June 16, 2021

Lyme Academy Welcomes Community Back to Campus with Upbeat Concert

OLD LYME — Hundred came out yesterday evening to enjoy a free concert hosted by Lyme Academy of Fine Arts featuring singer Chris Gregor on guitar, who was followed by Brad Bensko and Kathleen Parks.

The crowd seemed genuinely pleased to be back on the grounds of the beloved institution, which has experienced a period of uncertainty in recent years as it transitioned back from a degree-granting college to a fine arts academy.

It was an evening for all ages …

… with something for everyone.

The music delighted the audience …

… and a wonderful evening was had by all.

There will be another free concert next Thursday evening, June 17, from 5 to 7 p.m. on the grounds of the Academy featuring the Java Groove.

Don’t miss it!

Two Lyme-Old Lyme HS Grads Selected for Team US Men’s Eight Competing at Tokyo Olympics

LYME/OLD LYME — In a truly remarkable achievement, two Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) graduates have been selected to represent the US in the Men’s Eight at the 2021 Tokyo Olympics.

Austin Hack, LOLHS Class of 2010.

Austin Hack, who graduated from LOLHS in 2010, and Liam Corrigan, a member of the LOLHS Class of 2014, both rowed for LOLHS and then went on to represent their respective universities at Stanford (Hack) and Harvard (Corrigan).

Hack is the only returning member of the 2021 US Men’s Eight. He was a member of the 2016 US Men’s Eight team, which came in fourth in the Rio de Janeiro Olympics in Brazil.

His list of rowing accomplishments is encyclopedic with an abbreviated version including membership of the following national teams: Junior, 2009-10; Under 23, 2011-12; Senior, 2013-15, 2019; and Olympic, 2016, 2020.

In terms of international results, Hack finished fifth in the the eight at the 2019 World Rowing Championships and also fifth in the four at the 2019 World Rowing Cup II.

He won bronze in the eight at the 2016 World Rowing Cup II and won the eight at the 2016 Final Olympic Qualification Regatta.

Going back further than 2016, the list is equally extensive and can be viewed in detail at this link.

Hack has been working part time for McKinsey and Company, but during the COVID-19 pandemic, he was living and training in Old Lyme. Part of his training was on a bicycle adapted by Steve Morrissey of Old Lyme on which Hack ultimately set new records on all the Strava segments in town.

Asked how they felt about their son, Austin, and Corrigan’s success in being named to the US Men’s Eight, Dr. Gregory Hack and Dr. Barbara Hack told LymeLine exclusively, “We are beyond thrilled for both Austin and Liam! On the men’s side of rowing, the US will only be sending an 8+ and a 4- to Tokyo.  To think that of those 12 seats, two of them will be occupied by sons of Old Lyme is just incredible!”

The Hacks added, “It’s a testament not only to their grit and strength, but also to their years of training/coaching starting right here at Lyme-Old Lyme High School.”

Liam Corrigan, LOLHS Class of 2014.

Corrigan graduated from Harvard with an honors degree in Physics and Astrophysics and while at Harvard, he was captain of the men’s crew.

Since graduating, he has moved to Oakland, Calif. to train with the men’s training center for the upcoming Olympics. His accomplishments with Team USA include finishing fourth in the pair at the 2017 World Rowing Under 23 Championships, placing fifth in the four at the 2015 World Rowing Junior Championships, taking eighth in the pair at the 2014 Youth Olympic Games and finishing ninth in the eight at the 2014 World Rowing Junior Championships.

Corrigan recently rowed in the men’s four that won the B final at the 2019 World Rowing Under 23 Championships.

Responding to a question about how they felt after learning Liam had been selected for the US Men’s Eight, Brian and Joan Corrigan said, “It is difficult to describe how overjoyed and proud we are to see Liam on his way to achieving goals, which he set for himself many years ago. We have watched him work diligently over the years, and are ecstatic that he is finding success.”

They noted, “We are grateful to LOLHS, the Old Lyme Rowing Association (OLRA) and the Town of Lyme for their support over many years,” concluding, “We feel so fortunate to live in such a wonderful community.”

Liam Corrigan is at the front right of this photo of the Harvard boat.

Speaking on behalf of the OLRA, Candace and Paul Fuchs commented, “‘The Old Lyme Rowing Association is bursting with pride over the dedication and perseverance of our athletes and their families, which brought us to this historic moment. In partnership with the Town of Old Lyme and Regional School District 18, our little organization is pleased to provide a place for big kids to play and find success.’

Sadly, neither family can attend the Olympics in person due to COVID-19 restrictions, but Barbara and Greg Hack ended their email to us enthusiastically with the words, “Go Old Lyme!  Go USA!”  We wholeheartedly second that sentiment and wish Austin and Liam every success in their Olympic endeavors!

Editor’s Note: Old Lyme Rowing Association (OLRA) oversees LOLHS crew, and Blood Street Sculls. Blood  Street Sculls was established by Fred Emerson (on Blood Street) around 1965, for the cultivation of rowing for local high school students, college students and adults.  

Some of the country’s most notable athletes called Blood Street Sculls home in the early days including  Jim Dietz who is one of the most decorated scullers in US history (named to three US Olympic teams).  

A strong supporter of the nascent sport of women’s rowing, Fred Emerson organized some of the first  women’s national championships to be held on Rogers Lake in 1971, which included athletes who would  ultimately represent the US in Olympic competition.  

Blood Street Sculls was an incubator for rowing programs for high schools and colleges across New England. USCGA and Connecticut College got their start in this manner.

Anita DeFrantz first learned to row as a Connecticut College student, rowing on Rogers Lake. DeFrantz went on to represent the US in the 1976 women’s eight. She was a vocal legal authority when US athletes were prohibited from  competition in 1980 and she has risen through the ranks of international rowing and is currently the vice  president of the IOC.  

Significant achievements — excluding those by Hack and Corrigan —  by OLRA athletes since 2000 include:

Olympic Athletes
2008: Andrew Bolton Men’s lightweight four spare
2012: Sarah Trowbridge Women’s Open double sculls  

World Championships  
Sarah Trowbridge: 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011  

Under 23 World Championships 
Hannah Paynter: 2019  

Junior World Championships  
Christiana Congdon: 2017  

Since record-keeping was initiated in 1997, over 100 athletes in OLRA programs have gone on to  represent their university in collegiate rowing competition.  

Paul Fuchs, Director of Rowing, holds the men’s lightweight course record for Head of the Charles, and competed on seven US World Championship teams. He has coached at the Olympic and World  championship levels and serves on the Executive Council of FISA, the international governing body for  the sport of rowing.

Lyme-Old Lyme Girl’s Tennis are Class S State Champions for First Time in School History!

The Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) Girl’s Tennis team poses with the Class S state championship trophy yesterday after defeating Litchfield 5-2.

LYME/OLD LYME — The top-seeded Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) girl’s tennis team became the CIAC Class S state champions yesterday for the first time in school history when they stormed to  a 5-2 victory over #2 seeds Litchfield yesterday.  The tournament final was played indoors at the Magic Lincer Tennis Club in Manchester.

The Old Lyme girls finished the season undefeated at 20-0 and also won the Shoreline Conference title along the way.

Asked how she felt about this extraordinarily successful season, team coach Lauren Rahr, who is also a math teacher at LOLHS, responded, “It has been such an amazing season with a wonderful group of girls. When I woke up this morning I still couldn’t believe that we actually won a state tournament!”

The LOLHS Girl’s Tennis Team first-year coach Lauren Rahr accepts the Class S state championship trophy after her team’s win Thursday.

She continued, “This year was my first year coaching tennis. Previously, I had played tennis for Waterford High School and Endicott College. It was always my dream to teach math at a high school and coach their girls tennis team. Being hired at Old Lyme provided me with the opportunity to pursue these goals.”

Rahr added, “Going into this season, I didn’t want to let the girls down, and I hoped that they would all get along and win some matches. But what actually happened this season was more special than I ever imagined. The minute I saw them play and really compete on the court I knew we had something special.”

Describing the team overall, Rahr said, “Out of my 10 starting varsity players, one had competed in a varsity high school match before this season. There was a lot of nerves and inexperience when it came to match play, but each practice we ran mental toughness drills or talked tennis strategies to help bring the girls to the level they competed at all season long.”

Noting, “Tennis is such a wonderful sport because anyone can step on the court and swing a racket, Rahr pointed out, “But what makes a tennis player special is when they can analyze their short and their opponent’s shots. I like to call this “smart tennis” and by the end of the season all of my girls had accomplished this. Our change over conversations went from me doing most of the talking to them giving me detailed recollections of things they noticed and strategies they were using.”

In terms of statistics, Rahr recalled that, “During the regular season, the team competed at a high level winning 11 of their 16 matches 7-0. Three of my players went on to win the Shoreline conference individual tournament: Lauren Wallace and Alexis Fenton won the doubles draw and Samantha Tan won the ¾ singles draw.” She highlighted, “These three players were able to remain undefeated in post-season play as well as regular season. Livie Bass (four singles) was undefeated in team matches and clinched us both our semi-final win and our finals win.”

The LOLHS Girl’s Tennis team members deservedly celebrate being #1 in Class S statewide!

Talking specifically about the championship final, Rahr said, “Yesterday, every single girl went out on the court fighting not just for themselves, but for the team. This group of girls has passion, drive, and huge hearts. I feel so lucky and honored to have been able to coach them this year.”

She explained further, “During yesterday’s match, we knew winning doubles would put us in a good spot. My number one doubles pair of Lauren Wallace and Alexis Fenton won their match in record time, executing flawless doubles strategies, placement, and communication. Their win drove the momentum in our direction for the remainder of the match.”

She summed up Wallace and Fenton’s performance in the words, “Their leadership throughout the season has been a big part of our success.”

Rahr concluded, “This is one of those once in a lifetime moments that I will never forget, and I hope the girls will always remember too. No matter what else comes my way with coaching, I don’t know if anything can top this moment with this special group of girls.”

New ‘Family Club of CT River Valley’ Formed in Response to National Mom’s Club’s Intransigence on Racism,

Members of the new Family Club of the Connecticut River Valley share a smile in this photo taken when they gathered on the beach with some of their children. From left to right are Maraia Ener; Charity Archbald; Danielle Kuczkowski; Rachel Kaplan; and Jolene Brant. All photos submitted.

LYME/OLD LYME/AREAWIDE — The regional Connecticut Chapter of the Moms’ Club has been around for some 12 years and during that time, has supported many women as both new and seasoned moms. Recently, however, it took the difficult decision to leave the national umbrella of Moms’ Club and break away to form the Family Club of the Connecticut River Valley (FCCRV.)

Stefanie Hill, FCCRV Administrative Vice President, explained to LymeLine that this was not a decision taken lightly, noting that there had always been times when it was easier to look the other way when it came to the national Moms Club’s messaging and policies. For example, she pointed out, “We were not allowed to meet more than once a month during evenings or weekends because we were supposed to be at home supporting our husbands.”

Hill added, “We also assumed it was just old wording, which stated that the club was only “for at-home moms,” because our own club welcomed working moms.”

Club members could live with those things, she said, but then came the summer of 2020 when a major racial reckoning surfaced in the US. Understandably, Moms Clubs all across the country started discussing their response to this situation since, Hill said, “As moms, this affects us because we are actively raising children — the next generation in our society.”

One Club Chapter in California decided to make a simple statement and promise, “We stand with all moms and pledge that racial discrimination will stop with our kids.”

The national Moms Club, however, decided not to permit use of that statement and determined, to quote Hill, that, “Somehow standing for basic human rights is “political activity.”

The national Club took things even further, saying in a nutshell that if individual Clubs did not agree with the national position, then they should leave.

And so, over 200 chapters (including the regional Connecticut chapter) and thousands of members did leave due to the national Club’s stance that race itself is political and discussions about racism should not be entertained.

The local Old Lyme-Old Saybrook Moms Club took a vote among their own members and decided unanimously to leave the national club because, in Hill’s words, “We felt strongly that we needed to hold the organization, which we were a part of, accountable. Silencing conversations about race in our homes is harmful because silence is exactly how racism has continued to be so pervasive in our country.”

She added, “While we may think we are teaching “color blindness,” we are instead ignoring the realities of both personal and systemic racism that continue to harm people of color.”

Hill continued, “As parents we have the power to change the narrative for our children – that all skin colors, religions, genders, sexual orientations, abilities, and identities are valued. We are a part of a collective society and injustice towards those other than ourselves should not be ignored.”

The new Family Club of the Connecticut Valley organizes a variety of activities during the year. Here children of members are seen exploring the riverside during one of the events.

After the decision had been taken to leave the national Club, board members from the local club took up the call to action to form a more inclusive group.

In many ways the FCCRV is similar to the previous structure, which supported moms through making connections, but now it welcomes in addition dads and anyone serving in a parent role.

The mission statement of the FCCRV is, “… to create and promote a supportive network of families in the Connecticut River Valley, emphasizing inclusivity, diversity, kindness, and community engagement, to strengthen our parenting experiences and enrich the lives of our children.”

Hill emphasized the FCCRV is not a social justice club but they will not quash conversations about race as an essential parenting issue,” but instead encourage them.

She added, “While change is never easy, adapting is necessary … Family Club is choosing not to live in the past but instead to hope for a better future for all children. There is still a movement for social justice happening in our country that can’t be ignored. And parents in our communities still need support.”

Jolene Brant of Old Lyme, president of the newly-formed club, summed up her own feelings on creating the organization, saying, “I feel like now that we have created the Family Club, friends are joining and our membership is growing.”

The FCCRV now has some 30 members and welcomes new ones from Old Lyme, Lyme, East Lyme, Waterford, Old Saybrook, Westbrook, Chester, Deep River, and Essex. Many parents in the club are new parents or have elementary aged children, but parents with children of all ages are welcome.

Events hosted by members are held during the day, on weekdays or weekends to suit the varying schedules of members but monthly “social” meetings generally take place after school or on weekends to try and accommodate the most families. Evening ‘happenings’ for adults only are typically organized once a month and range from trivia nights to dessert and drinks.

One of the Club’s service activities was preparing flowers for the residents of Essex Meadows.

The Club plans two to four service projects a year to participate in the local community. One of these was preparing flowers in vases to take to the residents of Essex Meadows along with examples of artwork created by members’ children.

During the month of May, the FCCRV hosted a highly successful Diaper Drive to benefit the Shoreline Soup Kitchen and Pantries. The Drive not only raised funds bit also collected over 2,000 diapers for families in need.

Looking to the future, Brant concluded on a positive note, saying, “We are making an impact in the community with our outreach efforts, we are here to make our community stronger, and we are providing families with as much support as possible. I feel like we are making a difference, and I feel a sense of accomplishment.”

Editor’s Note: Visit this link for more information about the Family Club of the Connecticut River Valley, including details of how to join.

May 27 COVID-19 Update: Only One Town in CT Now in Red Zone; Lyme, Old Lyme Both Stay in Gray (Lowest) Zone; No New Cases in Either Town

This map, updated May 27, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are still in the (lowest) Gray Zone. (Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.) Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper. Details in italics are the same for each of the maps shown.

LYME/OLD LYME — The report issued Thursday, May 27, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks shows another dramatic improvement for the state as whole with the number of towns remaining in the Red Zone (indicating the highest COVID-19 new case rates) down to just one from last week’s number of eight.

The lone town still in the Red Zone is Putnam, which reported 19 cases in the past 14 days.

Both Lyme and Old Lyme remain in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone for two-week new case rates.

It is the third week for Old Lyme in that Zone, but Lyme is in the Gray Zone for an 11th straight week. It is very encouraging to see this number increase from 80 towns last week to 110 this week.

Neither Lyme nor Old Lyme reported any new cases in the May 27 report meaning Lyme holds steady at 107 cases and Old Lyme at 342.

Compare the map above with the one we published Dec. 18, 2020 to see the remarkable progress that has been made with controlling the spread of the virus through expansion of vaccination rates and improved mitigation strategies.

Map of Connecticut dated Dec. 17, 2020 showing both Lyme and Old Lyme now in the CT DPH-identified ‘Red Zone.’ This is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is over 15.

The 48 (down from 61 last week) towns in the Yellow (second lowest rate) Zone are: Ansonia, Barkhamsted, Beacon Falls, Bolton, Bridgeport, Bristol, Brooklyn, Cheshire, Clinton, Danbury, Derby, East Haven, East Lyme, Enfield, Glastonbury, Granby, Hamden, Killingly, Litchfield, Manchester, Meriden, Middletown, Monroe, Montville, Naugatuck, New Fairfield, New Haven, New London, North Haven, Norwalk, Norwich, Plainfield, Rocky Hill, Shelton, Stamford, Stratford, Suffield, Thomaston, Thompson, Tolland, Vernon, Wallingford, Waterford, West Haven, Westbrook, Winchester, Windham and Windsor

The Orange (second highest rate) Zone now has 10 (down from 20 last week) towns, which are: Bloomfield, Coventry, Cromwell, East Hartford, Hartford, Ledyard, New Britain, Salem, Waterbury and Willington.

  • The Gray category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is less than five or less than five reported cases.
  • The Yellow category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between five and nine reported cases.
  • The Orange category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between 10 and 14.
  • The Red category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town exceeds 15.

In all cases, this rate does not include cases or tests among residents of nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.

Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) also issued their latest weekly report of COVID data for the municipalities within their District.

North Stonington now joins Lyme and Old Lyme as the only towns in the nine-town district, which are reported to have less than five new cases in the past two weeks.

Ledge Light Director of Health Stephen Mansfield prefaces the report with the comment, “We are happy to see a continued decrease in the number of new cases throughout our jurisdiction and encourage everyone to get vaccinated! Most of the clusters reported by our contact tracers are associated with sporting events or family gatherings.”

Mansfield also notes, “The demand for vaccine is declining, and many providers are reporting that they have unfilled vaccination appointments at scheduled clinics. At this time, LLHD is vaccinating all individuals 18 and older.”

He adds, “Information regarding vaccination opportunities and other relevant information can be found at https://llhd.org/coronavirus-covid-19-situation/covid-19-vaccine/

The following link provides centralized access to Connecticut COVID data: https://data.ct.gov/stories/s/COVID-19-data/wa3g-tfvc/

Vaccination rates in Lyme and Old Lyme are also extremely encouraging with 79.4 percent of the population in Lyme having received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and the equivalent number for Old Lyme being 71.15 percent.

These are some of the highest percentages in the state.

May 25 COVID-19 Update: No New Cases in Either Lyme, Old Lyme; Cumulative Case Totals Hold at 107, 342 Respectively

LYME/OLD LYME —The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Tuesday, May 25, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health  (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Monday, May 24, shows that neither Lyme nor Old Lyme reported any new cases compared with the previous day.

Both towns held at their previous day’s cumulative case totals with Lyme at 107 and Old Lyme at 342.

This is the 12th reporting day in succession that there has been no change in the number of cumulative cases in Lyme and the fifth reporting day in succession for Old Lyme.

These Daily Reports are not issued by CT DPH on Saturdays or Sundays and therefore Monday’s data includes new cases from both weekend days.

The next new report will be issued in the afternoon of Wednesday, May 26.

Old Lyme –  No New Cases 

The May 25 Daily Data Report for Connecticut for data as at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 25, shows that Old Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 331 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 11 probable casesmaking a TOTAL of 342 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported May 24.

The total number of Old Lyme residents tested is 5,311, an increase of three over the May 24 number of 5,308.

Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 99 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases, making a TOTAL of 107 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Lyme residents tested is 1,426, which represents an increase of five over the May 24 number of 1,421.

May 24 COVID-19 Update: No New Cases in Either Town – Cumulative Case Totals Hold at 107 in Lyme, 342 in Old Lyme

LYME/OLD LYME —The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Monday, May 24, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health  (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Sunday, May 23, shows that neither Lyme nor Old Lyme reported any new cases compared with the previous day.

Both towns held at their previous day’s cumulative case totals with Lyme at 107 and Old Lyme at 342.

This is the 11th reporting day in succession that there has been no change in the number of cumulative cases in Lyme and the fourth reporting day in succession for Old Lyme.

These Daily Reports are not issued by CT DPH on Saturdays or Sundays and therefore Monday’s data includes new cases from both weekend days.

The next new report will be issued in the afternoon of Tuesday, May 25.

Old Lyme –  No New Cases 

The May 24 Daily Data Report for Connecticut for data as at 8:30 p.m. Sunday, May 24, shows that Old Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 331 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 11 probable casesmaking a TOTAL of 342 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported May 20.

The total number of Old Lyme residents tested is 5,308, an increase of 17 over the May 21 number of 5,291.

Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 99 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases, making a TOTAL of 107 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Lyme residents tested is 1,421, which represents an increase of four over the May 21 number of 1,417.

May 21 COVID-19 Update: No New Cases in Lyme, Old Lyme; Cumulative Totals Hold at 107, 342 Respectively

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

LYME/OLD LYME —The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Friday, May 21, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health  (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Thursday, May 20, shows that neither Lyme nor Old Lyme reported any new cases compared with the previous day.

Both towns held at their previous day’s cumulative case totals with Lyme at 107 and Old Lyme at 342.

This is the 10th reporting day in succession that there has been no change in the number of cumulative cases in Lyme and the third day in succession for Old Lyme.

These Daily Reports are not issued by CT DPH on Saturdays or Sundays and therefore Monday’s data includes new cases from both weekend days. The next new report will be issued in the afternoon of Monday, May 24.

Old Lyme –  No New Cases 

The May 21 Daily Data Report for Connecticut for data as at 8:30 p.m. Thursday, May 20, shows that Old Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 331 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 11 probable casesmaking a TOTAL of 342 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported May 20.

The total number of Old Lyme residents tested is 5,291, an increase of five over the May 20 number of 5,286.

Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 99 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases, making a TOTAL of 107 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Lyme residents tested is 1,417, which represents no change over the May 20 number of 1,417.

May 20 COVID-19 Update: Lyme, Old Lyme Remain in Gray (Lowest 2-Week Case Rate) Zone; No New Cases with OL Holding at 342, Lyme at 107; L-OL Vaccination Rates Among Highest in State

This map, updated May 20, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are now in the (lowest) Gray Zone. (Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.) Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper.

LYME/OLD LYME — The report issued Thursday, May 20, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks shows another massive improvement for the state as whole with the number of towns remaining in the Red Zone (indicating the highest COVID-19 new case rates) falling to eight from last week’s number of 26.

Both Lyme and Old Lyme are now in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone for two-week new case rates. It is the second week for Old Lyme in that Zone, but Lyme is in the Gray Zone for a 10th straight week. Eighty towns are in this zone increasing from 51 last week.

Compare the map above with the one we published Dec. 18, 2020 to see the remarkable progress that has been made with controlling the spread of the virus through expansion of vaccination rates and improved mitigation strategies.

Map of Connecticut dated Dec. 17 showing both Lyme and Old Lyme now in the CT DPH-identified ‘Red Zone.’ This is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is over 15.

Neither Lyme nor Old Lyme reported any new cases in the May 20 report meaning Lyme holds steady at 107 cases and Old Lyme at 342.

The eight towns in the Red (highest rate with 15 or more COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population) zone are East Hartford, Hartford, Meriden, Morris, New Britain, Putnam, Thomaston and Waterbury.

The 61 (up from 51 last week) towns in the Yellow (second lowest rate) Zone are: Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Berlin, Bethel, Bolton, Branford, Bristol, Brookfield, Brooklyn, Burlington, Coventry, Danbury, Deep River, Durham, East Hampton, East Lyme, East Windsor, Enfield, Griswold, Groton, Haddam, Hebron, Litchfield, Marlborough, Middletown, Monroe, Montville, New Canaan, New Fairfield, New Milford, Newington, Newtown, North Haven, North Stonington, Norwich, Plainfield, Plymouth, Redding, Rocky Hill, Seymour, Shelton, Somers, South Windsor, Southington, Stafford, Stamford, Suffield, Thompson, Torrington, Vernon, Wallingford, Waterford, Watertown, West Hartford, West Haven, Wethersfield, Winchester, Windham, Windsor Locks, Wolcott and Woodbury.

The Orange (second highest rate) Zone now has 20 (down from 41 last week) towns : Bloomfield, Bridgeport, Cromwell, Derby, East Haven, Hamden, Killingly, Ledyard, Lisbon, Manchester, Naugatuck, New Haven, New London, Norwalk, Plainville, Prospect, Salem, Stratford, Willington and Windsor.

  • The Gray category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is less than five or less than five reported cases.
  • The Yellow category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between five and nine reported cases.
  • The Orange category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between 10 and 14.
  • The Red category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town exceeds 15.

In all cases, this rate does not include cases or tests among residents of nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.

Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) also issued their latest weekly report of COVID data for the municipalities within their District. Lyme and Old Lyme are the only towns in the nine-town district reported to have less than five new cases in the past two weeks.

Ledge Light Director of Health Stephen Mansfield prefaces the report with the comment, “We are happy to see a continued decrease in the number of new cases throughout our jurisdiction, and encourage everyone to get vaccinated! Most of the clusters reported by our contact tracers are associated with sporting events or family gatherings.”

Vaccination rates in Lyme and Old Lyme are also extremely encouraging with 77.5 percent of the population having received at least one does of the COVID-19 vaccine and the equivalent number for Old Lyme being 69.31 percent. These are some of the highest percentages in the state.

Large Crowd Approves All Items at Lyme Budget Meeting, Including Restoration of Open Space Funding to $1 Million

More than 200 people gathered on the green in front of Lyme Town Hall for Wednesday evening’s Budget Meeting. Photo submitted.

LYME — Some 225 residents turned out Wednesday wearing masks and carrying their folding chairs to attend the Lyme Annual Budget Meeting, which was held outdoors starting at 5 p.m. on the Lyme Consolidated School playing field.

Don Gerber, standing with microphone, served as Moderator for the meeting. Photo by Emily Bjornberg.

Don Gerber moderated the meeting.

All six items on the agenda were subsequently approved, most unanimously.

The meeting drew an unusually large attendance due to the Open Space issue. Photo by Emily Bjornberg.

The agenda item, which had drawn the huge (by Lyme standards) crowd was Item 5, namely the resolution to re-establish the goal for the Open Space Fund at $1 million for next year and to direct the Board of Finance to provide town contributions to the fund to maintain that level.

Several people spoke in support of Item 5 including Lyme First Selectman Steven Mattson, Open Space Commission member Anthony Irving, Tina West and Judy Schaff.

The Annual Budget Meeting was held outdoors under sunny skies. Photo by Emily Bjornberg.

Those who spoke against the Item 5 motion included Lyme Board of Finance Chairman Dan Hagan and Mary Powell-St.Louis, who is a member of the Region 18 Board of Education.
Agenda item 5 was ultimately approved by a vote of 202-10.

May 19 COVID-19 Update: One New Case in Old Lyme Takes Cumulative Total to 342, Lyme Steady at 107

LYME/OLD LYME —The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Wednesday, May 19, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health  (CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 18, shows that Old Lyme reported one new case compared with the previous day, while Lyme’s cumulative case total held at 107.

This is the eighth reporting day in succession that no new cases have been recorded in Lyme.

The next new report will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 20.

Old Lyme – Cumulative Cases Up One

The May 19 Daily Data Report for Connecticut for data as at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 18, shows that Old Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 331 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 11 probable casesmaking a TOTAL of 342 cases.

This represents an INCREASE OF ONE in the cumulative number of confirmed cases and NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of probable cases compared with those reported May 17.

The total number of Old Lyme residents tested is 5,275, an increase of 17 over the May 17 number of 5,268.

Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 99 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases, making a TOTAL of 107 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Lyme residents tested is 1,417, which represents an increase of four over the May 17 number of 1,413.

Lyme-Old Lyme’s Food Share Garden Reaches Fundraising Goal, Further Donations Will Support Additional Needs

Lyme-Old Lyme Community Share Garden Board Members gather for a photo. From left to right are Jack Larocca, Jim Ward, Peter Hunt, Amy Mastrangelo, and Sheila McTigue-Ward.

Editor’s Note: Several hours after we published this article, we heard the wonderful news from Jim Ward that the fundraising goal of $7,500 had been reached. He greatly appreciates this, “tremendous support to the start of the garden.” He notes however, that, “While this gives us the ability to install a fence and purchase tools and equipment we have other important projects in the pipeline such as an irrigation system, electrical hook up, and a shed. Any further donations will assist us towards the completion of these projects.”

OLD LYME —The Lyme-Old Lyme Food Share Garden (LOLFSG) set itself quite a challenge back at the end of March.  The group launched a crowdfunding campaign with a target to raise $7,500.

If that amount is successfully raised by May 26, then the project will receive a matching grant of $7500 from Sustainable CT’s Community Match Fund — an initiative of Eastern Connecticut State University’s Institute for Sustainable Energy that inspires, supports, and recognizes sustainability action by towns and cities statewide.

The Community Match Fund — supported by the Smart Seed Fund, Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation and the Connecticut Green Bank —provides a dollar-for-dollar match to donations raised from the community, doubling local investment in projects. 

As at today’s date, the campaign stands at a remarkable $7,145.00!

Old Lyme resident Jim Ward is the inspiration behind the Lyme-Old Lyme Community Share Garden.

Asked what he felt about the community’s response to the campaign, the originator of the project Jim ward said, “We are extremely pleased and excited about the community’s support. Not only are we about to reach our goal, but we also have added several new volunteers. The generosity of the residents of Lyme/Old Lyme demonstrates the commitment they have towards helping those in need.”

He added, “I would also like to thank SustainableCT for making this possible.”

The LOLFSG celebrated a significant accomplishment on May 1 when members of the Board of Directors and Garden Design Committee staked out the perimeter of the future food share garden at Town Woods Park in Old Lyme.

All produce from the garden will be donated to area food pantries and food banks. 

Ward, a resident of Old Lyme since 2006, was the inspiration behind the project. While working towards his UCONN Master Gardening Certificate in 2020, he volunteered with the Food for All garden in Clinton, CT.

As a volunteer, he was impressed by the organization of the garden, humbled by the increasing demands on community food banks and food pantries, and energized by the sense of community that the garden embodied. He noted similar trends while visiting similar gardens in Old Saybrook, Pomfret and Killingworth and sought to develop a garden in the Lyme-Old Lyme area.

In the ensuing months, Ward worked with multiple town agencies to procure a site at the Town Woods Park, a recreational park overseen by the town Parks & Recreation Commission.

Ward describes the site as “ideal” in that the sports fields are organically maintained and the parcel of land, in addition to the fields, contains a playground and the Lymes’ Senior Center, thus making the garden accessible to multi-generational families in the towns.

Furthermore, he notes, through generous cooperation with the Parks and Recreation Commision, the garden has access to water, electricity and parking. 

The LOLFSG plans to have a fully functional garden by the spring of 2022. To make this vision become a reality, the organization is actively involved in grant writing and fundraising.

Notably, the Lyme-Old Lyme Food Share Garden is raising money through a crowd-sourcing effort supported by Sustainable CT. 

Measuring for the garden are Peter Hunt (left) and Carie Tonovitz.

The money raised by LOLFSG’s crowdfunding campaign was launched to enable the organization to erect a deer/rodent fence and purchase tools and equipment. 

Ward was delighted to share with LymeLine that the deer fencing has now been ordered and is set for installation on June 5-6.  He noted that the Rubitiski family has offered their backhoe to dig a trench for the rodent part of the fence.

In other updates, he said that:

  • LOLCSG Board Member Amy Mastrangelo watches as Mike Baczewski of New England Pollinator Garden tests the soil at the garden.
    Baczewski generously donated the soil testing.

    Board member Amy Mastrangelo arranged for Mike Baczewski of New England Pollinator Gardens to take soil samples from the garden for testing. New England Pollinator Gardens is donating the testing to the garden project.

  • Estate Solutions of Branford donated several tools consisting of rakes, shovels, sprayer,  etc, with more to come.
  • A small group visited the Food For All Garden in Clinton where we were given a tour of the facility and the opportunity to ask questions about composting, fundraising, irrigation, volunteering, and many other topics. They also donated a picnic table to our cause.
  • A meeting is planned with United Way to discuss a possible collaboration.
  • The board has met several times in the past months and continues to work hard.
  • A bank account has been established and has a positive balance.
  • The Design Committee met at Town Woods and measured and staked out the garden area and installed “Future Site of LOL Food Share Garden” signs.
  • A donation of tools has been made.
  • A Region 18 high school student, Connie Pan, is painting a couple of Rain Barrels for us. One of the Rain Barrels is being donated to Old Lyme Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library for their new garden.
  • LOLCSG received a $350 grant from the CT Master Gardening Program. These funds were put towards the SustainableCT fundraising effort.
  • LOLCSG applied for a Pfizer Community Grant for an irrigation system.

If you wish to donate to this project, visit this link.

 

Town of Lyme Holds Annual Budget Meeting Tonight, Outdoors: Major Issue is Town’s Open Space Fund

LYME — UPDATED 5/18: The Town of Lyme will hold its Annual Budget Meeting Wednesday, May 19, at 5 p.m., in person and outside Lyme Town Hall at 480 Hamburg Rd. in Lyme.

Due to COVID restrictions, attendees are requested to bring a folding chair or umbrella if needed. Masks must be worn, and social distancing is required.

The proposed budget can be viewed at this link.

The following agenda items will be discussed and may be voted on:

  1. Acknowledge receipt of the Town of Lyme Annual Reports for the Fiscal Years ending June 30, 2019 and June 30, 2020.
  2. Consider and act on an Ordinance to repeal and replace Town of Lyme Code 157-23(c) to adjust the process for applying for mooring permits in the waters of the Town of Lyme.
  3. Consider and act on an Ordinance concerning the appointment of the Treasurer.
  4. Consider and act on a Resolution accepting North Lyme Cemetery and the assets of the North Lyme Cemetery Association.
  5. Consider and act on a Resolution to require the Board of Finance to set a minimum goal of $1,000,000 for the Open Space Reserve Fund.
  6. Consider and act on estimates of the Board of Finance for the Fiscal Year ending June 30, 2022.

Concern have been raised both directly with LymeLine.com, via email announcements, and on social media regarding the decision by the Lyme Board of Finance to reduce the Town’s Open Space Reserve Fund by 50 percent from $1 million to $500,000. The Lyme Democratic Town Committee has also been actively encouraging residents to attend the meeting via e-blasts and social media posts..

On April 27, around 60 people attended the board of finance’s virtual Public Hearing on the budget to express their concerns verbally, while a number of others wrote letters that were read into the record.

A subsequent board of finance Special Meeting held April 29, confirmed the reduction in the size of the fund. Since then several groups have been actively spreading awareness of the change to their members and other townspeople.

First Selectman Steven Mattson has introduced a Resolution requiring the board of finance to set a minimum goal of $1 million for the Open Space Reserve Fund.

Mattson explained to LymeLine.com in a phone conversation on Sunday that the Resolution has, in fact, three objectives as follows, “to reset the [Open Space Fund] goal, to budget next year (financial year 2022-23) to reach one million [dollars in the Fund], and then [if it is depleted to make a land acquisition] to replenish it as soon as possible.”

Mattson stressed that residents cannot vote to increase the allocation to the Open Space Fund for the upcoming budget year (2021-22), which has already been determined by the Lyme Board of Finance. The Resolution — if approved — will change the Open Space Fund goal and its funding in the 2022-23 financial year.

All eligible Town of Lyme voters will be able to vote at the meeting.

Editor’s Note: The full text of the First Selectman’s Resolution is as follows:

A RESOLUTION DIRECTING THE LYME BOARD OF FINANCE TO SET A MINIMUM GOAL FOR THE OPEN SPACE RESERVE FUND OF $1,000,000

Whereas: The Plan of Conservation and Development has consistently supported Open Space acquisition as one of the prime objectives of the town residents, and,

Whereas: The Board of Finance is responsible for adopting financial plans and policies that meet the objectives of the Plan of Conservation and Development, and,

Whereas: The Lyme community has expressed its overwhelming desire for the Open Space Reserve Fund to be supported by appropriations in the annual budget to grow this fund to an amount that will allow the town to be in a strong position to acquire large critical properties that further the goals of the town and the Open Space Committee,

Now, Therefore: Be it resolved by the Town of Lyme in Town Meeting convened, that the Board of Finance be required to set a minimum goal of $1,000,000 for the Open Space Reserve Fund, take all measures to achieve this goal in the 2022/23 budget plan, and replenish this fund to this goal level in a timely fashion following the use of any of the Open Space Reserve Funds for property acquisitions.

 

May 14 COVID-19 Update: No New Cases in Either Lyme, Old Lyme; Lyme Holds at 107, OL at 341

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

LYME/OLD LYME —The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Friday, May 14, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health(CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Thursday, May 13, shows that no new COVID-19 cases were recorded in either Lyme or Old Lyme compared with the previous day. Lyme and Old Lyme held at their previous day’s cumulative case totals of Lyme at 107 and Old Lyme at 341.

This is the sixth reporting day in succession that there has been no change in the number of cumulative cases in Old Lyme and the fifth day in succession for Lyme.

These Daily Reports are not issued by CT DPH on Saturdays or Sundays and therefore Monday’s data will include new cases from both weekend days. The next new report will be issued in the afternoon of Monday, May 17.

Old Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

The May 14 Daily Data Report for Connecticut for data as at 8:30 p.m. Thursday, May 13, shows that Old Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 330 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 11 probable casesmaking a TOTAL of 341 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Old Lyme residents tested is 5,245, an increase of four over the previous day’s number of 5,241.

Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 99 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases, making a TOTAL of 107 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Lyme residents tested is 1,409, which represents an increase of three over the previous day’s number of 1,406.

May 13 COVID-19 Update: Lyme, Old Lyme in Lowest Zone for 2-Week New Case Rates, No New Cases in Either Town, Vaccination Rates High in Both Towns

This map, updated May 13, shows the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are now in the (lowest) Gray Zone. (Only cases among persons living in community settings are included in this map; the map does not include cases among people who reside in nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.) Map: Ver 12.1.2020 Source: CT Department of Public Health Get the data Created with Datawrapper.

LYME/OLD LYME — The report issued Thursday, May 13, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks shows another huge improvement for the state as whole with the number of towns remaining in the Red Zone (indicating the highest COVID-19 new case rates) falling to 26 from last week’s number of 54.

Both Lyme and Old Lyme are now in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone for two-week new case rates. It is the first week for Old Lyme in that Zone but Lyme is in the Gray Zone for a ninth straight week. Fifty one towns are in this zone increasing from 29 last week.

Neither Lyme nor Old Lyme reported any new cases in the May 13 report meaning Lyme holds steady at 107 cases and Old Lyme at 341.

Overall, the number of towns in each zone is shown below with the previous week’s number in parentheses:

  • 51 (29) towns are now in the (lowest case rate) Gray Zone
  • 51 (31) are in the (lowest but one) Yellow Zone
  • 41 (55) are in the (second highest case rate) Orange Zone.

Lyme and Old Lyme join 49 other towns in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone: Andover, Ashford, Avon, Bethany, Bethlehem, Bozrah, Bridgewater, Canaan, Chaplin, Chester, Clinton, Colchester, Colebrook, Cornwall, Darien, Deep River, East Granby, East Haddam, Eastford, Ellington, Essex, Franklin, Granby, Griswold, Guilford, Hampton, Kent, Lyme, Middlefield, Norfolk, North Canaan, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook, Pomfret, Portland, Preston, Roxbury, Salisbury, Scotland, Sharon, Southbury, Sterling, Union, Warren, Washington, Westbrook, Weston, Westport, Willington, Woodbridge and Woodbury.

The 51 towns in the Yellow (second lowest rate) Zone are: Bethel, Branford, Brookfield, Brooklyn, Canterbury, Canton, Cheshire, Columbia, Coventry, Durham, East Hampton, East Lyme, Easton, Fairfield, Farmington, Glastonbury, Greenwich, Haddam, Harwinton, Killingworth, Ledyard, Lisbon, Madison, Mansfield, Milford, Monroe, Montville, New Canaan, New Fairfield, New Hartford, Newington, Newtown, North Branford, Orange, Oxford, Redding, Ridgefield, Rocky Hill, Simsbury, Somers, Stonington, Suffield, Thompson, Tolland, Trumbull, Vernon, West Hartford, Wethersfield, Wilton, Winchester and Woodstock.

The Orange (second highest rate) Zone now has 41 towns : Ansonia, Barkhamsted, Beacon Falls, Berlin, Bloomfield, Bolton, Bristol, Burlington, Cromwell, Danbury, East Windsor, Enfield, Groton, Hebron, Lebanon, Litchfield, Manchester, Marlborough, Middlebury, Middletown, Naugatuck, New Milford, North Haven, Norwalk, Plainfield, Plainville, Putnam, Salem, Shelton, South Windsor, Southington, Stafford, Stamford, Torrington, Voluntown, Wallingford, Waterford, Watertown, Windham, Windsor and Windsor Locks.

  • The Gray category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is less than five or less than five reported cases.
  • The Yellow category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between five and nine reported cases.
  • The Orange category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between 10 and 14.
  • The Red category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town exceeds 15.

In all cases, this rate does not include cases or tests among residents of nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.

This report is issued daily, but only updated weekly on Thursdays. The most recent report was updated Thursday, May 13; the next updated report will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 20.

Old Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

The May 13 Daily Data Report for Connecticut for data as at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 12, shows that Old Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 330 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 11 probable casesmaking a TOTAL of 341 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Old Lyme residents tested is 5,241, an increase of four over the previous day’s number of 5,237.

Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 99 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases, making a TOTAL of 107 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Lyme residents tested is 1,406, which represents an increase of six over the previous day’s number of 1,401.

Vaccination Rates

Lyme is ahead of Old Lyme in terms of the percentage of its total population that have received a first dose, with 75.99 (74.65) percent vaccinated compared with 67.08 (65.56) percent in Old Lyme. The previous week’s percentages are shown in parentheses.

The percentages for both towns for the age cohort 65+ are very encouraging with Lyme now having 100 percent of seniors 65 and above fully vaccinated while 98.17 (97.69) percent of the same age cohort are fully vaccinated in Old Lyme.

The percentages for the age cohort 45-64, however, similarly show Lyme with 64.62 (53.91) fully vaccinated while Old Lyme has 59.72 (57.66) percent in that category.

Regarding the age 15-44 cohort, Lyme is in the lead again with 48.8 (37.71) percent fully vaccinated while Old Lyme stands at 43.87 (33.99) percent.

Three Fatalities in Old Lyme Since Pandemic Began, None in Lyme

According to the report mentioned above, there have now been THREE fatalities in Old Lyme. Asked Tuesday, Feb. 9, for details of this third fatality, Ledge Light Health Department Director of Health Stephen Mansfield responded, “We have not been notified of any recent deaths in Old Lyme. Keep in mind that that report is compiled by the Connecticut Department of Public Health; deaths are not reportable to local health districts.”

He added, “I can’t speak for their data sources.”

The two fatalities from Old Lyme previously reported in 2020 were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

No fatalities have been reported in Lyme.

May 12 COVID-19 Update: No New Cases in Either Lyme, Old Lyme; Old Lyme Holds at 341 for 4th Day, Lyme at 107

LYME/OLD LYME —The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Wednesday, May 12, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health(CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 11, shows that no new COVID-19 cases were recorded in either Lyme or Old Lyme compared with the previous day. Lyme and Old Lyme held at their previous day’s cumulative case totals of, respectively, 107 and 341.

This is the fourth reporting day in succession that there has been n change in the number of cumulative cases in Old Lyme and the second day in succession for Lyme.

The next new report will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 13, when the weekly reports of two-week case rates and vaccination rates will also be issued.

Old Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

The May 12 Daily Data Report for Connecticut for data as at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 11, shows that Old Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 330 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 11 probable casesmaking a TOTAL of 341 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Old Lyme residents tested is 5,237, an increase of three over the previous day’s number of 5,234.

Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 99 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases, making a TOTAL of 107 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Lyme residents tested is 1,401, which represents no change over the previous day’s number of 1,401.

Editor’s Note: We inadvertently published this article initially with May 11 in the headline. This is the same article with the correct date in the headline.

May 11 COVID-19 Update: No New Cases in Either Lyme, Old Lyme; Lyme Holds at 107, OL at 341

LYME/OLD LYME —The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Tuesday, May 11, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health(CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Monday, May 10, shows that no new COVID-19 cases were recorded in either Lyme or Old Lyme compared with the previous day. Lyme and Old Lyme held at their previous day’s cumulative case totals of, respectively, 107 and 341.

These Daily Reports are not issued by CT DPH on Saturdays or Sundays and therefore Monday’s data includes new cases from both weekend days. The next new report will be issued in the afternoon of Wednesday, May 12.

Old Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

The May 11 Daily Data Report for Connecticut for data as at 8:30 p.m. Monday, May 10, shows that Old Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 330 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 11 probable casesmaking a TOTAL of 341 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Old Lyme residents tested is 5,234, an increase of eight over the previous day’s number of 5,226.

Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 99 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases, making a TOTAL of 107 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Lyme residents tested is 1,401, which represents no change over the previous day’s number of 1,401.

Two-Week New Case Rates Zones: Old Lyme in Yellow, Lyme in Gray

The report issued Tuesday, May 11, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks shows another major improvement for the state as whole with the number of towns remaining in the Red Zone (indicating the highest COVID-19 new case rates) falling to 54 from last week’s number of 97.

During a news conference held Thursday, May 6, Gov. Ned Lamont attributed the decrease in infections to the continuing roll-out of the coronavirus vaccine.

Both Lyme and Old Lyme remain in the zones in which they were placed last week with Old Lyme still in the Yellow (second lowest new case rate) Zone while Lyme remains in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone.

Old Lyme is now one of the 31 towns in the Yellow Zone. Last week, there were 18 towns in this Zone, so this is encouraging news as more towns fall out of the Orange (second highest) Zone.

Lyme is in the Gray Zone for two-week new case rates, recording an eighth straight week in the lowest zone. Twenty-two towns were in this zone last week and, in more good news, this number has increased to 29 this week.

In both cases, the increased total in each Zone reflects a decreased new case rate. (Four zones are specified by the CT DPH — see details below.)

Overall, the number of towns in each zone is shown below with the previous week’s number in parentheses:

  • 29 (22) towns are now in the (lowest case rate) Gray Zone
  • 31 (18) are in the (lowest but one) Yellow Zone
  • 55 (32) are in the (second highest case rate) Orange Zone.

All the remaining 54 towns are in the Red Zone — last week’s number was 97.

Lyme joins 21 other towns in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone: Andover, Bozrah, Bridgewater, Canaan, Chaplin, Chester, Colebrook, Cornwall, Deep River, East Granby, Essex, Franklin, Hampton, Kent, Lisbon, Lyme, Middlefield, Norfolk, Pomfret, Roxbury, Salisbury, Scotland, Sharon, Union, Warren, Washington, Weston, Westport and Willington.

Old Lyme joins 30 other towns in the Yellow (second lowest rate) Zone: Avon, Brooklyn, Clinton, Colchester, Columbia, Darien, Durham, East Haddam, East Hampton, East Lyme, Easton, Glastonbury, Granby, Griswold, Killingworth, Ledyard, Marlborough, New Fairfield, New Hartford, Newington, Portland, Preston, Rocky Hill, Somers, Southbury, Stonington, Tolland, West Hartford, Woodbridge and Woodbury

The Orange (second highest rate) Zone now has 55 towns : Ashford, Beacon Falls, Berlin, Bethany, Bethel, Bethlehem, Bloomfield, Bolton, Branford, Brookfield, Canterbury, Canton, Cheshire, Coventry, Danbury, Ellington, Fairfield, Farmington, Goshen, Greenwich, Groton, Guilford, Haddam, Harwinton, Lebanon, Litchfield, Madison, Mansfield, Montville, New Canaan, New Milford, North Canaan, North Haven, North Stonington, Old Saybrook, Oxford, Redding, Ridgefield, Salem, Simsbury, South Windsor, Sprague, Stafford, Suffield, Thompson, Vernon, Voluntown, Waterford, Westbrook, Wethersfield, Wilton, Winchester, Windsor, Windsor Locks and Woodstock.

  • The Gray category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is less than five or less than five reported cases.
  • The Yellow category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between five and nine reported cases.
  • The Orange category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between 10 and 14.
  • The Red category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town exceeds 15.

In all cases, this rate does not include cases or tests among residents of nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.

This report is issued daily, but only updated weekly on Thursdays. The most recent report was updated Thursday, May 6; the next updated report will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 13.

More Detail on Two-Week Case Rates: Old Lyme Down, Lyme Up

LLHD Director of Health Stephen Mansfield

On Thursday, May 6, Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) also issued their latest weekly report of COVID data for the municipalities within their District.

Ledge Light Director of Health Stephen Mansfield prefaces the report with the comment, “Although the number of new cases remain relatively stable, our contact tracers continue to report clusters, especially those associated with social gatherings and sporting events.”

He stresses, however, “Although we are making great strides with our COVID vaccination program, it is still imperative that we remain diligent in our mitigation strategies.”

The latest Average Daily Case Rate announced Thursday, May 6, (from 4/18 to 5/01) have stayed constant in Old Lyme but decreased in Lyme.

The two-week case rates are as follows:

  • Old Lyme from 9.7 to 9.7
  • Lyme from 9.2 to 6.1

The same report shows that the case numbers in Week 1 and Week 2 respectively and recorded for the period 4/18 to 5/01  (compared with the previous two-week case rate shown in parentheses) are as follows:

  • Lyme had(1) case in Week 1 and(2) in Week 2
  • Old Lyme had(3) cases in Week 1 and(7) in Week 2

This data was updated May 6. The next Ledge Light Weekly Data Report for its District will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 13.

Vaccination Rates

Lyme is ahead of Old Lyme in terms of the percentage of its total population that have received a first dose, with 74.65 (72.06) percent vaccinated compared with 65.56 (63.89) percent in Old Lyme. The previous week’s percentages are shown in parentheses.

The percentages for both towns for the age cohort 65+ are very encouraging with Lyme now having 100 percent of seniors 65 and above fully vaccinated while 97.69 (92.85) percent of the same age cohort are fully vaccinated in Old Lyme.

The percentages for the age cohort 45-64, however, show the numbers reversing with Old Lyme having 57.66 percent fully vaccinated marginally ahead of Lyme at 53.91 percent.

Regarding the age 15-44 cohort, Lyme comes back into the lead again with 37.71 percent fully vaccinated while Old Lyme stands at 33.99 percent.

The state changed its reporting format for vaccination rates on April 15 and their new data does not align precisely with the former data. The detailed data below was partly updated April 29. One change is that the state is now reporting 65 and above as one group, whereas it was previously split into 65-74 and 75 and above. We will present new vaccination rate tables shortly.

Old Lyme
Total population:  7,306
Estimated population age 65-74:  1,067
Estimated population age 75 and above:  794

DateTotal pop. 1st dose given1st dose given as % of total pop. 1st dose given age 65-741st dose given as % of age 65-74 pop. 1st dose given age 75 & above1st dose given as % of age 75 & above pop.
3/12,11528.95%83578%73092%
3/82,62635,94%94588.57%76496.22%
3/153,07042.02%1,02796.25%797100.38%
3/243,24144.36%99893.53%75394.84%
3/313,55348.63%1,00193.81%75595.09%
4/74,17057.08%1,078101.08%76396.1%
4/154,80665.78%1,104103.47%77597.61%
4/294,66863.89%

Lyme
Total population:  2,316
Estimated population age 65-74:  372
Estimated population age 75 and above:  274

DateTotal pop. 1st dose gven1st dose given as % of total population 1st dose given age 65-741st dose given as % of age 65-74 pop.1st dose given age 75 & above1st dose given as a % of age 75 & above pop.
3/160526.12%24466%22281%
3/876733.12%28175.54%22983.58%
3/1580134.59%26972.31%20675.18%
3/241,13549.01%36297.31%279101.82%
3/311,25954.36%372100.00%289105.47%
4/71,51065.2%414111.29%295107.66%
4/151,73975.09%430115.59%298108.76%
4/291,66972.06%

Three Fatalities in Old Lyme Since Pandemic Began, None in Lyme

According to the report mentioned above, there have now been THREE fatalities in Old Lyme. Asked Tuesday, Feb. 9, for details of this third fatality, Ledge Light Health Department Director of Health Stephen Mansfield responded, “We have not been notified of any recent deaths in Old Lyme. Keep in mind that that report is compiled by the Connecticut Department of Public Health; deaths are not reportable to local health districts.”

He added, “I can’t speak for their data sources.”

The two fatalities from Old Lyme previously reported in 2020 were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

No fatalities have been reported in Lyme.

Connecticut Hospital Occupancy

At the request of several readers, we have added a new report showing the respective rates of hospital occupancy at local hospitals. The data for this report is obtained from the Connecticut Hospital Occupancy Report published weekly by the CT DPH and extracted from the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) facility-level data for hospital utilization aggregated on a weekly basis (Friday to Thursday).

The most recent report is dated Feb. 19 and covers the two-week period from 2/12 to 2/18. No subsequent updates have been issued.

Hospital Name% Adult In-patient Occupancy % Adult ICU Occupancy
Data from 1/8 - 1/14
Backus84.424.2
Lawrence & Memorial90.891.4
Middlesex78.289.9
Yale-New Haven87.982.6
Statewide80.860.9
Data from 1/15 - 1/21
Backus83.224.2
Lawrence & Memorial84.090.7
Middlesex83.388.7
Yale-New Haven91.487.9
Statewide79.960.8
Data from1/22 - 1/29
Backus66.10.0
Lawrence & Memorial90.690.0
Middlesex77.286.3
Yale-New Haven84.425.8
Statewide81.262.3
Data from1/29 - 2/5
Backus8622
Lawrence & Memorial8893
Middlesex6661
Yale-New Haven9189
Statewide79.360.7
Data from 2/1 - 2/11
Backus83.822.2
L & M87.687.9
Middlesex68.881.5
Yale-New Haven91.788.3
Statewide80.261.0
Data from 2/12 - 2/18
Backus79.122.4
L & M84.182.1
Middlesex74.488.1
Yale-New Haven90.883.6
Statewide77.959.8

Editor’s Note: The state issues a COVID-19 metric report daily around 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, which includes current data up to the previous evening. In light of the ongoing rise in Coronavirus cases, we publish a new weekday update reporting confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases in Lyme and Old Lyme. 

Big Y Withdraws Application for Gas Station/Convenience Store on Halls Rd., But Another Similar Application May be Planned Nearby

The site of the proposed Big Y Express at the western end of Halls Rd. in Old Lyme.

OLD LYME — In a letter dated May 10, addressed to Rachel Gaudio, Chairman of Old Lyme’s Inland Wetlands & Watercourses Commission, Ryan Scrittorale, PE, Project Manager at Benesch requested the commission to withdraw the application made on behalf of his client, Big Y Foods, Inc. for the “development at 99 Halls Rd. and 25 Neck Rd.”

The proposal was for a 2,100 sq. ft. convenience mart and a gas station on a site surrounding Essex Savings Bank that is currently vacant and partially cleared. The application stated that the fuel system consists of six dispensers under a protective canopy and two double wall fiberglass underground fuel tanks with electronic monitoring.

Scrittorale’s letter states, “Big Y Foods, Inc. has prided itself on being a Neighborhood Supermarket and is vested in the community of Old Lyme.”

5/12 UPDATE: We are now hearing via a social media post that a Letter of Intent has been signed for the purchase of 100 Halls Rd. with a view to submitting a proposal to construct a gas station/convenience store on that site  We contacted the person, who wrote the post, to verify it. The person does not wish to be identified in this article but states their  source is ‘reliable.’

100 Halls Rd is immediately opposite the 99 Halls Rd./25 Neck Rd. discussed above. If traveling up Halls Rd. from Lyme St., 100 Halls Rd. is the blue building on the left-hand-side of Halls Rd. where it meets Neck Rd. The Big Y proposal was for the right-hand-side of Halls Rd. at the same location. 

We will publish more information as we obtain further details.

 

May 10 COVID-19 Update: Lyme’s Cumulative Case Total Increases by One to 107, No Change in Old Lyme at 341

LYME/OLD LYME —The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Monday, May 10, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health(CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Sunday, May 9, shows that Lyme increased by one new COVID-19 case since the previous day to 107 while Old Lyme held at its previous day’s cumulative total of 341.

These Daily Reports are not issued by CT DPH on Saturdays or Sundays and therefore Monday’s data includes new cases from both weekend days. The next new report will be issued in the afternoon of Monday, May 10.

Lyme – Cumulative Cases Up One

Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 99 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases, making a TOTAL of 107 cases.

This represents an INCREASE of ONE in the cumulative number of confirmed cases and NO CHANGE in the number of probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Lyme residents tested is 1,401, which represents an increase of four over the previous day’s number of 1,397.

Old Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases

The May 10 Daily Data Report for Connecticut for data as at 8:30 p.m. Sunday, May 9, shows that Old Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 330 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 11 probable casesmaking a TOTAL of 341 cases.

This represents an NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Old Lyme residents tested is 5,226, an increase of 24 over the previous day’s number of 5,202.

Two-Week New Case Rates Zones: Old Lyme in Yellow, Lyme in Gray

The report issued Monday, May 10, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks shows another major improvement for the state as whole with the number of towns remaining in the Red Zone (indicating the highest COVID-19 new case rates) falling to 54 from last week’s number of 97.

During a news conference held Thursday, May 6, Gov. Ned Lamont attributed the decrease in infections to the continuing roll-out of the coronavirus vaccine.

Both Lyme and Old Lyme remain in the zones in which they were placed last week with Old Lyme still in the Yellow (second lowest new case rate) Zone while Lyme remains in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone.

Old Lyme is now one of the 31 towns in the Yellow Zone. Last week, there were 18 towns in this Zone, so this is encouraging news as more towns fall out of the Orange (second highest) Zone.

Lyme is in the Gray Zone for two-week new case rates, recording an eighth straight week in the lowest zone. Twenty-two towns were in this zone last week and, in more good news, this number has increased to 29 this week.

In both cases, the increased total in each Zone reflects a decreased new case rate. (Four zones are specified by the CT DPH — see details below.)

Overall, the number of towns in each zone is shown below with the previous week’s number in parentheses:

  • 29 (22) towns are now in the (lowest case rate) Gray Zone
  • 31 (18) are in the (lowest but one) Yellow Zone
  • 55 (32) are in the (second highest case rate) Orange Zone.

All the remaining 54 towns are in the Red Zone — last week’s number was 97.

Lyme joins 21 other towns in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone: Andover, Bozrah, Bridgewater, Canaan, Chaplin, Chester, Colebrook, Cornwall, Deep River, East Granby, Essex, Franklin, Hampton, Kent, Lisbon, Lyme, Middlefield, Norfolk, Pomfret, Roxbury, Salisbury, Scotland, Sharon, Union, Warren, Washington, Weston, Westport and Willington.

Old Lyme joins 30 other towns in the Yellow (second lowest rate) Zone: Avon, Brooklyn, Clinton, Colchester, Columbia, Darien, Durham, East Haddam, East Hampton, East Lyme, Easton, Glastonbury, Granby, Griswold, Killingworth, Ledyard, Marlborough, New Fairfield, New Hartford, Newington, Portland, Preston, Rocky Hill, Somers, Southbury, Stonington, Tolland, West Hartford, Woodbridge and Woodbury

The Orange (second highest rate) Zone now has 55 towns : Ashford, Beacon Falls, Berlin, Bethany, Bethel, Bethlehem, Bloomfield, Bolton, Branford, Brookfield, Canterbury, Canton, Cheshire, Coventry, Danbury, Ellington, Fairfield, Farmington, Goshen, Greenwich, Groton, Guilford, Haddam, Harwinton, Lebanon, Litchfield, Madison, Mansfield, Montville, New Canaan, New Milford, North Canaan, North Haven, North Stonington, Old Saybrook, Oxford, Redding, Ridgefield, Salem, Simsbury, South Windsor, Sprague, Stafford, Suffield, Thompson, Vernon, Voluntown, Waterford, Westbrook, Wethersfield, Wilton, Winchester, Windsor, Windsor Locks and Woodstock.

  • The Gray category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is less than five or less than five reported cases.
  • The Yellow category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between five and nine reported cases.
  • The Orange category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between 10 and 14.
  • The Red category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town exceeds 15.

In all cases, this rate does not include cases or tests among residents of nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.

This report is issued daily, but only updated weekly on Thursdays. The most recent report was updated Thursday, May 6; the next updated report will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 13.

More Detail on Two-Week Case Rates: Old Lyme Down, Lyme Up

LLHD Director of Health Stephen Mansfield

On Thursday, May 6, Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) also issued their latest weekly report of COVID data for the municipalities within their District.

Ledge Light Director of Health Stephen Mansfield prefaces the report with the comment, “Although the number of new cases remain relatively stable, our contact tracers continue to report clusters, especially those associated with social gatherings and sporting events.”

He stresses, however, “Although we are making great strides with our COVID vaccination program, it is still imperative that we remain diligent in our mitigation strategies.”

The latest Average Daily Case Rate announced Thursday, May 6, (from 4/18 to 5/01) have stayed constant in Old Lyme but decreased in Lyme.

The two-week case rates are as follows:

  • Old Lyme from 9.7 to 9.7
  • Lyme from 9.2 to 6.1

The same report shows that the case numbers in Week 1 and Week 2 respectively and recorded for the period 4/18 to 5/01  (compared with the previous two-week case rate shown in parentheses) are as follows:

  • Lyme had(1) case in Week 1 and(2) in Week 2
  • Old Lyme had(3) cases in Week 1 and(7) in Week 2

This data was updated May 6. The next Ledge Light Weekly Data Report for its District will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 13.

Vaccination Rates

Lyme is ahead of Old Lyme in terms of the percentage of its total population that have received a first dose, with 74.65 (72.06) percent vaccinated compared with 65.56 (63.89) percent in Old Lyme. The previous week’s percentages are shown in parentheses.

The percentages for both towns for the age cohort 65+ are very encouraging with Lyme now having 100 percent of seniors 65 and above fully vaccinated while 97.69 (92.85) percent of the same age cohort are fully vaccinated in Old Lyme.

The percentages for the age cohort 45-64, however, show the numbers reversing with Old Lyme having 57.66 percent fully vaccinated marginally ahead of Lyme at 53.91 percent.

Regarding the age 15-44 cohort, Lyme comes back into the lead again with 37.71 percent fully vaccinated while Old Lyme stands at 33.99 percent.

The state changed its reporting format for vaccination rates on April 15 and their new data does not align precisely with the former data. The detailed data below was partly updated April 29. One change is that the state is now reporting 65 and above as one group, whereas it was previously split into 65-74 and 75 and above. We will present new vaccination rate tables shortly.

Old Lyme
Total population:  7,306
Estimated population age 65-74:  1,067
Estimated population age 75 and above:  794

DateTotal pop. 1st dose given1st dose given as % of total pop. 1st dose given age 65-741st dose given as % of age 65-74 pop. 1st dose given age 75 & above1st dose given as % of age 75 & above pop.
3/12,11528.95%83578%73092%
3/82,62635,94%94588.57%76496.22%
3/153,07042.02%1,02796.25%797100.38%
3/243,24144.36%99893.53%75394.84%
3/313,55348.63%1,00193.81%75595.09%
4/74,17057.08%1,078101.08%76396.1%
4/154,80665.78%1,104103.47%77597.61%
4/294,66863.89%

Lyme
Total population:  2,316
Estimated population age 65-74:  372
Estimated population age 75 and above:  274

DateTotal pop. 1st dose gven1st dose given as % of total population 1st dose given age 65-741st dose given as % of age 65-74 pop.1st dose given age 75 & above1st dose given as a % of age 75 & above pop.
3/160526.12%24466%22281%
3/876733.12%28175.54%22983.58%
3/1580134.59%26972.31%20675.18%
3/241,13549.01%36297.31%279101.82%
3/311,25954.36%372100.00%289105.47%
4/71,51065.2%414111.29%295107.66%
4/151,73975.09%430115.59%298108.76%
4/291,66972.06%

Three Fatalities in Old Lyme Since Pandemic Began, None in Lyme

According to the report mentioned above, there have now been THREE fatalities in Old Lyme. Asked Tuesday, Feb. 9, for details of this third fatality, Ledge Light Health Department Director of Health Stephen Mansfield responded, “We have not been notified of any recent deaths in Old Lyme. Keep in mind that that report is compiled by the Connecticut Department of Public Health; deaths are not reportable to local health districts.”

He added, “I can’t speak for their data sources.”

The two fatalities from Old Lyme previously reported in 2020 were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

No fatalities have been reported in Lyme.

Connecticut Hospital Occupancy

At the request of several readers, we have added a new report showing the respective rates of hospital occupancy at local hospitals. The data for this report is obtained from the Connecticut Hospital Occupancy Report published weekly by the CT DPH and extracted from the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) facility-level data for hospital utilization aggregated on a weekly basis (Friday to Thursday).

The most recent report is dated Feb. 19 and covers the two-week period from 2/12 to 2/18. No subsequent updates have been issued.

Hospital Name% Adult In-patient Occupancy % Adult ICU Occupancy
Data from 1/8 - 1/14
Backus84.424.2
Lawrence & Memorial90.891.4
Middlesex78.289.9
Yale-New Haven87.982.6
Statewide80.860.9
Data from 1/15 - 1/21
Backus83.224.2
Lawrence & Memorial84.090.7
Middlesex83.388.7
Yale-New Haven91.487.9
Statewide79.960.8
Data from1/22 - 1/29
Backus66.10.0
Lawrence & Memorial90.690.0
Middlesex77.286.3
Yale-New Haven84.425.8
Statewide81.262.3
Data from1/29 - 2/5
Backus8622
Lawrence & Memorial8893
Middlesex6661
Yale-New Haven9189
Statewide79.360.7
Data from 2/1 - 2/11
Backus83.822.2
L & M87.687.9
Middlesex68.881.5
Yale-New Haven91.788.3
Statewide80.261.0
Data from 2/12 - 2/18
Backus79.122.4
L & M84.182.1
Middlesex74.488.1
Yale-New Haven90.883.6
Statewide77.959.8

Editor’s Note: The state issues a COVID-19 metric report daily around 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, which includes current data up to the previous evening. In light of the ongoing rise in Coronavirus cases, we publish a new weekday update reporting confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases in Lyme and Old Lyme. 

May 7 COVID-19 Update: One New Case in Old Lyme Takes Cumulative Total to 341, Lyme Holds at 106

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

LYME/OLD LYME —The Daily Data Report for Connecticut issued Friday, May 7, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health(CT-DPH) for data as at 8:30 p.m. Thursday, May 6, shows that Old Lyme increased by one new COVID-19 case since the previous day to 341 while Lyme held at its previous day’s cumulative total of 106.

These Daily Reports are not issued by CT DPH on Saturdays or Sundays and therefore Monday’s data includes new cases from both weekend days. The next new report will be issued in the afternoon of Monday, May 10.

Old Lyme – Cumulative Cases Up One

The May 7 Daily Data Report for Connecticut for data as at 8:30 p.m. Thursday, May 6, shows that Old Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 330 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 11 probable casesmaking a TOTAL of 341 cases.

This represents an INCREASE of ONE in the cumulative number of confirmed cases and NO CHANGE in the number of probable cases compared with those reported the previous day.

The total number of Old Lyme residents tested is 5,202, an increase of nine over the previous day’s number of 5,193.

Lyme – No Change in Cumulative Cases 

Lyme has a cumulative total (since the outbreak began) of 98 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases, making a TOTAL of 106 cases.

This represents NO CHANGE in the cumulative number of confirmed or probable cases compared with those reported the previous day, and represents the third consecutive reporting day with this number.

The total number of Lyme residents tested is 1,397, which represents an increase of two over the previous day’s number of 1,397.

Two-Week New Case Rates Zones: Old Lyme in Yellow, Lyme in Gray

The report issued Thursday, May 6, by the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) for the average daily rate of new cases of COVID-19 by town during the past two weeks shows another major improvement for the state as whole with the number of towns remaining in the Red Zone (indicating the highest COVID-19 new case rates) falling to 54 from last week’s number of 97.

During a news conference held Thursday, May 6, Gov. Ned Lamont attributed the decrease in infections to the continuing roll-out of the coronavirus vaccine.

Both Lyme and Old Lyme remain in the zones in which they were placed last week with Old Lyme still in the Yellow (second lowest new case rate) Zone while Lyme remains in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone.

Old Lyme is now one of the 31 towns in the Yellow Zone. Last week, there were 18 towns in this Zone, so this is encouraging news as more towns fall out of the Orange (second highest) Zone.

Lyme is in the Gray Zone for two-week new case rates, recording an eighth straight week in the lowest zone. Twenty-two towns were in this zone last week and, in more good news, this number has increased to 29 this week.

In both cases, the increased total in each Zone reflects a decreased new case rate. (Four zones are specified by the CT DPH — see details below.)

Overall, the number of towns in each zone is shown below with the previous week’s number in parentheses:

  • 29 (22) towns are now in the (lowest case rate) Gray Zone
  • 31 (18) are in the (lowest but one) Yellow Zone
  • 55 (32) are in the (second highest case rate) Orange Zone.

All the remaining 54 towns are in the Red Zone — last week’s number was 97.

Lyme joins 21 other towns in the Gray (lowest rate) Zone: Andover, Bozrah, Bridgewater, Canaan, Chaplin, Chester, Colebrook, Cornwall, Deep River, East Granby, Essex, Franklin, Hampton, Kent, Lisbon, Lyme, Middlefield, Norfolk, Pomfret, Roxbury, Salisbury, Scotland, Sharon, Union, Warren, Washington, Weston, Westport and Willington.

Old Lyme joins 30 other towns in the Yellow (second lowest rate) Zone: Avon, Brooklyn, Clinton, Colchester, Columbia, Darien, Durham, East Haddam, East Hampton, East Lyme, Easton, Glastonbury, Granby, Griswold, Killingworth, Ledyard, Marlborough, New Fairfield, New Hartford, Newington, Portland, Preston, Rocky Hill, Somers, Southbury, Stonington, Tolland, West Hartford, Woodbridge and Woodbury

The Orange (second highest rate) Zone now has 55 towns : Ashford, Beacon Falls, Berlin, Bethany, Bethel, Bethlehem, Bloomfield, Bolton, Branford, Brookfield, Canterbury, Canton, Cheshire, Coventry, Danbury, Ellington, Fairfield, Farmington, Goshen, Greenwich, Groton, Guilford, Haddam, Harwinton, Lebanon, Litchfield, Madison, Mansfield, Montville, New Canaan, New Milford, North Canaan, North Haven, North Stonington, Old Saybrook, Oxford, Redding, Ridgefield, Salem, Simsbury, South Windsor, Sprague, Stafford, Suffield, Thompson, Vernon, Voluntown, Waterford, Westbrook, Wethersfield, Wilton, Winchester, Windsor, Windsor Locks and Woodstock.

  • The Gray category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is less than five or less than five reported cases.
  • The Yellow category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between five and nine reported cases.
  • The Orange category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town is between 10 and 14.
  • The Red category is defined as when the Average Daily Rate of COVID-19 Cases Among Persons Living in Community Settings per 100,000 Population By Town exceeds 15.

In all cases, this rate does not include cases or tests among residents of nursing home, assisted living, or correctional facilities.

This report is issued daily, but only updated weekly on Thursdays. The most recent report was updated Thursday, May 6; the next updated report will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 13.

More Detail on Two-Week Case Rates: Old Lyme Down, Lyme Up

LLHD Director of Health Stephen Mansfield

On Thursday, May 6, Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) also issued their latest weekly report of COVID data for the municipalities within their District.

Ledge Light Director of Health Stephen Mansfield prefaces the report with the comment, “Although the number of new cases remain relatively stable, our contact tracers continue to report clusters, especially those associated with social gatherings and sporting events.”

He stresses, however, “Although we are making great strides with our COVID vaccination program, it is still imperative that we remain diligent in our mitigation strategies.”

The latest Average Daily Case Rate announced Thursday, May 6, (from 4/18 to 5/01) have stayed constant in Old Lyme but decreased in Lyme.

The two-week case rates are as follows:

  • Old Lyme from 9.7 to 9.7
  • Lyme from 9.2 to 6.1

The same report shows that the case numbers in Week 1 and Week 2 respectively and recorded for the period 4/18 to 5/01  (compared with the previous two-week case rate shown in parentheses) are as follows:

  • Lyme had(1) case in Week 1 and(2) in Week 2
  • Old Lyme had(3) cases in Week 1 and(7) in Week 2

This data was updated May 6. The next Ledge Light Weekly Data Report for its District will be issued in the afternoon of Thursday, May 13.

Vaccination Rates

Lyme is ahead of Old Lyme in terms of the percentage of its total population that have received a first dose, with 74.65 (72.06) percent vaccinated compared with 65.56 (63.89) percent in Old Lyme. The previous week’s percentages are shown in parentheses.

The percentages for both towns for the age cohort 65+ are very encouraging with Lyme now having 100 percent of seniors 65 and above fully vaccinated while 97.69 (92.85) percent of the same age cohort are fully vaccinated in Old Lyme.

The percentages for the age cohort 45-64, however, show the numbers reversing with Old Lyme having 57.66 percent fully vaccinated marginally ahead of Lyme at 53.91 percent.

Regarding the age 15-44 cohort, Lyme comes back into the lead again with 37.71 percent fully vaccinated while Old Lyme stands at 33.99 percent.

The state changed its reporting format for vaccination rates on April 15 and their new data does not align precisely with the former data. The detailed data below was partly updated April 29. One change is that the state is now reporting 65 and above as one group, whereas it was previously split into 65-74 and 75 and above. We will present new vaccination rate tables shortly.

Old Lyme
Total population:  7,306
Estimated population age 65-74:  1,067
Estimated population age 75 and above:  794

DateTotal pop. 1st dose given1st dose given as % of total pop. 1st dose given age 65-741st dose given as % of age 65-74 pop. 1st dose given age 75 & above1st dose given as % of age 75 & above pop.
3/12,11528.95%83578%73092%
3/82,62635,94%94588.57%76496.22%
3/153,07042.02%1,02796.25%797100.38%
3/243,24144.36%99893.53%75394.84%
3/313,55348.63%1,00193.81%75595.09%
4/74,17057.08%1,078101.08%76396.1%
4/154,80665.78%1,104103.47%77597.61%
4/294,66863.89%

Lyme
Total population:  2,316
Estimated population age 65-74:  372
Estimated population age 75 and above:  274

DateTotal pop. 1st dose gven1st dose given as % of total population 1st dose given age 65-741st dose given as % of age 65-74 pop.1st dose given age 75 & above1st dose given as a % of age 75 & above pop.
3/160526.12%24466%22281%
3/876733.12%28175.54%22983.58%
3/1580134.59%26972.31%20675.18%
3/241,13549.01%36297.31%279101.82%
3/311,25954.36%372100.00%289105.47%
4/71,51065.2%414111.29%295107.66%
4/151,73975.09%430115.59%298108.76%
4/291,66972.06%

Three Fatalities in Old Lyme Since Pandemic Began, None in Lyme

According to the report mentioned above, there have now been THREE fatalities in Old Lyme. Asked Tuesday, Feb. 9, for details of this third fatality, Ledge Light Health Department Director of Health Stephen Mansfield responded, “We have not been notified of any recent deaths in Old Lyme. Keep in mind that that report is compiled by the Connecticut Department of Public Health; deaths are not reportable to local health districts.”

He added, “I can’t speak for their data sources.”

The two fatalities from Old Lyme previously reported in 2020 were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

No fatalities have been reported in Lyme.

Connecticut Hospital Occupancy

At the request of several readers, we have added a new report showing the respective rates of hospital occupancy at local hospitals. The data for this report is obtained from the Connecticut Hospital Occupancy Report published weekly by the CT DPH and extracted from the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) facility-level data for hospital utilization aggregated on a weekly basis (Friday to Thursday).

The most recent report is dated Feb. 19 and covers the two-week period from 2/12 to 2/18. No subsequent updates have been issued.

Hospital Name% Adult In-patient Occupancy % Adult ICU Occupancy
Data from 1/8 - 1/14
Backus84.424.2
Lawrence & Memorial90.891.4
Middlesex78.289.9
Yale-New Haven87.982.6
Statewide80.860.9
Data from 1/15 - 1/21
Backus83.224.2
Lawrence & Memorial84.090.7
Middlesex83.388.7
Yale-New Haven91.487.9
Statewide79.960.8
Data from1/22 - 1/29
Backus66.10.0
Lawrence & Memorial90.690.0
Middlesex77.286.3
Yale-New Haven84.425.8
Statewide81.262.3
Data from1/29 - 2/5
Backus8622
Lawrence & Memorial8893
Middlesex6661
Yale-New Haven9189
Statewide79.360.7
Data from 2/1 - 2/11
Backus83.822.2
L & M87.687.9
Middlesex68.881.5
Yale-New Haven91.788.3
Statewide80.261.0
Data from 2/12 - 2/18
Backus79.122.4
L & M84.182.1
Middlesex74.488.1
Yale-New Haven90.883.6
Statewide77.959.8

Editor’s Note: The state issues a COVID-19 metric report daily around 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, which includes current data up to the previous evening. In light of the ongoing rise in Coronavirus cases, we publish a new weekday update reporting confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases in Lyme and Old Lyme.