August 14, 2022

‘The Farmers Market at Tiffany Farms’ is Open Today, New Addition This Year is ‘Community Outreach’ Tent

View of the Farmer’s Market at Tiffany Farms.

LYME — ‘The Farmers Market at Tiffany Farms’ in Lyme will open today from 9 a.m. through 12:30 p.m. with fresh farm produce, baked goods, seafood, maple syrup, and more on sale.

Jen Tiffany stands proudly in front of the 2020 Farmers Market that she and her husband Bill Hurtle will host again this summer at Tiffany Farms.

This Farmers Market, which evolved from the Lyme Farmers Market of yesteryear, is a perennially popular destination for both local and regional shoppers.

Jennifer Tiffany and her husband Bill Hurtle run the market and are excited this year to introduce “Community Service” and “Hospitality” tents.  

For the Community Outreach tent, Tiffany explains, “We will be compiling a list of approximately 20 different organizations and providing one group per week with the market venue as a form of outreach.”

She stresses, “The idea is to not promote sales of their product or enhance collection of donations. It’s quite simply to provide the selected group a platform giving them the opportunity to spread their cause — in other words, to say, “Here we are and this is what we are all about.”

The hospitality tent, Tiffany explains, will be a resting spot for those who just need to sit a spell, noting, “We had some very faithful, strong-willed but physically-challenged visitors attending the market last year and this tent will be out of respect for them.”

A view of the iconic Tiffany Farms where the Farmers Market will be held.

Tiffany notes, “All Department of Agriculture, Markets, Department of Health and CT Grown guidelines will apply.”  She aspires to the same look as [Lyme Farmers Market at] Ashlawn,” with the aim being to offer a “very classy ” market, focused on Connecticut-grown or-produced items such as dairy, beef, vegetables, herbs, jellies and syrups.

Aerial view of Tiffany farms showing where the Farmer’s Market will be located.

The list of full-time vendors this year includes:

  • Chatfield Hollow Farm

  • Dondero Orchards

  • Falls Brook Farm

  • Fat Stone Far

  • From the Farm

  • Maple Breeze Farm

  • Marna Roons

  • TALK Seafood

  • Tiffany Farms Pasture Raised Beef

  • Traveling Italian Chef

  • Upper Pond Farm

  • Wave Hill Breads

Guest Vendors include:

  • Confections by Toni-Marie
  • Mostly Nuts
  • Simply Sweet by Elana

CT Primary is Today, Polls Open in Lyme, Old Lyme 6am-8pm

LYME/OLD LYME — Connecticut’s Primary is being held tomorrow, Tuesday, Aug. 9. Only registered Democrats can vote in the Democratic Primary and registered Republicans in the Republican Primary. Unaffiliated and minor party voters may not vote in either Primary.

View a sample Democratic ballot for Lyme residents here.

View a sample Republican ballot for Lyme residents here.

View sample Democratic and Republican ballots for Old Lyme residents here.

IN-PERSON VOTING
For LYME Residents

For voters who prefer to vote in person, the polls at Lyme Town Hall will be open on Tuesday, Aug. 9, from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m.

For OLD LYME Residents

For voters who prefer to vote in person, the polls at the Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School gymnasium, 53 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, will be open on Tuesday, Aug. 9, from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m.

CANDIDATES ON THE REPUBLICAN BALLOT IN LYME & OLD LYME

UNITED STATES SENATOR: 
Themis Klarides, Madison, CT
Leora R. Levy, Greenwich, CT
Peter Lumaj, Fairfield, CT

SECRETARY OF THE STATE: 
Dominic Rapini, Branford, CT
Brock Weber, Wolcott, CT — NOW WITHDRAWN
Terrie E. Wood, Darien, CT

CANDIDATES ON THE DEMOCRATIC BALLOT IN LYME & OLD LYME

SECRETARY OF THE STATE:
Stephanie Thomas, Norwalk, CT
Maritza Bond, New Haven, CT

TREASURER: 
Erick Russell, New Haven, CT
Dita Bhargava, Greenwich, CT
Karen DuBois-Walton, New Haven, CT

INSTRUCTIONS FOR RETURNING ABSENTEE BALLOTS

To return your absentee ballot:

The official Ballot Box outside Lyme Town Hall. Photo courtesy of the Town of Lyme website.

For LYME Residents — three options

  • Walk into Lyme Town Hall and hand it to the Town Clerk before close of business on Aug. 8.
  • Mail it using the U.S. Postal Service. Ballots returned by mail must be received by the Town Clerk by 8 p.m. on Aug. 9.
  • Insert it in the Official Ballot Drop Box located on the edge of the sidewalk at Lyme Town Hall by 8 p.m. on Aug. 9. (See photo at left.)

Do not return your ballot via the mail slot in the door of Lyme Town Hall.

Note that the Official Ballot Drop Box is for completed ballots only.  No other material should be deposited in the drop box.  You should only deposit your ballot in the Town of Lyme drop box if you are a resident of Lyme.  Do not drop your ballot in the drop box of any other town.

Voters who have questions on absentee voting are welcome to contact the Lyme Town Clerk at 860-434-7733 during regular business hours.

The official Ballot Box outside Old Lyme Town Hall. Photo courtesy of the Old Lyme Selectman’s Office.

For OLD LYME Residents – three options

To return your absentee ballot:

  • Walk into Old Lyme Town Hall and hand it to the clerk at the front desk.
  • Mail it using the U.S. Postal Service. Ballots returned by mail must be received by the Town Clerk by 8 p.m. on Aug. 9.
  • Insert it in the Official Ballot Drop Box located in front of the Old Lyme Town Hall (see photo at right) by 8 p.m. on Aug. 9.

Do not return your ballot via the mail slot in the door of Old Lyme Town Hall.

Note that the Official Ballot Drop Box is for completed ballots only. No other material should be deposited in the drop box. You should only deposit your ballot in the Town of Old Lyme drop box if you are a voter of Old Lyme.  Do not drop your ballot in the drop box of any other town.

Voters who have questions on absentee voting are welcome to contact the Old Lyme Town Clerk at 860-434-1605 x 220 and x 221 during regular business hours.

Editor’s Note: The League of Women Voters is a non-partisan organization in existence for over 100 years.  All genders are welcome to join. For more information, visit: https://my.lwv.org/connecticut/lwv-southeastern-connecticut

Old Lyme Shopping Center Goes Up For Auction, Aug. 23-25

The Old Lyme Marketplace is scheduled to be sold via an online auction. File photo.

OLD LYME — The Old Lyme Shopping Center has been put up for sale via an online auction opening Aug. 23.

Ten-x.com’s NorthEast Private Client Group is handling the sale and the property details are listed as follows:

Primary Property Type: Retail
Gross Area (Sq. Ft.): 50,223
Year Built: 1964
Occupancy: 77%
Occupancy as of Date: 07/06/2022
Lot Size (Acres): 5.22
Parking Count: 154
Bidding opens Aug. 23 and closes Aug. 25, with the starting bid set at $1.5 million.
The property is being marketed per the agent’s description as, “Ideally located immediately off exit 70 on I-95 (59,000 ADT) on US Route 1 (11,000 ADT) in the heart of a primary retail and commercial corridor.” The description also notes, “Annual consumer spending within a 5-mile radius surpasses $435,000,000.”
The potential sale was mentioned at yesterday’s Old Lyme Board of Selectmen meeting by members of the Halls Road Improvement Committee (HRIC), who were presenting their proposal for a Halls Road Overlay District (HROD) to the selectmen.
Asked this morning for her reaction to the planned sale, HRIC Chair Edie Twining responded by email, “If you look at the announcement, they go on about how convenient to the highway it is.  [That could likely mean] More gas stations??

She added, “So until that overlay [the proposed HROD] is in place, this [property] is most appealing to highway service plazas and the like. If we had the overlay, highway-focused developers would have to compete for the space with those interested in pursuing our vision:- retail up front with multi-family residential, with its better ROI.”

Twining concluded optimistically, “We are aiming to submit our application for the Halls Road Overlay District in September. After some productive meetings with the [Old Lyme] Zoning Commission, I am hopeful that this will become a reality this year.”
Editor’s Note: We will have more on the Halls Road Overlay District in a subsequent article.

Kick-Off Concert for Old Lyme’s Midsummer Festival Draws Hundreds to Listen, Picnic, Dance

OLD LYME – What a beautiful night for a concert!

Hundreds of people turned out last night for the opening event of Old Lyme’s Midsummer Festival when The Mighty Soul Drivers brought the classic soul sounds of Memphis and points South to the banks of the Lieutenant River adjacent to the Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme.

Folk were picnicking, a variety of food trucks were on-site offering all kinds of delicacies, and the toe-tapping sounds from the band brought many to their feet to dance joyfully under the stars.

SweetSeidners.com did a roaring trade in all kinds of delectable cookies and brownies. The business is run by Lymes’ Youth Service Director Mary Seidner’s sister-in-law. The photo above shows Mary standing in the center between her brother-in-law and sister-in-law.

Old Lyme’s Midsummer Festival Comes Back With a (Joyful) Bang!

The day began with the 5K Midsummer Run hosted by LYSB, in which more than 300 runners participated.

OLD LYME — 8/1 UPDATED with more photos: Clear blue skies and warm temperatures welcomed the return of Old Lyme’s Midsummer Festival yesterday, after a two-year absence due to COVID. From early in the day, Lyme Street was alive with cheerful people of all ages enjoying the activities and festivities on offer and perusing the great variety of art, craft and edible items for sale.

Awards were presented after the race by Alli Behnke and her team of helpers to the winners. The photo above shows Rowan Hallahan receiving his award.

Shortly after, a ribbon-cutting was held at Lyme Academy of Fine Arts (LAFA) to celebrate the official opening of the de Gerenday Fine Art Materials and Curiosities shop on the campus. All the members of the Old Lyme (OL) Board of Selectmen  — First Selectman Tim Griswold (second from left), Selectwoman Martha Shoemaker (fourth from left), and Matt Ward (third from right, at rear) — as well as members of the OL Economic Development Commission (EDC), including chair Cheryl Poirier (third from left) and Mona Colwell (left), were on hand to assist with the ceremony.

Chairman of the LAFA Board of Trustees Michael Duffy cut the ribbon while LAFA Executive Director Mora Rowe to his right looked on enthusiastically. Holding the ribbon at the far right was Cameron Paynter, who is the Store Associate responsible for running the shop.

Outside on the Academy grounds, several different bands played drawing listeners appreciative of a bale of straw on which to take a rest.

Across at the Old Lyme Inn, the Fence Show Artists were plying their trade.

The range of styles and genres of artwork was exceptional this year.

Over at the Lyme Art Association, visitors were first greeted by the smiling faces of members of the OL EDC, in this case, Joe Camean (left) and Cheryl Poirier …

… and now, Mona Colwell and John Stratton.

Nancy Gladwell explained with passion to those, who stopped by the Public Art for Racial Justice Education (PARJE) stand, what PARJE’s mission is and how the group is working on achieving it.

The Old Lyme Land Trust hosted A Place Called Hope, who gave a popular demonstration including the live raptor pictured above.

Fat Stone Farm, located in Lyme, was doing a roaring trade throughout the day in their maple syrups, honeys, soaps, relishes, jellies and more.

Moving up to the grounds of the Florence Griswold Museum, members of the OL Solid Waste & Recycling Committee gathered for a photo at their stand. Fred Behringer (second from right) and his daughter (not pictured) had created an ingenious, interactive game to test people’s knowledge of local recycling facts and figures. It proved a big attraction and attracted many keen participants.

Jim Ward and his wife Sheila McTigue Ward manned the Lyme-Old Lyme Food Share Garden tent encouraging new volunteers to sign up while sharing information about the remarkable project.

Photo by Linda Ahnert.

This fine fellow named Boomer, who opted for a lion headdress in the Parading Paws contest held at the Museum, , deservedly won an award for Best Costume. Our apologies that we do not know his owner’s name.

Staying with the canine theme, here are volunteers for Project Paws: The Tim Buckley Project, which fosters the therapeutic benefits of the human animal bond, impacts social emotional learning for youth, and restores hope to families impacted by mental health and substance use disorders.

Project Paws provides education and resources for bringing Animal Assisted Activity and Animal Assisted Therapy to many organizations.

Old Lyme Emergency Services Management volunteers were hard at work demonstrating the skills they employ to folk who came by their tent, also at the Museum. This young visitor was especially interested in the business of resuscitation!

Going up Lyme Street a tad further to the former Bee and Thistle Inn, now the home of the Roger Tory Peterson Estuary Center, one found the Lyme-Old Lyme Lions hosting their Classic Car Show. An extensive selection of fabulous vehicles was on display and the event culminated with some of the proud owners receiving awards.

The wonderful day ended with the OL Town Band giving a concert on the field behind the LOL Middle School, which preceded a magnificent fireworks display hosted by the Town.

It was a splendid Festival, which thousands came out to enjoy.

Congratulations to the organizers, whose hard work and attention to detail could be seen and appreciated everywhere. Many thanks to them and all who participated in person or as sponsors for your combined efforts.

Old Lyme’s Solid Waste & Recycling Committee Takes Important Message ‘On The Road’ at Midsummer Festival

“No plastic bags in green bins” (Suzanne Thompson, Old Lyme Solid Waste & Recycling Committee Member)

OLD LYME — Did you read that green slip which arrived in the mail with your 2022-23 Old Lyme property tax invoice?

It notes that the Town of Old Lyme has a new waste and recycling hauling contract with CWPM Inc. but perhaps more significantly, it emphasizes the need for residents to be vigilant regarding what they place in their green recycling bin.

The green slip was the work of Old Lyme’s Solid Waste & Recycling Committee, which has recently been reconstituted under co-chairs Maryellen Basham and Jim Ward, with members including Leslie O’Connor, Karen Taylor, Fred Behringer, and Suzanne Thompson.

We asked Thompson why the committee had conceived the idea of sending out the green slip to all property owners. She explained, “Old Lyme residents have an opportunity to hold down our waste handling costs and  reduce our impact on the environment by putting the correct items in their green recycling bins.”

She stressed that this means quite simply and unambiguously, “No plastic bags in green bins.”

Thompson adds, “The committee also encourages residents to home compost their vegetable peelings instead of tossing them into the blue trash bin.”

In an effort to expand their message further, Thompson notes that the committee is taking their message “out on the road,” with a stand at the Midsummer Festival on Saturday (July 30.)  The committee will be one of the participant organizations in the Hands On-M!nds On feature along the Artist’s Trail at the Florence Griswold Museum, which is anticipated to draw many visitors.

The committee will offer a variety of games and activities to educate and inform Festival-goers of all ages about recycling and solid waste management.

Committee member Behringer and his daughter are currently hard at work designing an interactive quiz game related to ‘Going Green’ with regard to recycling and more, which will be available for people to play when they stop by at the stand.

Thompson says enthusiastically, “Come and see us on the Trail, have some fun … and learn a lot!”

She adds that more tips and methods to reduce waste will be coming soon from the committee and the Town of Old Lyme. LymeLine.com will continue to support the committee’s efforts by publishing this information as it becomes available.
Editor’s Note: Visit this link to read updated Old Lyme Transfer Station information, which includes a valuable recycling guide titled, ‘What’s In, What’s Out.’ 

COVID-19 Update: 14 Confirmed Cases in Old Lyme This Week, Three in Lyme

Old Lyme’s Total Cumulative COVID-19 Cases Now 1402, Lyme’s Equivalent Number is 339

LYME/OLD LYME — The latest CT DPH COVID-19 case count (dated July 28) shows 1402 cases for Old Lyme and 339 for Lyme. These numbers have increased from our last report on Monday, July 25, by 14 and three cases respectively.

Connecticut’s Positivity Rate was 11.09% on July 25 but has now risen to 11.79% as the increased infection rates of Omicron BA.4 and BA.5 make their mark.

Visit this link to view additional historical data and detailed graphics on COVID-19 vaccination levels and positive cases in Lyme and Old Lyme. The site is updated by Old Lyme resident William Fitzgerald.

COVID-19 Update: 52 Cases Confirmed in Past 28 Days in Old Lyme, Eight in Lyme Over Same Period

This map shows the distribution of COVID-19 cases by town for the past seven days. To protect confidentially, the data in towns with fewer than five (5) cases or five (5) positive NAAT tests in the past seven (7) days are suppressed. Map from CT DPH — see details regarding how to access the map in the text below.

Old Lyme’s Total Cumulative COVID-19 Cases Now 1388, Lyme’s Equivalent Number is 336

LYME/OLD LYME — We have not issued a COVID-19 update since June 29, 2022, which coincided with the Connecticut Department of Health (CT DPH) significantly changing its COVID reporting structure on June 27, which included no longer issuing details of towns in the established red, orange, yellow and gray zones.

The CT DPH stated that in its efforts to “update and streamline the reporting of COVID-19 cases, deaths, and testing data … As of 6/27/2022, the data will be published in four tables instead of 12.” At that time, it seemed case numbers were falling but, in fact, the state’s Positivity Rate had already begun to rise from its 2022 low of 7.52% on June 20 to 8.67% on June 27.

On June 27, Old Lyme reported a cumulative total of 1336 cases while Lyme’s total was 328.

Today (Monday, July 25), Old Lyme’s total has risen to 1388 reflecting an increase of 52 cases in 28 days whereas Lyme’s total has only increased to 336, showing eight new cases in the same period.

The map above shows CT DPH’s new map reporting COVID-19 cases in the past seven days, which is now updated daily on a rolling basis. On the map above dated July 22, Old Lyme is shown as having 11 cases in the past seven days while Lyme’s number is suppressed as it is less than five. The original of the map is at this link (scroll down to reach section titled COVID-19 Cases and Tests by Town) and is interactive in that one can click on each town to view that town’s data, but be aware it will change later today when new data is issued.

As previously stated, Connecticut’s Positivity Rate was 8.67% on June 27, but now that has risen to 11.09% with the rising dominance of Omicron BA.4 and BA.5.

Visit this link to view additional historical data and detailed graphics on COVID-19 vaccination levels and positive cases in Lyme and Old Lyme. The site is updated by Old Lyme resident William Fitzgerald.

There have been no additional fatalities in Lyme or Old Lyme since Feb. 4, 2022, when the death of an Old Lyme resident was reported. No details of the individual’s age or gender were made available.

On Nov. 21, 2021, the death of a Lyme resident — a 57-year-old male — was reported

A total of three COVID-related fatalities were reported in Old Lyme in 2020 and 2021. The first two, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male. The third fatality also occurred in 2021, but no details were made available.

After Two-Year Absence, Long-Awaited White Elephant Sale Opens TODAY at 9am

The annual White Elephant Sale starts opens today on the first strike of the church bell at 9 a.m.

OLD LYME — After a two-year hiatus due to COVID, the perennially popular White Elephant Sale (WES) opens TODAY, Friday, July 8, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and continues Saturday, July 9, from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Most departments offer items at half-price on the second day. There may be some mask restrictions on inside shopping.

The Sale is hosted by the Ladies Benevolent Society of the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme.

For those new to the town or folk who have never participated, this sale is one of the main events on both the town and church calendars.

Garage, tag and rummage sales may be everyday affairs, but few, if any, can match the size and color of this one. The sale items are organized into some 20 departments that fill the church buildings as well as every available space on the lawn.

The WES has grown so large that it has become a true “community event” since many of the donations are from non-church members and quite a number of volunteers are also from outside the church.

The sale raises a significant amount of money for missions and good works both locally and throughout the world. Some of the beneficiaries include food pantries, health organizations, family support centers, children’s programs, literacy volunteers, affordable housing, and disaster relief worldwide.

For more information about the sale or if you would like to volunteer to help in any capacity, whether with the sale itself or clean-up, call the church office at 860.434.8686 and/or visit www.fccol.org/wes.

See you at ‘The Sale’!

Friends of Lymes’ Senior Center Make $25,000 Donation to Support Activities, Programs at the Center

Pictured holding the check at the presentation of a check for $25,000 to the Lymes’ Senior Center Board of Directors (BOD) by the Friends of the Center are Lymes’ Senior Center Director Stephanie Gould (right in black top) and Chair of the Center’s BOD, Jeri Baker (left, cream top.) Also in attendance at the presentation are (from left to right, seated), Joanie Bonvicin, Susan Campbell and Recording Secretary Paula Emery, and (from left to right, standing) Kim Hale and Diane Blackwell, who are both Friends of the Center, and Center BOD members Diana Seckla, Kathy Lockwood, Jane Folland, Christina Gotowka, Doris Hungerford, David Griswold, and Jeremy Crisp. Photo submitted.

OLD LYME — UPDATED 1:30pm with names of everyone in the photo: The Friends of the Lymes’ Senior Center presented a check for $25,000 to the center at the June 21 Board of Directors meeting.  As a 501(c)3 organization, the Friends have conducted several fundraising efforts over recent years in order to contribute to the programs and activities of the center.

A spokesperson for the Friends said, ”We are grateful to the communities of Lyme and Old Lyme and also to the Center’s members for meeting our request for financial support with enthusiasm.”

The spokesperson added, “The programs are so rich and diverse and it is rewarding to see so many seniors taking part,” while posing the question to the community at large, “Have you attended an education talk or an exercise or art class?  If not, go see what you’ve been missing!”

Jeri Baker, who serves as chair of the Senior Center’s Board of Directors commented after the presentation had been made, “The Center benefits immensely from the fundraising efforts of the dedicated members of this group, who represent residents of both the towns of Lyme and Old Lyme.”

She continued, “Through their efforts to fund our programs we are able to plan for both the present offerings of the center and the future.  Since the towns do not subsidize any programs, it is vital that such efforts are not only necessary but a remarkable reflection of how important this Center is to the community.”

Today is Final Day of Intake for Old Lyme’s White Elephant Sale, 9am-2pm

Intake, which continues today, June 25, is always a busy time. All photos are file photos.

After a two-year hiatus due to COVID, the perennially popular White Elephant Sale (WES) is back and intake continues today at the church from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Intake ends Thursday, June 30, and will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Details of items that will be accepted are below and also on the church website. Note that neither lamps nor audiovisual electronics will be accepted this year due to space limitations.

The sale itself will be held on Friday, July 8, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Saturday, July 9, from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.  Most departments offer items at half-price on the second day. There may be some mask restrictions on inside shopping.

The Sale is hosted by the Ladies Benevolent Society of the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme.

For those new to the town or folk who have never participated, this sale is one of the main events on both the town and church calendars. It all starts with the intake period when you can drop off unwanted items at the church from your house — perhaps your basement, attic or closets — or yard.

The Sports Department offers a treasure trove of sporting ‘stuff.’

Garage, tag and rummage sales may be everyday affairs, but few, if any, can match the size and color of this one. The sale items are organized into some 20 departments that fill the church buildings as well as every available space on the lawn. The WES has grown so large that it has become a true “community event” since many of the donations are from non-church members and quite a number of volunteers are also from outside the church. 

The sale raises a significant amount of money for missions and good works both locally and throughout the world. Some of the beneficiaries include food pantries, health organizations, family support centers, children’s programs, literacy volunteers, affordable housing, and disaster relief worldwide.

Crowds anxiously await the first strike of 9 a.m. when the White Elephant Sale begins.

For more information about the sale or if you would like to volunteer to help in any capacity, whether with intake, the sale itself, or clean-up, call the church office at 860.434.8686 and/or visit www.fccol.org/wes.

See you at ‘The Sale’!

Here is a summary of items that are / are not accepted by the White Elephant Sale. For further information, visit www.fccol.org/wes.

Items that will GLADLY be accepted  [Quality please]

  • Antiques, Fine China, Silver                       
  • Appliances, Small (Working)
  • Art, Sculpture, Posters, Frames
  • Automobiles, Trucks [call church]
  • Baskets 
  • Bedding, Linens
  • Boats, Canoes, Kayaks
  • Bicycles, Tricycles 
  • Books: Children’s, Non-Fiction, Fiction
  • Clothes: 
    • Child’s, Men’s, Women’s
    •  Fine, Fashion
    •  Vintage, Costume & Accessories
  • Collections
  • Computer Hardware (working)
  • Christmas Decorations
  • Curtains, Drapes
  • Furniture, Indoor & Outdoor [call church]
  • Gifts, Sundries, Knickknacks 
  • Jewelry: Costume & Fine
  • Kitchen Items (Appliances, Dishes, Cookware)
  • Luggage [soft side or Steamer trunks only]
  • Musical Instruments
  • Plants, Containers
  • Shoes
  • Skis – downhill must be “shape” style
  • Sporting Goods [good condition]
  • Tools (House & Garden)
  • Toys,  Stuffed Animals
  • VHS, DVDs (Family Content)

Items that WILL NOT be accepted:

  • Dirty or Broken Items or Junk
  • Appliances (Large): 
    • Air Conditioners 
    • Refrigerators & Stoves
    • Freezers
    • Washers & Dryers 
  • Bike helmets [used]
  • Books:
    • Technical or Textbooks
    • Encyclopedias 
  • Car Seats  
  • Chemicals
  • Computers & monitors
  • Cribs
  • Electronics: audiovisual
  • Furniture: Particle Board, Stuffed Sofas, Dining Room Sets & Hutches
  • Luggage (hard sided)
  • Fuel cans with Gasoline or Kerosene
  • Guns, Knives, Weapons
  • Lamps
  • Magazines, Newspapers
  • Mattresses and Box Springs
  • Paint
  • Particle board furniture
  • Rugs
  • Sewing Machines
  • Skis – old style downhill
  • Stuffed animals (unless new)
  • Tires
  • Treadmills                         
  • TVs (all styles)

Lyme-Old Lyme’s VFW Post 1467 Named ‘Best Post in CT’ by VFW State Leadership

VFW Post 1467 Commander David Griswold tells members of the recognition that the Post had recently received recognition from VFW State leadership as the ‘Best Post in Connecticut.’ All photos by Doug Wilkinson.

OLD LYME — On Monday, June 27, members of the Lyme-Old Lyme Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 1467 learned that their Post had been recognized by VFW State leadership as the ‘Best Post in Connecticut.’ Members had gathered for a regular meeting at the Lymes’ Senior Center unaware the award would be announced.

This great honor had been announced two weeks previously when the VFW State leadership held their annual awards ceremony at which they recognize 10 Posts out of 100 for their accomplishments. Criteria include membership, community activities, and helping veterans.

Commander David Griswold receives a number of gifts from incoming Commander Richard Mason as Griswold stepped down from his position after seven years of service to the Post in that role.

At the same meeting, Commander David Griswold, who had served seven years during two terms as Commander of the Post, was also honored as he handed over the command to Richard Mason.

Commander Griswold made the following statement during the ceremony, “As Post Commander, I was honored to accepted the award as the Best Post in Connecticut (VFW Post 1467) on behalf of our membership.  Our success is attributed to our members who represents the best in military service as well as giving back to their community as well as the towns of Lyme and Old Lyme who’s businesses and individuals have been so generous in helping veterans.”

Griswold added, “I would also like to acknowledge the Old Lyme Senior Center for all their support. This is a very special community who honors all who have served”.

Commander Griswold happily displays one of his gifts.

VFW Post 1467 success,  especially within the Old Lyme community has been primarily a result of focused, aggressive veterans outreach relief funding to approximately 80 military vets, who have benefited from over $100,000 in support during the past 10 years along with thousands of dollars in annual contributions to the VA Giant Steps Program, West Haven, CT and State of CT Rocky Hill Soldiers Home.

Newly-installed Commander Mason noted, “As the incoming commander for 2022-23, I will make sure our leadership team continues the popular traditions and community partnerships that Lyme, Old Lyme enjoys with our very interactive Post.

Commander David Griswold displays the certificate from the VFW National Home for Children for VFW Post 1467’s continuous support of the Home.

The Post also received a Certificate of Appreciation from the VFW National Home for Children for the Post’s continuous support of the Home.

June 21-27 COVID-19 Update: Lyme Falls to Lowest Case Rate Zone with One New Case; Old Lyme Now in Yellow Zone, Reports 11 New Cases Since 6/20

Cumulative Totals Rise to 1336 in Old Lyme, 328 in Lyme

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Reports issued Tuesday, June 21, through Monday, June 27, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) show a total of 11 new, confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme and also one in Lyme compared with June 20 numbers. Note: The link above is always to the most recent day of CT DPH reports.

These cases raise Old Lyme’s cumulative case total to 1336 from 1325 on June 15 and Lyme’s to 328 from 327 on the same date.

The state does not issue reports over weekends.

The cases by town were as follows:

Lyme
6/21: 1
6/22: 0
6/23: 0
6/24: 0
6/27: 0

Old Lyme
6/21: -1
6/22: 2
6/23: 0
6/24: 3
6/27: 7

June 23 now stands as the most recent day on which no new cases were reported in either town.

Prior to March 25, the Town of Lyme had gone for 23 consecutive days with no new cases being reported. Two new cases were reported in Lyme on March 25.

Visit this link to view additional historical data and detailed graphics on COVID-19 vaccination levels and positive cases in Lyme and Old Lyme. The site is updated by Old Lyme resident William Fitzgerald

Statewide Situation – Weekly Update

On Thursday, June 23, the CT DPH also released its latest weekly COVID-19 Alert Map, shown above, which indicates that 98 municipalities remain in the Red (highest of four) Zone for case rates. Lyme is in the lowest (Gray) zone and Old Lyme in the lowest but one (Yellow) zone.

Thirty-three towns are in the Orange Zone, 12 in the Yellow Zone and 16 in the Gray Zone.

This number for the Red Zone is 11 less than for the previous week meaning the number of towns in the Red Zone  now represents 57.9% of the state.

As a reminder, the number of towns in the Red Zone on Jan. 27, 2022 was 168 out of 169 towns.

The CT DPH will issue an updated map of the zones Thursday, June 30 — the map is updated weekly on Thursdays.

The color-coded zones on the map above are:

Red: Indicates case rates over the last two weeks of greater than 15 per 100,000 population
Orange: Indicates case rates between 10 to 14 cases per 100,000 population
Yellow: Indicates case rates between 5 and 9 per 100,000 population
Gray: Indicates case rates lower than five per 100,000 population

CDC Maintains ‘Community Level’ at Low for New London County, Fairfield County Also Low; All Other CT Counties are ‘Medium’

The map above shows that on June 23, New London County remains categorized as ‘Low’ for Community Level along with Fairfield, Hartford, Tolland and Windham Counties, while New Haven, Middlesex and Litchfield Counties are ‘Medium.’ These levels are updated weekly by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Thursdays.

Community Levels can be low, medium, or high and are determined by looking at hospital beds being used, hospital admissions, and the total number of new COVID cases in a specific geographical area. CDC recommends taking precautions to protect yourself and others from COVID based on Community Levels in your area.

You can view the new tool by following this link: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/your-health/covid-by-county.html

LLHD continues to focus its vaccination efforts on homebound populations and providing initial vaccinations and boosters to individuals who were vaccinated previously. Information about vaccination opportunities can be found at https://llhd.org/coronavirus-covid-19-situation/covid-19-vaccine/.

COVID testing opportunities can be found at COVID-19 Testing | Ledge Light Health District (llhd.org)

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/.

An explanation of the CDC Community Levels tool by Thomas Gotowka can be found at this link.

Statewide Situation – Daily Update

The state’s COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate broke the 10% watershed on May 4 at 10.32%. It went through the 14% mark with the May 20 Rate of 14.19%, but the June 27 Positivity Rate has fallen to  8.67%. 

On June 27, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations was 245. In contrast, on Jan. 12, 2022, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations was 1,939.

Of those hospitalized on June 27, the number not fully vaccinated was 80 (representing 32.65%).

The total number of COVID-related deaths in Connecticut was 11,034 on June 27, according to The New York Times.

The next Daily Data Report will be issued by CT DPH Wednesday, June 29, around 4 p.m.

Increase in Cases in Lyme & Old Lyme Since August 2021

The cumulative total of confirmed cases for Old Lyme has now increased by 893 since Wednesday, Nov. 10, when the total stood at 443 — that number had stood unchanged for a week since the previous Thursday, Nov. 4.

On Aug. 26 — which was the day Lyme-Old Lyme Schools started the new academic year — Old Lyme’s cumulative case total stood at 372, meaning there have now been 964 new cases there since that date.

Meanwhile, Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 indicating 214 new cases have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Fatalities Due to COVID-19 in Lyme, Old Lyme

There has been one COVID-related fatality of a Lyme resident: a 57-year-old male passed away Nov. 16, 2021. On Nov. 30, the state finally included this fatality in its data

Four COVID-related fatalities have now been reported in Old Lyme. The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

Details of the third and fourth fatalities, which were reported respectively in 2021 and on Feb. 4, 2022, have not been made available.

COVID-19 Situation in LOL Schools

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools are now on summer recess and so there will be no further reporting from LOL Schools until late August.

Details published between April 1, when Gov. Lamont said schools were no longer required to report positive cases, show the following number of positive cases reported in LOL Schools by week.
April 3-9: 0
April 10-16: 0
April 17-23: Spring Break
April 24-30: 7
May 2-7: 27
May 8-14: 41
May 15-21: 30
May 22-28: 23
May 29-June 4: 55
June 5-June 11: 19
June 12-June 18: 4

For a summary of cases in LOL Schools between Jan. 1 and March 31, 2022, visit this link.

View a full listing of cases in LOL Schools between 8/26/21 – 12/23/21 at this link.

ARPC Proposal for $2.1M in Federal Funds Accepted Unanimously by OL BOS, BOF; Detailed Recommendations Now Announced

OLD LYME — UPDATED 6/28 WITH ‘FINAL RECOMMENDATIONS’ and PRESENTATION DETAILS: On Tuesday, June 21, the Old Lyme (OL) American Rescue Plan Committee (APRC) presented their recommendations for allocation of $2.1 million of federal ARPA funds to a joint meeting of the OL Boards of Selectmen and Finance.

The ‘Final Recommendations,’ which include details of  the businesses, non-profits and Town Departments and organizations that are to receive funds, along with the supporting presentation have now been published on the Town of Old Lyme website at this link. Note there are two separate links on the left column of the page.

All of the recommendations were accepted unanimously by both boards.

The next step in the process will be for the recommendations to be presented to a Town Meeting at which residents will be asked to vote on them. The date of the Town Meeting has not yet been finalized but the meeting is likely to be held within the next two weeks.

And the Band(s) Played on—Making Music on Lyme Street to Celebrate Midsummer

Lucas Neil was a popular performer in front of The Old Lyme Ice Cream Shoppe.

OLD LYME — Lyme Street was alive with music last night as a dozen bands and soloists played in different locations stretching from Lyme Academy in the north down to the First Congregational Church in the south.

The Old Lyme Town Band drew a large crowd on the Center School lawn.

The Town was celebrating International Make Music Day, joining many other locations across the globe to mark Midsummer’s Night — the longest day of the year.

The Lyme-Old Lyme Lions did a roaring trade in hot dogs and burgers.

Hundreds of people came out in Old Lyme to enjoy the music and fill the street with relaxed cheer and conversation.

To the delight of many visitors, local celebrity Braiden Sunshine sang on the lawn at Lyme Academy.

Although the weather looked a little ominous initially, it ultimately decided to cooperate and stayed relatively warm and dry throughout the whole event.

‘The Moving Target Band’ played many cheery tunes Tuesday night outside The Village Shops on Lyme Street.

It was a great opportunity to catch up with friends despite the lingering shadow of the COVID-19 pandemic.

John Brown and Friends played Indy Folk and original tunes outside The Cooley Gallery.

The musicians ranged in age from teens to seniors and similarly, the genres of music varied from country to folk to blues and everything in between!

Nightingale’s Cafe featured a variety of solo musicians and bands throughout the evening.

Launched in France in 1982, Make Music Day is an international musical festival open to all who would like to participate, and takes place in over 1,000 cities in 120 countries on June 21, the summer solstice.

‘The Midnight Anthem’ performed in front of Old Lyme’s Memorial Town Hall.

The State of Connecticut Office of the Arts debuted the State’s effort in 2018 with 528 free musical performances at 224 locations across the state, including Old Lyme. 

The band at 71 Lyme St. was ‘Five Bean Row.’

Many thanks to the organizers of this wonderful event, who included Dan and Gail Stevens of the MusicNow Foundation and Nightingale’s Cafe, Old Lyme’s 2021 Volunteer of the Year Cheryl Poirier, and Mary Seidner, Executive Director of LYSB.

Playing a variety of music genres, ‘Hot Strings Cafe’ entertained in front of the Elms Building.

 

June 16-20 COVID-19 Update: Number of CT Towns in Red Zone Falls to 65%; 10 New Cases in Old Lyme Over Three Days, Three in Lyme

This map, updated June 16, 2022 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme remain in the Red (highest) Zone. One hundred and nine towns (representing a total of 64.5% of the state) remain in the Red Zone. Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities. Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper.

Cumulative Totals Rise to 1325 in Old Lyme, 327 in Lyme

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Reports issued Thursday, June 16, Friday, June 17, and Monday, June 20, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) show a total of 10 new, confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme and also three in Lyme compared with June 15 numbers. Note: The link above is always to the most recent day of CT DPH reports.

These cases raise Old Lyme’s cumulative case total to 1325 from 1315 on June 15 and Lyme’s to 327 from 324 on the same date.

The state does not issue reports over weekends.

The cases by town were as follows:

Lyme
6/16: 0
6/17: 2
6/20: 1

Old Lyme
6/16: 3
6/17: 2
6/18: 5

Therefore June 9 still stands as the first day since April 5, 2022 on which no new cases were reported in either town.

Prior to April 5, the previous day on which no new cases were reported in either Lyme or Old Lyme was March 24. There were also no new cases on March 9 and 4, and Feb. 24. The previous date prior to Feb. 24 when no new cases were reported in either town was Dec. 12, 2021.

Prior to March 25, the Town of Lyme had gone for 23 consecutive days with no new cases being reported. Two new cases were reported in Lyme on March 25.

Visit this link to view additional historical data and detailed graphics on COVID-19 vaccination levels and positive cases in Lyme and Old Lyme. The site is updated by Old Lyme resident William Fitzgerald

Statewide Situation – Weekly Update

On Thursday, June 9, the CT DPH also released its latest weekly COVID-19 Alert Map (pictured at the head of this article), which indicates that 109 municipalities remain in the Red (highest of four) Zone for case rates. These towns in the Red Zone include both Lyme and Old Lyme.

Thirty-eight towns are in the Orange Zone, eight in the Yellow Zone and 14 in the Gray Zone.

This number for the Red Zone is 40 less than for the previous week meaning the number of towns in the Red Zone  now represents 64.5% of the state.

As a reminder, the number of towns in the Red Zone on Jan. 27, 2022 was 168 out of 169 towns.

As of June 16, 2022, six of the nine towns in the Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) remain in the Red Zone. North Stonington, Stonington, and New London have moved into the Orange Zone. The LLHD is no longer issuing reports with updated Case Rates and other metrics.

The CT DPH will issue an updated map of the zones Thursday, June 23 — the map is updated weekly on Thursdays.

The color-coded zones on the map above are:

Red: Indicates case rates over the last two weeks of greater than 15 per 100,000 population
Orange: Indicates case rates between 10 to 14 cases per 100,000 population
Yellow: Indicates case rates between 5 and 9 per 100,000 population
Gray: Indicates case rates lower than five per 100,000 population

CDC Maintains ‘Community Level’ at Low for New London County, Fairfield County Also Low; All Other CT Counties are ‘Medium’

June 16 Community Transmission levels. Map courtesy of CDC.

The map above shows that on June 16, New London County remains categorized as ‘Low’ for Community Level, while all other counties are ‘Medium.’ These levels are updated weekly by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Thursdays.

The most recent email sent out by Ledge Light Health District regarding COVID data, which was sent out Friday, May 27, said, “Community members are advised to stay up to date with COVID-19 vaccines, get tested if they have symptoms, and wear a mask when they are around others if they have symptoms, are positive or have had an exposure.”

It added, “People with symptoms should be tested and people with a positive test should isolate per guidelines. Masking remains an effective method for reducing the spread of COVID-19 and people may choose to mask even though our region is not designated as “High.””

The email concluded, “You can find the latest CDC Community Level, schedules of vaccination clinics and community testing events, and isolation/quarantine guidance on our website and, as always, we are here to answer any questions or provide support for community members.

Community Levels can be low, medium, or high and are determined by looking at hospital beds being used, hospital admissions, and the total number of new COVID cases in a specific geographical area. CDC recommends taking precautions to protect yourself and others from COVID based on Community Levels in your area.

You can view the new tool by following this link: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/your-health/covid-by-county.html

LLHD continues to focus its vaccination efforts on homebound populations and providing initial vaccinations and boosters to individuals who were vaccinated previously. Information about vaccination opportunities can be found at https://llhd.org/coronavirus-covid-19-situation/covid-19-vaccine/.

COVID testing opportunities can be found at COVID-19 Testing | Ledge Light Health District (llhd.org)

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/.

An explanation of the CDC Community Levels tool by Thomas Gotowka can be found at this link.

Statewide Situation – Daily Update

The state’s COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate broke the 10% watershed on May 4 at 10.32%. It went through the 14% mark with the May 20 Rate of 14.19%, but the June 20 Positivity Rate has fallen to 7.52%. 

On June 15, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations fell to 246 from the 273 recorded June 16.

In contrast, on Jan. 12, 2022, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations was 1,939.

Of those hospitalized on June 20, the number not fully vaccinated was 85 (representing 34.55%).

The total number of COVID-related deaths in Connecticut held at 11,015 on June 120, according to The New York Times.

The next Daily Data Report will be issued by CT DPH Thursday, June 23, around 4 p.m.

Increase in Cases in Lyme & Old Lyme Since August 2021

The cumulative total of confirmed cases for Old Lyme has now increased by 882 since Wednesday, Nov. 10, when the total stood at 443 — that number had stood unchanged for a week since the previous Thursday, Nov. 4.

On Aug. 26 — which was the day Lyme-Old Lyme Schools started the new academic year — Old Lyme’s cumulative case total stood at 372, meaning there have now been 953 new cases there since that date.

Meanwhile, Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 indicating 213 new cases have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Fatalities Due to COVID-19 in Lyme, Old Lyme

There has been one COVID-related fatality of a Lyme resident: a 57-year-old male passed away Nov. 16, 2021. On Nov. 30, the state finally included this fatality in its data

Four COVID-related fatalities have now been reported in Old Lyme. The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

Details of the third and fourth fatalities, which were reported respectively in 2021 and on Feb. 4, 2022, have not been made available.

COVID-19 Situation in LOL Schools

Under new state protocols for schools, Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools are no longer required to carry out contact tracing.

LOL Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser explained the latest developments in LOL Schools COVID protocols in an email dated April 1 to the school community, saying, “As noted in my email of February 17, 2022, beginning April 1, 2022 we will no longer report daily COVID-19 cases in the schools.”

He then stated, “For the remainder of this school year, that information will be complied on a weekly basis and will be available on our website at the following link: https://www.region18.org/parents/covid-data.”

Details published to date show the following number of positive cases in LOL Schools by week.
April 3-9: 0
April 10-16: 0
April 17-23: Spring Break
April 24-30: 7
May 2-7: 27
May 8-14: 41
May 15-21: 30
May 22-28: 23
May 29-June 4: 55
June 5-June 11: 19
June 12-June 18: 4

The total number of cases recorded by the CT DPH in Lyme and Old Lyme for the week June 12-June 18 was 12, indicating a minority of all reported cases were potentially associated with LOL Schools.

LOL Schools are now on summer recess and so there will be no further reporting from LOL Schools until late August.

For a summary of cases in LOL Schools between Jan. 1 and March 31, 2022, visit this link.

View a full listing of cases in LOL Schools between 8/26/21 – 12/23/21 at this link.

Board Votes on Proposal to Arm Security Guards in Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Tonight; Live Stream, Public Comment Available

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser. (File photo)

OLD LYME — The Region 18 Board of Education meets tonight at 6:30 p.m. in the Board of Education Conference Room at Center School.  The fourth item on their agenda is a vote on the ‘Approval of Armed Security Guards [in Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools]’. 

A live stream of the meeting will be available at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCF2_W7yYtFwx067Ici9776Q/live

The second item on the agenda is Public Comment.

The agenda states, “While in person public comment is still acceptable, those wishing to make public comment virtually  may use the following Zoom link: https://region18.zoom.us/j/87635839590; Meeting ID: 876 3583  9590; +16465588656,,83527766795# US (New York).”

The agenda notes, “Those choosing this option will be required to follow the same expectations for those making public comment in person. After being recognized by  the chairperson, participants must state their name and place of residence before making their comments to the Board.”

The background to this vote is that on Friday, June 3, LOL Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser sent an email to all LOL Schools parents and staff stating, “At Wednesday night’s [June 1] Board of Education (BOE) meeting, the Board discussed my recommendation that we arm our school security staff beginning next school year.”

He continued, “This recommendation is based on long standing concerns over police response time to our schools should there ever be a life-threatening situation such as we saw in [Uvalde] Texas last week.”

Neviaser emphasized, “We do not take this decision lightly, but do feel that this additional preventive measure will add yet another layer of safety to all three of our campuses.”

An online tool called ThoughtExchange has been used to gather input from LOL Schools parents and staff anonymously. The window for feedback via that means ended on Sunday, June 12.

The methodology of the input-gathering involves, “A few survey questions and then one open-ended question.” This in turn leads to the submission and ranking of the respondent’s own thoughts, and then those of others.

Neviaser said in his email that he believed, “This online tool will help us to effectively gather a wide-range of thoughts in light of the abbreviated timeline to make this decision.”

The timeline to which Neviaser referred is the board’s decision to vote tonight on the measure. The reason for this short time-frame is that if the proposal is approved tonight, in Neviaser’s words, “There are numerous requirements that must be met to have this in place by August,” when the new 2022-23 school year commences.

Asked by email whether the community at large (meaning those who are neither parents of current students nor staff) could submit their opinions on the proposal, Neviaser responded to LymeLine that, “[They can] share their thoughts in the usual fashion via email [to him and/or BOE members] or public comment at the BOE meeting.” Emails can still be sent today through the end of the business day.

Neviaser had stated in his email to staff and students that, “All armed security officers must be retired state or municipal police officers with a minimum of 10 years of experience who have retired in good standing.  All of our current security personnel meet this standard.”

Asked how many security guards are currently employed by LOL Schools, Neviaser confirmed, “We currently employ four guards but are looking to arm five people as their supervisor (Director of Facilities and Technology) would also be armed as a backup.”

June 13 COVID-19 Update: Four New Cases Reported in Lyme, Four in Old Lyme, Monday; CT Breaks 11,000 COVID Fatalities

Four New Cases in Each Town Monday, Cumulative Totals Increase to 1312 (OL), 321 (Lyme)

Photo by CDC on Unsplash,

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Report issued Monday, June 13, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) show a total of four new, confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme and similarly, four in Lyme compared with June 10 numbers. Reports are not issued by CT DPH over the weekend.

These cases raise Old Lyme’s cumulative case total to 1312 from 1308 on June 10 and Lyme’s to 321 from 317 on the same date.

Therefore June 9 still stands as the first day since April 5, 2022 on which no new cases were reported in either town.

Prior to April 5, the previous day on which no new cases were reported in either Lyme or Old Lyme was March 24. There were also no new cases on March 9 and 4, and Feb. 24. The previous date prior to Feb. 24 when no new cases were reported in either town was Dec. 12, 2021.

Prior to March 25, the Town of Lyme had gone for 23 consecutive days with no new cases being reported. Two new cases were reported in Lyme on March 25

Statewide Situation – Weekly Update

This map, updated June 9, 2022 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme remain in the Red (highest) Zone. One hundred and forty nine towns (representing a total of 88.2% of the state) remain in the Red Zone. Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities. Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper.

On Thursday, June 9, the CT DPH also released its latest weekly COVID-19 Alert Map (pictured above), which indicates that 149 municipalities remain in the Red (highest of four) Zone for case rates. These towns in the Red Zone include both Lyme and Old Lyme.

Eleven towns are in the Orange Zone, one in the Yellow Zone and eight in the Gray Zone.

This number for the Red Zone is 10 less than for the previous week meaning the number of towns in the Red Zone  represents 88.2% of the state.

As a reminder, the number of towns in the Red Zone on Jan. 27, 2022 was 168 out of 169 towns.

As of June 9, 2022, all nine towns in the Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) remain in the Red Zone. The LLHD is no longer issuing reports with updated Case Rates and other metrics.

The CT DPH will issue an updated map of the zones Thursday, June 16 — the map is updated weekly on Thursdays.

The color-coded zones on the map above are:

Red: Indicates case rates over the last two weeks of greater than 15 per 100,000 population
Orange: Indicates case rates between 10 to 14 cases per 100,000 population
Yellow: Indicates case rates between 5 and 9 per 100,000 population
Gray: Indicates case rates lower than five per 100,000 population

CDC Maintains ‘Community Level’ at Low for New London County, Fairfield County Also Low; All Other CT Counties are ‘Medium’


June 9 Community Transmission levels. Map courtesy of CDC.

The map above shows that on June 9, both New London and Fairfield Counties are now categorized as ‘Low’ for Community Level, while all other Towns are ‘Medium.’ These levels are updated weekly by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Thursdays.

The most recent email sent out by Ledge Light Health District regarding COVID data, which was sent out Friday, May 27, said, “Community members are advised to stay up to date with COVID-19 vaccines, get tested if they have symptoms, and wear a mask when they are around others if they have symptoms, are positive or have had an exposure.”

It added, “People with symptoms should be tested and people with a positive test should isolate per guidelines. Masking remains an effective method for reducing the spread of COVID-19 and people may choose to mask even though our region is not designated as “High.””

The email concluded, “You can find the latest CDC Community Level, schedules of vaccination clinics and community testing events, and isolation/quarantine guidance on our website and, as always, we are here to answer any questions or provide support for community members.

Community Levels can be low, medium, or high and are determined by looking at hospital beds being used, hospital admissions, and the total number of new COVID cases in a specific geographical area. CDC recommends taking precautions to protect yourself and others from COVID based on Community Levels in your area.

You can view the new tool by following this link: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/your-health/covid-by-county.html

LLHD continues to focus its vaccination efforts on homebound populations and providing initial vaccinations and boosters to individuals who were vaccinated previously. Information about vaccination opportunities can be found at https://llhd.org/coronavirus-covid-19-situation/covid-19-vaccine/.

COVID testing opportunities can be found at COVID-19 Testing | Ledge Light Health District (llhd.org)

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/.

An explanation of the CDC Community Levels tool by Thomas Gotowka can be found at this link.

Statewide Situation – Daily Update

The state’s COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate broke the 10% watershed on May 4 at 10.32%. It went through the 14% mark with the May 20 Rate of 14.19%, but the June 13 Positivity Rate fell to to 7.57%. 

On June 10, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations increased to 265 from the 259 recorded June 10.

In contrast, on Jan. 12, 2022, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations was 1,939.

Of those hospitalized on June 10, the number not fully vaccinated was 89 (representing 33.58%).

The total number of COVID-related deaths in Connecticut rose to 11,000 on June 13, according to The New York Times.

The next Daily Data Report will be issued by CT DPH Tuesday, June 14, around 4 p.m.

Increase in Cases in Lyme & Old Lyme Since August 2021

The cumulative total of confirmed cases for Old Lyme has now increased by 869 since Wednesday, Nov. 10, when the total stood at 443 — that number had stood unchanged for a week since the previous Thursday, Nov. 4.

On Aug. 26 — which was the day Lyme-Old Lyme Schools started the new academic year — Old Lyme’s cumulative case total stood at 372, meaning there have now been 940 new cases there since that date.

Meanwhile, Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 indicating 207 new cases have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Fatalities Due to COVID-19 in Lyme, Old Lyme

There has been one COVID-related fatality of a Lyme resident: a 57-year-old male passed away Nov. 16, 2021. On Nov. 30, the state finally included this fatality in its data

Four COVID-related fatalities have now been reported in Old Lyme. The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

Details of the third and fourth fatalities, which were reported respectively in 2021 and on Feb. 4, 2022, have not been made available.

COVID-19 Situation in LOL Schools

Under new state protocols for schools, Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools are no longer required to carry out contact tracing.

LOL Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser explained the latest developments in LOL Schools COVID protocols in an email dated April 1 to the school community, saying, “As noted in my email of February 17, 2022, beginning April 1, 2022 we will no longer report daily COVID-19 cases in the schools.”

He then stated, “For the remainder of this school year, that information will be complied on a weekly basis and will be available on our website at the following link: https://www.region18.org/parents/covid-data.”

Details published to date show the following number of positive cases in LOL Schools by week.
April 3-9: 0
April 10-16: 0
April 17-23: Spring Break
April 24-30: 7
May 2-7: 27
May 8-14: 41
May 15-21: 30
May 22-28: 23
May 29-June 4: 55
June 5-June 11: 19

The total number of cases recorded by the CT DPH in Lyme and Old Lyme for the week June 5-June 11 was 18, indicating almost all reported cases are potentially associated with LOL Schools.

For a summary of cases in LOL Schools between Jan. 1 and March 31, 2022, visit this link.

View a full listing of cases in LOL Schools between 8/26/21 – 12/23/21 at this link.

June 9 & 10 COVID-19 Update: Over 88% of CT Still in Red Zone, But Encouraging Signs Abound; Lyme & Old Lyme Record First Day With No Cases Since April 5

This map, updated June 9, 2022 shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme remain in the Red (highest) Zone. One hundred and forty nine towns (representing a total of 88.2% of the state) remain in the Red Zone. Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities. Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper.

No New Cases in Either Town Thursday; One in Each Town Friday Take Cumulative Totals to 1308 (OL), 317 (Lyme)

LYME/OLD LYME — The Daily Data Reports issued Thursday, June 9, and Friday, June 10, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) show a total of one new, confirmed COVID-19 case in Old Lyme and one in Lyme compared with June 8 numbers.

These cases raise Old Lyme’s cumulative case total to 1308 from 1307 on June 8 and Lyme’s to 317 from 316 on the same date.

The cases by day were:

June 9: L–0, OL–0
June 10: L–1, OL–1

This makes June 9 the first day since April 5, 2022 on which no new cases were reported in either town.

Prior to April 5, the previous day on which no new cases were reported in either Lyme or Old Lyme was March 24. There were also no new cases on March 9 and 4, and Feb. 24. The previous date prior to Feb. 24 when no new cases were reported in either town was Dec. 12, 2021.

Prior to March 25, the Town of Lyme had gone for 23 consecutive days with no new cases being reported. Two new cases were reported in Lyme on March 25

Statewide Situation – Weekly Update

On Thursday, June 9, the CT DPH also released its latest weekly COVID-19 Alert Map (pictured above), which indicates that 149 municipalities remain in the Red (highest of four) Zone for case rates. These towns in the Red Zone include both Lyme and Old Lyme.

Eleven towns are in the Orange Zone, one in the Yellow Zone and eight in the Gray Zone.

This number for the Red Zone is 10 less than for the previous week meaning the number of towns in the Red Zone  represents 88.2% of the state.

As a reminder, the number of towns in the Red Zone on Jan. 27, 2022 was 168 out of 169 towns.

As of June 9, 2022, all nine towns in the Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) remain in the Red Zone. The LLHD is no longer issuing reports with updated Case Rates and other metrics.

The CT DPH will issue an updated map of the zones Thursday, June 16 — the map is updated weekly on Thursdays.

The color-coded zones on the map above are:

Red: Indicates case rates over the last two weeks of greater than 15 per 100,000 population
Orange: Indicates case rates between 10 to 14 cases per 100,000 population
Yellow: Indicates case rates between 5 and 9 per 100,000 population
Gray: Indicates case rates lower than five per 100,000 population

CDC Maintains ‘Community Level’ at Low for New London County, Fairfield County Also Low; All Other CT Counties are ‘Medium’


June 9 Community Transmission levels. Map courtesy of CDC.

The map above shows that on June 9, both New London and Fairfield Counties are now categorized as ‘Low’ for Community Level, while all other Towns are ‘Medium.’ These levels are updated weekly by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Thursdays.

The most recent email sent out by Ledge Light Health District regarding COVID data, which was sent out Friday, May 27, said, “Community members are advised to stay up to date with COVID-19 vaccines, get tested if they have symptoms, and wear a mask when they are around others if they have symptoms, are positive or have had an exposure.”

It added, “People with symptoms should be tested and people with a positive test should isolate per guidelines. Masking remains an effective method for reducing the spread of COVID-19 and people may choose to mask even though our region is not designated as “High.””

The email concluded, “You can find the latest CDC Community Level, schedules of vaccination clinics and community testing events, and isolation/quarantine guidance on our website and, as always, we are here to answer any questions or provide support for community members.

Community Levels can be low, medium, or high and are determined by looking at hospital beds being used, hospital admissions, and the total number of new COVID cases in a specific geographical area. CDC recommends taking precautions to protect yourself and others from COVID based on Community Levels in your area.

You can view the new tool by following this link: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/your-health/covid-by-county.html

LLHD continues to focus its vaccination efforts on homebound populations and providing initial vaccinations and boosters to individuals who were vaccinated previously. Information about vaccination opportunities can be found at https://llhd.org/coronavirus-covid-19-situation/covid-19-vaccine/.

COVID testing opportunities can be found at COVID-19 Testing | Ledge Light Health District (llhd.org)

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/.

An explanation of the CDC Community Levels tool by Thomas Gotowka can be found at this link.

Statewide Situation – Daily Update

The state’s COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rate broke the 10% watershed on May 4 at 10.32%. It went through the 14% mark with the May 20 Rate of 14.19%, but the June 10 Positivity Rate fell to to 8.79%. 

On June 10, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations decreased to 259 from the 276 recorded on June 8.

In contrast, on Jan. 12, 2022, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations was 1,939.

Of those hospitalized on June 10, the number not fully vaccinated was 78 (representing 30.12%).

The total number of COVID-related deaths in Connecticut held at 10,998 on June 10, according to The New York Times.

The next Daily Data Report will be issued by CT DPH Monday, June 13, around 4 p.m.

Increase in Cases in Lyme & Old Lyme Since August 2021

The cumulative total of confirmed cases for Old Lyme has now increased by 865 since Wednesday, Nov. 10, when the total stood at 443 — that number had stood unchanged for a week since the previous Thursday, Nov. 4.

On Aug. 26 — which was the day Lyme-Old Lyme Schools started the new academic year — Old Lyme’s cumulative case total stood at 372, meaning there have now been 936 new cases there since that date.

Meanwhile, Lyme’s cumulative total on Aug. 26 was 114 indicating 203 new cases have also been confirmed there during the same period.

Fatalities Due to COVID-19 in Lyme, Old Lyme

There has been one COVID-related fatality of a Lyme resident: a 57-year-old male passed away Nov. 16, 2021. On Nov. 30, the state finally included this fatality in its data

Four COVID-related fatalities have now been reported in Old Lyme. The first two fatalities from Old Lyme, which were reported in 2020, were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

Details of the third and fourth fatalities, which were reported respectively in 2021 and on Feb. 4, 2022, have not been made available.

COVID-19 Situation in LOL Schools

Under new state protocols for schools, Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools are no longer required to carry out contact tracing.

LOL Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser explained the latest developments in LOL Schools COVID protocols in an email dated April 1 to the school community, saying, “As noted in my email of February 17, 2022, beginning April 1, 2022 we will no longer report daily COVID-19 cases in the schools.”

He then stated, “For the remainder of this school year, that information will be complied on a weekly basis and will be available on our website at the following link: https://www.region18.org/parents/covid-data.”

Details published to date show the following number of positive cases in LOL Schools by week.
April 3-9: 0
April 10-16: 0
April 17-23: Spring Break
April 24-30: 7
May 2-7: 27
May 8-14: 41
May 15-21: 30
May 22-28: 23
May 29-June 4: 55
June 5-June 11: 19

The total number of cases recorded by the CT DPH in Lyme and Old Lyme for the week June 5-June 11 was 18, indicating almost all reported cases are potentially associated with LOL Schools.

For a summary of cases in LOL Schools between Jan. 1 and March 31, 2022, visit this link.

View a full listing of cases in LOL Schools between 8/26/21 – 12/23/21 at this link.

Lyme-Old Lyme Seniors Celebrate Upcoming Graduation with Joyful Parade

All photos by Michele Dickey except where indicated.

OLD LYME — It may have poured Thursday morning but nothing was going to rain on the Lyme-Old Lyme High School Seniors planned parade that evening. By the evening, however, skies were clear and the soon-to-graduates, who will celebrate their Commencement tonight, organized their now decorated cars into a line at the high school.

They then drove down Lyme Street and McCurdy Rd. to cheers, clapping and great jubilation. But there were not only  cars in the parade. There were trucks …

and more trucks …

Photo by Robbin Myers.

There were boats …

Photo by Robbin Myers.

There were ambulances …

Photo by Dottie Wells.

There were fire trucks …

Photo by Dottie Wells.

And there were vehicles we are not quite sure how to describe!

Sunroofs took on a whole new purpose …

Windows made great seats …

Truck beds were filled …

Jeeps were jam-packed …

And cheery waves came from cabriolets …

 

The Old Lyme Fire Department pulled out all the stops (and ladders!) to celebrate the Seniors ….

Photo by Dottie Wells.

All along the route, people waved enthusiastically …

Photo by Dottie Wells.

Families congratulated their soon-to-be-graduates …

… while one little girl, full of eager anticipation, waited patiently with her mom for the parade to come into view!

Congratulations to all the soon-to be-graduates!