October 20, 2021

Region 18 BOE ‘Meet the Candidates’ Event Will Be Held In-Person Tonight, Also Live-Streamed and Recorded

Photo by Robinson Recalde on Unsplash.

LYME-OLD LYME — Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB) and the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce are hosting an in-person, Meet the Candidates for Board of Education event on Wednesday, Oct. 20, starting at 7 p.m. at Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School.

LymeLine.com is proud to sponsor the event and all are welcome.

The eight candidates running for the Old Lyme open seats on the Region 18 Board of Education (BOE) will give prepared statements and answer questions posed by the Event Moderator, Attorney John A. Collins III of Suisman Shapiro Attorneys at Law.

Three Old Lyme incumbents on the current Region 18 BOE — Chair Diane Linderman, Treasurer Jean Wilczynski and Rick Goulding — have chosen not to seek re-election. Old Lyme incumbent Martha Shoemaker is seeking reelection.

Lyme incumbent Stacey Leonardo (D) is also not seeking re-election.

The eight candidates running for the four, four-year-term Old Lyme seats are:

  • Marisa Calvi-Rogers, (D)
  • Mona Colwell, (U) Endorsed by Old Lyme Republicans
  • Laura Dean-Frazier, (U) Endorsed by Old Lyme Republicans
  • Jason Kemp, (D)
  • Alexander Lowry, (D)
  • Michael Presti, (R)
  • Martha Shoemaker, (D), incumbent
  • Christopher Staab, (R)

Anna James (D), who is unable to attend the event, is running uncontested for the open Lyme seat.

Many thanks to all the readers, who submitted questions for possible use at the event. A significant number was received – far more than can be asked within the event’s timeline. The event planning committee will be solely responsible for selecting the questions asked at the event.  There will be no questions taken from the floor.

The program will be livestreamed on the Region 18 BOE YouTube channel at this link. It will also be recorded and posted at the same link for future viewing. Note: this is a new link from that previously announced.

Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 2.

For further information, contact Mary Seidner at mseidner@lysb.org or 869-434-7208.

Red Ribbon Week Encourages Everyone to Take Stand Against Drug Misuse, Starts Saturday,

LYME/OLD LYME — Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB) and Lyme/Old Lyme Prevention Coalition (LOLPC) are planning a number of activities to celebrate Red Ribbon Week, which is set for Oct. 23 through Oct. 31.

The week is aimed at uniting youth, parents, schools, and communities in order to take a stand against drug misuse. As part of this year’s observance — which will be themed “Drug Free Looks Like Me” — the Upstanders Club at Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School (LOLMS) is hosting a Door-Decorating Contest and other Red Ribbon events, and LYSB will be aglow in red lights for the week.

Also, a National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day event is planned for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 23, at the Old Lyme Fire House. This drive-through collection event, which is held in partnership with local law enforcement, will give residents an opportunity to safely dispose of expired, unused and unwanted medications.

On Thursday Oct. 28, from 7 to 8:30 p.m., the LOLPC is sponsoring a virtual workshop titled, The Dangerous Truth About Today’s Marijuana: Johnny Stack’s Life and Death Story.

Laura Stack, best-selling author and public speaker, will share the story of her son Johnny’s marijuana addiction from a mother’s point of few, a poignant chronicle of shocking descent from innocence to eventual suicide. This important event is free and registration to obtain the Zoom link for the presentation is available at this link or at www.lysb.org.

These events are supported by the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of a financial assistance award funded by ONDCP.

Editor’s Note: For more information about Red Ribbon Week or the Lyme-Old Lyme Prevention Coalition, contact Alli Behnke, MSW, MA at abehnke@lysb.org.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Host Presentation on Pre-K to 8 Facilities Study’s Initial Findings, Tonight; Architects to Seek Community Input, All Welcome

Lyme Consolidated School is one of the Lyme-Old Lyme Schools under consideration in the Pre-K to 8 Facilities Study undertaken by QA+M Architecture.

Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School

LYME/OLD LYME — Lyme-Old Lyme Schools will host a Community Presentation this evening, Thursday, Sept. 30, at 6 p.m. by QA+M Architecture, who will discuss the initial findings from their study of the LOL Schools Pre-K to 8 Facilities and solicit community input.

The meeting will be held in the Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School auditorium at 53 Lyme St., Old Lyme, CT. All are welcome.

The facilities study includes a review of existing conditions, assessment and evaluation of the buildings, and the future budget cost estimation for repairs/updates. 

Center School, along with the three other Lyme-Old Lyme Pre-K to 8 Schools, has been the subject of a Facilities Study. Initial findings of the study conducted by QA+M Architecture will be presented on Thursday.

Mile Creek School

The information resulting from this study will allow the superintendent and board of education both to plan and budget in a responsible, proactive manner.

The objective of this planning and budgeting will be to maintain the quality facilities that are an integral part of a Lyme-Old Lyme Schools education.

A second presentation will be made Nov. 17, also at 6 p.m.

Desperately Seeking Drivers: National Shortage of School Bus Drivers Impacting Lyme-Old Lyme Schools

The sign says it all.

LYME/OLD LYME — Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser sent out an email Sept. 22, to the school community in which he stated, “There is a national shortage of bus drivers.”

He went on to urge, “… individuals who would like to drive for our [the company which runs the school buses for LOL Schools] bus company, M&J Bus, Inc.,” to consider applying for a position.

Neviaser linked his email to a statement from M&J Bus Inc., which reads as follows:

The Covid 19 pandemic has ravaged the school transportation industry. There is a nationwide shortage of school bus drivers and Connecticut has been hit especially hard. We are seeking potential drivers to become licensed to transport school children. We are also seeking licensed drivers, who would like to earn up to $5000 in signing bonuses.

Many of our current employees, started out driving school buses because they were parents of pre-school or school-aged children and it was a way for them to supplement their family’s income and still be with their young children.

We also have many semi-retired persons that were originally looking for part-time work to stay busy, and college students earning money to get through school. Some of those parents are still with us after 20, 30,and 40 years or more.

Sadly, many of the semi-retired are becoming the fully retired.

We are hoping you see yourself in the descriptions of our drivers above. We offer a full comprehensive training program for those who are not yet licensed. Parents can bring their pre-school aged children (and school-aged children) on the bus with them (thereby saving on day care).

If you would like to drive for the Lyme-Old Lyme Schools, please call our main office in Old Saybrook CT, toll-free at
1-877-GO-MJBUS (1-877-466-5287) or, if local to Old Saybrook, at 860-388-6782.

Editor’s Note: For more information about M&J Bus, Inc., visit their website.

Letter to the Editor: Shoemaker Explains Decision to Run for Old Lyme’s ‘Top Job’ + BOE, Seeks Broad Support From Voters

To the Editor:

An Open Letter to the Residents of Old Lyme:

I am running for First Selectwoman of our town and I hope to earn the support of all our citizens whether they be Democrat, Republican, or Unaffiliated.  Old Lyme residents deserve a leader who will listen to their concerns, create sound fiscal budgets, and bring consensus among diverse groups working toward the common goal of improving our town.  I will prepare this town for the challenges of the future. My decision to run was prompted by overwhelming resident concerns that these critical responsibilities were not being met. I am confident that my skill-set and prior experience will enable me to address these issues

During my 35-year career as a public-school teacher I worked collaboratively with fellow teachers, administration, and parents to provide a quality education for students.  I served as the union president for the last twelve years of my tenure.  Mediation, negotiation, and conflict resolution skills are tools that I incorporated to bring consensus between people.  These experiences will be crucial as First Selectwoman.  I am currently Co-Chair of the Lyme/Old Lyme Prevention Coalition (LOLPC) and President of the Friends of the Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library. I am passionate about public service and believe there is a benefit for the entire Old Lyme community in being able to integrate activities, align networks and identify compatible and complementary opportunities among organizations.  

I am also running for re-election to the Region 18 Board of Education. I was first elected to the Board for a four-year term in 2017 after retiring from teaching.  Public education has been and is an integral part of my life and is critically important to the residents of Old Lyme.  I have enjoyed working on the Board of Education and look forward to contributing to the Regional District 18 Strategic Plan beginning in the fall of 2021.

The role of First Selectwoman is to serve the community of Old Lyme and to maintain, and where appropriate improve, the quality of town assets and services for our citizens.  I will respect the trust you place in me to lead our town.  If also re-elected to the Board of Education, I will continue to collaborate with the other eight members of the board to make the best decisions we can for the public education our students deserve. 

I look forward to meeting you on the campaign trail.

Sincerely,

Martha H. Shoemaker,
Old Lyme.

Editor’s Note: The author is the Democratic-endorsed candidate for Old Lyme First Selectwoman and also one of the four Democratic-endorsed candidates for the Region 18 Board of Education, on which she currently serves.

UPDATED: Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Announce Raucci as Teacher of the Year, Aldrich as Employee of the Year


LYME/OLD LYME — UPDATED 9/7:
Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser announced at the All-Faculty and -Staff Convocation held Aug. 25, that Andrew Raucci (pictured above), who is the Instructional Technology Specialist at Lyme-Old Lyme Middle and High Schools, had been selected as Teacher of the Year.

Raucci has been with Lyme-Old Lyme Schools for eight years and is universally known as a friend to all. His willingness at all times to help, listen, give advice, and most of all, make others laugh was cited as one of the main reasons for the award.

He was also described as having navigated the numerous technology challenges related to the pandemic with a ‘can-do’ attitude, a calm demeanor, and a positive attitude. 

Although most of Raucci’s work is with teachers, he also works with students at technology boot camps, the WLYM morning news broadcasts, ping-pong club, drone lessons and more.  

Asked his reaction to receiving the award, Raucci told LymeLine exclusively, “Although it is a sincere honor to receive this recognition from my colleagues, to me this award is truly a team award. Anything I have done well in Lyme-Old Lyme Schools is merely a reflection of the talented, thoughtful, and kind people I’m fortunate enough to work with every day.”

He added, “I thank all of you for making this community so special for students and one another.”

At the same event, Patricia Aldrich (pictured above), who serves as Technology Facilitator at Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School, was named Employee of the Year. She has been with the District for seven years and a key reason behind her award is that she consistently goes above and beyond the call of duty.

Also, Aldrich is described as constantly seeking new challenges and knowledge to help students and staff excel. Her peers noted that she handles a wide range of issues, both small and large, but regardless of the nature of the issue, she never makes anyone feel as though their question is unimportant.  

Her constant striving for improved job skills, a great attitude and remarkable work ethic were also identified  by her peers as reasons for the award.

 

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Enjoy ‘Excellent’ First Day

Third grader Max Garvin (left) and his friend stride enthusiastically towards their next class in Mile Creek School. Photo by Michelle Tackett.

LYME/OLD LYME — Students were back in school yesterday at Lyme-Old Lyme Schools and at the end of the day, Superintendent Ian Neviaser told LymeLine, “We had an excellent first day of school with lots of excitement and enjoyment as students were welcomed back into classrooms.”

These masked students were hard at work on Opening Day.

He added, “It was a good start to what we expect will be a great year.”

This student clearly, ” … liked his first day of Kindergarten!”

Masks are still mandated by the Governor’s executive orders, but in almost all other respects, and quoting from a recent email sent by the superintendent to the school community, the school experience will be, “… far closer to a normal school year than last year as we return to our cafeterias for lunch, our buses for transportation, and participate fully in after school activities and athletics.”

Friends reunited on the first day of school. Photo by Michelle Tackett.

Neviaser emphasized though, “All students, staff, and visitors, no matter their vaccination status, will be required to wear masks inside school buildings and on school buses. Masks are not required outdoors.”

He noted, however, “If there is no change to the aforementioned executive orders, on Sept. 30, 2021, we will revisit our indoor mask requirement and make any adjustments based on public health measures at that time.”

Masks have become quite a fashion item for students!

Adding, “Some of our more effective mitigation strategies will remain in place including, but not limited to, encouraging students and staff to remain home when they are sick, physical distancing where feasible, quarantining of confirmed cases, mask breaks, and increased ventilation,”

Neviaser also noted, “This school year remote learning will no longer be an option for students.”  

Regarding quarantine, Neviaser said, “Fully vaccinated students and staff who remain asymptomatic are no longer required to quarantine.  For those who are not vaccinated, or are unable to receive a vaccine, we will continue to follow contact tracing protocols and quarantine guidelines from the Connecticut State Department of Education.”

Please can we go and play outside? Photo by Michelle Tackett.

On the topic of sports, Neviaser reported that, “The CIAC plans to offer all sports with the possibility of required masking in both indoor sports and those that are considered “high-intensity” (enhanced respiration) activities (e.g., football, ice hockey, etc.), adding, “We expect to get more clarity on these possible requirements in the near future.”

The Superintendent stressed that flexibility continues to be the key to success, commenting that Lyme-Old Lyme Schools, “will continue, as we have for the last 18 months, to adapt to new information and adjust accordingly.”

On Opening Day, exploring everything is the name of the game in this class.

He concluded his email on a positive note saying to the school community, “We appreciate your support in working toward the goal of providing our students the best in-person learning opportunity possible.”

Editor’s Note: Visit this link to read another story about opening day at Lyme-Old Lyme Schools. Written by Elizabeth Regan, Lyme-Old Lyme has fresh air focus for new school year was published Aug. 26 on TheDay.com.

 

Lyme-Old Lyme Students Start School Today … With Masks

The Lyme-Old Lyme Schools’ buses will be rolling again Thursday when the 2021-22 academic year begins.

LYME-OLD LYME– The students of Lyme-Old Lyme Schools will commence the 2021-22 academic year tomorrow, Aug. 26, with masks still mandated by the Governor’s executive orders.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser. (File photo)

In almost all other respects, however, and quoting from a recent email sent by Superintendent Ian Neviaser to the school community, the school experience will be, “… far closer to a normal school year than last year as we return to our cafeterias for lunch, our buses for transportation, and participate fully in after school activities and athletics.”

Neviaser emphasized though, “All students, staff, and visitors, no matter their vaccination status, will be required to wear masks inside school buildings and on school buses.  Masks are not required outdoors.”

He noted, however, “If there is no change to the aforementioned executive orders, on September 30, 2021, we will revisit our indoor mask requirement and make any adjustments based on public health measures at that time.”

Adding, “Some of our more effective mitigation strategies will remain in place including, but not limited to, encouraging students and staff to remain home when they are sick, physical distancing where feasible, quarantining of confirmed cases, mask breaks, and increased ventilation,”  Neviaser noted, “This school year remote learning will no longer be an option for students.”  

Regarding quarantine, Neviaser said, “Fully vaccinated students and staff who remain asymptomatic are no longer required to quarantine.  For those who are not vaccinated, or are unable to receive a vaccine, we will continue to follow contact tracing protocols and quarantine guidelines from the Connecticut State Department of Education.”

On the topic of sports, Neviaser reported that, “The CIAC plans to offer all sports with the possibility of required masking in both indoor sports and those that are considered “high-intensity” (enhanced respiration) activities (e.g., football, ice hockey, etc.), adding, “We expect to get more clarity on these possible requirements in the near future.”

The Superintendent stressed that flexibility continues to be the key to success, commenting that Lyme-Old Lyme Schools, “will continue, as we have for the last eighteen months, to adapt to new information and adjust accordingly.”

He concluded on a positive note saying, “We appreciate your support in working toward the goal of providing our students the best in-person learning opportunity possible.”

Old Lyme Children’s Learning Center Reopens, Appoints New Director; Some Spots Still Open for Fall

The newly-appointed Director of the Old Lyme Children’s Learning Center is Dana Gatchek.

OLD LYME — After all the challenges created by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Old Lyme Children’s Learning Center (OLCLC) Board of Directors is proud to announce that the Center at 57 Lyme Street has reopened permanently and also appointed Dana Gatchek as its new Director.  

Gatchek resides in East Lyme with her husband Bryon and children Tanner, Sydney and Owen. She has both a Bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education and a Master’s in Curriculum Instruction and Design from UCONN.  She has been a teacher in East Lyme Public Schools as well as a director at a local childcare facility. 

A delighted OLCLC Board President Kristen St. Germain comments, “We are so excited to have Dana’s experience on board to continue to move our Center forward.” She adds, “Joining Dana, we welcome an entirely new staff at the Center, all trained in first aid and CPR, as well as other state mandates required to maintain our licensing.” 

St. Germain says, “We are so grateful to our patrons, who were patient while we closed during the pandemic, as we used the time to reinvent our programming to better reflect the childcare needs of our families in Southeastern Connecticut.”

The OLCLC continues to provide a family-like atmosphere, with small and intimate programs ready to serve families in the local area. The programs offered include Infants (six weeks to a year), Transition (one year to two years), and Toddlers (age two and up.)

Noting, “If you are in need of extended care beyond Region 18’s hours of operation,” St. Germain points out, “We also have the ability to walk their partial-day programmers over to the Center School.”

Currently, the OLCLC programs are almost at capacity with a few full-time spots in each program still available, but there are spots still open in the Region 18-sponsored School Age Program (Pre-K through Grade 5) at Center School.

For more information about programming, to schedule a tour of the facility, or to request a registration packet, email the Director at office.olclc@gmail.com

Lyme-Old Lyme Middle, High School Announce Q4 Honor Rolls

Lyme-Old Lyme High School
Quarter 4 Honor Roll   2020-21

HIGH HONORS
Grade 12:

Paige Alpha, Kaylee Armenia, Sonia Bair, Olivia Bartlett, Maxwell Bauchmann, Ava Berry, Emma Boardman, Kyuss Buono, Keenan Burr, Kate Cheney, Hunter Collins, Megan Cravinho, George Danes, Emily DeRoehn, Corah Engdall, Isabella Flagge, Fiona Frederiks, Grace Lathrop, Gabriel Lavoie, Owen Macadam, Mackenzie Machnik, Elle McAraw, Emma McCulloch, Brendan McTigue, Emma Meekhoff, Marina Melluzzo, Michael Milazzo, Riley Nelson, Sophia Ortoleva, Connie Pan, Anwyn Paynter, Cajamarca Pelaez, Gavin Porter, Aidan Powers, Ezra Pyle, Julie Rudd, John Ruhling, Hayden Saunders, Tait Sawden, Tessa St.Germain, Jake Stewart, Lian Thompson, McKenzey Thompson, Kelly Walsh 

Grade 11:

Emily Almada, John Almy, Nihad Bicic, Hannah Britt, Mackenzie Bussolotti, Ryan Clark, Grace Coverdale, Lauren Creagan, Elizabeth Duddy, Eleanor Dushin, Lauren Enright, Iona Fitzgerald, Victoria Gage, Shawn Grenier, Liam Grethel, Nicolette Hallahan, Austin Halsey, Jackson Harris, Julia Johnston, Nevin Joshy, Kian Kardestuncer, Robyn King, Michael Klier, Felse Kyle, William Larson, Reese Maguire, Abigail Manthous, Stephanie Mauro, Evan Morgan, Elle Myers, Emily Nickerson, Bella Orlando, Jacob Ritchie, Margaret Rommel, Aidan Russell, Frank Sablone, Calvin Scheiber, Abigail Sicuranza, McLean Signora, Abby Speckhals, Drew St.Louis, Nikolai Stephens-Zumbaum, Victoria Stout, Maverick Swaney, Madison Thompson, Alexandra Tinniswood, Olivia Turtoro, Aidan Ward, Melanie Warren, Ellie Wells, Jenna Woods, Jerry Zhang

Grade 10:

Olivia Alpha, Whitney Barbour, William Barry, Callie Bass, Livie Bass, Jillian Beebe, Cooper Bowman, Gillian Bradley, Ava Brinkerhoff, Jamie Bucior, Gretchen Burgess, Sarah Burnham, Liam Celic, Alexander Chrysoulakis, Grace Colwell, William Danes, Anna Davis, John Eichholz, Zachary Eichholz, Matthew Grammatico, Willa Hoerauf, Arber Hoxha, Karissa Huang, Theodore Lampos, Yanza Lata, Jonah Lathrop, Jacob Lopez-Bravo, Ford Macadam, Marielle Mather, Kennedy McCormick, Madalyn McCulloch, Madeleine Morgado, Cooper Munson, Alexander Olsen, Alain Pecher-Kohout, Kelsey Pryor, Izzadora Reynolds, Benjamin Roth, Eli Ryan, Anders Silberberg, Alyssa Spooner, Samantha Tan, Tova Toriello, Harry Whitten, George Williams

Grade 9:

Emma Bayor, Oliver Berry, Alis Bicic, Natalie Buckley, Jackson Bullock, Sarah Colangelo, Ava Cummins, Ella Curtiss-Reardon, Macklin Cushman, Eric Dagher, Eva D’Onofrio, Mulanga Drysile, Marcia Geronimo, Calla Gilson, Ryder Goss, Sydney Goulding, Nyla Goulis, Alexis Grasdock, Justin Green, Douglas Griswold, Ella Halsey, Sedona Holland, Agatha Hunt, Beatrice Hunt, Sabina Jungkeit, Emmerson Kaye, Matthew Mazzalupo, Griffin McGlinchey, Elaina Morosky, Delaney Nelson, Isabelle O’Connor, Ronald Olin, Dylan Paynter, Jack Porter, Luisa Raby, Sydney Siefken, Madeleine Soriano, Hannah Thomas, Kalea VanPelt, Keara Ward, Louisa Warlitz, Mason Wells, Tyler Wells, Summer Wollack, Duohui Yan

HONORS
Grade 12:

Juliette Atkinson, Sadie Bowman, Martinez Carcamo, Martinez Carcamo, Emerson Colwell, John Cox, Axel Cruz, Patrick Dagher, Leslie Farrell, Sadie Frankel, Samantha Gray, Schuyler Greenho, Isabella Hine, Avery Lacourciere, Madelyn Maskell, Olivia Papanier, Lauren Pitt, Jeremy Rand, Ethan Rivera, Jesper Silberberg, Katelyn Zbierski

Grade 11:

Nicholas Adeletti, Dylan Avelange, Evan Clark, Anne Colangelo, James Creagan, Delaney Gagnon, Robert Gajda, Samantha Geshel, Andrew Hedberg, Lillian Herrera, Fiona Hufford, Zoe Jensen, Mikayla Masilotti, Grace McAdams, Emily Mesham, Samuel Mullaney, Michael O’Donnell, Lauren Presti, Adeline Riccio, Alexander Roth, Parker Sprankle, Daniel Stack, Paige Winchell, Avery Wyman, Ryan Zbierski

Grade 10:

Sophia Adkins, Jordan Beebe, Jennifer Cajamarca, Hayley Cann, Ava Catalano, Nicholas Cox, Marjorie Curtis, Kylie Dishaw, Alexis Fenton, Ethan Hale, Owen Ingersoll-Bonsack, Aidan Kerrigan, Madison Krol, Monique Lavoie, Amy Magalhaes, Joseph Montazella, Jack Morgan, Olivia Powers, Jaden Reyes, Santiago Rodriguez, Rhyleigh Russell, Jenna Schauder, Kaitlyn Ward

Grade 9:

Peighton Andrews, Elliot Bjornberg, Lucas DaSilva, Amelia Gage, Katherine Gryk, Abby Hale, Leland Hine, Luke Legein, Anna McAdams, Lucas McMillan, Matthew Miller, Katherine Mullaney, Grace Phaneuf, Cailin Ruhling, Elias Sahadi, Kylie-Jean Sevigny, Haley Shaw, Gabriel Tooker, Ned Smith

Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School
Quarter 4 2020-21   Honor Roll

HIGH HONORS
Grade 8:

Christopher Anderson, Emma Arelt, Quinn Arico, Natalie Barndt, Molly Boardman, Justin Bonatti, Nathaniel Bradley, Mark Burnham, Nathan Burres, Andrew Clougherty, Tabitha Colwell, Chloe Datum, Andrea DeBernardo, Zoe Eastman-Grossel, Caeli Edmed, Anna Eichholz, Benedict Frazier, Hoshena Gemme, Ava Gilbert, Hayden Grethel, Abigail Griffith, Henry Griswold, Jonathan Harms, Nicolas Hatch, Kaela Hoss, Kyle Ingersoll-Bonsack, Shyla Jones, Simon Karpinski, Olivia Kelly, Ella Kiem, Mia Klewin, Peter Kuhn, Ada LaConti, Straub Lahot, Elise Leonardo, Andrew Liu, Abigail O’Brien, Kanon Oharu, Sophie Pennie, Shannon Pryor, Mutia Quarshie, Ysabel Rodriguez, Drea Simler, Audrey Spiegel, Kathleen Walsh

Grade 7:

Charlotte Antonino, Ilona Binch, Zoe Brunza, Alec Butzer, Trevor Buydos, Makayla Calderon, Tyler Cann, Colman Curtiss-Reardon, Christopher Dagher, James Dahlke, Sophia D’Angelo, Michael DeFiore, Rose Dimmock, Alexa Donovan, Jonathan Farrell, Chase Gilbert, Alexander Glaras, Benjamin Goulding, Scarlette Graybill, Christopher Kachur, Thomas Kelly, Katherine King, Harrison Kleefeld, William Landon, Jade Lawton, Maya LeQuire, Jayden Livesey, Emily Looney, Ian Maeby, Elise Marchant, Yanza Marin, Yanza Marin, Samuel Masanz, Bridget McAdams, Carter McGlinchey, Sybil Neary, Nina Nichols, Ryan Olsen, Ryan Ortoleva, Quenten Patz, Isabella Presti, Jacob Prokopets, Taylor Quintin, Jenna Salpietro, Sophia Shaposhnikova, Luca Signora, Emma Singleton, Tanner Snurkowski, Charlotte Spiegel, Addison Spooner, Carson St.Louis, Andrew Taylor, Meredith Thompson, Margaret Thuma, Lucian Tracano, Madeleine Trepanier, John Turick, Connor Vautrain, Elisabeth Viera, Warren Volles, Gabriel Waldo, Edith Williams, Julius Wilson, Oliver Wyman, Stella Young, Carl Zapatka, Katherine Zhang

Grade 6:

Lucia Arico, Zak Avelange, Mia Bonatti, Ceciley Buckley, Morgan Buerger, Marla Bulas, Brooke Burgess, William Burgess, Ryan Burres, Anna Bussmann, Brennan Butzer, Lillian Calabrese, Aidan Carpentino, Chase Catalano, Isaac Chartier, Johanna Coker, Amirah D’Lizarraga, Elliot Dunn-Sims, Samson Edmed, Edward Fiske, Lauren Fulara, Kaedin Gerster, Samuel Gilbert, Gavin Goulis, Harrison Goulis, Owen Holth, Carolyn Hu, Marley Iaia, Kalonji Joyce, Josephine Kiem, Allisondra Krol, Callahan Lacourciere, Alexa Legein, Olivia Lovendale, John Morosky, Emelia Munster, Grace Osborne, Mia Palmer, Arthur Riccio, Ainsley Rinoski, Kevork Shegirian, Nicholas Sokolowski, Magdalena Tooker, Kaylyn Vernon, Ivy Wilson

HONORS

Grade 8:

Micah Bass, Chase Calderon, Ella Evans, Grace Ferman, Samantha Fiske, Bronwyn Kyle, Brenden Landry, Evan LeQuire, Colette Marchant, Nola Slubowski, Charlotte Tinniswood, Ava Wood-Muller

Grade 7:

Julia Clark, Jack Conroy, Synthia Diaz, Anne-Marie Hinckley, Bodie Holland, Sebastian Lopez-Bravo, Ryan Miller, Jackson Pannier, Eve Videll

Grade 6:

Phineas Barrett, Zachary Belval, Taiyo Gemme, Skylar Graybill, Charles Halsey, Marley Igersheimer, Paul Kuhn, Matilda Miller, Vincenzo Pietrowicz, Cameron Russell, Milo Stiles, Collin Swaney, Ethan Trepanier, Bowen Turick, Charles Zelek

In It Together: Binge Drinking is Bad for the Brain … Even for Teens

Underage binge drinking is a reality in all communities and Lyme and Old Lyme are no different. Photo by Kelsey Chance on Unsplash.

Summer is here, parties are happening, and alcohol consumption will increase. This is a good time of year to dive deeper into the effects of binge drinking on the brain and development.

You have surely heard that abusing alcohol hurts your health. But how many years of drinking do you think it takes to visibly affect your brain? Ten years? Twenty?

Turns out that it doesn’t take that long at all — in fact, scientists can already see changes in the brains of teenagers who drink.

In a research study, Professor Susan Tapert of the University of California at San Diego used an MRI to scan the brains of teens who binge drink — defined as drinking four or five (or more) drinks in a couple of hours. Dr. Tapert found that the “white matter” in their brains — the part that transmits signals, like a TV cable or a computer USB cord — was abnormal compared with the white matter of teens who do not binge drink.

Transmitting signals is a big part of what the brain does, so affecting the white matter in this way could also affect a person’s thinking, learning, and memory.

The really scary part is that these teens weren’t alcoholics, and they didn’t drink every day. All they did (to be considered “binge drinkers”) was drink at least four (for women) or five (for men) drinks in one sitting, at least one time during the previous three months.

A Youth Survey conducted by Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB) in 2019 in Lyme and Old Lyme found that 67 percent of students in grades 7-12 reported having engaged in binge drinking at least once in their lifetime. The survey also found that 24 percent of students in grades 7-12 reported binge drinking within the past 30 days and 34 percent of all 12th graders reported the same thing. 

Underage binge drinking is a reality in all communities and ours is no different.  

How could it be possible for just a few sessions of heavy drinking to affect the white matter of the brain? Well, science has shown that alcohol can poison brain cells and alter the brain’s white matter in adult alcoholics.

Dr. Tapert thinks that teenagers’ brains are even more susceptible this way. She states, “Because the brain is still developing during adolescence, there has been concern that it may be more vulnerable to high doses of alcohol.”

And the bottom line?

If you’re a teen, drinking to the point of getting drunk could damage the white matter of your brain—even if you do it only once in a while.                               

Tips for parents about how to talk to your kids about alcohol, and more information on the LYSB’s survey results are  available at this link.

Article source: The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

Alli Behnke

About the Author: Alli Behnke, MSW, MA is the Prevention Coordinator at Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau. She has been a Social Worker for 20 years working in the fields of prevention, therapy, youth leadership, and health coaching. Alli believes strongly in providing accurate information, education, and tools for success when empowering the Lyme/Old Lyme Prevention Coalition and REACH Youth Coalition to work together on strengths-based campaigns. The Coalitions address substance abuse and other risky behaviors challenging our youth and families. Contact her at abehnke@lysb.org or visit  www.lysb.org to become involved in this important community work.

Lyme-Old Lyme HS Principal Tells Class of 2021 its Key Quality is ‘Resiliency … [and so] You Will Not Just Survive, You Will Thrive’

OLD LYME — 6/13 UPDATED 3:20pm: It was a perfect evening for the Commencement Ceremony of Lyme-Old Lyme High School’s 115 members of the Class of 2021.

They marched in, mostly masked …

Lyme-Old Lyme High School Principal James Wygonik (pictured above) reminded the Class of 2021 of the saying on the coat-of-arms of the Benedictine Monks, who were founded in 529 AD, which says, “When you cut it down, it grows back stronger.”

Valedictorian Connie Pan ‘s speech was filled with touches of humor. Photo by Warner Swain.

 

The theme of Valedictorian Connie Pan’s speech was trees. Urging her classmates to, ” Just imagine for a moment: we are all trees,'” she continued, “We are gathered here to celebrate our growth, as well as a future of branches arcing towards the sun.  We have been through storms, through uprootings of our friends and peers, and therefore, we all have some of the same roots.”

She ended her speech on a profoundly positive note, saying, “This is the place from which we grow, stretching our limbs into the light of the world.  I couldn’t ask for a better place for my roots to be.”

Salutatorian Megan Cravinho, pictured above, brought her childhood step-stool to the podium to ensure she could reach the microphone and then referenced it throughout her speech in relation to the growth — not necessarily physical — that the Class of 2021 had experienced in their four years of high school.

The crux of her message was, “Whatever your next steps are, and even if you need a step-stool along the way, the room for growth is boundless. Keep expanding and improving, taking chances, finding new opportunities.”

Honor Essayist Riley Nelson is pictured above. The theme of her speech was the importance of walking and she reminded her fellow members of the Class of 2021, “Sometimes it will feel like you’re walking too slowly but that is allowed. There will be times when you have to force yourself to slow down before you burn yourself out … there’s no race to the end, even if it seems like that sometimes.”

She concluded, “We’re allowed to take our time, to not know the direction, to go at our own speed, and bring friends along on the journey. We’re allowed our own pace. A walking pace.”

The Mildred Sanford Outstanding Educator Award, the recipient of which is selected by the senior class, was longtime English teacher Karen Duhamel, pictured above.

Another English teacher, Jill Ressler, was presented with a bouquet by Principal Wygonik in recognition of her retirement after 15 years tenure at the high school. She stands in the photo above at left with her colleague — and Mildred Sanford Award recipient — Karen Duhamel.

The choir sang …

The band played …

 

And there were smiles here, for valedictorian Connie Pan and her family  …

… there, for this wonderful group of lady graduates …

and everywhere … especially for these two fine young men, Jake Quaratella and Gabe Lavoie!

Here are the speeches from the evening:

Lyme-Old Lyme High School Principal
James Wygonik

To our Board of Education, Superintendent Neviaser, administrative team, the best teachers in America, families, alumni, community members, and of course the class of 2021, it is my honor to welcome you to the 48th Lyme-Old Lyme High School graduation exercises.     

To the parents and families of our graduates.  I am confident that I speak for the administrative team and our faculty when I say that you have been great partners in this journey. Thank you for trusting us with your children.  May I remind the graduates that your families are your biggest fans.  They will be there for you.  And believe me, you will need them.  Never take for granted their love and support.  You will be astonished how smart your parents will become in the next few years.  Don’t be afraid or too proud to lean on them. I am going to pause my remarks, so each of you to take the next ten seconds to think of the people who have helped you become who you are.

I do fear that I am currently dreaming and when I wake up all of you will be on my computer screen.  For now, we will work under the presumption that I am awake.  So let’s continue.

On the coat-of-arms of the Benedictine Monks founded in 529 AD is the Latin phrase su-keesa where-esket.  It translates into “when you cut it down, it grows back stronger.”  For the past year, this pandemic did its very best to” cut-down” if you will, your senior year.  The disruptions, restrictions, and distractions were too numerous to count.  To many, just getting through the year would be monumental.  But the class of 2021 raised the bar at a school with already high standards.

I first noticed something special back in the Fall.  

The math team, despite having to conduct their matches via Zoom won the Middlesex County title and finished as one of the top ten schools in the state.  Our artists dominated the Shoreline Art show.  No traditional Robotics season.  No problem.  Let’s just build a satellite.  While most other schools were cancelling concerts and musicals, we moved the music outside under the stars and produced a first-class movie.  COVID shut down spring sports last year.  Fast-forward to this year. Despite having only one player with varsity experience, our girl’s tennis team went undefeated to win the state championship.  Heck, they may never lose again.  Something as simple as our day to day operations ran smoothly because of you.  You did what leaders do.  You led by example.  As a class, you never settled.  You never made excuses.  You just flourished.  Everything this year was harder.  But you kept getting better.   There is a saying that the same boiling water that softens the potato, also hardens the egg.  It’s what you are made of, not the circumstances.  Class of 2021, you are an inspiring basket of eggs. 

47 classes have walked across this stage before you.  Each with many talents and gifts.  But you will leave here with a distinctive quality that no other class as a whole can claim.  Resiliency.  And that quality will serve you for the rest of your life.  Nobody goes through life undefeated.  But watching you this past year… how you dealt with disappointment, restrictions, and limitations has convinced me that whatever curveballs life throws, you will not just survive.  You will thrive. My money is on you. 

In closing I am not going to wish you a life of success.  Success is what others think of you. Success is adding value to yourself. Instead I wish you a life of significance.  I believe significance comes when you add value to others—and you can’t have true success without significance.  Your contributions and leadership during this pandemic have added value to our school and our community.  Carry that mindset with you as you begin the next phase of your life’s journey.

Su-keesa where-esket.  “When you cut it down, it grows back stronger.”

Class of 2021.  Thank you.  You led us.  You made us better.  Remember that you are Wildcats for life.  I wish you all the best.

Valedictorian
Connie Pan

If you were a tree, what kind of tree would you be?  I’ll give you a second to think about it.  

Maybe some of you thought about sturdy sycamores, or delicate willows, or cartoon Truffula trees from the Lorax animated film, circa 2012.  Personally, that was my choice.  Maybe you didn’t think of any particular species, but said, a big tree. A strong tree.  A pretty tree.  Whatever tree you thought of, hold onto that thought for a little.  

Trees are some of the most fascinating organisms on this planet.  They take months, years, decades to stretch their branches up to the sky and dig their roots into the ground below.  Roots hold the soil in place, help the tree acquire nutrients, and provide habitat for other creatures.  They’re wonderful – and have you ever seen a tree growing on top of what looks like bare rock, too stubborn to starve or fall over?  Have you ever seen a sidewalk cracked and broken because some obstinate tree’s roots destroyed the pavement in a quest for life?  Roots cling, they nourish, they have power.  

Just imagine for a moment: we are all trees.  We are gathered here to celebrate our growth, as well as a future of branches arcing towards the sun.  We have been through storms, through uprootings of our friends and peers, and therefore, we all have some of the same roots.

I’ve spent my whole life in Old Lyme.  I’ve grown up with some of you, our trunks nearly intertwined with how close we’ve been throughout the years – I don’t have many memories of childhood without you in them.  Some of you I met a little later, but my roots are tangled with yours anyway.  I know that each tree in this forest will have stories in its rings, because our class is complex, layered, and magical.  Every time I talk to anyone in our grade, I learn something new, both about them and about myself.  I’m so grateful for all of you. 

Of course, trees can’t grow to their fullest potential without a little help.  So I want you all to think about the people who have supported you, and I’ll be selfish for a little bit and take the time to thank the people who supported me.  

To my wonderful teachers, no matter how large or small of an impact you think you’ve had on me, thank you.  The teachers in this school have been like the rain for this tree, like gentle showers of wisdom, support, and guidance. Whether you’ve helped me write my poetry (Mrs. Cleveland, Ressler, Duhamel, and Burke), supported my independent projects for charities (Madame), or simply asked me how I was in the hallway each day (DH), I have a lot of love in my heart for you.  Mr. Allik, you get a special little shoutout, as the person who put up with endless tantrums and tears, who has worn me down so much that I’m finally following my passion in college.

I have to thank my friends and peers as well. You’ve been like the sun to this tree, helping my leaves turn green and unfurl.  As I look at all of you, I’m so lucky.  I get to make jokes with you, listen to you read your poems out loud, eat lunch with you, go to the gym with you, cheer you on at sports games, watch you go ham at spirit week challenges every year (George Danes, you know who you are), go on endless goodwill trips with you, do crosswords with you when we should be listening in class, or even just pass by you in the hallway.  You guys shine so bright – it’s wonderful and terrifying and I love you all.

And I need to say one last thank you.  To my family, you are the soil I’m rooted in.  You are the people who have supported me unconditionally, who wipe my tears when I cry, who teach me about life and love through everything you do.  In particular, I need to give a special shoutout to the strongest person I know, the one who has dedicated her whole life to making mine better.  Mom, you have taken me to thirteen-hour swim meets, let me scream when I’m angry, held me as I sobbed.  People think I’m successful? I would be nothing without you cheering me on, reminding me of appointments I have to go to, and last but not least, waking me up in the mornings so I’m only tardy instead of absent.  I couldn’t be here at all without you, both literally and figuratively.  So, to my wonderful family, I love you more than I can say in words.

Just as we have grown through our four years here, our class has helped the school grow too.  We have won championships, performed in shows, made new clubs, served our peers and community – you name it, we’ve done it.  I could not be prouder of the things my peers achieve, or of the dreams I know each one of us carries forward.  

The class of 2021 is passing down the torch – we are leaving behind our sports uniforms, our textbooks, our seats at lunch, and our mission to make this school and these towns a better place to learn and grow.  I know that we will thrive after getting these diplomas, just as I know this school will thrive beyond our time here.

This, friends, is the place that we are from.  This is the place from which we grow, stretching our limbs into the light of the world.  I couldn’t ask for a better place for my roots to be.

Salutatorian
Megan Cravinho

How have we grown? 

I keep asking myself this question, pondering whether I’ve grown at all. Like in many families, mine carries the tradition to measure the kids and cousins’ height on the pantry door. Mine is all marked up with pencil lines, names, and dates. Even some friends joined in throughout the years. Just a couple weeks ago, I opened up the pantry door full of marks, and measured myself once again. (pause) Turns out, I haven’t budged a quarter inch since 2018, our freshman year. I brought my childhood step-stool today just to make sure I could reach the mic. And yes, I still use it to reach the higher shelves in the pantry too. 

On the other hand, all of us still have a-ways to grow, but growth isn’t always physical. Our class, in hindsight, has made tremendous strides over the past four years. We have progressed past our freshman pranks and thanks to our government-mandated education (pause), we’ve been provided space to develop into the unique individuals we are and will continue to become. Each of our niches at Lyme-Old Lyme High School, Wind Ensemble for me, maybe environmental or ping pong club for you, has contributed to our quote on quote high school experience, shaped our vision for the future, and impacted our passions, interests, and purposes. 

I hope we can all agree that when we are going through life, it’s hard to see how much we change over time.  Growth isn’t always noticeable. In Tait’s case, I am not so sure. He shot up to a tall 6’3’’. 

However, I have seen you adapt and thrive for every curveball thrown, bump in the road, or obstacle, you know, like a global pandemic. We have picked up new skills. Yes, different ones than how to use noodletools or create MLA citations. Among the new skills, learning to play with instrument bags and masks on! It really isn’t as easy as we make it look. These challenges have pushed us to move on and up. 

What initiates growth and progress?

Taking advantage of the challenges life brings and capturing new opportunities has proven successful. Our time used in a constructive way has allowed us to grow into ourselves. Through our senior projects, which varied from writing a fantasy novel to building a meat smoker to starting a sustainable clothing shop, our creative freedom flourished in the project’s limited direction. 

Keys to adulthood and moving onward are rooted in our already solid foundation.

Whatever your next steps are, and even if you need a step-stool along the way, the room for growth is boundless. Keep expanding and improving, taking chances, finding new opportunities. Don’t dwell on past accomplishments and the glory days of high school. Seek out new challenges and keep reaching for the highest shelf, even if you need a step- stool to help get you there. Our families, friends, and teachers have been that step-stool and supported us through the high school journey – we all needed it when we got here, but hopefully now we can all reach the top shelf on our own.

Congratulations Class of 2021 on your momentous achievements and in advance, congratulations on your future growth.

Honor Essayist
Riley Nelson

I want to start by saying a few thank you’s. Thank you to all the teachers, faculty, and staff, for all the support you have given us over the past four years and especially for enabling us to have a senior year that was as close to normal as possible. Thank you to friends and family for being there for us, especially the parents in the audience. And thank you to my fellow members of the class of 2021. Congratulations to us. We’ve made it. And what a journey it’s been. 

When I began thinking about what I wanted to say today, I’ll be honest, I wasn’t sure how to put it into words. We’ve definitely been through a lot these past four years. How was I supposed to fit all the feelings, memories, and emotions into one compact lesson that I could send you all off with? It was a struggle. I likely still would have been stuck without an idea if my mom hadn’t worked through things with me. (Thanks, mom). We were sitting in her car when she reminded me of the memory.

When quarantine first began, I’m sure like the rest of you, I struggled with the sudden loss of all the normal activities of high school life. The boredom was overwhelming. But then I received a text from a friend. “Wanna go for a walk?” It was something simple, and I was allowed to do it because we were outside. My friend and I could walk for hours, sometimes talking about nothing or everything, it didn’t matter. Sometimes we picked a direction, sometimes we just wandered, doing multiple laps around that neighborhood and still not wanting to go home. It was during those times that I learned the importance of walking. 

This is likely the point where you’re thinking “walking? There’s nothing special about walking. It’s just the easiest way to get from one place to the next,” but I would beg to differ. There are so many things that walking can teach us. I do agree that walking is simple but I also think that is the beauty of it. We don’t have to worry about how we’re doing it or how we look to other people, we can just be. Another thing to be learned from walking is that we don’t always have to know the direction. We can wander and take time for ourselves and trust that our feet will be able to get us to where we need to be.

The important thing to remember is that we are allowed to be lost. We do not have to know what comes next, or how we are supposed to get there. Sometimes our paths will be confusing. You’ll end up standing at a crossroads with four different directions to pick from and you’ll have no idea which is the one that is supposed to lead you “home” wherever that may be. You are allowed to take that moment, to slow yourself down and just be lost. Where we are right now is one of those crossroads. I will be the first to admit that I feel lost. We are leaving our familiar path and venturing on to find new ones. It is a terrifying feeling but I know that it is not a forever feeling. So I will allow myself this moment to breathe. And then I will walk across this stage and begin walking again. 

The people we walk with may be just as important as “the walking” itself. Some people stay for long periods of time while others are gone in no time at all. People cross our paths, or stumble onto them, or sometimes block them entirely. We must learn to deal with these things and accept that they are part of the walking experience. Sometimes we even get pulled onto other people’s paths. I likely would have stayed home for a while longer if that friend had not reached out first. My life would have been wholly different if she had not sent that text in the first place. You have the power to change other people’s paths like she changed mine. You have the power to pull people onto your path or let your paths diverge. It is entirely up to you. 

Sometimes it will feel like you’re walking too slowly but that is allowed. There will be times when you have to force yourself to slow down before you burn yourself out. You don’t have to run, to be the first to everything all the time. Remember that we are allowed to take things at a walk instead of a full out sprint.  

Remember there’s no race to the end, even if it seems like that sometimes. We’re allowed to take our time, to not know the direction, to go at our own speed, and bring friends along on the journey. We’re allowed our own pace. 

A walking pace.

Class President
Lucas Wood-Muller

Fellow students, teachers, staff, and family, thank you for being here to celebrate the class of 2021’s graduation. Now, you’re probably wondering who this handsome, charming, and amazingly awesome kid is speaking, and my name is Lucas. I am honored to have the privilege and opportunity to speak before you today.

Where do I even begin? Should I start with the hellos, the goodbyes, the thank you’s? I honestly don’t know.

To all the teachers who have had me in their classes , first of all, I’m sorry, but thank you for all that you have done for us. Thank you for devoting your professional career to making ours. To the custodians who kept our school clean, especially this past year, thank you. To all the groundskeepers and maintenance workers who make sure we have a beautiful school to come into every day, thank you. To the security guards, who make sure we have a safe school to come into, we thank you. To all the people who made sure we had the best school experience by devoting their time for us, we thank you.

In my four years at Lyme-Old Lyme High School, I have always wanted to say thank you to this one person, but I never knew how to approach them. This teacher has, by far, made my high school experience, and gave me a reason to show up to school every day. This teacher goes out of his way to help each and every student and seems like he would give the shirt off his own back. They say you can tell when someone is meant to have the job they do, and this is one of those people. I took away much more than the subject this teacher taught us. I learned respect, dignity, quality,  humbleness, and selflessness. I don’t think I would be the same without you. You made every part of my day, so a very special thank you to Mr. Goss thank you for all you do.

And I can’t forget to give a special shout out to Mr. Rayder, we love you. I would also like to have a big thank you and shout out to our other class officers, Emma Boardmen, Megan Cravino, Schulyer Greenho, and Franki Donato. 

To my fellow graduates, we made it. It has been a long journey no doubt, but we are still standing here today. I remember seeing some of your faces on the first day of preschool at Grasshoper Green. We have been a part of each other’s lives on a daily basis. We grew up together, and we’ve  shared some incredible memories together. I can still think back to our first day of kindergarten, our first talent show at Lyme school, the first field day, that first girlfriend,  and all the love and joy of  being young, innocent kids, and it feels like it was yesterday.

But now, we are in the spot we always wished to be as kids, and it kind of sucks. I know I’m feeling the senioritis, it’s crippling. But that’s just the message I want to share with you all. Think back on how fast these past few years have gone. I know I would give anything to go back and restart. Think about what it’s going to be like in 10 years, or even 30 years.

Cherish the time you have now and appreciate today. Love the people around you. Tomorrow is never promised, so live like it is ending. Be loyal to those who are loyal to you, or should I say, “to thine self be true.” Focus on yourself, and be proud of the person you are.

The key to happiness isn’t the number in your bank account either, it’s about how much of an impact you make on everyone around you every single day. You can’t measure what’s inside a good person’s heart. A simple smile can make someone’s day.

So to conclude, to all of my classmates, my friends and family. I love you all, and I wouldn’t be where I am today without all of you. I wish all of you the best success, and a happy life. Goodbye and good luck, woody out.

CLASS OFFICERS

Lucas Wood-Muller, President
Emma Boardman, Vice President
Schuyler Greenho, Secretary
Connie Pan, Treasurer
Francette Donato, Class Historian

CANDIDATES FOR DIPLOMAS

Paige Marie Alpha 
Colbe Kent Andrews
Benton Mehadin Arafeh-Hudson
Kaylee Ann Armenia 
Sophia Lane Arnold 
Juliette Frances Atkinson 
Sonia Swan Bair 
Rachel Katherine Barretta
Olivia Louise Bartlett 
Michael Dominic Battalino
Maxwell Otto Bauchmann 
Jason Richard Beebe
Ava Campbell Berry
Emma Ann Boardman 
Truman Arthur Boller
Sadie Helen Bowman 
Kyuss Buono 
Keenan Lawrence Burr
Erika Yanira Carcamo Martinez 
Kate Margaret Cheney 
Chloe Mae Cleveland
Hunter Collins 

Emerson Mylon Colwell III 
Jackson Martin Cowell
John Berry Cox 
Megan Dorothy Cravinho 
Axel Damian Cruz
Michael Patrick Cushman
Patrick Nuhad Dagher
Richard Joseph Damiano III
George Stratton Danes 
Bianca Serapilia Dasilva 
Trube Anthony Dean
Nicholas Anthony DellaGrotte
Emily Jane DeRoehn 
Maxwell Carson Diebolt
Francette Mae Donato 
Corah Serene Engdall 
Leslie Dorothy Farrell
Isabella Mary Flagge
Sadie Caffry Frankel
Fiona Mary Frederiks 
Riley Madison Hope Fruth
Eveliz Adelaide Fuentes
Jackson Richard Goulding 
Ashton Jahieem Eric Gratton
Tyler Adam Gratton
Samantha Kelly Gray
Schuyler Bates Greenho 
Lillian Ellette Zager Dolan Grethel 
Emma Rose Griffith 
Thomas Ian Haley
Isabella Faith Hine
Aryn Teresa Jones
Regan Joshua Kaye 
Corey Aidan Klimaszewski
Lily Olivia Knight
Samuel Nelson Koenigs
Paige Elizabeth Kolesnik 
Destiny Rose Kus
Avery Rae Lacourciere 
Grace Ann Lathrop 
Gabriel Llunga Lavoie 
Justen Helene Lessard
Peter Joseph Lodi
Owen Russell Macadam 
Mackenzie Rose Machnik 
Luke Doheny Macy 
Madelyn Michele Maskell 
Elle Addison McAraw 
Emma Kay McCulloch 
Brendan James McTigue 
Emma Meekhoff 
Brianna Frances Melillo 
Marina May Melluzzo 
Michael Joseph Milazzo 
Riley Elizabeth Nelson 
Timothy Shane O’Brien 
Sophia Grace Ortoleva 
Connie Wendy Pan 
Olivia Day Papanier 
Nicholas Pasquale Parrillo
Anwyn Mae Paynter 
Lauren Adam Pitt 
Gavin Lawrence Porter 
Aidan Nelson Powers 
Ezra Nelson Pyle 
Jacob Leary Quaratella 
Jeremy Nelson Rand
Ethan Rivera
Anthony Jonathan Rosario
Julie Lynn Rudd 
John Turner Ruhling
Sean Thomas Sagristano
Hayden Brooks-McCall Saunders 
Tait Alexander Sawden 
Jesper Fredrik Silberberg 
Isabella Catherine Oulahan Smith 
Tessa Leighann St. Germain 
Kassidy Elizabeth Standish
Jake Talin Stewart 
Lian Elise Thompson 
McKenzey Pepper Thompson
Angus James Graeme Tresnan 
Nicholas Andrew Vandette
Katrina Marie Wallace 
Lauren Elizabeth Wallace 
Kelly Marie Walsh 
Alison Grace Ward 
Avery Thomas Welch 
Alden Bryce Wilson
Lucas Reed Wood-Muller
Joshua Matthew Yumbla
Katelyn Paige Zbierski
Ellery Hope Zrenda

 

Lyme-Old Lyme HS Seniors Kick Off Graduation Festivities with Jubilant Parade

All photos by Michele Dickey, except where indicated.

OLD LYME — 6/12 UPDATED: MORE PHOTOS ADDED Parents and townspeople came out in throngs yesterday evening to cheer the Lyme-Old Lyme High School seniors as they drove their cars through Old Lyme in a jubilant parade to celebrate their upcoming graduation this evening.

Cars were gaily decorated …

Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

Old Lyme Emergency Services participated with their usual vigor …

The Old Lyme Fire Department helped out as always …

Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

It was a huge parade …

Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

…which wound its way down Lyme Street.

They rode solo …

They rode in twos here …

Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

… and twos there.

They rode in threes …

Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

… and fours …

Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

… and more!

In fact, they rode in crowds!

… and such a great time was had by all.

It was a Grand Parade indeed …

Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

Spirits were high …

They waved …

Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

Photo by Liz Frankel.

They cheered …

And the cars just kept on coming!

and coming …

and coming …

Still more …

They stood proudly atop this jeep …

and that car …

and that truck ..

and these ones too!


Even the Old Lyme Memorial Town Hall joined the celebrations to offer its own words of congratulations …

It was indeed a night to remember!

Two Lyme-Old Lyme HS Grads Selected for Team US Men’s Eight Competing at Tokyo Olympics

LYME/OLD LYME — In a truly remarkable achievement, two Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) graduates have been selected to represent the US in the Men’s Eight at the 2021 Tokyo Olympics.

Austin Hack, LOLHS Class of 2010.

Austin Hack, who graduated from LOLHS in 2010, and Liam Corrigan, a member of the LOLHS Class of 2014, both rowed for LOLHS and then went on to represent their respective universities at Stanford (Hack) and Harvard (Corrigan).

Hack is the only returning member of the 2021 US Men’s Eight. He was a member of the 2016 US Men’s Eight team, which came in fourth in the Rio de Janeiro Olympics in Brazil.

His list of rowing accomplishments is encyclopedic with an abbreviated version including membership of the following national teams: Junior, 2009-10; Under 23, 2011-12; Senior, 2013-15, 2019; and Olympic, 2016, 2020.

In terms of international results, Hack finished fifth in the the eight at the 2019 World Rowing Championships and also fifth in the four at the 2019 World Rowing Cup II.

He won bronze in the eight at the 2016 World Rowing Cup II and won the eight at the 2016 Final Olympic Qualification Regatta.

Going back further than 2016, the list is equally extensive and can be viewed in detail at this link.

Hack has been working part time for McKinsey and Company, but during the COVID-19 pandemic, he was living and training in Old Lyme. Part of his training was on a bicycle adapted by Steve Morrissey of Old Lyme on which Hack ultimately set new records on all the Strava segments in town.

Asked how they felt about their son, Austin, and Corrigan’s success in being named to the US Men’s Eight, Dr. Gregory Hack and Dr. Barbara Hack told LymeLine exclusively, “We are beyond thrilled for both Austin and Liam! On the men’s side of rowing, the US will only be sending an 8+ and a 4- to Tokyo.  To think that of those 12 seats, two of them will be occupied by sons of Old Lyme is just incredible!”

The Hacks added, “It’s a testament not only to their grit and strength, but also to their years of training/coaching starting right here at Lyme-Old Lyme High School.”

Liam Corrigan, LOLHS Class of 2014.

Corrigan graduated from Harvard with an honors degree in Physics and Astrophysics and while at Harvard, he was captain of the men’s crew.

Since graduating, he has moved to Oakland, Calif. to train with the men’s training center for the upcoming Olympics. His accomplishments with Team USA include finishing fourth in the pair at the 2017 World Rowing Under 23 Championships, placing fifth in the four at the 2015 World Rowing Junior Championships, taking eighth in the pair at the 2014 Youth Olympic Games and finishing ninth in the eight at the 2014 World Rowing Junior Championships.

Corrigan recently rowed in the men’s four that won the B final at the 2019 World Rowing Under 23 Championships.

Responding to a question about how they felt after learning Liam had been selected for the US Men’s Eight, Brian and Joan Corrigan said, “It is difficult to describe how overjoyed and proud we are to see Liam on his way to achieving goals, which he set for himself many years ago. We have watched him work diligently over the years, and are ecstatic that he is finding success.”

They noted, “We are grateful to LOLHS, the Old Lyme Rowing Association (OLRA) and the Town of Lyme for their support over many years,” concluding, “We feel so fortunate to live in such a wonderful community.”

Liam Corrigan is at the front right of this photo of the Harvard boat.

Speaking on behalf of the OLRA, Candace and Paul Fuchs commented, “‘The Old Lyme Rowing Association is bursting with pride over the dedication and perseverance of our athletes and their families, which brought us to this historic moment. In partnership with the Town of Old Lyme and Regional School District 18, our little organization is pleased to provide a place for big kids to play and find success.’

Sadly, neither family can attend the Olympics in person due to COVID-19 restrictions, but Barbara and Greg Hack ended their email to us enthusiastically with the words, “Go Old Lyme!  Go USA!”  We wholeheartedly second that sentiment and wish Austin and Liam every success in their Olympic endeavors!

Editor’s Note: Old Lyme Rowing Association (OLRA) oversees LOLHS crew, and Blood Street Sculls. Blood  Street Sculls was established by Fred Emerson (on Blood Street) around 1965, for the cultivation of rowing for local high school students, college students and adults.  

Some of the country’s most notable athletes called Blood Street Sculls home in the early days including  Jim Dietz who is one of the most decorated scullers in US history (named to three US Olympic teams).  

A strong supporter of the nascent sport of women’s rowing, Fred Emerson organized some of the first  women’s national championships to be held on Rogers Lake in 1971, which included athletes who would  ultimately represent the US in Olympic competition.  

Blood Street Sculls was an incubator for rowing programs for high schools and colleges across New England. USCGA and Connecticut College got their start in this manner.

Anita DeFrantz first learned to row as a Connecticut College student, rowing on Rogers Lake. DeFrantz went on to represent the US in the 1976 women’s eight. She was a vocal legal authority when US athletes were prohibited from  competition in 1980 and she has risen through the ranks of international rowing and is currently the vice  president of the IOC.  

Significant achievements — excluding those by Hack and Corrigan —  by OLRA athletes since 2000 include:

Olympic Athletes
2008: Andrew Bolton Men’s lightweight four spare
2012: Sarah Trowbridge Women’s Open double sculls  

World Championships  
Sarah Trowbridge: 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011  

Under 23 World Championships 
Hannah Paynter: 2019  

Junior World Championships  
Christiana Congdon: 2017  

Since record-keeping was initiated in 1997, over 100 athletes in OLRA programs have gone on to  represent their university in collegiate rowing competition.  

Paul Fuchs, Director of Rowing, holds the men’s lightweight course record for Head of the Charles, and competed on seven US World Championship teams. He has coached at the Olympic and World  championship levels and serves on the Executive Council of FISA, the international governing body for  the sport of rowing.

Lyme-Old Lyme High School Hosts Graduation Ceremony This Evening; All Welcome … But Masks Mandatory

Lyme-Old Lyme High School graduates celebrate their success. File photo by Kim Tyler.

OLD LYME — Lyme-Old Lyme High School will hold its Commencement Ceremony for the Class of 2021 Friday evening on the field between the middle and high schools starting at 6 p.m.

Entry to the field is open and the public is welcome to attend the event provided they are wearing masks.  The mask requirement is mandatory regardless of vaccination status.

Congratulations to the Class of 2021!

Powers Runs ‘The Perfect Race’ (Daquila), is CIAC Class S 400m State Champion, Sets New Lyme-Old Lyme HS Record

Aidan Powers is the 2021 Class S 400 meter State Champion and also the new Lyme-Old Lyme High School 400 meter record holder.

LYME-OLD LYME — Senior Aidan Powers set a new Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) record in the 400 meters today with a blistering time of 51.3 seconds at the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference (CIAC) Class S championship, which was held at Willow Brook Park in New Britain, Conn.

Additionally, Powers is the Class S state champion in the 400 meters after finishing in first place in Class S.

Asked how he felt about this remarkable result, LOLHS Track Coach Aron Daquila responded exclusively to LymeLine, “Aidan is such a smart runner and has so much grit. He ran the perfect race yesterday.  The 400 is a long sprint and requires strategy.  He started strong, but in control, and when he hit the back stretch, he really exploded off the turn. He’s been training all season for that race and all that hard work really paid off.”

Daquila added, “But Aidan doesn’t quit. He turned around after that individual performance to run the anchor leg of the 4×400, where he gave his all, again, and helped his team earn a spot at the state open next week. It truly was a team effort, Aidan, [fellow senior] Gabe Lavioe, [junior] Nevin Joshy and [sophomore] Dylan Sheehan each ran great legs.”

As a result of these placements, both Powers and the relay team will now advance to compete in the 400 m and 4 x 400 m races at the CIAC State Open next Wednesday.

Powers plans to attend Lyme Academy of Fine Arts in the fall.

Huge congratulations to Aidan and the relay team, and good luck on Wednesday!

Lyme-Old Lyme Girl’s Tennis are Class S State Champions for First Time in School History!

The Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) Girl’s Tennis team poses with the Class S state championship trophy yesterday after defeating Litchfield 5-2.

LYME/OLD LYME — The top-seeded Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) girl’s tennis team became the CIAC Class S state champions yesterday for the first time in school history when they stormed to  a 5-2 victory over #2 seeds Litchfield yesterday.  The tournament final was played indoors at the Magic Lincer Tennis Club in Manchester.

The Old Lyme girls finished the season undefeated at 20-0 and also won the Shoreline Conference title along the way.

Asked how she felt about this extraordinarily successful season, team coach Lauren Rahr, who is also a math teacher at LOLHS, responded, “It has been such an amazing season with a wonderful group of girls. When I woke up this morning I still couldn’t believe that we actually won a state tournament!”

The LOLHS Girl’s Tennis Team first-year coach Lauren Rahr accepts the Class S state championship trophy after her team’s win Thursday.

She continued, “This year was my first year coaching tennis. Previously, I had played tennis for Waterford High School and Endicott College. It was always my dream to teach math at a high school and coach their girls tennis team. Being hired at Old Lyme provided me with the opportunity to pursue these goals.”

Rahr added, “Going into this season, I didn’t want to let the girls down, and I hoped that they would all get along and win some matches. But what actually happened this season was more special than I ever imagined. The minute I saw them play and really compete on the court I knew we had something special.”

Describing the team overall, Rahr said, “Out of my 10 starting varsity players, one had competed in a varsity high school match before this season. There was a lot of nerves and inexperience when it came to match play, but each practice we ran mental toughness drills or talked tennis strategies to help bring the girls to the level they competed at all season long.”

Noting, “Tennis is such a wonderful sport because anyone can step on the court and swing a racket, Rahr pointed out, “But what makes a tennis player special is when they can analyze their short and their opponent’s shots. I like to call this “smart tennis” and by the end of the season all of my girls had accomplished this. Our change over conversations went from me doing most of the talking to them giving me detailed recollections of things they noticed and strategies they were using.”

In terms of statistics, Rahr recalled that, “During the regular season, the team competed at a high level winning 11 of their 16 matches 7-0. Three of my players went on to win the Shoreline conference individual tournament: Lauren Wallace and Alexis Fenton won the doubles draw and Samantha Tan won the ¾ singles draw.” She highlighted, “These three players were able to remain undefeated in post-season play as well as regular season. Livie Bass (four singles) was undefeated in team matches and clinched us both our semi-final win and our finals win.”

The LOLHS Girl’s Tennis team members deservedly celebrate being #1 in Class S statewide!

Talking specifically about the championship final, Rahr said, “Yesterday, every single girl went out on the court fighting not just for themselves, but for the team. This group of girls has passion, drive, and huge hearts. I feel so lucky and honored to have been able to coach them this year.”

She explained further, “During yesterday’s match, we knew winning doubles would put us in a good spot. My number one doubles pair of Lauren Wallace and Alexis Fenton won their match in record time, executing flawless doubles strategies, placement, and communication. Their win drove the momentum in our direction for the remainder of the match.”

She summed up Wallace and Fenton’s performance in the words, “Their leadership throughout the season has been a big part of our success.”

Rahr concluded, “This is one of those once in a lifetime moments that I will never forget, and I hope the girls will always remember too. No matter what else comes my way with coaching, I don’t know if anything can top this moment with this special group of girls.”

Lyme-Old Lyme Techno-Ticks Complete Successful ‘Lymelyte’ Cube Satellite Test Launch

The weather balloon is carefully filled with helium.

OLD LYME — On Saturday, May 15, the Lyme-Old Lyme High School’s FIRST Robotics Team 236-TechnoTicks  gathered at the practice field behind high school for a second test launch of their “Lymelyte” Cube Satellite (CubeSat) prototype.

The weather conditions were perfect, with minimal wind.

The balloon reached the team’s target test height of 500 ft.

The CubeSat and harness were attached to a carefully-inflated weather balloon and launched via tether (much like a kite).

TechnoTicks team members were able to monitor the data transmitted from the CubeSat.

The balloon quickly rose to the target altitude of 500 ft., sending data back to a laptop on the ground via the attached CubeSat.

The TechnoTicks were able to monitor temperature, air quality, air pressure and other data.

The balloon and CubeSat prototype were reeled in and safely landed./or

The CubeSat will ultimately work in tandem with the team’s “Trailyte” app to provide information about conditions at various hiking trails in the Lymes.

Editor’s Note: FIRST Robotics Team 236-Techno Ticks offers students from Lyme-Old Lyme High School and East Lyme High School a creative way to learn about robotics, design and computer programming. Visit the TechnoTicks  website and/or follow the team on InstagramFacebook and Twitter to keep up to date with all the team’s latest news.

Old Lyme Children’s Learning Center Seeks Applicants for Variety of Positions

OLD LYME — The Old Lyme Children’s Learning Center (OLCLC) in Old Lyme has openings for the following positions, all starting Aug. 2021:

-Director
-Head Teacher (Infant and Toddlers)
-Teacher’s Assistants (all programs)
-Before and After Care Coordinator
-Before and After Care staff
The Old Lyme Children’s Learning Center believes in children. Children need the time and opportunity to grow,  explore, and discover. The OLCLC programs promote the development of children as creative individuals and as members  of small groups, and staff who believe in these same philosophies are sought.
Staff who  will help us to make the Center a secure, safe and happy environment that fosters the natural development of the whole child, which includes socio-emotional, cognitive, language and small and large motor skills are required.
More information on each position follows:

Director: Seeking a strong leader with a vast knowledge of Early Childhood Education and practice. Director’s Certificate preferred but can be completed within first year of position. Must have strong organizational skills and managerial experience. Strong communication skills a MUST and looking for someone passionate about the field and making our Center the best place it can be for our staff and students.

Head Teachers: (Infants and Toddlers) Early Childhood degree with 2 yrs. Exp. in field. Knowledge of contemporary early childhood education appreciated and strong management, communication skills and leadership a must.

Teacher’s Assistants (all programs): Seeking full and part time teacher’s assistants. Experience working with children preferred.

Before and After Care Coordinator: Flexible hours a must– morning and afternoon hours available. Must be able to work a 7am-8:45am shift in the mornings and a 2:30pm-5:30pm shift in the afternoons.

Before and After Care staff: Looking for high school/college age students available either shift. Ideal after school job for high school student or for someone with another part time job in the program off hours.

If interested, send a letter of interest, a resume and two letters of recommendation to: Kristen St.  Germain at office.olclc@gmail.com

Lyme-Old Lyme High School, Middle School Announce Q3 Honor Rolls

Lyme-Old Lyme High School
Q3 Honor Roll    2020-21

HIGH HONORS
Grade 12:
Kaylee Armenia, Olivia Bartlett, Maxwell Bauchmann, Ava Berry, Emma Boardman, Kyuss Buono, Keenan Burr, Kate Cheney, Hunter Collins, Emerson Colwell, Megan Cravinho, Patrick Dagher, George Danes, Bianca Dasilva, Emily DeRoehn, Corah Engdall, Isabella Flagge, Sadie Frankel, Fiona Frederiks, Samuel Koenigs, Paige Kolesnik, Avery Lacourciere, Grace Lathrop, Mackenzie Machnik, Madelyn Maskell, Elle McAraw, Brendan McTigue, Marina Melluzzo, Riley Nelson, Sophia Ortoleva, Connie Pan, Olivia Papanier, Anwyn Paynter, Jenny Pelaez Cajamarca, Gavin Porter, Aidan Powers, Ezra Pyle, Julie Rudd, Hayden Saunders, Tait Sawden, Jesper Silberberg, Tessa St.Germain, Lian Thompson, McKenzey Thompson, Kelly Walsh, Alison Ward, Ellery Zrenda.

Grade 11:
Nicholas Adeletti, Nihad Bicic, Hannah Britt, Mackenzie Bussolotti, James Creagan, Lauren Creagan, Henry Cutler-Stamm, Eleanor Dushin, Lauren Enright, Victoria Gage, Nicolette Hallahan, Austin Halsey, Andrew Hedberg, Fiona Hufford, Julia Johnston, Nevin Joshy, Kian Kardestuncer, Robyn King, Michael Klier, Felse Kyle, William Larson, Reese Maguire, Abigail Manthous, Stephanie Mauro, Elle Myers, Bella Orlando, Jacob Ritchie, Margaret Rommel, Alexander Roth, Frank Sablone, Calvin Scheiber, Abigail Sicuranza, Abby Speckhals, Drew St.Louis, Nikolai Stephens-Zumbaum, Maverick Swaney, Madison Thompson, Alexandra Tinniswood, Evan Visgilio, Aidan Ward, Melanie Warren, Ellie Wells, Paige Winchell, Jenna Woods.

Grade 10:
Olivia Alpha, William Barry, Callie Bass, Livie Bass, Jillian Beebe, Jordan Beebe, Cooper Bowman, Gillian Bradley, Jamie Bucior, Gretchen Burgess, Hayley Cann, Liam Celic, Alexander Chrysoulakis, Grace Colwell, William Danes, Anna Davis, Jacob Derynioski, John Eichholz, Alexis Fenton, Ethan Hale, Willa Hoerauf, Arber Hoxha, Jonah Lathrop, Ford Macadam, Amy Magalhaes, Marielle Mather, Kennedy McCormick, Madalyn McCulloch, Madeleine Morgado, Cooper Munson, Alexander Olsen, Alain Pecher-Kohout, Kelsey Pryor, Izzadora Reynolds, Santiago Rodriguez, Benjamin Roth, Eli Ryan, Alyssa Spooner, Samantha Tan, Tova Toriello, Kaitlyn Ward, Harry Whitten.

Grade 9:
Emma Bayor, Oliver Berry, Alis Bicic, Natalie Buckley, Jackson Bullock, Sarah Colangelo, Ella Curtiss-Reardon, Eric Dagher, Eva D’Onofrio, Mulanga Drysile, Amelia Gage, Marcia Geronimo, Calla Gilson, Sydney Goulding, Alexis Grasdock, Justin Green, Douglas Griswold, Abby Hale, Ella Halsey, Sedona Holland, Agatha Hunt, Beatrice Hunt, Sabina Jungkeit, Emmerson Kaye, Grady Lacourciere, Griffin McGlinchey, Elaina Morosky, Delaney Nelson, Isabelle O’Connor, Ronald Olin, Jack Porter, Luisa Raby, Sydney Siefken, Hannah Thomas, Louisa Warlitz, Mason Wells, Tyler Wells, Duohui Yan.

HONORS
Grade 12:
Paige Alpha, Colbe Andrews, Juliette Atkinson, Sonia Bair, Rachel Barretta, Sadie Bowman, Jackson Cowell, John Cox, Francette Donato, Samantha Gray, Schuyler Greenho, Emma Griffith, Aryn Jones, Regan Kaye, Gabriel Lavoie, Owen Macadam, Emma McCulloch, Emma Meekhoff, Michael Milazzo, Lauren Pitt, Jacob Quaratella, Kassidy Standish, Jake Stewart, Katelyn Zbierski.

Grade 11:
John Almy, Evan Clark, Ryan Clark, John Conley, Grace Coverdale, Caroline Crolius, Elise DeBernardo, Elizabeth Duddy, Samantha Geshel, Aiden Goiangos, Shawn Grenier, Liam Grethel, Jackson Harris, Zoe Jensen, Cora Kern, Evan Morgan, Samuel Mullaney, Emily Nickerson, Brendan O’Brien, Michael O’Donnell, Lauren Presti, Adeline Riccio, Aidan Russell, McLean Signora, Daniel Stack, Victoria Stout, Olivia Turtoro, Aden Wilson, Ryan Zbierski.

Grade 10:
Sophia Adkins, Whitney Barbour, Ava Brinkerhoff, Sarah Burnham, Jennifer Cajamarca, Luke Celic, Nicholas Cox, Matthew Grammatico, Aidan Kerrigan, Theodore Lampos, Karleigh Landers, Monique Lavoie, Jacob Lopez-Bravo, Calvin Monte, Jaden Reyes, Rhyleigh Russell, Jenna Schauder, Anders Silberberg, Ned Smith, Malcolm Speirs.

Grade 9:
Jedidiah Arico, Elliot Bjornberg, Ava Cummins, Macklin Cushman, Lucas DaSilva, Alexis Frascarelli, Nyla Goulis, Katherine Gryk, Leland Hine, Jair Lata Yanza, Luke Legein, Matthew Mazzalupo, Katherine Mullaney, Dylan Paynter, Grace Phaneuf, Ava Roth, Cailin Ruhling, Kylie-Jean Sevigny, Haley Shaw, Madeleine Soriano, Gabriel Tooker, Kalea VanPelt, Keara Ward, Summer Wollack.

Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School
Quarter 3 Honor Roll   2020-21

HIGH HONORS
Grade 8:
Christopher Anderson, Emma Arelt, Quinn Arico, Natalie Barndt, Micah Bass, Molly Boardman, Justin Bonatti, Mark Burnham, Nathan Burres, Chase Calderon, Andrew Clougherty, Tabitha Colwell, Chloe Datum, Andrea DeBernardo, Zoe Eastman-Grossel, Caeli Edmed, Anna Eichholz, Ella Evans, Grace Ferman, Benedict Frazier, Hoshena Gemme, Ava Gilbert, Abigail Griffith, Henry Griswold, Jonathan Harms, Nicolas Hatch, Kaela Hoss, Rowan Hovey, Shyla Jones, Simon Karpinski, Olivia Kelly, Ella Kiem, Mia Klewin, Peter Kuhn, Ada LaConti, James Lahot Straub, Elise Leonardo, Evan LeQuire, Andrew Liu, Abigail O’Brien, Kanon Oharu, Mutia Quarshie, Drea Simler, Audrey Spiegel, Kathleen Walsh.

Grade 7:
Charlotte Antonino, Zoe Brunza, Alec Butzer, Trevor Buydos, Makayla Calderon, Tyler Cann, Colman Curtiss-Reardon, Christopher Dagher, James Dahlke, Sophia D’Angelo, Rose Dimmock, William Donnelly, Jonathan Farrell, Gabrielle Field, Chase Gilbert, Alexander Glaras, Scarlette Graybill, Christopher Kachur, Thomas Kelly, Katherine King, Jade Lawton, Maya LeQuire, Jayden Livesey, Emily Looney, Elise Marchant, Samuel Masanz, Bridget McAdams, Carter McGlinchey, Ryan Miller, Nina Nichols, Ryan Olsen, Ryan Ortoleva, Louis Patana, Isabella Presti, Jacob Prokopets, Taylor Quintin, Jenna Salpietro, Sophia Shaposhnikova, Luca Signora, Emma Singleton, Addison Spooner, Carson St.Louis, Andrew Taylor, Meredith Thompson, Margaret Thuma, Lucian Tracano, Madeleine Trepanier, Connor Vautrain, Elisabeth Viera, Warren Volles, Edith Williams, Oliver Wyman, Stella Young, Carl Zapatka, Katherine Zhang.

Grade 6:
Collin Anderson, Lucia Arico, Addison Arndt, Zak Avelange, Phineas Barrett, Zachary Belval, Mia Bonatti, Ceciley Buckley, Morgan Buerger, Marla Bulas, Brooke Burgess, William Burgess, Ryan Burres, Anna Bussmann, Brennan Butzer, Lillian Calabrese, Aidan Carpentino, Chase Catalano, Isaac Chartier, Amirah D’Lizarraga, Elliot Dunn-Sims, Samson Edmed, Edward Fiske, Lauren Fulara, Kaedin Gerster, Harrison Goulis, Charles Halsey, Owen Holth, Carolyn Hu, Kalonji Joyce, Elsa Jungkeit, Josephine Kiem, Allisondra Krol, Callahan Lacourciere, Alexa Legein, Olivia Lovendale, John Morosky, Emelia Munster, Grace Osborne, Mia Palmer, Ainsley Rinoski, Cameron Russell, Kevork Shegirian, Nicholas Sokolowski, Carli Teixeira, Magdalena Tooker, Ethan Trepanier, Bowen Turick, Kaylyn Vernon, Ivy Wilson, Charles Zelek.

HONORS

Grade 8:
Oliver Avelange, Shane Eastman-Grossel, Samantha Fiske, Bronwyn Kyle, Brenden Landry, Colette Marchant, Andrew Sicuranza, Madeline Supersano.

Grade 7:
Julia Clark, Anne-Marie Hinckley, Harrison Kleefeld, William Landon, Sebastian Lopez-Bravo, Ian Maeby, Daniela Marin Yanza, Quenten Patz, Tanner Snurkowski, Charlotte Spiegel, John Turick.

Grade 6:
Johanna Coker, Taiyo Gemme, Samuel Gilbert, Gavin Goulis, Skylar Graybill, Logan Landry, Matilda Miller, Eva Oulahan-Smith, Arthur Riccio, Collin Swaney, Brody Ziolkovski.