May 19, 2022

Letter to the Editor: Keep the Vision of Public Access to Public Land Alive in Old Lyme

To the Editor:

The Republican Party has a long history of protecting one of our nation’s most precious resources – the beauty of our natural environment. President Theodore Roosevelt, known as “The Conservation President”, established the United States Forest Service and during his administration preserved over 230 million acres of public land  to be kept in its natural state and to be enjoyed by the public. President Johnson spearheaded the Clean Water Act during his administration and President Nixon followed up with the Clean Air Act during his tenure. Our party is also proud to have worked with our Democrat friends to keep America beautiful.

Why do we live in Old Lyme? One of the top answers is because it is the most beautiful rural small town along the Connecticut coastline. We are second to none with a landscape bounded by the Long Island Sound, rivers, wooded hills and filled with a very biodiverse ecology. The question that needs to be asked is, “How do we protect this beauty and still enjoy it with all our senses?”

Recently, there have been several news stories about a parcel of town owned property located at 36-1 Buttonball Road. It was deeded to the town with a restriction that it shall be used by the public for waterfront access. A representative from CT DEEP indicated that if the town went forward with that plan and an environmental impact study were to be done, then it would be very probable that DEEP would permit some minimal development to access the water based on an on-site observation. There would be room to park a vehicle and then access the water by way of a minimally impacting boardwalk to launch a kayak or to just enjoy the salt marsh ecology.

We support and encourage the town to pursue the wishes of this property’s donor to allow the public to have waterfront access. Furthermore, we stress the importance of responsible stewardship for these generous gifts. Proper stewardship will demonstrate that we value and will protect a donor’s wishes; and, it will encourage future donors to gift parcels of land for the public benefit knowing that their gift’s purpose will be honored.

We do understand that this parcel falls within jurisdictional aspects of several town authorities and so we encourage a post haste resolution of this jurisdictional issue so that the town may expeditiously move forward with a DEEP application for an environmental impact study.

It has been well over a century since President Theodore Roosevelt made it a national vision to protect and enjoy nature. Let’s continue to keep this vision alive in Old Lyme!

Robert A. Nixon,
Old Lyme.

Editor’s Note: The author is the chairman of the Old Lyme Republican Town Committee.

May 5 COVID-19 Update: Over 85% of CT Now in Red Zone, CT Positivity Rate Breaks 10%; Five New Cases in Old Lyme Take Cumulative Total to 1129, One New Case Takes Lyme’s Total to 277

This map, updated May 5, 2022 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme remain in the Red (highest) Zone. One hundred and forty five towns (representing a total of 85.8% of the state) are now found in the Red Zone. Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities. Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper.

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Reports issued Thursday, May 5, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) shows five new, confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme and one in Lyme.

These cases raise Old Lyme’s cumulative case total to 1129 and Lyme’s to 277.

Old Lyme reported two new cases on Tuesday and five on Wednesday. Lyme reported one new case on each day.

Statewide Situation – Weekly Update

On Thursday, May 5, the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) also released its latest weekly COVID-19 Alert Map (pictured above), which indicates that 145 municipalities are now in the Red (highest of four) Zone for case rates. These towns in the Red Zone include both Lyme and Old Lyme.

This number has increased by 14 over the 131 towns recorded in the Red Zone last week, thus increasing the number of towns in the Red Zone to over 85.8%) of the state.

This total of 145 Red Zone towns is moving rapidly towards the Jan. 27, 2022 number, when the total was 168 out of 169 towns.

As of May 5, 2022 all nine towns in the Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) remain in the Red Zone.

The LLHD is no longer issuing reports with updated Case Rates and other metrics.

The CT DPH will issue an updated map of the zones Thursday, May 12 — the map is updated weekly on Thursdays.

The color-coded zones are:

Red: Indicates case rates over the last two weeks of greater than 15 per 100,000 population
Orange: Indicates case rates between 10 to 14 cases per 100,000 population
Yellow: Indicates case rates between 5 and 9 per 100,000 population
Gray: Indicates case rates lower than five per 100,000 population

More on the Local Situation

April 5, 2022 was the most recent day on which no new cases were reported in either town.

Prior to March 25, Lyme had gone for 23 consecutive days with no new cases being reported. Two new cases were reported in Lyme on March 25.

Prior to April 5, the most recent day on which no new cases were reported in either Lyme or Old Lyme was March 24. There were also no new cases on March 9 and 4, and Feb. 24. The previous date prior to Feb. 24 when no new cases were reported in either town was Dec. 12, 2021.

Statewide Situation – Daily Update

The state’s COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate broke the 10% watershed on May 4 at 10.32%. It rose again on May 5 to 10.35%.

Thursday’s rate of 10.35% is the state’s highest recorded COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate since Jan.26, 2022 when the Rate stood at 10.93%.

On May 5, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations decreased by 12 to 233.

In contrast, on Jan. 12, 2022, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations was 1,939.

Of those hospitalized on May 5, the number not fully vaccinated was 82 (representing 35.19%).

The total number of COVID-related deaths in Connecticut remained at 10,858 on May 4, according to The New York Times.

The next Daily Data Report will be issued by CT DPH Friday, May 6, around 4 p.m.

Increase in Cases in Lyme & Old Lyme Since August 2021

The cumulative total of confirmed cases for Old Lyme has now increased by 686 since Wednesday, Nov. 10, when the total stood at 443 — that number had stood unchanged for a week since the previous Thursday, Nov. 4.

On Aug. 26 — which was the day Lyme-Old Lyme Schools started the new academic year — Old Lyme’s cumulative case total stood at 372, meaning there have now been 757 new cases there since that date.

Meanwhile, Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 indicating 163 new cases have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Ledge Light Health District Update

The LLHD is no longer issuing weekly updates unless there is, “any significant change in case rates, hospitalizations, etc.”

On April 14, LLHD sent LymeLine.com this press release issued by CT DPH the same day. It begins: With the current uptick of COVID-19 cases—coupled with the upcoming schedule of spring holidays and family gatherings—the Connecticut Department of Public Health is reminding residents of the tools currently in place to help contain the spread of the virus. 

The new Community Levels tool created by the CDC can be viewed at this link: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/your-health/covid-by-county.html

Ledge Light Health District continues to focus its vaccination efforts on homebound populations and providing initial vaccinations and boosters to individuals, who were vaccinated previously. Information about vaccination opportunities can be found at https://llhd.org/coronavirus-covid-19-situation/covid-19-vaccine/.

An explanation of the new CDC Community Levels tool by Thomas Gotowka can be found at this link.

COVID testing opportunities can be found at COVID-19 Testing | Ledge Light Health District (llhd.org)

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/

Fatalities Due to COVID-19 in Lyme, Old Lyme

There has been one COVID-related fatality of a Lyme resident: a 57-year-old male passed away Nov. 16, 2021. On Nov. 30, the state finally included this fatality in its data

Four COVID-related fatalities have now been reported in Old Lyme. The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

Details of the third and fourth fatalities, which were reported respectively in 2021 and on Feb. 4, 2022, have not been made available.

COVID-19 Situation in LOL Schools

Under new state protocols for schools, Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools are no longer required to carry out contact tracing.

LOL Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser explained the latest developments in LOL Schools COVID protocols in an April 1 email to the school community, saying, “As noted in my email of February 17, 2022, beginning April 1, 2022 we will no longer report daily COVID-19 cases in the schools.”

He then stated, “For the remainder of this school year, that information will be complied on a weekly basis and will be available on our website at the following link: https://www.region18.org/parents/covid-data.”

Details published to date show the following number of positive cases in LOL Schools by week.
April 3-9: 0
April 10-16: 0
April 19-23: Spring Break
April 24-30: 7

For a summary of cases in LOL Schools between Jan. 1 and March 31, 2022, visit this link.

View a full listing of cases between 8/26/21 – 12/23/21 at this link.

Death of Mary Blossom Turner Announced, Widow of Jack, Who Founded LymeLine.com; Service May 22 in Old Lyme

Mary Blossom Turner: January 1, 1932 – April 30, 2022

OLD LYME — We are deeply saddened to announce the death of Mary Blossom Turner, the widow of Jack Turner, who founded LymeLine.com. To quote from the obituary published in The Day, Mary passed, “easily in her sleep April 30, 2022, at 90 years old.”

Mary was a remarkable woman, as her full obituary published below testifies. I met her on several occasions during the time I worked for Jack as the first News Editor of his fledgling online publication, LymeLine.com. That was back in 2003 (when LymeLine.com was launched) through 2005, when Jack died. She was the most cheerful and supportive companion to Jack — and therefore, in turn, me — imaginable.

Jack and Mary’s relationship was truly wonderful in so many ways. After Jack’s untimely death, it was dear Mary with whom we negotiated the purchase of LymeLine.com — she made it quite clear that she personally had no interest in continuing its publication but was very happy to see someone else pursue Jack’s legacy.

We send sincere condolences to Mary’s children, Mariette and John, and their families. (For the record, it was Mariette, who recommended me to Jack to be his News Editor. Jack lured me away from the Main Street News … and the rest is history!)

A memorial service for Mary will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday afternoon, May 22, at the Grassy Hill Church in Old Lyme.

Kindly make any memorial donations to the Cure Alzheimer’s Fund, at: https://curealz.org/giving/donate/.

I will never forget Mary … or Jack.

Olwen Logan, Publisher & Editor: LymeLine.com

Mary’s obituary follows:

Mary Turner was the first baby born in Port Chester, NY in 1932, to Mary Drummond and Earl Blossom. She had a pony and a dog growing up in Westport, CT where her father’s home studio smelled like turpentine. Her elder brother, David, put whiskey in the dog bowl and the dog got drunk. Mary tended to the dog while David joined the Coast Guard before becoming a commercial illustrator like their father. The dog recovered and Mary went off to Bennington College, where she learned proper grammar.

Mary met Jack Turner of Wilton CT at a party, and since they both liked cats, they decided to marry. Jack would become Mary’s lifelong hero. He joined the Marines after graduating from Colgate, but the two managed to see each other enough to produce two children, Mariette and John, one of whom turned out perfectly.

The young family moved to an apartment in Bloomfield. Mary ran shotgun while Jack and friends distilled vodka from potatoes and conceived Soundings at the dining room table. Children were to be seen and not heard, but Mary saw them as hers to sculpt—by instilling the Golden Rule and correcting grammar.

After moving to Wethersfield as Jack grew Soundings, Mary kept a successful portrait business, sold real estate, made wicked Halloween costumes, practiced yoga, shopped and prepped for Jack’s cooking, and briefly owned a bakery where she produced healthy donuts.

Frostbite sailing on Wethersfield Cove was a family affair and a social immersion—with racing and cocktails for the adults and racing to grow up for the kids. Mary kept her children grounded in an alluring, challenging world.

Block Island vacations exaggerated regular life without the work, and while packs of young cousins ran wild, Mary sojourned to paint watercolors. The children felt important and grown-up as she always took time to explain just why, or what, we might do, or to patiently describe what would be proper, or to make a sardine sandwich.

Jack and Mary gardened, cooked, leisured, and worked to assure a wholesome family atmosphere while Mariette and John tackled high school and college. Ever supporting her husband and children, Mary endured fiberglass boatbuilding in the driveway, amplified rock-n-roll, polyester fumes, milk and butter tasting of plastic, orange juice re-purposed as bong-water and rolling cohorts of teenagers, dogs, and cats in the house. As surrogate second but present authority, Mary anchored existence in Jack’s absence—rising each day to exemplify cheer, vigor, empathy, and purpose.

When Soundings moved to Essex and the family to Old Lyme, Mary continued painting portraits, working in real-estate, taking walks, and absorbing what she sensed best in life. Jack left Soundings, built another boat, and started Lymeline.

The children married and moved away to grow the tree—with three grandchildren, (Marilee Root, Brittany Figueroa and John Paul Turner IV) and five great-grandchildren, all stars in no small part due to Mary’s examples of excellent grammar, adherence to the Golden Rule, and casual parenting.

Jack died in 2005. Mary forged on without him, walking daily to the Chocolate Shell for a fix with Molly, the last of the many dogs and cats. She pursued her artwork until advancing years betrayed her capacity.

None would envy her long experience with Alzheimer’s.

We remember Mary smiling as she hummed, “Happy Days are Here Again,” or shrieking what she called the “Cry of the Happy Housewife.” If we transgressed in right and wrong, she would say: “You wouldn’t want someone to do that to you, would you?”

With a name like Mary Blossom Turner, we would expect to learn from her.

Mary leaves two children (Mariette and John); three grandchildren (Marilee Root, Brittany Figueroa, and John Turner IV), four great-grandchildren, (Tyler Root, Annabelle, Damien, and their soon-to-be little sister Figueroa), and five nephews and their families. She joins—eternally—her partner, hero and husband, Jack; her brother David; her granddaughter, Halle Root; and her eldest nephew, David Blossom.

We all miss her dearly.

 

 

 

 

May 3 & May 4 COVID-19 Update: Seven New Cases in Old Lyme Take Cumulative Total to 1124, Two New Cases in Lyme Takes Total There to 276

Photo by CDC on Unsplash,

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Reports issued respectively Tuesday, May 3, and Wednesday, May 4, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) show a total of seven new, confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme and two in Lyme.

These cases raise Old Lyme’s cumulative case total to 1124 and Lyme’s to 276.

Old Lyme reported two new cases on Tuesday and five on Wednesday. Lyme reported one new case on each day.

April 5, 2022 was the most recent day on which no new cases were reported in either town.

Prior to March 25, Lyme had gone for 23 consecutive days with no new cases being reported. Two new cases were reported in Lyme on March 25.

Prior to April 5, the most recent day on which no new cases were reported in either Lyme or Old Lyme was March 24. There were also no new cases on March 9 and 4, and Feb. 24. The previous date prior to Feb. 24 when no new cases were reported in either town was Dec. 12, 2021.

Statewide Situation – Weekly Update

This map, updated April 28, 2022 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme remain in the Red (highest) Zone. One hundred and thirty one towns (representing a total of 77.5% of the state) are now found in the Red Zone. Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities. Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper.

On Thursday, April 28, the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) released its latest weekly COVID-19 Alert Map (pictured above), which indicates that 131 municipalities are now in the Red (highest of four) Zone for case rates. These towns in the Red Zone include both Lyme and Old Lyme.

This number has increased by 23 over the 108 towns recorded in the Red Zone last week, thus increasing the number of towns in the Red Zone to over three-quarters (77.5%) of the state.

Although this total of Red Zone towns reflects a dramatic increase over last week’s number, it still shows a reduction in the number of Red Zone towns since  Jan. 27, when the total was 168 out of 169 towns.

As of April 21, 2022 all nine towns in the Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) are now in the Red Zone.

The LLHD is no longer issuing reports with updated Case Rates and other metrics.

The CT DPH will issue an updated map of the zones Thursday, May 5 — the map is updated weekly on Thursdays.

The color-coded zones are:

Red: Indicates case rates over the last two weeks of greater than 15 per 100,000 population
Orange: Indicates case rates between 10 to 14 cases per 100,000 population
Yellow: Indicates case rates between 5 and 9 per 100,000 population
Gray: Indicates case rates lower than five per 100,000 population

Statewide Situation – Daily Update

The state’s COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate rose to 9.99% on May 3 and again on May 4 to 10.32%.

Wednesday’s rate of 10.32% is the state’s highest recorded COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate since Jan.26, 2022 when the Rate stood at 10.93%.

On May 3, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations increased by six to 236. On May 4, the number rose again to 245.

In contrast, on Jan. 12, 2022, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations was 1,939.

Of those hospitalized on May 4, the number not fully vaccinated was 78 (representing 31.84%). On May 3, the number not fully vaccinated was 67 (representing 28.39%).

The total number of COVID-related deaths in Connecticut increased to 10,858 on May 4, according to The New York Times.

The next Daily Data Report will be issued by CT DPH Thursday, May 5, around 4 p.m.

Increase in Cases in Lyme & Old Lyme Since August 2021

The cumulative total of confirmed cases for Old Lyme has now increased by 681 since Wednesday, Nov. 10, when the total stood at 443 — that number had stood unchanged for a week since the previous Thursday, Nov. 4.

On Aug. 26 — which was the day Lyme-Old Lyme Schools started the new academic year — Old Lyme’s cumulative case total stood at 372, meaning there have now been 752 new cases there since that date.

Meanwhile, Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 indicating 162 new cases have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Ledge Light Health District Update

The LLHD is no longer issuing weekly updates unless there is, “any significant change in case rates, hospitalizations, etc.”

On April 14, LLHD sent LymeLine.com this press release issued by CT DPH the same day. It begins: With the current uptick of COVID-19 cases—coupled with the upcoming schedule of spring holidays and family gatherings—the Connecticut Department of Public Health is reminding residents of the tools currently in place to help contain the spread of the virus. 

The new Community Levels tool created by the CDC can be viewed at this link: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/your-health/covid-by-county.html

Ledge Light Health District continues to focus its vaccination efforts on homebound populations and providing initial vaccinations and boosters to individuals, who were vaccinated previously. Information about vaccination opportunities can be found at https://llhd.org/coronavirus-covid-19-situation/covid-19-vaccine/.

An explanation of the new CDC Community Levels tool by Thomas Gotowka can be found at this link.

COVID testing opportunities can be found at COVID-19 Testing | Ledge Light Health District (llhd.org)

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/

Fatalities Due to COVID-19 in Lyme, Old Lyme

There has been one COVID-related fatality of a Lyme resident: a 57-year-old male passed away Nov. 16, 2021. On Nov. 30, the state finally included this fatality in its data

Four COVID-related fatalities have now been reported in Old Lyme. The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

Details of the third and fourth fatalities, which were reported respectively in 2021 and on Feb. 4, 2022, have not been made available.

COVID-19 Situation in LOL Schools

Under new state protocols for schools, Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools are no longer required to carry out contact tracing.

LOL Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser explained the latest developments in LOL Schools COVID protocols in an April 1 email to the school community, saying, “As noted in my email of February 17, 2022, beginning April 1, 2022 we will no longer report daily COVID-19 cases in the schools.”

He then stated, “For the remainder of this school year, that information will be complied on a weekly basis and will be available on our website at the following link: https://www.region18.org/parents/covid-data.”

Details published to date show the following number of positive cases in LOL Schools by week.
April 3-9: 0
April 10-16: 0
April 19-23: Spring Break
April 24-30: 7

For a summary of cases in LOL Schools between Jan. 1 and March 31, 2022, visit this link.

View a full listing of cases between 8/26/21 – 12/23/21 at this link.

Lyme-Old Lyme Tennis Girls Remain Unbeaten, “They are Determined Players … and it Shows” (Coach Rahr)

The undefeated Lyme-Old Lyme High School team gathers for a celebratory photo. All photos by A. Fenton.

OLD LYME — The Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) girls’ tennis team is enjoying a truly remarkable season. Look at the scoresheets below and you will see that the girls not only remain undefeated, but also have hardly dropped an individual match this season.

Abby Sicuranza demonstrates the strength of her serve in this game against Morgan. Sicuranza is the Wildcats’ #1 singles player.

Coach Lauren Rahr admits with complete honesty that this situation is something, “I don’t think I have fully wrapped my head around.”

Rahr, who is a math teacher at LOLHS, recalls that “Last year was truly a dream season with all we accomplished and how it all flowed together so well,” but notes, “This year has presented different challenges.”

Asked how she would summarize the team’s performance to date this season, Rahr responded, “From last season to this season, I have seen a lot of growth and maturity from all of my players.”

Elaina Morosky is having a terrific season regularly playing in the #3 or #4 singles spot.

She said they had clearly put in a great deal of time in the off-season to continue improving their games, and as a result, “… came into this season with specific goals in mind that they want to accomplish both as individuals and as a team.”

Lyme-Old Lyme High School Girl’s Tennis Coach Lauren Rahr celebrates her team’s continuing success in this photo with her father, Dave Rahr, who serves as the team’s Junior Varsity Coach. Photo submitted.

She added, “Every match we go out and play, they continue to amaze me. There are always things we can continue to improve upon, but overall, they are determined players this year and it shows, not only in how they carry themselves but also in how they play each point.”

The #3 doubles partnership of senior Fiona Hufford and junior Izadora Reynolds has played some memorable games.

Expanding on how she feels when she is watching a match, Rahr said she finds herself thinking, “Wow, I am so lucky to have a team that is not only this strong, but this passionate about what they do.” She explained that this year she feels  they are trusting themselves more, noting, “You can see them playing smart tennis on the court, while also taking the risk of applying new skills and strategies we have talked about.”

Sam Tan, who regularly plays in the #2 singles spot, celebrates after winning her game at Waterford following a third set tie-breaker.

Rahr says Old Lyme’s toughest opponent so far this season has been Westbrook since, going into it, the girls knew they were going to be facing strong competition, which meant they were eagerly anticipating the match. The expectation was fulfilled with three out of the seven matches going to three sets, with, in Rahr’s words, “Each of them a battle. You could feel the energy on the sidelines just watching all of the matches finish.”

From left to right, Lyme-Old Lyme 2nd doubles sophomore Aggie Hunt, 1st doubles Junior Livie Bass,  1st doubles Junior Alexis Fenton, and 2nd doubles Sophomore Beatrice Hunt celebrate their respective wins over Waterford.

Recalling one of her favorite memories of the season was during the Westbrook match when the whole team was sitting at the fence watching the Old Lyme #3 finish her third set. Then, “As soon as she was done, they all sprinted down to the #3 doubles with their blankets and snack bags just in time for them to hit a volley winner to end the match.”

Callie Bass always comes through with a strong game.

Rahr said, “It was nice to see them all support each other. It is moments like these that not only bring a team together, but remind everyone why they chose to play tennis.” She explained, “Playing better competition brings out the best in teams, and I was happy to see the girls step up to the challenge so early on in the season.”

Elaina Morosky (at front in photo) has played consistently well throughout the season.

Questioned as to the factors to which she credited the team’s amazing success, Rahr replied, “This is a tough question as I have thought about this often recently. There have been so many factors that have come together to contribute to our team’s success: the new courts, the passion of the girls, the support of families…just to name a few.”

The Lyme-Old Lyme #1 doubles team of juniors Alexis Fenton (right) and Livie Bass handily defeated their Morgan opponents.

She continued, “Many people have asked me, “Is it that you are a good coach or is it that they are just good players?” In her always humble fashion, she commented, “I like to think it is a little of both. We both work together to bring out the best in each other, and that has allowed us to reach our goals and create a team chemistry that I will truly never forget.”

The Waterford and Old Lyme coaches review the rules prior to the match against Waterford. The Old Lyme girls stand to the left and the Waterford team to the right.

Reviewing the season as a whole, Rahr concluded on an upbeat note, “Another thing I think that is really important is that we take each match as a new opportunity to play the sport we love.”

Here are the results of the most recent games with the LOL players indicated in blue.

Tuesday, May 3
Old Lyme Defeats Coginchaug
6-1 

1st Singles:
Abby Sicuranza vs Piper Remillard 2-6, 1-6

2nd Singles: 
Callie Bass vs Estella Perel 6-0, 6-0

3rd Singles: 
Elaina Morosky vs Maggie Ross 6-1, 6-1

4th Singles: 
Olivia Schaedler vs Grace Hinsch 6-2, 6-1

1st Doubles: 
Livie Bass / Alexis Fenton
Nora O’Connell / Karenna Patel 6-0, 6-0

2nd Doubles:  
Aggie Hunt/ Beatrice Hunt
Monica Garbacz / Sawyer Stone 6-0, 6-0

3rd Doubles:
Fiona Hufford / Izzy Reynolds
Diya Patel / Taylor Cooney 6-0, 6-0

Saturday, April 30
Old Lyme Defeats Waterford
6-1

1st Singles:
Abby Sicuranza vs Sarah Hage 2-6, 1-6

2nd Singles:
Sam Tan vs Autumn Brothers 4-6, 6-2, tiebreak for 3rd 12-10

3rd Singles: 
Callie Bass vs Michelle Liu 6-0, 6-1

4th Singles: 
Elaina Morosky vs Ava Tinnerello 6-3, 6-1

1st Doubles: 
Livie Bass / Alexis Fenton 6-0, 6-1
Maple Siu / Hazel Siu

2nd Doubles:  
Aggie Hunt / Beatrice Hunt 6-1, 6-0
Joyce McK / Lillian Steinhouse

3rd Doubles:
Fiona Hufford / Izzy Reynolds 3-6, 6-0
Maria Molina / Bre Kilcolmons tiebreaker for 3rd 13-11

Wednesday, April 27:
Old Lyme Defeats Morgan 7-0

1st Singles:
Abby Sicuranza vs Abbie Vitola 6-1, 6-0

2nd Singles:
Sam Tan vs Molly Vitola 6-0, 6-0

3rd Singles:
Callie Bass vs Ana Colebank 6-0, 6-1

4th Singles:
Elaina Morosky vs Riley Schmidt 6-0, 6-0

1st Doubles:
Livie Bass / Alexis Fenton 6-1, 6-0
Kyra Savage / Maggie O’Donnell

2nd Doubles:
Aggie Hunt / Beatrice Hunt 6-1, 6-4
Ava Johnson / Ainsley Corgan

3rd Doubles:
Fiona Hufford / Izzy Reynolds 6-3, 6-3
Sara Morrissey / Gavin Gersz

Monday, April 25:
Old Lyme Defeats H-K 7-0

1st Singles:
Abby Sicuranza vs Elanna Tousignant 6-0, 6-0

2nd Singles: 
Sam Tan vs Kami Narducci 6-0, 6-0

3rd Singles: 
Callie Bass vs Brenna Lonergan 6-0, 6-0

4th Singles: 
Elaina Morosky vs Jenna LeMontagne 6-0, 6-0

1st Doubles: 
Livie Bass / Fiona Hufford 6-0, 6-0
Adrianne Wolf / Lauren Macy

2nd Doubles:  
Olivia Schaedler / Eva D’Onofrio 6-1, 6-0
Maddie Gordon / Devon Haase

3rd Doubles:
Old Lyme wins by forfeit

Friday, April 22:
Old Lyme Defeats Portland 7-0

1st Singles:
Abby Sicuranza vs Mia Lapinski 6-0, 6-0

2nd Singles: 
Sam Tan vs Nat Przes 6-0, 6-0

3rd Singles: 
Callie Bass vs Allison Scott 6-2, 6-3

4th Singles: 
Olivia Schaedler vs Morganne Plneda 6-0, 6-0

1st Doubles: 
Livie Bass / Fiona Hufford
Amella Hair / Isa McLelland 6-3, 6-0

2nd Doubles:  
Aggie Hunt/ Beatrice Hunt
Maddy Varano / Emily Dering 6-0, 6-1

3rd Doubles:
Elaina Morosky / Natalie Buckley
Joda Cohen / Anna Stone 6-0, 6-0

Monday, April 18
Old Lyme Defeats East Hampton 7-0

1st Singles:
Abby Sicuranza vs Liz MacDonald 6-0, 6-0

2nd Singles: 
Sam Tan vs Eshani Karkun 6-1, 6-2

3rd Singles: 
Elaina Morosky vs Charlotte Minnick 6-0, 6-0

4th Singles: 
Callie Bass vs forfeit *forfeit* 

1st Doubles: 
Livie Bass / Fiona Hufford
Emma Giovanelli / Jen Trip 6-1, 6-0

2nd Doubles:  
Aggie Hunt/ Beatrice Hunt
Melanie Hurt / Ginneg Decker 6-0, 6-0

3rd Doubles:
Olivia Schaedler / Karissa Huang
Addi Howard / Baylee Olzacki 6-0, 6-0

Celebration of Life of Townsend Ludington, Jr. to be Held at First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, June 4

OLD LYME — A Celebration of the Life of Charles Townsend Ludington, Jr. will be held at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme on Saturday, June 4, at 11 a.m.

Friends and family are invited to join the service.

A reception/lunch at 2 Lyme Street (next door to the church) in Old Lyme will follow the service.

April 29 & May 2 COVID-19 Update: Eight New Cases in Old Lyme Take Cumulative Total to 1117, One New Case in Lyme Takes Total There to 274

Photo by CDC on Unsplash.

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Reports issued respectively Friday, April 29, and Monday, May 2, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) show a total of eight new, confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme and one in Lyme.

These cases raise Old Lyme’s cumulative case total to 1117 and Lyme’s to 274.

Old Lyme reported two new cases on Friday and six on Monday. Lyme’s new case was reported on Monday.

The CT DPH does not issue reports over the weekend.

April 5, 2022 was the most recent day on which no new cases were reported in either town.

Prior to March 25, Lyme had gone for 23 consecutive days with no new cases being reported. Two new cases were reported in Lyme on March 25.

Prior to April 5, the most recent day on which no new cases were reported in either Lyme or Old Lyme was March 24. There were also no new cases on March 9 and 4, and Feb. 24. The previous date prior to Feb. 24 when no new cases were reported in either town was Dec. 12, 2021.

Statewide Situation – Weekly Update

This map, updated April 28, 2022 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme remain in the Red (highest) Zone. One hundred and thirty one towns (representing a total of 77.5% of the state) are now found in the Red Zone. Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities. Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper.

On Thursday, April 28, the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) released its latest weekly COVID-19 Alert Map (pictured above), which indicates that 131 municipalities are now in the Red (highest of four) Zone for case rates. These towns in the Red Zone include both Lyme and Old Lyme.

This number has increased by 23 over the 108 towns recorded in the Red Zone last week, thus increasing the number of towns in the Red Zone to over three-quarters (77.5%) of the state.

Although this total of Red Zone towns reflects a dramatic increase over last week’s number, it still shows a reduction in the number of Red Zone towns since  Jan. 27, when the total was 168 out of 169 towns.

As of April 21, 2022 all nine towns in the Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) are now in the Red Zone.

The LLHD is no longer issuing reports with updated Case Rates and other metrics.

The CT DPH will issue an updated map of the zones Thursday, May 5 — the map is updated weekly on Thursdays.

The color-coded zones are:

Red: Indicates case rates over the last two weeks of greater than 15 per 100,000 population
Orange: Indicates case rates between 10 to 14 cases per 100,000 population
Yellow: Indicates case rates between 5 and 9 per 100,000 population
Gray: Indicates case rates lower than five per 100,000 population

Statewide Situation – Daily Update

The state’s COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate rose to 9.42% on April 29 and fell to 8.85% on May 2. It was 8.92% on April 28.

Friday’s rate of 9.42% is the state’s highest recorded COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate since Jan.28, 2022 when the Rate stood at 9.73%.

On April 29, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations decreased by 21 to 212 from 233 on April 28. On May 2, the number rose by 18 to 230.

In contrast, on Jan. 12, 2022, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations was 1,939.

Of those hospitalized on April 29, the number not fully vaccinated was 62 (representing 29.25%). On May 2, the number not fully vaccinated was 68 (representing 29.57%).

The total number of COVID-related deaths in Connecticut increased 10,850 on April 29, according to The New York Times, and then to 10,851 on May 2.

The next Daily Data Report will be issued by CT DPH Tuesday, May 3, around 4 p.m.

Increase in Cases in Lyme & Old Lyme Since August 2021

The cumulative total of confirmed cases for Old Lyme has now increased by 674 since Wednesday, Nov. 10, when the total stood at 443 — that number had stood unchanged for a week since the previous Thursday, Nov. 4.

On Aug. 26 — which was the day Lyme-Old Lyme Schools started the new academic year — Old Lyme’s cumulative case total stood at 372, meaning there have now been 745 new cases there since that date.

Meanwhile, Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 indicating 160 new cases have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Ledge Light Health District Update

The LLHD is no longer issuing weekly updates unless there is, “any significant change in case rates, hospitalizations, etc.”

On April 14, LLHD sent LymeLine.com this press release issued by CT DPH the same day. It begins: With the current uptick of COVID-19 cases—coupled with the upcoming schedule of spring holidays and family gatherings—the Connecticut Department of Public Health is reminding residents of the tools currently in place to help contain the spread of the virus. 

The new Community Levels tool created by the CDC can be viewed at this link: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/your-health/covid-by-county.html

Ledge Light Health District continues to focus its vaccination efforts on homebound populations and providing initial vaccinations and boosters to individuals, who were vaccinated previously. Information about vaccination opportunities can be found at https://llhd.org/coronavirus-covid-19-situation/covid-19-vaccine/.

An explanation of the new CDC Community Levels tool by Thomas Gotowka can be found at this link.

COVID testing opportunities can be found at COVID-19 Testing | Ledge Light Health District (llhd.org)

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/

Fatalities Due to COVID-19 in Lyme, Old Lyme

There has been one COVID-related fatality of a Lyme resident: a 57-year-old male passed away Nov. 16, 2021. On Nov. 30, the state finally included this fatality in its data

Four COVID-related fatalities have now been reported in Old Lyme. The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

Details of the third and fourth fatalities, which were reported respectively in 2021 and on Feb. 4, 2022, have not been made available.

COVID-19 Situation in LOL Schools

Under new state protocols for schools, Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools are no longer required to carry out contact tracing.

LOL Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser explained the latest developments in LOL Schools COVID protocols in an April 1 email to the school community, saying, “As noted in my email of February 17, 2022, beginning April 1, 2022 we will no longer report daily COVID-19 cases in the schools.”

He then stated, “For the remainder of this school year, that information will be complied on a weekly basis and will be available on our website at the following link: https://www.region18.org/parents/covid-data.”

Details published to date show the following number of positive cases in LOL Schools by week.
April 3-9: 0
April 10-16: 0
April 19-23: Spring Break
April 24-30: 7

For a summary of cases in LOL Schools between Jan. 1 and March 31, 2022, visit this link.

View a full listing of cases between 8/26/21 – 12/23/21 at this link.

April 28 COVID-19 Update: 75%+ of CT Now in Red Zone; Two New Cases in Old Lyme Take Cumulative Total to 1109, One New Case in Lyme Takes Total There to 273

This map, updated April 28, 2022 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme remain in the Red (highest) Zone. One hundred and thirty one towns (representing a total of 77.5% of the state) are now found in the Red Zone. Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities. Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper.

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Report issued Thursday, April 28, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) shows two new, confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme and one in Lyme.

This case raises Old Lyme’s cumulative case total to 1109 and Lyme’s to 273.

On Thursday, April 28, the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) also released its latest weekly COVID-19 Alert Map (pictured above), which indicates that 131 municipalities are now in the Red (highest of four) Zone for case rates. These towns in the Red Zone include both Lyme and Old Lyme.

This number has increased by 23 over the 108 towns recorded in the Red Zone last week, thus increasing the number of towns in the Red Zone to over three-quarters (77.5%) of the state.

Although this total of Red Zone towns reflects a dramatic increase over last week’s number, it still shows a reduction in the number of Red Zone towns since  Jan. 27, when the total was 168 out of 169 towns.

As of April 21, 2022 all nine towns in the Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) are now in the Red Zone.

The LLHD is no longer issuing reports with updated Case Rates and other metrics.

The CT DPH will issue an updated map of the zones Thursday, May 5 — the map is updated weekly on Thursdays.

The color-coded zones are:

Red: Indicates case rates over the last two weeks of greater than 15 per 100,000 population
Orange: Indicates case rates between 10 to 14 cases per 100,000 population
Yellow: Indicates case rates between 5 and 9 per 100,000 population
Gray: Indicates case rates lower than five per 100,000 population

More on the Local Situation

April 5, 2022 was the most recent day on which no new cases were reported in either town.

Prior to March 25, Lyme had gone for 23 consecutive days with no new cases being reported. Two new cases were reported in Lyme on March 25.

Prior to April 5, the most recent day on which no new cases were reported in either Lyme or Old Lyme was March 24. There were also no new cases on March 9 and 4, and Feb. 24. The previous date prior to Feb. 24 when no new cases were reported in either town was Dec. 12, 2021.

Statewide Situation – Daily Update

The state’s COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate rose to 8.92% on April 28, from 8.8% on April 27.

Yesterday’s rate of 8.92% is the state’s highest recorded COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate since Jan.28, 2022 when the Rate stood at 9.73%.

On April 28, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations increased by 23 to 233 from 210 on April 27.

In contrast, on Jan. 12, 2022, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations was 1,939.

Of those hospitalized on April 28, the number not fully vaccinated was 70 (representing 30.04%).

The total number of COVID-related deaths in Connecticut increased 10,840 on April 28, according to The New York Times.

The next Daily Data Report will be issued by CT DPH Friday, April 29, around 4 p.m.

Increase in Cases in Lyme & Old Lyme Since August 2021

The cumulative total of confirmed cases for Old Lyme has now increased by 666 since Wednesday, Nov. 10, when the total stood at 443 — that number had stood unchanged for a week since the previous Thursday, Nov. 4.

On Aug. 26 — which was the day Lyme-Old Lyme Schools started the new academic year — Old Lyme’s cumulative case total stood at 372, meaning there have now been 737 new cases there since that date.

Meanwhile, Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 indicating 159 new cases have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Ledge Light Health District Update

The LLHD is no longer issuing weekly updates unless there is, “any significant change in case rates, hospitalizations, etc.”

On April 14, LLHD sent LymeLine.com this press release issued by CT DPH the same day. It begins: With the current uptick of COVID-19 cases—coupled with the upcoming schedule of spring holidays and family gatherings—the Connecticut Department of Public Health is reminding residents of the tools currently in place to help contain the spread of the virus. 

The new Community Levels tool created by the CDC can be viewed at this link: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/your-health/covid-by-county.html

Ledge Light Health District continues to focus its vaccination efforts on homebound populations and providing initial vaccinations and boosters to individuals, who were vaccinated previously. Information about vaccination opportunities can be found at https://llhd.org/coronavirus-covid-19-situation/covid-19-vaccine/.

An explanation of the new CDC Community Levels tool by Thomas Gotowka can be found at this link.

COVID testing opportunities can be found at COVID-19 Testing | Ledge Light Health District (llhd.org)

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/

Fatalities Due to COVID-19 in Lyme, Old Lyme

There has been one COVID-related fatality of a Lyme resident: a 57-year-old male passed away Nov. 16, 2021. On Nov. 30, the state finally included this fatality in its data

Four COVID-related fatalities have now been reported in Old Lyme. The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

Details of the third and fourth fatalities, which were reported respectively in 2021 and on Feb. 4, 2022, have not been made available.

COVID-19 Situation in LOL Schools

Under new state protocols for schools, Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools are no longer required to carry out contact tracing.

LOL Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser explained the latest developments in LOL Schools COVID protocols in an April 1 email to the school community, saying, “As noted in my email of February 17, 2022, beginning April 1, 2022 we will no longer report daily COVID-19 cases in the schools.”

He then stated, “For the remainder of this school year, that information will be complied on a weekly basis and will be available on our website at the following link: https://www.region18.org/parents/covid-data.”

Details published to date show no cases reported in the week April 3-9, and 14 cases reported in the week April 10-16. The following week was the spring break vacation.

For a summary of cases in LOL Schools between Jan. 1 and March 31, 2022, visit this link.

View a full listing of cases between 8/26/21 – 12/23/21 at this link.

PARJE Celebrates Unveiling of New ‘Welcome’ Mural at Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School

Old Lyme First Selectman Timothy Griswold stands with the mural’s lead artist Jasmine Oyola-Blumenthal after the mural had been officially unveiled on Wednesday at Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School. All photos by K. Monson except where indicated.

OLD LYME — UPDATED WITH FULL STORY: Around 40 members of the community along with several Old Lyme and Lyme-Old Lyme Schools dignitaries joined some 200 Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School students and faculty on Wednesday to celebrate the unveiling of a new Welcome mural, which had been sponsored by Public Art for Racial Justice Education (PARJE) and created in the school.

The completed mural shows students from many nations holding hands to cross a bridge.

The mural is part of the Sister Murals Project sponsored by Public Art for Racial Justice Education (PARJE), which was officially launched March 1, 2021. PARJE utilizes the broad appeal of art and education to confront racial injustice.

One mural has already been unveiled in Norwich and now murals are being worked on concurrently in Old Lyme and New London. Jasmine Oyola-Blumenthal, who is an alumna of Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts, is the lead artist of the new Welcome mural in the Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School (LOLMS.)

In addition to her role as lead artist, Oyola-Blumenthal worked with school faculty to develop student workshops, which coordinated with the project.

Oyola-Blumenthal and her counterpart, Marvin Espy, in New London were selected from a field of nearly 20 applicants. In her application, Oyola-Blumenthal had described art as, “a neutral vessel,” contending that [it], “Can bring forth conversations that can be uncomfortable and promote opportunities to open dialogue on racial justice and education.”

Jasmine Oyola-Blumenthal, lead artist for the ‘Welcome’ mural, addresses the audience at Wednesday’s ceremony in Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School to celebrate the unveiling of the mural. Photo by S. Hayes.

Superintendent of Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Ian Neviaser opened the ceremony and then a number of speeches were made including one by Kimberly Monson, a professional artist, who studied at Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts, and subsequently became one of its faculty. She, in fact, had taught lead artist Oyola-Blumenthal when the latter was a student at the same college.

Monson noted, “An artistic legacy is passed from instructor to student and is a direct line to the artists and instructors before them. Therefore, with her training, Jas’s [Jasmine’s] pedigree can be traced back to artistic behemoths such as Saint Gaudens and Gerome.”

Monson then commented on Oyola-Blumenthal’s own legacy and its relevance to the project, saying, “Jas also has a legacy in her heritage. She holds within her … the hopes and dreams of embracing diversity, which, in addition to her talent, give her an insightful perspective to this Mural project … [She carries] the legacy, of not only the Artists housed and trained here, but also [in her role] as the voice of collaboration with our kids.”

Monson spoke warmly of Oyola-Blumenthal’s skills saying, “Jas’s sense of design was always powerful. She knows how to arrange a picture to tell a story and she has a strong command of color and pattern that celebrates her contagious optimism,” emphasizing, “All of this shows itself beautifully on the Mural painted in your hall.”

Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School students hard at work on the mural.

Three LOLMS eighth grade students read their poems related to the Witness Stones project in Old Lyme, in which houses where enslaved people were kept in town have been identified by engraved stones placed in front of them. The students were Maggie Thuma, Thomas Kelly and Anne-Marie Hinkley.

Thelma Halloran, who is the LOLMS art teacher also spoke during the ceremony. She had collaborated with Oyola-Blumenthal on many parts of the mural project. She explained how she had become involved with, “a new group in Old Lyme created by the Rev. David W. Good, Minister Emeritus of The First Congregational Church of Old Lyme.”

This group, which became PARJE, was created more than a year ago in response to tragic events in the news like the death of George Floyd. Halloran said, “David wanted to remind everyone in Old Lyme that the town has a history of welcoming people – all kinds of people.”

She then listed some of those who had been welcomed into the town mentioning four refugee families from Laos, a refugee family from Rwanda, and another from Syria. She also recalled a family from the Congo, who lived in a refugee house bought by the Congregational church and families from Pakistan, Guatemala, Burma, and South Africa. In addition, she mentioned a family, whose home was destroyed by a hurricane in Puerto Rico, who also found a home in Old Lyme.  

No space was left unpainted as the mural takes form.

Halloran noted, “This history of hospitality to all who come to Old Lyme has evolved through time. It has not always been perfect. This is why there is a continued effort to strive to be a better community, including in our schools.”

She continued, “Let the message of this mural continue to be a reminder of the values we share in the town of Old Lyme, and as a community in our schools. Make the message of this mural come to life in your words and your actions with everyone you encounter, not just student to student, not just student to teacher, and not just the new faces you see.”

Urging the students to, “continue to show your kindness” to everyone in school including such people as custodians, security guards, secretaries, and paraprofessionals, she then told them also to, “Show your kindness to the student, who looks like you, but doesn’t think like you.” explaining firmly, “This is what we mean when we say welcome.” 

The intensity given to the project is clear on the faces of the students.

Halloran concluded by quoting the words of the 2021 US Presidential Inauguration poet Amanda Gorman, who said evocatively,
“The new dawn balloons as we free it.
For there is always light, if only we’re brave enough to see it.
If only we’re brave enough to be it.”

Editor’s Note: Visit this link to see the video NBC TV posted about the event.

April 27 COVID-19 Update: Three New Cases in Old Lyme Take Cumulative Total to 1107, Lyme Holds at 272

Photo by CDC on Unsplash,

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Report issued Wednesday, April 27, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) shows three new, confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme and none in Lyme.

This case raises Old Lyme’s cumulative case total to 1107 while Lyme’s holds at 272.

April 5, 2022 was the most recent day on which no new cases were reported in either town.

Prior to March 25, Lyme had gone for 23 consecutive days with no new cases being reported. Two new cases were reported in Lyme on March 25.

Prior to April 5, the most recent day on which no new cases were reported in either Lyme or Old Lyme was March 24. There were also no new cases on March 9 and 4, and Feb. 24. The previous date prior to Feb. 24 when no new cases were reported in either town was Dec. 12, 2021.

Statewide Situation – Daily Update

The state’s COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate rose to 8.8% on April 27, from 8.51% on April 26.

Yesterday’s rate of 8.8% is the state’s highest recorded COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate since Jan.28, 2022 when the Rate stood at 9.73%.

On April 27, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations increased by 19 to 210 from 191 on April 26.

In contrast, on Jan. 12, 2022, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations was 1,939.

Of those hospitalized on April 22, the number not fully vaccinated was 64 (representing 30.48%).

The total number of COVID-related deaths in Connecticut increased 10,838 on April 27, according to The New York Times.

The next Daily Data Report will be issued by CT DPH Thursday, April 28, around 4 p.m.

Statewide Situation – Weekly Update

This map, updated April 21, 2022 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are now in the Red (highest) Zone. One hundred and eight towns (representing a total of 63.9% of the state) are now found in the Red Zone. Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities. Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper.

On Thursday, April 21, the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) released its latest weekly COVID-19 Alert Map (pictured above), which indicates that 108 municipalities are now in the Red (highest of four) Zone for case rates. These towns in the Red Zone include both Lyme and Old Lyme.

This number has increased by 54 from the 54 towns recorded in the Red Zone last week, thus doubling the number of towns in the Red Zone.

Although this total of Red Zone towns reflects a dramatic increase over last week’s number, it still shows a reduction in the number of Red Zone towns since  Jan. 27, when the total was 168 out of 169 towns.

This April 21 total of 108 towns in the Red Zone means more than half of the towns in the state are now in the Red Zone. The number of 108 is equivalent to 63.9% of towns in the state, which are in the Red Zone.

As of April 21, 2022 eight out of the nine towns in the Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) are in the Red Zone, with North Stonington being in the Orange (second highest) Zone.

East Lyme, Groton, Lyme, Old Lyme, Waterford, New London, Ledyard and Stonington are all in the Red Zone.

No towns are in the Yellow (second from lowest) or Gray (lowest) Zones.

The LLHD is no longer issuing reports with updated Case Rates and other metrics.

The CT DPH will issue an updated map of the zones Thursday, April 28 — the map is updated weekly on Thursdays.

The color-coded zones are:

Red: Indicates case rates over the last two weeks of greater than 15 per 100,000 population
Orange: Indicates case rates between 10 to 14 cases per 100,000 population
Yellow: Indicates case rates between 5 and 9 per 100,000 population
Gray: Indicates case rates lower than five per 100,000 population

Increase in Cases in Lyme & Old Lyme Since August 2021

The cumulative total of confirmed cases for Old Lyme has now increased by 664 since Wednesday, Nov. 10, when the total stood at 443 — that number had stood unchanged for a week since the previous Thursday, Nov. 4.

On Aug. 26 — which was the day Lyme-Old Lyme Schools started the new academic year — Old Lyme’s cumulative case total stood at 372, meaning there have now been 735 new cases there since that date.

Meanwhile, Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 indicating 158 new cases have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Ledge Light Health District Update

The LLHD is no longer issuing weekly updates unless there is, “any significant change in case rates, hospitalizations, etc.”

On April 14, LLHD sent LymeLine.com this press release issued by CT DPH the same day. It begins: With the current uptick of COVID-19 cases—coupled with the upcoming schedule of spring holidays and family gatherings—the Connecticut Department of Public Health is reminding residents of the tools currently in place to help contain the spread of the virus. 

The new Community Levels tool created by the CDC can be viewed at this link: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/your-health/covid-by-county.html

Ledge Light Health District continues to focus its vaccination efforts on homebound populations and providing initial vaccinations and boosters to individuals, who were vaccinated previously. Information about vaccination opportunities can be found at https://llhd.org/coronavirus-covid-19-situation/covid-19-vaccine/.

An explanation of the new CDC Community Levels tool by Thomas Gotowka can be found at this link.

COVID testing opportunities can be found at COVID-19 Testing | Ledge Light Health District (llhd.org)

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/

Fatalities Due to COVID-19 in Lyme, Old Lyme

There has been one COVID-related fatality of a Lyme resident: a 57-year-old male passed away Nov. 16, 2021. On Nov. 30, the state finally included this fatality in its data

Four COVID-related fatalities have now been reported in Old Lyme. The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

Details of the third and fourth fatalities, which were reported respectively in 2021 and on Feb. 4, 2022, have not been made available.

COVID-19 Situation in LOL Schools

Under new state protocols for schools, Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools are no longer required to carry out contact tracing.

LOL Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser explained the latest developments in LOL Schools COVID protocols in an April 1 email to the school community, saying, “As noted in my email of February 17, 2022, beginning April 1, 2022 we will no longer report daily COVID-19 cases in the schools.”

He then stated, “For the remainder of this school year, that information will be complied on a weekly basis and will be available on our website at the following link: https://www.region18.org/parents/covid-data.”

For a summary of cases in LOL Schools between Jan. 1 and March 31, 2022, visit this link.

View a full listing of cases between 8/26/21 – 12/23/21 at this link.

Registration Open for ‘Tour de Lyme’ 2022, Event Now Scheduled for June 5

And away they go … the 8th annual Tour de Lyme will take place Sunday, June 5.

LYME — After a two-year hiatus caused by COVID, the eighth annual Tour de Lyme is happening again on Sunday, June 5. This is a change to the original May date announced in order to support the local farmer, who leases the Ashlawn Farm fields. This change will enable the fields, where cars are parked for the Tour de Lyme, to be hayed prior to the event.

For competitive riders, this is a chance to warm up for the cycling season ahead. For others, it provides a wonderful occasion to pedal through Lyme and enjoy the surrounding countryside.  If you are a mountain biker, this is an opportunity to ride through private lands open only for this event.

Everyone – riders, sponsorsand volunteers – will enjoy a post-ride picnic at Ashlawn Farm with popular food trucks, beer and live music.  This year there will be physical therapists to help with any injuries, the always popular massage therapists to loosen tight muscles, and a plant sale to stock up on herbs for the season ahead. There will also be Tour de Lyme shirts for sale.

For complete information and online registration, visit www.tourdelyme.org

Ready to ride!

It is not a race but a carefully planned series of rides designed to suit every level of skill and endurance. There are four road rides of varying length and degree of difficulty:

  • The CHALLENGE, the name says it all, is 60 miles – a real workout;
  • The CLASSIC, shorter at 25 miles, but still a challenge;
  • The VALLEY Rides  pleasant easier rides with fewer hills, 26 miles or 35 miles
  • The FAMILY  at just 8 miles designed for riding with children.

There are also two mountain bike options;

  • the RIDER’S TEST a 26.5 mile ride for serious enthusiasts
  • a shorter, less challenging option.

The Tour de Lyme is hosted by The Lyme Land Conservation Trust.  Since 1966, the Lyme Land Trust has been conserving the unique and historic landscapes of Lyme, Connecticut. During those years, the Lyme rural community has shown that a small population can have a big impact and protect more than 3000 acres of woodlands, working farm fields, and bird-filled marshes. The result is an outdoor paradise – open to all.

Money raised from the Tour de Lyme will create added opportunities for public enjoyment of the Land Trust preserves while protecting and maintaining what has already been conserved for generations to come.

The Lyme Land Trust is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization – registration and donations are tax deductible.

Gardening Tips for April from ‘The English Lady,’ a ‘Month of Activity’

Dandelions are one of the prettier weeds to announce the arrival of spring. But do not forget that the young foliage of dandelions is great in salads,  and when the foliage is cooked, it tastes like spinach! Photo by Viridi Green on Unsplash.

Those April showers that come our way
They bring the flowers that bloom in May
And when it’s raining, let’s not forget,
It isn’t raining rain at all, its raining violets

Maureen Haseley-Jones is “The English Lady.”

April is the month of activity in the garden, and our old nemesis, weeds are beginning to rear their heads, so we need to extract the little devils before they take hold and are difficult to remove.

Having said that, I must point out the benefits of many weeds. Nettles are food for butterflies, clover extracts nitrogen from the air and fixes it in the soil, and oil from jewel weed soothes poison ivy rash. The young foliage of dandelions is great in salads, healthy and containing many nutrients, and when the foliage is cooked, it tastes like spinach.  I also do not want to forget our songbirds and other wildlife, who depend on weed seeds as a food source.

Weed removal – weeds must be pulled gently so the weed and roots do not break apart for, if this happens, thousands of weed seeds will reseed and you will find yourself with an endless cycle of unnecessary weeding. When careful weeding has been accomplished, apply an organic weed pre-emergent, with a corn gluten base by Bradfield organics. This will keep weeds at bay for about six weeks.

Plant bare root roses at the end of April. Photo by Bailey Chenevey on Unsplash.

ROSES, ROOTS & MORE

Plant bare root roses at the end of April and container roses in mid-May.

Then in the middle of May when the soil temperature has reached 55 degrees, add manure with a fine bark mulch about one foot from the base of the rose. Check my March tips to refresh yourself on pruning roses.

Be careful clearing winter debris from around rhododendrons, mountain laurel and azaleas; these evergreens have shallow roots and you do not want the roots being exposed.

If the winter weather did indeed erode soil around some roots, add a few inches of soil to cover the exposed roots and at the same time resettle the plant in place. Then in the middle of May apply manure and fine bark mulch as well as some peat, which adds much needed acidity to evergreens.

Plant gladioli corms at two-week intervals in late April. Planting in two week intervals ensures you will get a succession of bloom. Plant the corms eight inches down; this extra depth helps keep the heavy blooms erect.

The Red Lily beetle will soon begin to appear, therefore I suggest applying organic Neem oil on the Lilies when they are about four inches above ground, which helps prevent and deal with the beetle problem.

SOIL SOLARIZATION

This is an effective way to control many soil- borne problems, specifically the tomato blight that causes fruit rot. Covering the soil with clear plastic at the end of April, for one to two months can generate high enough temperatures in the top six to 12 inches of soil to kill pests, nematodes, weed seeds and many disease organisms like the tomato blight.

This process has proved invaluable for home gardeners and the beneficial effects last for several seasons.

To solarize, dig a trench several inches deep around the bed, and spread a thin, clear plastic film (1-4 mils) over the bed.  Press the plastic into close contact with the soil and seal the edges by filling the trench with soil.  Leave the plastic on the soil until you are ready to plant tomatoes or other vegetables in about a month to six weeks.

When the soil temperature reaches 55 degrees, manure all the borders with composted manure in bags from the garden center or aged manure from the bottom of the farmer’s pile and mulch with a fine brown hardwood mulch.

In the vegetable garden, after preparation and planting, and when it is time to mulch, do so with manure which will not ‘cap’ — this means that it does not form a crust like other mulches so that air and water can get through to the roots of the plants where it is needed.      

If you did not apply an organic grub control on the grass in March, apply now to keep the grubs down and cut down on the mole population.    

The soil is the most important component of the growing business; compost, organic manure and peat amend the soil to rebuild its structure. The ratio to use is one part compost to three parts manure and apply peat to the planting mix in the ratio of one part peat to three parts manure when planting evergreens. And as mentioned above, peat adds the acidity which evergreens need.

Good soil structure is extremely important in the garden. Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

Good soil structure assists with drainage, prevents compaction, and the rich nutrients that is the result as these amendments break down and encourage the soil animals beneath the surface to work at full capacity.

In a light soil such as sand, humus — which is the combination of manure — mulch and carbon from the atmosphere bind the sand particles together and, in heavy soil such as clay, keep the clay particles separate to make room for air and drainage.  

Growing conditions in April are very favorable for new plant-root development and it is the ideal time to transplant evergreen shrubs and new evergreens. Put the organic manure and peat with the topsoil in the planting hole in the ratios. Then give the roots a workout before planting to release them. In this way, the roots are opened up and will reach into the surrounding soil for nutrients and water. Also, they will not dry out in the heat of summer.    

Many years ago, when I moved into my farmhouse on the shoreline, I discovered that my soil was sandy, which is good for drainage but sadly lacking in nutrients. I began adding a few inches of manure to all planted borders in April, July and October and today when I put a spade in the ground to check the color of the soil in spring, it is ‘black gold.’  

Gloves should be worn using manure which contains bacteria. The bacteria is great for the plants and the soil but not good for your health.  These products tend to be slow acting; gradually making the nutrients available to the plant and the rewards are infinite.

Organic fertilizers like manure are applied in spring around mid May when the soil temperature has reached 55 degrees and when the plant has about six inches of growth; this allows for the nutrients to become active at the time when plant growth is happening quickly. 

A beautiful spring sight is always, ‘A host of golden daffodils.’ Photo by Sarah Mitchell-Baker on Unsplash.

Daffodils are blooming and what a lovely sight to see. When the daffodil bloom has past, do not cut the leaves from any of your spring flowering bulbs, the leaves send down energy into the bulbs to store for next season’s bloom. 

April is the time to tackle a new lawn or patch seed, use only good quality seed and organic fertilizers.   

Do not be lulled into complacency with a few back-to-back warm days; we can still get a frost and I caution you not to plant annuals until Memorial weekend. 

Do not cultivate around the perennials in the borders until mid May.

Do not panic if you were not able to get the April tasks done until May — your garden will wait for you and the constancy that is Mother Nature will continue to keep your patch of earth flourishing. 

Enjoy the pleasure of being outdoors in warmer temperatures, inhaling the pungency of awakening soil and experience the connection with Mother Nature. Do not overdo it; warm up the body before the garden labor and stay well hydrated with lots of water. We are inexorably entwined with the earth and know that even the smallest gesture of a garden has positive rewards and the effects are positive not only on you but our planet. 

I will return with more gardening tips in May when you are out in the garden in force.

About the author: Maureen Haseley-Jones is a member of a family of renowned horticultural artisans, whose landscaping heritage dates back to the 17th century. She is one of the founders, together with her son Ian, of, The English Lady Landscape and Home Company. Maureen and Ian are landscape designers and garden experts, who believe that everyone deserves to live in an eco-conscious environment and enjoy the pleasure that it brings. Maureen learned her design skills from both her mother and grandmother, and honed her horticultural and construction skills while working in the family nursery and landscape business in the U.K. Her formal horticultural training was undertaken at the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew in Surrey.

April 26 COVID-19 Update: Five New Cases in Old Lyme Take Cumulative Total to 1104, One New Case in Lyme Raises Town’s Total to 272

Photo by CDC on Unsplash,

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Report issued Tuesday, April 26, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) shows five new, confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme and one in Lyme.

This case raises Old Lyme’s cumulative case total to 1104 and Lyme’s to 272.

April 5, 2022 was the most recent day on which no new cases were reported in either town.

Prior to March 25, Lyme had gone for 23 consecutive days with no new cases being reported. Two new cases were reported in Lyme on March 25.

Prior to April 5, the most recent day on which no new cases were reported in either Lyme or Old Lyme was March 24. There were also no new cases on March 9 and 4, and Feb. 24. The previous date prior to Feb. 24 when no new cases were reported in either town was Dec. 12, 2021.

Statewide Situation – Daily Update

The state’s COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate rose to 8.51% on April 26, from 7.81% on April 25.

Yesterday’s rate of 8.51% was the state’s highest recorded COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate since Feb. 1, 2022 when the Rate stood at 8.68%.

On April 22, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations increased by 12 to 191 from 179 on April 25.

In contrast, on Jan. 12, 2022, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations was 1,939.

Of those hospitalized on April 22, the number not fully vaccinated was 62 (representing 32.46%).

The total number of COVID-related deaths in Connecticut held at 10,834 on April 25, for the third day in a row according to The New York Times.

The next Daily Data Report will be issued by CT DPH Wednesday, April 27, around 4 p.m.

Statewide Situation – Weekly Update

This map, updated April 21, 2022 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are now in the Red (highest) Zone. One hundred ad eight towns (representing a total of 63.9% of the state) are now found in the Red Zone. Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities. Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper.

On Thursday, April 21, the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) released its latest weekly COVID-19 Alert Map (pictured above), which indicates that 108 municipalities are now in the Red (highest of four) Zone for case rates. These towns in the Red Zone include both Lyme and Old Lyme.

This number has increased by 54 from the 54 towns recorded in the Red Zone last week, thus doubling the number of towns in the Red Zone.

Although this total of Red Zone towns reflects a dramatic increase over last week’s number, it still shows a reduction in the number of Red Zone towns since  Jan. 27, when the total was 168 out of 169 towns.

This April 21 total of 108 towns in the Red Zone means more than half of the towns in the state are now in the Red Zone. The number of 108 is equivalent to 63.9% of towns in the state, which are in the Red Zone.

As of April 21, 2022 eight out of the nine towns in the Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) are in the Red Zone, with North Stonington being in the Orange (second highest) Zone.

East Lyme, Groton, Lyme, Old Lyme, Waterford, New London, Ledyard and Stonington are all in the Red Zone.

No towns are in the Yellow (second from lowest) or Gray (lowest) Zones.

The LLHD is no longer issuing reports with updated Case Rates and other metrics.

The CT DPH will issue an updated map of the zones Thursday, April 28 — the map is updated weekly on Thursdays.

The color-coded zones are:

Red: Indicates case rates over the last two weeks of greater than 15 per 100,000 population
Orange: Indicates case rates between 10 to 14 cases per 100,000 population
Yellow: Indicates case rates between 5 and 9 per 100,000 population
Gray: Indicates case rates lower than five per 100,000 population

Increase in Cases in Lyme & Old Lyme Since August 2021

The cumulative total of confirmed cases for Old Lyme has now increased by 661 since Wednesday, Nov. 10, when the total stood at 443 — that number had stood unchanged for a week since the previous Thursday, Nov. 4.

On Aug. 26 — which was the day Lyme-Old Lyme Schools started the new academic year — Old Lyme’s cumulative case total stood at 372, meaning there have now been 732 new cases there since that date.

Meanwhile, Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 indicating 158 new cases have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Ledge Light Health District Update

The LLHD is no longer issuing weekly updates unless there is, “any significant change in case rates, hospitalizations, etc.”

On April 14, LLHD sent LymeLine.com this press release issued by CT DPH the same day. It begins: With the current uptick of COVID-19 cases—coupled with the upcoming schedule of spring holidays and family gatherings—the Connecticut Department of Public Health is reminding residents of the tools currently in place to help contain the spread of the virus. 

The new Community Levels tool created by the CDC can be viewed at this link: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/your-health/covid-by-county.html

Ledge Light Health District continues to focus its vaccination efforts on homebound populations and providing initial vaccinations and boosters to individuals, who were vaccinated previously. Information about vaccination opportunities can be found at https://llhd.org/coronavirus-covid-19-situation/covid-19-vaccine/.

An explanation of the new CDC Community Levels tool by Thomas Gotowka can be found at this link.

COVID testing opportunities can be found at COVID-19 Testing | Ledge Light Health District (llhd.org)

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/

Fatalities Due to COVID-19 in Lyme, Old Lyme

There has been one COVID-related fatality of a Lyme resident: a 57-year-old male passed away Nov. 16, 2021. On Nov. 30, the state finally included this fatality in its data

Four COVID-related fatalities have now been reported in Old Lyme. The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

Details of the third and fourth fatalities, which were reported respectively in 2021 and on Feb. 4, 2022, have not been made available.

COVID-19 Situation in LOL Schools

Under new state protocols for schools, Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools are no longer required to carry out contact tracing.

LOL Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser explained the latest developments in LOL Schools COVID protocols in an April 1 email to the school community, saying, “As noted in my email of February 17, 2022, beginning April 1, 2022 we will no longer report daily COVID-19 cases in the schools.”

He then stated, “For the remainder of this school year, that information will be complied on a weekly basis and will be available on our website at the following link: https://www.region18.org/parents/covid-data.”

For a summary of cases in LOL Schools between Jan. 1 and March 31, 2022, visit this link.

View a full listing of cases between 8/26/21 – 12/23/21 at this link.

Old Lyme’s ‘Welcome’ Mural to be ‘Revealed’ to the Community at LOL Middle School, Today at 1:30pm; All Welcome


OLD LYME —
On Wednesday, April 27, the newly-created ‘Welcome’ mural at Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School (LOLMS) will be revealed to the community at a ceremony in the school’s auditorium beginning at 1:30 p.m. and lasting around 30 minutes.

All are welcome to attend the ceremony and then view the mural after its official ‘reveal.’ Members of the public attending the ceremony are requested to check-in at the LOLMS office to obtain a ‘Visitor’ sticker prior to going to the auditorium.

The mural is part of the Sister Murals Project sponsored by Public Art for Racial Justice Education (PARJE), which was officially launched March 1, 2021. The primary mission of PARJE is to utilize the broad appeal of art and education to confront racial injustice.

One mural has already been unveiled in Norwich and now murals are being worked on concurrently in Old Lyme and New London.

Lead artist for the Old Lyme Sister Mural is Jasmine Oyola-Blumenthal.

The lead artists for the Old Lyme mural is Jasmine Oyola-Blumenthal, who is an alumna of Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts

The Old Lyme Sister Mural is being installed inside Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School, adjacent to the gymnasium.

In addition to her role as lead artist, Oyola-Blumenthal has worked with school faculty to develop student workshops, which coordinate with the project.

Oyola-Blumenthal and her counterpart, Marvin Espy, in New London were selected from a field of nearly 20 applicants.

In her application, Oyola-Blumenthal referred to the ability of art to inspire people to talk to one another, commenting, “Art is a neutral vessel that can bring forth conversations that can be uncomfortable and promote opportunities to open dialogue on racial justice and education.”

 

Lyme Public Hall Hosts Open Jazz Jam Session, Tonight

LYME — On Wednesday, April 27, from 7 to 9 p.m., Lyme Public Hall will host another Open Jazz Jam session.

All are welcome to come and participate or just listen.

This is a BYOB event and admission is free.

Lyme Public Hall is located at 249 Hamburg Rd. in Lyme.

Lyme-Old Lyme Boy’s Lacrosse Roundup: Cox Consistently Top Scorer for Wildcats

Nick Cox (#12) is currently the Wildcats leading scorer for this 2022 season.

LYME/OLD LYME — The Old Lyme boys’ lacrosse team experienced a slow start to the season but has now rallied with two wins in a row, defeating both Cromwell and Old Saybrook.

The Wildcats’ record in the Shoreline Conference currently stands at 2-3, and 2-5 in the season overall.

Nick Cox of Old Lyme has been the leading scorer in all the team’s games to date.

Here is a roundup of the team’s recent results:

April 21: Old Lyme Defeats Cromwell 12-6

Top scorer for the Wildcats in this a Shoreline Conference game was Nick Cox with six goals and one assist. Sam Mullaney and Mason Bussman scored two goals apiece, while Macklin Cushman and Brodie Lippincott scored one each.

April 19:
Old Lyme Secures Win Over Old Saybrook 14-8

Top scorer for the Wildcats was Nick Cox with seven goals and two assists. Sam Mullaney scored four goals and Mason Bussman added two. Liam Grethel notched one.

April 12:
Valley Defeats Old Lyme 10-7

Top scorer for the Wildcats was Nick Cox with four goals and one assist. Sam Mullaney, Kian Kardestuncer and Brendan O’Brien made up the remainder of the scoring with one goal each.

April 2:
St. Joe’s Takes Victory Over Old Lyme 17-5

Top scorer for the Wildcats was Nick Cox with two goals, while Sam Mullaney and Liam Celic each scored one.

Lyme-Old Lyme Baseball Roundup

LYME/OLD LYME BASEBALL
April 25:
East Hampton defeats Old Lyme 7- 6 

The game was tied at five with East Hampton batting in the bottom of the sixth when Hall (2-4; 2 RBI) doubled on a 1-2 count, scoring one run.

Lyme-Old Lyme Wildcats lost despite out-hitting East Hampton nine to eight. Lyme- Old Lyme scored 3 runs in the top of the first inning to take an early lead.

East Hampton took the lead back in the bottom of the first inning when Scovill (1-1; 2 RBI) singled on a 2-2 count, scoring two runs.

East Hampton knotted the game up at five in the bottom of the fourth inning.  East Hampton scored one run when Hall singled.

Paluska got the win for East Hampton. He went four and two-thirds innings, allowing one run on three hits and striking out three.

Both Santiago Rodriguez and Maverick Swaney had 5 strikeouts a piece for the Lyme-Old Lyme Wildcats.

Lyme-Old Lyme Wildcats had nine hits in the game.  Owen Snurkowski (2-4; 1 RBI) , Grady Lacourciere (2-3; 1 RBI), and Riley Warecke (2-4; 3 RBI) all managed multiple hits for Lyme-Old Lyme Wildcats.

East Hampton collected eight hits on the day.  Diaz (2-4) and Hall each collected multiple hits for East Hampton.

April 22:
Cromwell defeats Old Lyme 8-2 

DiMenna was credited with the victory for Cromwell as he surrendered only two runs on six hits over seven innings, striking out two.

Grady Lacourciere went 3-for-3 at the plate to lead Lyme-Old Lyme Wildcats in hits.

Cromwell racked up nine hits in the game.  DiMenna (2-4; 2 RBI) and Ucol (2-4) each managed multiple hits for Cromwell.

April 20
Valley Regional Crushes Old Lyme 16- 1

Valley got things moving in the first inning, when James Marsden(1-4; 1 RBI) hit a solo homer.

Old Lyme knotted the game up at one in the bottom of the first inning, when Sparaco threw a wild pitch allowing Grady Lacourciere to reach home for Lyme-Old Lyme Wildcats.

Valley pulled away for good with one run in the second inning.  In the second, Shea hit a solo homer.

Valley scored six runs in the sixth inning.  Valley’s big inning was driven by home runs by Carver (3-4; 1 RBI) and Hutchinson (3-4; 7 RBI) and a single by Finnegan (1-2; 1 RBI).

Sparaco took the win for Valley Regional. The pitcher allowed three hits and one run over two innings, striking out three and walking one.

Hutchinson threw four innings in relief out of the bullpen.

Valley Regional tallied six home runs on the day. Marsden had a long ball in the first inning. Carver went for the long ball in the sixth inning. Hutchinson had a homer in the fifth and sixth innings. Shea (2-3; 3 RBI) went deep in the second and third innings.

Lacourciere led Old Lyme with two hits in four at bats.

Valley collected 14 hits on the day. Carver, Hutchinson, Shea, Sparaco, and Salbiniski each collected multiple hits for Valley.

Valley was sure-handed and didn’t commit a single error. Erwin made the most plays with  11.

April 18:
North Branford defeats Old Lyme 8- 4 

North Branford got on the board first and scored on a sacrifice fly by Garett (1-2; 1 RBI) , a triple by Scalia (1-2; 2 RBI), and an error in the second inning.

Lyme-Old Lyme Wildcats lost despite out-hitting North Branford ten to five.

Mike Virginelli pitched North Branford to victory. He allowed nine hits and three runs over six and a third innings, striking out four.  Oconner threw two-thirds of an inning in relief out of the bullpen.

As the Lyme-Old Lyme Wildcats racked up ten hits in the game.  Owen Snurkowski (2-3), Alex Roth (2-4), and Grady Lacourciere (2-4; 2 RBI) each had multiple hits for Lyme-Old Lyme Wildcats.

Nuzzo went 2-for-4 with 2 RBI at the plate to lead North Branford in hits.

April 25 COVID-19 Update: Nine New Cases in Old Lyme Take Cumulative Total to 1099, One New Case in Lyme Raises Town’s Total to 271

Photo by CDC on Unsplash,

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Report issued Monday, April 25, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) shows nine new, confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme and one in Lyme.

This case raises Old Lyme’s cumulative case total to 1099 and Lyme’s to 271.

April 5, 2022 was the most recent day on which no new cases were reported in either town.

Prior to March 25, Lyme had gone for 23 consecutive days with no new cases being reported. Two new cases were reported in Lyme on March 25.

Prior to April 5, the most recent day on which no new cases were reported in either Lyme or Old Lyme was March 24. There were also no new cases on March 9 and 4, and Feb. 24. The previous date prior to Feb. 24 when no new cases were reported in either town was Dec. 12, 2021.

Statewide Situation – Daily Update

The state’s COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate fell to 7.81% on April 25, from 8.09% on April 22.

Yesterday’s rate of 7.81% was the state’s highest recorded COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate since Feb. 1, 2022 when the Rate stood at 8.68%.

On April 22, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations decreased by nine to 179 from 188 on April 22.

In contrast, on Jan. 12, 2022, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations was 1,939.

Of those hospitalized on April 22, the number not fully vaccinated was 47 (representing 26.6%).

The total number of COVID-related deaths in Connecticut held at 10,834 on April 25, for the second day in a row according to The New York Times.

The next Daily Data Report will be issued by CT DPH Tuesday, April 26, around 4 p.m.

Statewide Situation – Weekly Update

This map, updated April 21, 2022 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are now in the Red (highest) Zone. One hundred ad eight towns (representing a total of 63.9% of the state) are now found in the Red Zone. Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities. Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper.

On Thursday, April 21, the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) released its latest weekly COVID-19 Alert Map (pictured above), which indicates that 108 municipalities are now in the Red (highest of four) Zone for case rates. These towns in the Red Zone include both Lyme and Old Lyme.

This number has increased by 54 from the 54 towns recorded in the Red Zone last week, thus doubling the number of towns in the Red Zone.

Although this total of Red Zone towns reflects a dramatic increase over last week’s number, it still shows a reduction in the number of Red Zone towns since  Jan. 27, when the total was 168 out of 169 towns.

This April 21 total of 108 towns in the Red Zone means more than half of the towns in the state are now in the Red Zone. The number of 108 is equivalent to 63.9% of towns in the state, which are in the Red Zone.

As of April 21, 2022 eight out of the nine towns in the Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) are in the Red Zone, with North Stonington being in the Orange (second highest) Zone.

East Lyme, Groton, Lyme, Old Lyme, Waterford, New London, Ledyard and Stonington are all in the Red Zone.

No towns are in the Yellow (second from lowest) or Gray (lowest) Zones.

The LLHD is no longer issuing reports with updated Case Rates and other metrics.

The CT DPH will issue an updated map of the zones Thursday, April 28 — the map is updated weekly on Thursdays.

The color-coded zones are:

Red: Indicates case rates over the last two weeks of greater than 15 per 100,000 population
Orange: Indicates case rates between 10 to 14 cases per 100,000 population
Yellow: Indicates case rates between 5 and 9 per 100,000 population
Gray: Indicates case rates lower than five per 100,000 population

Increase in Cases in Lyme & Old Lyme Since August 2021

The cumulative total of confirmed cases for Old Lyme has now increased by 656 since Wednesday, Nov. 10, when the total stood at 443 — that number had stood unchanged for a week since the previous Thursday, Nov. 4.

On Aug. 26 — which was the day Lyme-Old Lyme Schools started the new academic year — Old Lyme’s cumulative case total stood at 372, meaning there have now been 727 new cases there since that date.

Meanwhile, Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 indicating 157 new cases have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Ledge Light Health District Update

The LLHD is no longer issuing weekly updates unless there is, “any significant change in case rates, hospitalizations, etc.”

On April 14, LLHD sent LymeLine.com this press release issued by CT DPH the same day. It begins: With the current uptick of COVID-19 cases—coupled with the upcoming schedule of spring holidays and family gatherings—the Connecticut Department of Public Health is reminding residents of the tools currently in place to help contain the spread of the virus. 

The new Community Levels tool created by the CDC can be viewed at this link: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/your-health/covid-by-county.html

Ledge Light Health District continues to focus its vaccination efforts on homebound populations and providing initial vaccinations and boosters to individuals, who were vaccinated previously. Information about vaccination opportunities can be found at https://llhd.org/coronavirus-covid-19-situation/covid-19-vaccine/.

An explanation of the new CDC Community Levels tool by Thomas Gotowka can be found at this link.

COVID testing opportunities can be found at COVID-19 Testing | Ledge Light Health District (llhd.org)

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/

Fatalities Due to COVID-19 in Lyme, Old Lyme

There has been one COVID-related fatality of a Lyme resident: a 57-year-old male passed away Nov. 16, 2021. On Nov. 30, the state finally included this fatality in its data

Four COVID-related fatalities have now been reported in Old Lyme. The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

Details of the third and fourth fatalities, which were reported respectively in 2021 and on Feb. 4, 2022, have not been made available.

COVID-19 Situation in LOL Schools

Under new state protocols for schools, Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools are no longer required to carry out contact tracing.

LOL Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser explained the latest developments in LOL Schools COVID protocols in an April 1 email to the school community, saying, “As noted in my email of February 17, 2022, beginning April 1, 2022 we will no longer report daily COVID-19 cases in the schools.”

He then stated, “For the remainder of this school year, that information will be complied on a weekly basis and will be available on our website at the following link: https://www.region18.org/parents/covid-data.”

For a summary of cases in LOL Schools between Jan. 1 and March 31, 2022, visit this link.

View a full listing of cases between 8/26/21 – 12/23/21 at this link.

April 22 COVID-19 Update: Five New Cases in Old Lyme Take Cumulative Total to 1090, Two New Cases in Lyme Raise Town’s Total to 270

Photo by CDC on Unsplash.

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Report issued Friday, April 22, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) shows five new, confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme and two in Lyme.

This case raises Old Lyme’s cumulative case total to 1090 and Lyme’s to 270.

April 5, 2022 was the most recent day on which no new cases were reported in either town.

Prior to March 25, Lyme had gone for 23 consecutive days with no new cases being reported. Two new cases were reported in Lyme on March 25.

Prior to April 5, the most recent day on which no new cases were reported in either Lyme or Old Lyme was March 24. There were also no new cases on March 9 and 4, and Feb. 24. The previous date prior to Feb. 24 when no new cases were reported in either town was Dec. 12, 2021.

Statewide Situation – Daily Update

The state’s COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate rose from 7.6% on April 21, to 8.09% on April 22.

Yesterday’s rate of 8.09% was the state’s highest recorded COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate since Feb. 1, 2022 when the Rate stood at 8.68%.

On April 22, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations increased by 12 to 188 from 176 on April 21.

In contrast, on Jan. 12, 2022, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations was 1,939.

Of those hospitalized on April 22, the number not fully vaccinated was 60 (representing 31.9%).

The total number of COVID-related deaths in Connecticut rose to 10,834 on April 22, from 10,826 on April 21, according to The New York Times.

The next Daily Data Report will be issued by CT DPH Monday, April 25, around 4 p.m.

Statewide Situation – Weekly Update

This map, updated April 21, 2022 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are now in the Red (highest) Zone. One hundred ad eight towns (representing a total of 63.9% of the state) are now found in the Red Zone. Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities. Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper.

On Thursday, April 21, the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) released its latest weekly COVID-19 Alert Map (pictured above), which indicates that 108 municipalities are now in the Red (highest of four) Zone for case rates. These towns in the Red Zone include both Lyme and Old Lyme.

This number has increased by 54 from the 54 towns recorded in the Red Zone last week, thus doubling the number of towns in the Red Zone.

Although this total of Red Zone towns reflects a dramatic increase over last week’s number, it still shows a reduction in the number of Red Zone towns since  Jan. 27, when the total was 168 out of 169 towns.

This April 21 total of 108 towns in the Red Zone means more than half of the towns in the state are now in the Red Zone. The number of 108 is equivalent to 63.9% of towns in the state, which are in the Red Zone.

As of April 21, 2022 eight out of the nine towns in the Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) are in the Red Zone, with North Stonington being in the Orange (second highest) Zone.

East Lyme, Groton, Lyme, Old Lyme, Waterford, New London, Ledyard and Stonington are all in the Red Zone.

No towns are in the Yellow (second from lowest) or Gray (lowest) Zones.

The LLHD is no longer issuing reports with updated Case Rates and other metrics.

The CT DPH will issue an updated map of the zones Thursday, April 28 — the map is updated weekly on Thursdays.

The color-coded zones are:

Red: Indicates case rates over the last two weeks of greater than 15 per 100,000 population
Orange: Indicates case rates between 10 to 14 cases per 100,000 population
Yellow: Indicates case rates between 5 and 9 per 100,000 population
Gray: Indicates case rates lower than five per 100,000 population

Increase in Cases in Lyme & Old Lyme Since August 2021

The cumulative total of confirmed cases for Old Lyme has now increased by 647 since Wednesday, Nov. 10, when the total stood at 443 — that number had stood unchanged for a week since the previous Thursday, Nov. 4.

On Aug. 26 — which was the day Lyme-Old Lyme Schools started the new academic year — Old Lyme’s cumulative case total stood at 372, meaning there have now been 718 new cases there since that date.

Meanwhile, Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 indicating 156 new cases have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Ledge Light Health District Update

The LLHD is no longer issuing weekly updates unless there is, “any significant change in case rates, hospitalizations, etc.”

On April 14, LLHD sent LymeLine.com this press release issued by CT DPH the same day. It begins: With the current uptick of COVID-19 cases—coupled with the upcoming schedule of spring holidays and family gatherings—the Connecticut Department of Public Health is reminding residents of the tools currently in place to help contain the spread of the virus. 

The new Community Levels tool created by the CDC can be viewed at this link: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/your-health/covid-by-county.html

Ledge Light Health District continues to focus its vaccination efforts on homebound populations and providing initial vaccinations and boosters to individuals, who were vaccinated previously. Information about vaccination opportunities can be found at https://llhd.org/coronavirus-covid-19-situation/covid-19-vaccine/.

An explanation of the new CDC Community Levels tool by Thomas Gotowka can be found at this link.

COVID testing opportunities can be found at COVID-19 Testing | Ledge Light Health District (llhd.org)

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/

Fatalities Due to COVID-19 in Lyme, Old Lyme

There has been one COVID-related fatality of a Lyme resident: a 57-year-old male passed away Nov. 16, 2021. On Nov. 30, the state finally included this fatality in its data

Four COVID-related fatalities have now been reported in Old Lyme. The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

Details of the third and fourth fatalities, which were reported respectively in 2021 and on Feb. 4, 2022, have not been made available.

COVID-19 Situation in LOL Schools

Under new state protocols for schools, Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools are no longer required to carry out contact tracing.

LOL Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser explained the latest developments in LOL Schools COVID protocols in an April 1 email to the school community, saying, “As noted in my email of February 17, 2022, beginning April 1, 2022 we will no longer report daily COVID-19 cases in the schools.”

He then stated, “For the remainder of this school year, that information will be complied on a weekly basis and will be available on our website at the following link: https://www.region18.org/parents/covid-data.”

For a summary of cases in LOL Schools between Jan. 1 and March 31, 2022, visit this link.

View a full listing of cases between 8/26/21 – 12/23/21 at this link.

Happy St. George’s Day 2022!

The 16th century Parish Church of St Mary in Morchard Bishop, Devon, England proudly flew the St. George’s flag on April 23 2021. Photo by R. Fogg.

UPDATED 4/24: In response to our article about St. George’s Day published yesterday, LymeLine reader Russell Fogg kindly sent us the photo above from his 2021 travels in England.

While he was visiting the village of Morchard Bishop in mid-Devon, he spotted the flag of St. George flying atop the 95 ft. tower of the 16th century Parish Church of St Mary. Interestingly, although the village has a population of only 975, it is home to two churches!

Yesterday was St. George’s Day!

And for those who may not know, St. George’s Day is the equivalent for the English of St. Patrick’s Day for the Irish (and Americans!)

It has long been interesting to the author of this article (who is English by birth) as to why St. Patrick’s Day is so widely celebrated in the US while St. George’s Day is just another day on the calendar.

St. George, (who incidentally is also the patron saint of Russia, Portugal, Georgia, Greece, Ethiopia and Palestine) is believed to have been born in Turkey in the third century AD and subsequently became a Roman soldier.  He rose up through the ranks of the Roman army, eventually becoming a personal guard to the Emperor Diocletian.

George was executed April 23, AD 303 for refusing to deny his Christian faith and is buried in the town of Lod in Israel.

Centuries later, St. George’s emblem — a red cross on a white background — was adopted by Richard I (Richard the Lionheart) of England, who only reigned for 10 years from 1189 to 1199. St. George officially became the patron saint of England around 1348, after King Edward III established the Order of the Garter in his name.

But as every English schoolchild learns, St. George is most famous for slaying a dragon. The irony of George being both the patron saint of England and famous for slaying a dragon is that it is highly unlikely the gentleman ever visited England and almost certain that he never fought a dragon!

This painting by Raphael depicts Saint George slaying the Dragon. It is part of the Google Art and is a Public Domain image.

According to legend, the only well in the town of Silene was guarded by a dragon. In order to obtain water, the inhabitants of the town had to offer a human sacrifice every day to the dragon. The person to be sacrificed was chosen by lot.

On the day that St George was visiting, a princess had been selected to be sacrificed. However, he killed the dragon, saved the princess and gave the people of Silene access to water. In gratitude, they converted to Christianity.

It is generally thought that the dragon represents a certain type of pagan belief that included the sacrifice of human beings.

The English are not generally regarded as a very patriotic nation and in a recent poll, England was found to be the least patriotic country in Europe with only one in three citizens knowing the date of St. George’s Day.

One might say, to quote from the famous lyrics of the song titled, “A Song of Patriotic Prejudice,” and written by the acclaimed duo of Michael Flanders and Donald Swann back in 1977:

“The English are moral, the English are good
And clever and modest and misunderstood …”

This famous (in England) song explains (almost) everything about the English and is performed in this video by the King’s Singers. And many thanks to Peter Ewart for providing this memory!

The St. George’s cross has, however, experienced something of a resurgence recently with the flag being used as a national symbol by fans of the English national football (soccer), rugby and cricket teams. At international matches, flags and scarves bearing this cross are worn and people paint it on their faces.

The red cross on the white background has been the official flag of England for centuries, but the Union Flag — more commonly known as the Union Jack — is a combination of St George’s cross, St Andrew’s cross (of Scotland), and St Patrick’s cross (of Ireland), is the national flag of the United Kingdom. Notably, Wales has no representation on the Union Jack.

April 23 is also supposedly both the birth (1564) and definitely the death date (1616) of the world-famous playwright William Shakespeare.  This day is also the anniversary of the death of the great English poet William Wordsworth (of “Daffodils” fame) on April 23, 1850.

Visit this link if you would like to hear the rousing battle cry from Shakespeare’s Henry V, which mentions St. George, and this one if you would like to learn more about St. George’s Day.

Editor’s Note: Parts of this article were first published April 23, 2020 on LymeLine.com.