July 21, 2019

Death of Former Old Lyme Resident Brian Loper Announced, Celebration of Life Scheduled This Evening

Brain Loper

Brian David Loper, born October 9, 1955, passed away suddenly on Saturday, June 15, 2019.

A native of Port Jefferson, NY, Brian attended Union College in Schenectady, NY and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in civil engineering.  He was also a member of the Sigma Phi Fraternity.

Brian began his professional career employed by Schlumberger on an offshore oil rig in Louisiana.  Following this, in 1980, he relocated to the area of his choice, the shores of southeastern Connecticut, being hired by Stone and Webster, stationed at Millstone Nuclear Power Station in Waterford, CT.  Later employed by Bechtel Corporation and other contractors, Brian continued at this location for 24 years, being placed in charge of major construction projects of Units 2 and 3, until 2004.

Following, employed by Manafort, he assumed responsibilities for the next three years for coordinating, and safely decommissioning, including the demolition of the containment dome, at Connecticut Yankee Nuclear Power Plant in Haddam, CT, a complex project that was the first of its kind to be completed.

In 2007, an employment opportunity took Brian from his home in Old Lyme, to the Carolinas.  Hired by Shaw Group Inc., Brian rose to the level of Area Project Manager of Nuclear Island, on this multi-billion dollar, VC Summer job site in Jenkinsville, SC.  Brian took great pride and satisfaction in his work, such as, overseeing the assembly of one of the world’s largest cranes–a heavy lift derrick which stood approximately 560ft. tall–that was required for this highly complex project.   Brian was recognized for his vast abilities.  He was also known and respected by those who worked for and alongside him.

Brian had an innate ability to fix or build.  Much of this, he would tell you, stemmed from working on various projects in his grandparent’s, Carroll and Helen Loper’s, basement as a boy.  His grandfather, along with his grandfather’s brothers owned and operated a well-respected lumber yard, Loper Bothers, in Port Jefferson for more than 70 years.   This history, knowledge and confidence fueled Brian, as a family man, alongside his former wife Debbie of 32 years, through the design and construction of their beautiful home in Old Lyme.  Here, their sons grew, and family gathered.  Holidays, especially Christmas and Thanksgiving, were joyously spent on Flat Rock Hill Road, with great-grandparents, grandparents, parents, in-laws, nieces, nephews, friends and cherished pets.

Brian’s most favorite times were spent on the sidelines, proudly watching his three sons playing sports- baseball, soccer, and fencing- and also time spent with family and friends on Long Island Sound, either on the beaches or on the water, boating.  Fishing was forever a chosen pastime.  Brian also had wonderful memories of summers at West Meadow Beach on Long Island, with family at the beach cottage that was soundly built by his grandfather.  Brian was a voracious reader; a joy gifted to him by his dearly beloved grandmother.  Also being sports enthusiasts, the NY Yankees and NY Giants were always favorites for Brian and his sons Dylan, Jared and Sean.

Brian is survived by his parents, Robert and Ann Loper of Saint Petersburg, FL, his three loving sons, Dylan C. Loper of Columbia, SC, Jared C. Loper and Sean R. Loper both of Waterford, CT, his brother Barry Loper, and wife Catherine, of Saint Petersburg, FL.  Also, his wife of three years, Donna Kirkegard Loper of Columbia, SC, and his former wife Deborah M. Loper of Old Lyme, CT

The big hugs, laughter and goodness of Brian will be forever cherished by those most dear to him.

Please join us in celebrating Brian’s life, at Town Woods Fields, at the Lymes’ Senior Center, 26 Town Woods Rd, Old Lyme, CT, from 6 to 9 p.m. on Friday, July 12, 2019.

Donations may be made to a charity of your choice, in Brian’s memory, with deepest thanks.

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Death of Milton N. Allen of Old Lyme Announced

The death of Milton N. Allen, of Old Lyme, has been announced.  Mr. Allen passed away May 29, 2019, at Essex Meadows.

A Memorial Service will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 24, 2019, at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, 2 Ferry Rd., Old Lyme, CT 06371.

A full obituary will be published in the coming days.

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Death of Paul Nelson Announced

Paul Howard Nelson, 1933-2019

Paul Howard Nelson, Navy flight navigator, salesman, business leader, photographer, author, and lecturer passed away on May 24th at the age of 86 in Old Lyme, CT. He was surrounded by his children and his companion.

He began his career in 1953 by enlisting in the Navy where he served on the aircraft carrier the USS Coral Sea during the Korean War. In 1957, he graduated from St. John’s University with a BA in Liberal Arts. For over four decades he worked his way up in textile sales.  At J.P. Stevens, he started as a sales associate and rose to become the head of institutional sales. He later ran The Bibb Company, before becoming a textile broker, working with global textile giants such as Frette. He was a true salesman who became a great manager. He authored several textbooks on management for his industry. Throughout his life, he maintained a love for aviation and photography.  He combined the two by shooting cover photos for aviation magazines.

After retirement, he turned his focus to a longtime hobby, Ragtime and Jazz music. He lectured extensively on the historical and cultural significance of this music.

Born in Brooklyn, New York, Mr. Nelson grew up in Far Rockaway, Queens, attending St. Francis De Sales primary school and then St. John’s Preparatory School.

Mr. Nelson believed in family first, specifically children first. He was predeceased by his loving wife of 48 years, Maureen T. Nelson (Gilbride).  He is survived by four children Gina Wilcox (Brady) of Old Lyme, CT; Laura Nelson (Jim Kremens) of Westport, CT; Paul F. Nelson (Julie) of Wilmette, IL; and Andrew Nelson (Meghan) of Cincinnati, OH as well as his brother Peter Nelson of Far Rockaway, Queens.  A self-described “Indoor Grandpa,” he is also survived by eight adoring grandchildren; Charles Kremens, Sarah Nelson, Mary Nelson, Annabelle Kremens, Daphne Nelson, Ava Gray Wilcox, Tess Nelson, and John Nelson. Finally, he was honored to be the loving companion to Irene Stella.

A wake will be held at Christ the King Church in Old Lyme, CT on Friday, May 31 between 5 – 7 pm. A mass of Christian burial will be held the following day on Saturday, June 1st at 2 pm in the same location.

In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be made to The Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme, CT or the Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital “Closer to Free” fund in New Haven, CT.

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Death Announced of Veteran, Former Old Lyme Citizen of Year, James G. ‘Tim’ Keenan

This photo taken on Patriots Day, September 11, 2015 includes James G. (Tim) Keenan seated at right of the middle row. Also in the photo are WWII veterans (from left to right) are (front row) Norman Emerson, Thomas Clements and Francis Fetrow; (second row) George King, George Hunt, and Edmund Wolcott (standing); and (third row: Janet Littlefield, James Noyes and Page Wodell.

The death of James G. ‘Tim’ Keenan on May 11, 2019 has been announced. A familiar figure at veteran’s events in Old Lyme, Mr. Keenan was also a former Old Lyme Citizen of the Year.  His obituary can be found at this link.

Calling hours will be held on Friday, May 17, from 5 until 7 p.m. at Fulton-Theroux Funeral Home, 13 Beckwith Ln., Old Lyme, CT 06371. A graveside service will take place Saturday, May 18, 2019 at 12:30 p.m. at Duck River Cemetery, Old Lyme. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Old Lyme Ambulance Association, 14 Cross Ln., Old Lyme, CT 06371, or the Old Lyme Chapter of the American Legion, 52 Lyme St., Old Lyme, CT 06371.

Visit www.fultontherouxoldlyme.com for photos, tributes, directions, and more service information.

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Death of Doreen Meyer Announced; Celebration of Life to be Held in Lyme, May 11

Doreen Meyer

Doreen Meyer, age 86, passed away peacefully April 4, 2019 at home after a short illness with her family by her side. She was born in 1932 in Cambridge, Massachusetts to Stanley and Helen Arnold. She married her true love Robert Charles Meyer, in June 21, 1953 and they shared 66 wonderful years together.

She graduated from the prestigious Katherine Gibbs School in Newark, NJ. Doreen was a devoted wife and mother who took pride in providing a warm and nurturing home every day of the year for her family. She was accomplished at sewing, knitting, rug hooking, cooking and baking, as well being extremely knowledgeable about the history, repair and restoration of antiques. Her hands and feet were rarely still and not a Sunday went by without a “made-from-scratch” dessert for her beloved husband. Few could keep up with her abundance of energy.

For many years Doreen worked at Coffee’s Country Market, Old Lyme, where she greeted everyone with her beautiful smile. All who knew her were attracted her warm, kind and sweet personality.

Doreen will be forever remembered by her husband, Robert; their daughters, Kim Morgan and Heidi Meyer; sister and brother-in-law, Gail and Bud Nemec; six grandchildren, Devon Rust, Lindsey Morgan, Meredith Chapman, Ryan Meyer, Madeleine Meyer Schumacher, Olivia Meyer Schumacher; four great-grandchildren, Levi Morgan, Wyatt Rust, Andy Rust and Tristan Meyer as well as many nieces, nephews and friends. Doreen was predeceased by her son, Keith Meyer and sister, Audrey Lindquist. All whom she loved and touched deeply. She will be greatly missed by all who were fortunate to know her.

Forever in our hearts.

Please join us for a Celebration of Life on Saturday, May 11, at 1 p.m., 8 Oak Tree Lane, Lyme to remember Doreen.

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Death Announced of Candy Green; Former Innkeeper of Old Lyme Inn, Owner of ‘Rooster Hall’

Candy Green
Photo by Malcolm Denemark/FLORIDA TODAY and published with permission of the Green family.

The death has been announced of the former innkeeper and general manager of the Old Lyme Inn, Catherine (Candy) Clifford Green. Her obituary published by Ammen Family Funeral and Cremation Care  and on LymeLine.com with their permission, reads as follows:

“Catherine (Candy) Clifford Green, was a force of nature. She was a lifelong lover of the arts and an active volunteer committed to public service. On Martin Luther King, Jr. Day in 2016, she was first diagnosed with ovarian cancer, but she never let the disease get the better of her. If her time was going to be limited, she wanted to be sure it was devoted to the things she felt were important – her family, civil rights and the environment.

Two years after her first diagnosis, she was told that the cancer had returned, but she never gave up on anything, and always put up a fight, a legacy she leaves with us. Her battle with ovarian cancer was featured in the October 25, 2018, edition of Florida Today. https://www.floridatoday.com/story/life/2018/10/23/ovarian-cancer-survivor-advocates-sharing-dont-keep-secret/1484361002/

Candy died February 28, 2019, in Melbourne, FL. She was 74.

“Her laughter is what I will miss the most about my mom,” her daughter, Temple Diehl Mecchella, a West Melbourne resident said. “Her contagious laugh could echo through our noise and make you drop everything to find out what you were missing. Her smile would make your heart melt. She had a true natural beauty, with those electric blue eyes.”

She was born on Halloween in South Bend, IN, to Carol (Kidd) and Temple Clifford, both of whom predeceased her.

Along with her daughter, Temple, she is survived by her adored grandchildren Tyler and Rylie Grace of West Melbourne, FL, her sister Julie Clifford (John Hanson), of Alexandria, VA, stepson Josh Green of New York City and her husband Keith Green. Her cousin Madelyn Young and a number of devoted friends provided invaluable support during her illness.

Candy also lived in Atlanta, GA and New York, NY, where she had an award-winning 20-year career in advertising and public relations, which culminated as vice-president for broadcast and music production at Ogilvy and Mather.

She lived in an historic home in Old Lyme, CT, which was later converted to Rooster Hall Bed and Breakfast. She was also innkeeper and general manager of the Old Lyme Inn. She opened them to countless charitable events. Her annual birthday party on Halloween initiated an annual event that children from all over Old Lyme look forward to attending. This spectacular evening ended in a casserole competition judged by local food writers. The event would culminate with trophies for best costume, but somehow she always won “Best Candy.”

Candy was particularly involved with the Child and Family Agency of New London, CT, hosting and chairing the very successful Child and Family Garden Tour. She was named Volunteer of the Year in 2005. She also raised funds for the Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts.

When she moved to West Melbourne in 2011, she continued her volunteer and community betterment activities, serving as a docent and volunteer at the Foosaner Art Museum, vice president and board member of the Space Coast Progressive Alliance, where she was active in planning many programs, and a member of the Brevard County Chapter of the Brandeis National Committee.

Memorial donations may be made to the American Cancer SocietyChild and Family Agency of New London, CT, theBrandeis National Committee, the Space Coast Progressive Alliance or the Foosaner Art Museum.

Celebrations of Candy’s life will be held in Melbourne and Old Lyme.” We will provide details of the latter as soon as they are available.

 

 

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Death of Old Lyme High School Graduate, Captain Richard John Losea (USCG, Ret.), Announced

Captain Richard John Losea (USCG, Ret.)

Captain Richard John Losea (USCG, Ret.), 71, passed away the day after Memorial Day on May 29, 2018.

Born in Brooklyn, NY, he was the son of the late Howard and Anne Losea.  After graduating from Old Lyme High School, Richard received a Bachelor of Science degree from the Coast Guard Academy in New London, CT, a  Master of Science-Financial Management degree from the Navy Post Graduate School in Monterey, CA, a Master of Arts-International Relations at Salve Regina University in Newport, RI and also graduated from the Naval War College in Newport, RI.

He retired from the United States Coast Guard as a Captain after 26 ½ years of service. He also retired from the Department of Defense Joint Staff after 18 ½ years of service. He was a veteran of the Vietnam War.  Richard was the Commander of the Patrol Boat USCG Point Arena, the Pay and Personnel Center, and the Group Milwaukee.

The late Captain Richard John Losea (USCG, Ret.) and his wife, Patricia, who survives him, on their wedding day.

He also served on the Board of Chesapeake Integrated Behavior Services and the Board at ABNB Federal Credit Union.

Richard was predeceased by Howard Losea and Anne Losea, formerly of Old Lyme.  Left to cherish Richard’s memory: his wife, Patricia Mary Losea and son, Thomas E. Losea of Chesapeake VA; sister, Diane Losea Roeder and her husband, Bill, of Northampton, MA;  brother, Steven Losea of Phoenix, AZ, and niece, Amanda Roeder of Beverly, MA.  

Richard is survived by his aunt, Florence Linskey, and cousins John, Matthew, Steven, Peter and Andrew Linskey, Joan Doherty and Florence Hartman.  He will be dearly missed by his wife Patricia’s niece Dominique Finch Weber of Montz, Louisiana and her family.

Richard’s funeral service was held on Saturday, June 2, 2018, followed by interment with military honors at Chesapeake Memorial Gardens In Chesapeake Virginia.

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Death Announced of Anthony V. Lynch III

Anthony V Lynch III

Anthony V. Lynch, III, age 94, passed away peacefully on June 8, 2018 in Winston-Salem, NC.  Known as Tony by friends and family, he was predeceased by his beloved wife Jane (Wischmeyer) Lynch and his parents, Anthony V. Lynch, Jr. and Gertrude (Momand) Lynch of Greenwich, CT.  He leaves behind a sister, Keiron Lynch Jesup of Dorset, VT; two sons, Anthony V. Lynch, IV of Lyme, CT and Keiron G. Lynch, II of Melvin Village, NH; three step-daughters, Emily A. Arents of Arcata, CA, Dorothy (Arents) Caudill of Winston-Salem, NC, and Gina Arents of Nottingham, MD.  Tony had seven grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren, and five great-great grandchildren.

Tony was born and raised in Greenwich, CT.  He attended Greenwich Country Day School and Phillips Academy Andover, where he was a friend and classmate of future President George H.W. Bush.  Tony then went on to Princeton University.  His time at Princeton (Class of 1945) was interrupted by World War II.  At age 18 he volunteered to serve as a U.S. Navy pilot, flying combat missions in Grumman TBF Avenger torpedo bomber fighters and the like from aircraft carriers in the Pacific.  Tony returned from the war and, in 1947, finished his college education at Princeton and began his career as a stockbroker on Wall Street.  He married the love of his life, Jane, in 1953 and raised his family in Mt. Kisco, NY, and then Southport and Greenwich, CT.  He and Jane retired in 1982 to Shushan, NY and in 1991 moved to warmer climes in Clemmons, NC.

Tony was known for his warm and welcoming smile, his dry wit and keen intellect right up to the end of his life.  He had a real passion for the outdoors as a hiker, sailor, RV’er, and gardener.  He loved people, wanting to hear their stories before telling his own.  He was a Boy Scout leader with his sons and, later in life, volunteered at several state parks in the far west doing whatever was needed – from docent work to grounds keeping.  He was dedicated to his family and had a strong moral compass which he did his level best to pass on to those he loved.

We are especially grateful to the compassionate staff at Arbor Acres Assisted Living in Winston-Salem for the care and friendship they provided in the final years of his life.

A memorial service celebrating Tony’s life will be held for family and friends at St. Ann’s Episcopal Church, Old Lyme, CT on August 11th at 11:00 AM.  His ashes will be interred next to his beloved Jane’s in St. Ann’s Memorial Garden.  In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Nature Conservancy, Habitat for Humanity, or to the charity of your choice.

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Death of Diana Atwood Johnson Announced; Arts & Open Space Advocate, Avid Birder & Photographer, Philanthropist

Diana Atwood Johnson

Diana Atwood Johnson surrendered peacefully on January 1, 2018 to a rare progressive autoimmune disease that attacked her lungs in 2013. She was the daughter of Edwin Havens Atwood and Barbara Field Atwood (both deceased) and is survived by her stepmother of 50 years, Eileen Atwood, all of Rochester, NY.  Her two brothers, Peter and Ted Atwood, predeceased her. Born in Rochester, New York in 1946, she spent 4 years at Northfield School for Girls and received a BA from Skidmore College in 1976.

Diana founded the Old Lyme Inn in 1976 and built it over 25 years into a nationally renowned restaurant and country inn. At the same time she became involved in her community, helping found Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts, the Connecticut River Museum, Mystic Coast & Country Travel & Leisure Council, the Maritime Bank and Trust and the Bank of Southeastern Connecticut. She also served on the Board of Inncom International, a manufacturer of advanced guest room controls, which was sold to Honeywell in 2012.

Diana was passionate about land protection and chaired the Town of Old Lyme’s Open Space Commission for almost 20 years. In addition, she was appointed to the Connecticut State Natural Heritage, Open Space and Watershed Land Acquisition Review Board in 1997 and spent 19 years as its Chair. Diana served on the board of The Nature Conservancy and the Trust for Public Land. Diana was the first person to donate a scenic easement to the State of Connecticut when the Gateway Commission was established in 1973. She was the Chairman of the Board of the Connecticut River Museum, a board member of the Florence Griswold Museum, the Old Lyme Educational Foundation, the Connecticut Restaurant Association and an advisor to the Madry Temple’s Building Committee (New London, CT). She has provided philanthropic advice to all the organizations with which she was involved. As a legacy, she has established funds at the Community Foundation of Eastern Connecticut to provide scholarships for minorities from New London County with interests in the environment and the arts. She has also established an endowment fund for the 1817 Sill House and a scholarship fund for minorities at Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts.

Diana received notable recognition for her professionalism and community service. In 1996 she received the Industry Image award from the Connecticut Restaurant Association. In 1999 Diana received the Distinguished Advocate for the Arts award from the State of Connecticut. In 2012 she was named citizen of the Year in Old Lyme. In 2014 she was honored with the Community Service award from Northfield School for Girls. In 2015 she received the Dave Engelman Volunteer Benchmark Award from Connecticut Audubon and an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from the University of New Haven.

Birds provided much respite during Diana’s health challenges. She became an exceptional nature photographer and had several exhibitions around New London County of her bird photographs.  “Swallow Tales,” her privately published book, presents her photographs of the swallow phenomena on the Connecticut River.  On her birthday in November 2017, the CT Land Conservation Council renamed its amateur photographer photo contest in her honor.

Diana is survived by her nieces, Nan Atwood Stone and Barbara Atwood Cobb and her nephew, Peter Moore Atwood II and their children; her stepson and his wife, Scott and Shelley Johnson and their children Max and Alex Johnson whom she considered her grandsons; Spencer McFadden Hoge, whom she also considered a grandson and his mother Cynthia McFadden along with many dear friends including Luanne Rice, Jane Ghazarossian, Jack Madry, Sarah Blair, Mary Ann Besier, Becky McAdams, Andy Griswold, Mary Jo Nosal,  Teri Lewis and David Pease.

Diana was a direct descendant of many of the early settlers of colonial New England, including the Seldens of Lyme, the Atwoods of Plymouth and Chatham, MA, the Moores of New Hampshire and the Ellwangers of Germany and then Rochester, NY where she was born. Some of her Selden ancestors, who came to Lyme in the late 1600’s, went west along the Erie Canal in the 1800’s thinking it was too crowded in Connecticut!

There will be a memorial service at the Madry Temple Church in New London at a later date in the spring. Donations in Diana’s memory may be made to the Pastor’s Discretionary Fund at the Madry Temple Church, 25 Manwaring Street, New London, CT 06320.

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Death of Barbara (Seim) Hill Announced

Barbara (Seim) Hill, Sept. 7, 1925 – Dec. 1, 2017

Barbara (Siem) Hill

Barbara (Seim) Hill, 92, passed away peacefully at home, Bay Village, Sarasota, Florida on December 1, 2017. She was born in Bridgeport, CT September 7, 1925, daughter of Harry E. and Vera (Bertilson) Seim. She obtained her nursing degree from Simmons College. Her beloved husband of 64 years, Nicholas S. Hill IV, predeceased her in 2012.  She retired from a nursing career which culminated in 16 years as Supervisor of the Visiting Nurses Association in Old Saybrook. She resided in Old Lyme for 34 years, where she raised her six children, then Old Saybrook for 31 years, before moving to Sarasota, Florida.

Barbara will be remembered for her sweet kindness, her brightness of spirit and her determination to make the world around her a better place, which she passed on to her children and everyone she met. She saw the positive in every situation. “She was the best mother and grandmother in the world” and she will be dearly missed.

She is survived by her children: Pamela Vernon of Quechee, Vermont; Nicholas S. Hill V (Sophia) of Sherborn, MA; Penny Hill (Larry Wild) of Sarasota, FL; Wendolyn Hill (Richard Sutton) of Lyme, CT; Melinda Hill (Mark Yuknat) of Haddam, CT; and Jeffrey Hill (Sherry) of Old Saybrook, CT.  She is also survived by 9 grandchildren: Kayt and Colin Vernon, Kyra and Alyssa Hill, Hester and Isabel Sutton, Alex Yuknat, Bethany Benak and Samantha Hill; and four great-grandchildren; and her best friend, Ann Daum.

There will be a private service.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in her memory to Visiting Nurses Southeastern CT: VNASC, 403 N Frontage Road, Waterford, CT 06385or Planned Parenthood of Southwest Florida, 736 Central Avenue, Sarasota, Fl 34236.

Online Guest book located at www.wiegandbrothers.com

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Obituary: Death of Stanislaus (Stan) Bury Coxe Announced; Service Nov. 4

See how easy it is to be a man

Stanislaus Bury Coxe (Stan) April 8, 1971 – September 26, 2017.

Beloved father, husband, son, brother, friend.

Chef, craftsman, fisherman, farmer, gearhead.

Share our joy and sorrow, November 4, 2017.

St. Joseph Cemetery, Willimantic, CT, 10 a.m.

Abbeys Cremation Service, 800-890-9000.

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Death of Popular, Former LOL Middle School Teacher Announced

Richard LaVecchia. Photo courtesy of Potter Funeral Home, Willimantic.

Richard “Rich” LaVecchia, known affectionately to his students as “Mr. L,” passed away on Saturday, Aug. 12, of brain cancer.  Mr. LaVecchia was an immensely popular sixth grade science teacher at Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School for more than 40 years.  As his obituary states, “He engaged his students with hands-on experiments and interactive lessons that inspired many to go on in the field or, at least, return to say “hi” and share a desk-drawer snack.”

Today, we have heard nothing but fond memories of Mr. LaVecchia and the highest praise for his teaching and interpersonal skills from colleagues, Region 18 parents and former students alike.

Thank you for your outstanding and inspiring service to so many students, Mr. L.  You will be sadly missed.

RIP.

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Obituary: Death of Matilda A. Colihan (Tillie) Announced

In this submitted photo, the late Tillie Colihan is seen tending her flowers.

Avid gardener, conservationist, seeker of solutions to make the world and our local communities better places, Tillie Colihan died peacefully in her Essex Meadows home on May 2, 2017.

Born May 20, 1920 in Mount Vernon, NY to William and Rowena Alston, Tillie attended Madeira School in Greenway, VA, and graduated from Pine Manor College, Chestnut Hill, MA in 1940.  She made lasting friendships with classmates and served as alumnae secretary for both schools.

Not wanting to be left behind after her brothers enlisted in the Armed Services, Tillie joined the Red Cross in December 1943. She was assigned to the 85th Division, stationed in northeastern Italy, and served until the war ended.  She was awarded a Medal of Freedom for “gallantry in the line of duty and devoted service while under enemy fire.” (While immensely proud of her medal, Tillie always insisted, with undue modesty, she was just serving donuts and coffee to the G.I.’s.)

Following the war, she became a receptionist at the Young & Rubicam advertising agency in New York City.  There, she met William J. Colihan, whom she married in May 1948. Tillie and Bill settled in Greenwich, CT, where they raised four children, Alston Colihan of Washington, D.C., Jane Colihan of Brooklyn, NY, William Colihan of New York, NY, and Abby Colihan of Montpelier, VT.  During these years, Tillie took up yoga and developed an interest in natural foods and alternative medicine.

In 1980, Tillie and Bill moved to a house – designed by Bill and her brother, Henry Alston – on the Connecticut River in Essex. Tillie spent springs and summers in her field, surrounded by bluebirds and wildflowers.  She enthusiastically organized the making of trough gardens for May Markets. Wanting to share nature’s beauty, Tillie regularly brought flowers from her garden to the Essex Meadows Medical Center – a practice she kept up for many years. During the winters she and her husband traveled in the U.S. and internationally. Bill died at Essex Meadows Medical Center in July 1994.

In 1998, Tillie moved to an apartment in Essex Meadows.  Hours that she had spent in her garden she now spent feeding birds and keeping up with all things happening in the world.  In recent years she has enjoyed watching her four rarely-disciplined grandchildren, Dan, Jim, Dana, and Molly, turn out fine.

As she wished, there will be a small memorial service later this summer.

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Obituary: Death Announced of Walter Kaylin, Former 52-Year Resident of Old Lyme

Walter Kaylin 06.28.1921 – 02.15.2017

Walter Kaylin, 95, died peacefully on February 15 at Apple Rehab in Guilford, Ct., after a long period of declining health. His two daughters were by his side.

Walter was born in New York City on June 28, 1921 to Rose and Alexander Kaylin. He grew up on the Grand Concourse in the Bronx and graduated from Dewitt Clinton High School, then the College of William and Mary in Virginia.

He enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1942 and served in the Signal Corps during World War II. Walter’s first love was writing: He was anthologized by the Saturday Evening Post and worked for many years at Magazine Management, writing adventure stories for pulp magazines in a stable of writers that included Mario Puzo, Joseph Heller and Alex Austin. He wrote two novels, Another Time, Another Woman and The Power Forward. Walter enjoyed a late-in-life resurgence of his cult popularity with the 2013 publication of two collections featuring his stories: Weasels Ripped My Flesh and He-Men, Bag Men and Nymphos.

Walter was an avid sports fan since his days of visiting Yankee Stadium as a boy, once sending a pep-talk letter to a slumping Lou Gehrig, who sent a note of thanks in return. Years later, he found another hero in Muhammad Ali from the time he was Cassius Clay, not only for his prowess in the boxing ring but for his role in the Civil Rights Movement and his resistance to the Vietnam War. Walter expressed his own staunch opposition to the war in frequent, impassioned, well-informed letters to the editor of the local paper at a time when he was all but a lone voice.

He was a jazz enthusiast and a record collector; at his beachfront home of 52 years in Old Lyme, Ct., he played the piano at least an hour a day before enjoying a cocktail with his wife, Peggy, while gazing out at the waves and invariably remarking, “It doesn’t get any better than this.” He continued to play jazz piano at Apple Rehab, to the delight of his fellow residents, even when his right hand was contorted by arthritis.

Walter was predeceased by Peggy, both parents and his brother, Edward. He is survived by his two daughters, Jennifer Kaylin (Randall Beach), a writer in the communications office of the Yale School of Public Health; Lucy Kaylin (Kimball Higgs), editor of O, The Oprah Magazine; and four grandchildren: Natalie Beach, Charlotte Beach, Sophie Higgs and Owen Higgs.

Walter Kaylin was a charismatic, sharp, devoted, delightful husband, father, grandfather and friend–a man of boundless curiosity, searching intellect and deep social conscience. His family, who will carry him in their hearts forever, are grateful to the staff at Apple Rehab for their compassionate care. A memorial service will be held at a later date. Donations in Walter’s memory may be made to Doctors Without Borders or the ACLU.

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Obituary: Death of Margaret Amy Hoffman (Peggy) Announced

Margaret Amy Hoffman

Margaret Amy Hoffman (Peggy), 95, died peacefully on January 31 in Peterborough, NH after a long period of declining health. 

She was born in Spring Lake, New Jersey on August 24, 1921 to Everard C. Stokes and Phyllis M. (Beavis) Stokes, who had emigrated from England in 1919.  Her father published three books of poetry and was vice president of the Church Fire Insurance Corporation based in New York, which provided insurance to Episcopal churches. Margaret grew up in the coastal town of Sea Girt, NJ graduating from Manasquan High School in 1939, where she had played basketball and tennis. Following a preparatory year at St. Mary’s School in Peekskill, NY she entered Radcliffe College as a chemistry major where she met her husband John L Hoffman, an editor of the Harvard Lampoon and midshipman with the USNR. He was the son of artists Harry and Beatrice Hoffman of Old Lyme, CT. Margaret and Jack went on to have five children, settling first in Old Lyme, CT and then Winchester, MA, before retiring to Amherst, NH in 1984.  As children arrived, her chemistry training gravitated towards kitchen cuisine and her interests shifted to child psychology and sociology. She had always been a champion of the underdog and an advocate for the less fortunate. In midlife she completed a BS in psychology at Northeastern University in 1968 followed by a MSW at Simmons College in 1973.  She served as a clinical instructor at the Boston College Graduate School of Social Work, was employed as a medical social worker at the Winchester Hospital in MA and then for the rest of her career at Kennedy Memorial Hospital for Children in Boston. There she provided psychosocial assessments of children with a broad spectrum of problems including neurological, emotional, behavioral and developmental issues. She also provided individual and family therapy and was a group leader for the Rehabilitation Unit.

While living in Old Lyme, CT she had been a regular at the Old Lyme Beach Club during the 1940s and 50s. She and her husband were benefactors of the Florence Griswold Museum and the Old Lyme Land Trust, providing the first main portion of the riparian woodland that was to become the Hoffman-Matthiessen-Degerenday Preserve along Sill Lane.               

Following retirement and the move to Amherst, NH she pursued the creative interests she hadn’t had time for while working and raising a family.  She took a variety of art classes and worked hard at developing her natural talent.  She became a skilled artist, working in watercolor, oils, and pastel, and produced beautiful work, mainly flower studies and portraits.  She also took piano lessons and became an excellent pianist, although she was too shy to play in front of people.            

For several years she volunteered for the Friends of the Amherst Town Library and FISH, a group that provides rides to medical appointments.         

Margaret was an avid reader, library patron, and a gardener who thrived on being out in the sunshine maintaining her lovely flower gardens.  She loved dogs and had a number of them over the years.  Earlier in her life she enjoyed horseback riding.  She was adept with a sewing machine and made most of her own dresses (all the while grumbling about what a waste of time sewing was).  She was a devoted mother who frequently said that her greatest joy in life was her children.          

Her beloved husband Jack, a Harvard social anthropologist, died in 1992 after nearly 50 years of marriage.  In the years following his death, she took several trips abroad, traveling to England, France, Spain, and Russia with her sister Mary or via Elderhostel.  In 2002, while attending the Unitarian church in Wilton, she met John Voss of Hollis, NH.  They spent a happy five years in each other’s company until his death in early 2008.  Margaret then moved with her dog Cedric to the RiverMead retirement community in Peterborough NH, where she lived until the time of her death.      

She was predeceased by a son, John L. Hoffman, Jr. in 1957, by both parents, her sister Mary Horn, and her beloved West Highland white terrier, Cedric.  She is survived by her sister Beatrice Miles, her devoted children, David Hoffman and his wife Suzanne of Bivalve, MD and Old Lyme, CT; Stephen Hoffman of Alexandria, VA; Thomas Hoffman and his wife Alexis of Anchorage, AK; and Elizabeth Hoffman and her partner Anthony Iovino of Putney, VT.  She is also survived by her four grandchildren, Molly and husband Mike, Alex and wife Amanda, Michael and wife Cheryl, and James; three great-grandchildren, Sophie, Oliver, and Madelyn; her sister Beatrice Miles, and seven nieces and nephews.           

Margaret was smart, funny, artistic, empathetic, insightful, and generous.  She will be greatly missed.     

Her family would like to thank the staff at RiverMead for their unfailingly patient and loving care.  

She was buried at the Duck River Cemetery in Old Lyme, CT, with arrangements through the Jellison Funeral Home of Peterborough, NH.  A family memorial service will be held at a later date. Donations in Margaret’s memory may be made to Westie Rescue of New England, 10 South Washington Street, Norton MA 02766 www.westierescuene.com or your local humane society.   

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Death of Andrew Pfeiffer Announced

Andrew Pfeiffer of Old Lyme, Conn., died at home on November 19th with his family at his side.

He was born in 1917 in Port Jefferson, N.Y.  At a young age he excelled in music, and was sent to study piano under Leopold Stokowski at the New York School of Music.  He then attended the Ethical Culture School and Fieldston during his teens and graduated from Wells High School in Maine at the age of 16, where he developed his life-long affinity for coastal living in the family cottage in Ogunquit.

After graduation, Andrew came to Old Lyme and worked as a camp counselor at McCulloch’s “Camp Aladdin”, on Whippoorwill Road.  His first career job was as a wood carver and touring puppeteer for America’s Puppet Master – Tony Sarg.  He later took his carving and woodworking skills to local furniture maker, Stanley Davis, whose factory was on Mill Lane in Old Lyme.   

He always had a keen and inventive mind.  He possessed the rare characteristic of genius, coupled with tremendous dexterity — a mix of science and ingenuity that allowed him not only to determine the issue, but also to design and build tools to implement the solutions. His accomplishments were achieved with only a high school education.

During the early stages of WWII, Andrew worked in the aero-technology industry for Sikorsky helping in the production of Connecticut’s fighter plane the “Corsair” and later aided in the development of helicopters.  He then took his skill to the Manhattan Project with Westinghouse in Bloomfield, New Jersey.  There, he worked directly with a new metal known as Uranium, or as the machinists called it, “Tubealloy”.  It had strange properties that made it difficult with which to work.  It caught fire, galled during machining, and required special techniques to handle during the manufacturing process.   In the lab, Andrew worked on many of those difficulties, as well as several experimental projects associated with x-ray and electrolysis.  At the end of the war, while offered a research lab opportunity, Andrew chose instead to settle back in Old Lyme, build his home, and raise a family. 

Andrew married Marianne Goetze, whom he met at the McCulloch farm. They were married for 74 years.  Her family had emigrated from Germany in 1934. Her father was a professor of Babylonian and Near Eastern Studies at Marburg University and assumed a position at Yale on his escape from Nazi Germany.   Andrew and Marianne built their house and family farm on Whippoorwill Road and raised three children.  Andrew built a shop and laboratory attached to the house.  Pfeiffer Research Instruments continued designing specialized equipment for various research laboratories and academic institutions.  Andrew held several patents in diverse fields of medical research and communications.  Several times in his career, Andrew and Marianne took on an artistic and creative sideline, designing and producing various kinds of jewelry.  Pfeiffer Cloisonné and Silver Work reached many corners of the world and has even been owned by some world leaders.   

Working for himself at his home and shop permitted Andrew to spend valuable time with his family.  He and Marianne formed a genuine partnership.  Together they raised two daughters and a son.  Andy and his wife bestowed to them the love of music, art, natural studies, academics, engineering and mechanics, as well as a competitive spirit.   They lived and modeled a life of integrity and honor, emphasizing the importance of community service and making the world a better place. 

During his life in Old Lyme, Andrew served as a high school class tutor in Chemistry and Physics, was on the Board of Education, served in several capacities in Civil Defense, was a member of the American Amateur Radio League, the Archaeological Society of Southeastern Connecticut, and most importantly – a friend to many.

Andrew is survived by his wife Marianne;  son Ned Pfeiffer and wife Marga of Old Lyme; daughter Dianne Merrill of San Rafael, California; and three grandchildren  – Aubris and Dane Pfeiffer of Old Lyme; and Trevor Page of San Francisco, California.  He was predeceased by his daughter Merrily Page of San Francisco, California and beloved brother John E. Pfeiffer of New Hope, Pennsylvania.   Andrew will be missed but not forgotten.

At Andrew’s request, no services will be held. The family extends its grateful thanks to the staff and volunteers of Hospice and Palliative Care at Middlesex Hospital.

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Death of Eleanor Emery Harper of Lyme Announced

Eleanor Emery Harper

Eleanor Emery Harper

Eleanor Emery Harper, born on July 11, 1919, passed away peacefully on July 19, 2016 with her loving family around her. She and her late husband were long time residents of Lyme.

Raised in Denver with her four siblings, Eleanor graduated from the Kent School For Girls where she developed a strong interest in the arts, specifically drama, singing and literature. She went on to Bryn Mawr College and earned a BA in English. Following graduation, she studied drama at The New School in New York City, supporting herself with odd jobs. She worked in the product placement department at an advertising agency, at MGM Studios as a story analyst, and as an assistant at a reducing salon. At night, she pursued her other great love, singing, performing in nightclubs. In 1947 she married Paul C. Harper, Jr., with whom she had six children, including two sets of twins. They remained devoted partners until his passing in 2013.

The obligatory summary of Eleanor’s life doesn’t nearly capture the warmth, humor, iron will, intelligence and devotion that her family and friends had the privilege to experience. A loving mother and wife, she dedicated herself to the task of raising her children and creating a home built on love and connection. She encouraged creativity, sensitivity, achievement and was her family’s most ardent cheerleader. And through the ups and downs of domestic life, she sang. She sang when laboring over yet another meal for eight. She sang when changing myriad diapers. She sang in church. She sang when she tucked the children in at night. And she sang, most joyously, with her beloved daughters, all of whom inherited her angelic voice.

When her children left home, Eleanor turned her extraordinary energies to writing, producing three memoirs. “Love Around Us” chronicled her early life in Denver, still very much a frontier town. In “Love Between Us” she told of a budding romance with a young advertising executive and Yale graduate who became her husband of 67 years. “Love Among Us” recalled early motherhood, a perilous but rewarding journey of budget stretching and cramped Chicago apartments.

To her three sons and three daughters, to her fourteen grandchildren, to her five great grandchildren, she gave the gifts of empathy, humanity, humor, grace and, most of all, love. She wrote, “When the children were little, I had thought love was a kind of gentle mist that floated around us, drifted between us, that could be summoned and focused by a hug, a cookie or a song. But now that they were older I felt love more as a force that drove through our differences and difficulties until they were settled and we could see how to move ahead. Not just a mist, but a powerful force, and I meant to keep it among us. Whatever my faults and failures, I meant it to last.”

Eleanor Emery Harper’s love remains the song in all of our hearts.

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Philip Scheffler, “60 Minutes” Executive Editor, Former Essex Resident, Died April 7

Philip Scheffler

Philip Scheffler

Philip Scheffler, CBS News’ first television street reporter, a documentary producer and the executive editor at 60 Minutes for many years, died April 7, 2016, in New York Presbyterian – Cornell Weill Medical Center. He was 85 and lived in Manhattan. Until recently he also spent much of his time in Essex, Conn., where he had a home for 40 years.

Scheffler retired from 60 Minutes in June of 2003 and had served as a consultant to CBS News up until a few years ago. He was a friend and mentor to Jeff Fager, executive producer of 60 Minutes. “Phil was a guiding force behind the success of 60 Minutes for more than two decades,” said Fager. “Don Hewitt often said he couldn’t have done it without him. He was a first-class journalist, an admirable human being, and a great friend to many of us. We will miss him very much.”

Scheffler was a reporter and producer for CBS News for the first half of his five-decade career. He became the senior producer at 60 Minutes in 1980, handling the day-to-day responsibilities – essentially the right hand of the broadcast’s executive producer Don Hewitt. Hewitt named him executive editor later. In this capacity, Scheffler had a direct hand in producing every 60 Minutes report broadcast from 1980 to 2003 – a period during which 60 Minutes was the number-one program in America five times.

Scheffler oversaw the reporting from the field and handled most of the producers’ journalistic issues, enabling Hewitt to focus almost exclusively on shaping the newsmagazine’s stories. When tempers flared in the screening room between Hewitt and one of his correspondents, such as Mike Wallace or Morley Safer, it was the professorial Scheffler, sporting a bow tie and close-cropped beard, who played referee.

Before his senior positions, Scheffler produced 60 Minutes stories over nine seasons for Wallace, Safer, Harry Reasoner and Dan Rather. His first story with Safer was “After Attica,” a look inside a maximum security prison in Colorado broadcast after the horrible riots in the New York prison in 1971.

Hewitt hired him in March of 1951 as a copy boy for “Douglas Edwards with the News,” which Hewitt directed and produced. Debuting in May 1948, that broadcast was the first network television news program, and in 1951, Scheffler became its first street reporter.

His first field assignment was to ask people whether they thought Gen. Dwight Eisenhower should enter politics and run for the Republican presidential nomination. But reporting was only one of the hats worn by early television news people like Scheffler. Out of necessity, he also invented a makeshift news teleprompter.

Hewitt wanted his anchor, Edwards, to look at the camera instead of his script when reading the news, so he had Scheffler make cue cards. “My first job at CBS Television News,” recalls Scheffler, “was to hand print Douglas Edwards’ copy on two-by-three-foot cue cards. Then, when we were on the air, I would hold them up next to the camera lens and move them up a line at a time for Doug to read. My arms were always tired and sore, so I asked Don if the camera could move in closer. He put on a wide-angle lens and moved the camera to within 10 feet of Doug, and I started typing the copy using wide adding-machine paper and a huge-type typewriter. It was the first crude teleprompter, but I didn’t have the wit to develop it!” said Scheffler in 2001.

In 1953, Scheffler was drafted into the Army and served his two years. During this period, he convinced his superior officer that he could put the Army on television — as long as he could get a few weekends off to film the piece! The result was a feature series in weekly installments he helped produce and write for CBS in which a Korean War recruit was followed through basic training at New Jersey’s Fort Dix. Scheffler returned to CBS and continued working as writer, reporter and producer for the nightly network news and other regularly scheduled CBS News programs through the 1950s.

The news program, “Eyewitness,” was Scheffler’s next stop, where he served as associate producer and on-air reporter for the half-hour weekly from 1960 to 1963. He briefly served as an associate producer on “The CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite,” where he covered the Kennedy assassination, before joining the documentary unit in 1964. There, Scheffler became a producer of documentary and special news broadcasts, including “CBS Special Reports” and “CBS Reports.” He produced more than 100 of them, including: “After 10 Years: The Court and the Schools” (1964), on school integration; “CBS REPORTS: Robert F. Kennedy” (1967), on Sen. Kennedy and his political ambitions; and “The Cities” (1968), about the nation’s urban crisis.

Scheffler’s assignments took him to 47 states and to 50 foreign countries, including Vietnam. He traveled there for six assignments during the war; his output included three two-hour specials on American policy in Southeast Asia, “Where We Stand in Vietnam” (1967), “Where We Stand in Indochina” (1970), and “The Changing War in Indochina” (1971).

CBS News broadcasts that Scheffler worked on, especially 60 Minutes, have received the industry’s highest recognition, including the Peabody, DuPont and Emmy awards. In 1981, he received the Alumni Award for distinguished contributions to journalism from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, from which he received a master’s degree. As an adjunct professor, he once taught classes there as well.

Scheffler was born Sept. 16, 1930 in New York City and was graduated from the City College of New York. He is survived by his wife, Dr. Linda Weingarten Scheffler, a clinical psychologist, author and retired professor at Hunter College in New York City; his daughter, Ramsay Klaff, of Massachusetts; and a son, Adam, of Chicago.

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Marjorie L. (Faulkner) Meehan: 11/18/15

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June Froggatt: 11/18/15

Click to read full obituary.

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