reduce electricity costs year-round, the SVBA Board had determined their best option was to install solar panels on the Center’s roof.

Fuller points out, “This, however, would represent a major expense for the SVBA since the Center is designated a commercial building and therefore not eligible for federal, residential grants.”

The Shoreline Community Center board is hoping to raise sufficient funds to install solar panels on the Center’s roof.


In support of the Shoreline Community Center’s fundraiser, Trinity Solar has offered to donate $100 to the SVBA for every homeowner, who has an appointment in their home with one of their solar experts. If Trinity Solar subsequently installs solar panels on that home — regardless of the town in which the house is sited — the Center will receive $1,000 towards its own solar installation.  
Trinity Solar will provide home- and property-owners with a no-cost solar installation funded by federal grants for residential homes. 
 
There is no commitment for signing up for an appointment. The benefit is learning more about solar from a company that has been in business for many years and is also supporting the community.  
Trinity Solar states on its website, “We believe solar is the most practical form of renewable energy on the planet and seek to make it accessible to as many people as possible.” 
 
Fuller comments enthusiastically, “The SVBA is excited about this fundraiser and the opportunity to install solar [panels] on the Shoreline Community Center.”  
She notes, “If you are considering solar or would just like to learn more about your options, make sure to contact Trinity Solar through our partnership. There are two ways to sign up.  You can click on this link and enter your name, address and contact information or call 800-655-2500 and be sure to mention the Sound View Beach Association.”
Editor’s Note: For more information about Trinity Solar, visit their website.

Updated Time for US Men’s Eight Repechage Due to Anticipated Typhoon in Tokyo

Screenshot from Windy.com showing Typhoon Nepartak approaching Japan. Tokyo is in the center of the map.

TOKYO/OLD LYME — After experiencing a year’s delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Tokyo is now bracing for the arrival of a Typhoon Nepartak. As a result, all rowing events scheduled for Tuesday, July 27, have been postponed to Wednesday and Thursday.

The Men’s 8+ repechage — in which the US boat that includes team members Austin Hack and Liam Corrigan from Old Lyme will participate — was already scheduled for Wednesday, but its time has been changed. It will now be rowed at 12:50 p.m. Tokyo time, which is 11:50 p.m. EST on Tuesday, July 27.

Five boats will be in the Men’s 8+ repechage — Australia, Great Britain, New Zealand, and Romania will join the US.

The first four boats in the repachage will then join Germany and The Netherlands in the final. Germany and The Netherlands qualified directly for the final by winning their respective heats.

Griswold Running Again for Old Lyme First Selectman, Republicans Approve Full Slate of Candidates for November; No Word Yet on Election From Democrats

OLD LYME — The Chair of the Republican Town Committee’s Nominating Committee, Vicki Lanier, has shared the party’s slate of endorsed candidates for the November election with us. These were approved at the RTC meeting held Thursday evening and are as follows with incumbents noted with an (I) after their name:

Old Lyme First Selectman Timothy Griswold is running again in November 2021 as the endorsed Republican candidate for First Selectman.

First Selectman:
Tim Griswold (I)

Selectman:
Matt Ward
Town Clerk:
Vicki Urbowicz (I)
Board of Finance:
Andrew Russell (I)

Judith Read (I)

Board of Finance Alternates:
Maria Marchant

Matthew Olson

Board of Assessment Appeals:
Tim Griswold
Planning Commission:
Todd Machnik (I)
Zoning Commission:
Sloane Danenhauer

Jane Marsh (I)

Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA):

Dan Montano

ZBA Alternates:
Steven Cinami
Rod Clingman

Chris Kerr

Region 18 Board of Education (BOE):
Chris Staab
Laura Dean-Frazier
Michael Presti
Mona Colwell
Regarding the incumbent Old Lyme members of the Region 18 BOE, Chairman Diane Linderman (D), Treasurer Jean Wilczynski (D) and Rick Goulding (D) are all not seeking re-election. Secretary Martha Shoemaker’s (D) four-year term will also end, but she is seeking another term.
Lyme incumbent Stacey Leonardo (D) is also stepping down.

July 23 COVID-19 Update: Three New Cases in Old Lyme Take Cumulative Total to 347, Lyme Holds at 112

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

LYME/OLD LYME —The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Friday, July 23, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health  (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Thursday, July 22, shows that Old Lyme has reported three new confirmed COVID-19 cases. There are no new cases in Lyme.

This takes Old Lyme’s cumulative total of confirmed cases to 347, while Lyme’s hold at 112.

There is no change in the number of fatalities reported in either Lyme (0) or Old Lyme (3).

The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male. Details of the third, which was reported in 2021, have not been made available.

Visit this link for our July 22 update, which includes statewide data.