October 27, 2020

State Senate, House Candidates on Lyme, Old Lyme Ballots Respond to our Questions

  1. What do you believe are currently the three most pressing issues in the state of Connecticut?
  2. From the three issues you cite in your response to Question1, identify the one that you think is the most pressing and explain your choice. Then expand on steps you believe should be taken to resolve it and how you could contribute to that resolution process?
  3. What personal characteristics do you embody that justify why people should vote for you?

We gave a 350-word limit for the response to each question to which each candidate strictly adhered: we are most appreciative of that.

We are delighted that all the candidates responded to our questions in a timely manner. We thank them sincerely and are pleased to publish their responses today accompanied by their respective biographies and photos.

There is a third candidate on the ballot for the State Senate 20th District, Joseph Taraya. We sent him the same invitation to respond to our questions as the other candidates, and this was the reply we received: “I fully endorse Ms. Martha Marx. She’ll be a good addition to our state senate chamber.”

We should also state that, again in keeping with our long-held policy, we will not be making any candidate endorsements.

Click on the links below to read each candidate’s responses:

CT State Senate, 20th District (includes the Town of Old Lyme)

Paul Formica (R – incumbent)

Martha Marx (D)

CT State Senate, 33rd District (includes the Town of Lyme)

Norm Needleman (D – incumbent)

Brendan Saunders (R)

CT House of Representatives, 23rd District (includes the Towns of Lyme and Old Lyme)

Devin Carney (R- incumbent)

David Rubino (D)

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Lyme Street Invokes a ‘Little Whimsy’ with an Influx of ‘Fairy Doors’

The Fairy House outside Old Lyme Memorial Town Hall.

OLD LYME — Take a stroll down Lyme Street this month, look very carefully and you will see all kinds of mystical, magical Fairy Houses tucked into trees, fancifully formed against fences and lingering on lawns.

Find this fairy House is at 30 Lyme Street.

This little piece of wonderment has come about because, through Oct. 28, a variety of businesses, nonprofits, and private residences on Lyme Street has chosen to participate in the 2nd annual “Fairy Doors on Lyme Street.”

The Fairy Door at Lyme Art Association is exquisite.

There are 14 fairy doors on the grounds of the Lyme Academy of Fine Arts (LAFA), created by Region 18 students and LAFA alumni.

Another 16 fairy doors can be found along Lyme Street and all the fairy doors can be seen from the sidewalk.

See this masterful creation by Tammi Flynn at EF Watermelon.

LymeLine caught up with Cheryl Poirier, one of the coordinators, who explained, “Fairy Doors on Lyme Street is a way to add a little whimsy to our days, especially this year as we are all needing more smiles than ever.”

She continued, “Whether walking into Old Lyme Town Hall or on your way to one of the small businesses on Lyme Street, it’s fun to look down and see that someone used their creativity to share some fun with neighbors and friends.”

At 78 Lyme St. (see photo above), two graduates of the Savannah College of Art and Design took on the fun of creating, “A village of fairy doors,” amidst the greenery of the front lawn.

This wonderful fairy dropped into Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds.

Olivia Denison and Alexandra Vasquez Dheming were New York City roommates working in the theater industry when COVID shut down their work.

They came to wait out the pandemic at Olivia’s parent’s home in Old Lyme pending the return of theater in New York, and now the roommates’ fairy door village contribution is a delightful, artistic endeavor for everyone who either lives on or walks down Lyme Street to enjoy.

The Old Lyme Arts District reminds all that Lyme Street is a residential street, and asks that social distancing and face masks are used as always.
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COVID Cases Increase in Both Lyme, Old Lyme; OL Adds Three, Total Now 32 Cases; Total in Lyme Now 10

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

OLD LYME/LYME — On Friday afternoon, Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) reported three new confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Old Lyme and one in Lyme in their COVID-19 summary for the week ending Oct. 16.

These latest cases in Old Lyme are a 61-year-old male, a 35-year-old male, and a 38-year-old female.

The case in Lyme is a male for whom no age is available.

This takes the total number of cases in Old Lyme to 32 including two fatalities. The number of surviving cases in Old Lyme now comprises 15 males and 15 females ranging in age from 19- to 82-years-old. The two fatalities were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

The total number of cases in Lyme now rises to 10 and comprises four females and six males ranging in age from one- to 68-years-old. There have been no fatalities in Lyme.

This afternoon’s report, which covers all the towns in the LLHD and includes Lyme and Old Lyme, is prefaced with these words, “As you will see, new cases continue to rise. Although there is no singular reason for this increase, our contact tracers continue to report that they have observed many instances of family and social gathering connections. Cases associated with institutions (schools, long-term care facilities, etc.) remain relatively low.”

Ledge Light Health District states their data may conflict with the data DPH reports on their website, as there is often a delay in posting data at the state level. The data LLHD reports is current as of noon on the Friday on which it is issued.

Gender and age details of the confirmed cases in Lyme to date are:

  1. Male, age 34
  2. Female, age 61
  3. Female, age 34
  4. Male, age 1
  5. Male, age 34
  6. Male, age 20
  7. Male, aged 68
  8. Female, age 21
  9. Female, age 62
  10. Male, age unknown

To demonstrate the growth in confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme, the table below is a summary of the cases that LymeLine.com has reported since March 31 when the first case was announced and also includes both fatalities.

DateCumulative no. of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme
March 311
April 44
April 96
April 107
April 1510
April 1812
May 113
May 1515
May 2616
June 817
June 1018
June 1419
June 2221
June 2422
July 1722
July 2823
Sept. 224
Sept. 426
Sept. 1527
Oct. 128
Oct. 829
Oct. 1630
Oct. 1631
Oct. 1632

Details of all Old Lyme’s confirmed surviving cases to date are as follows:

  1. Female, age 64
  2. Female, age 21
  3. Male, age 27
  4. Female, age 53
  5. Female, age 61
  6. Female, age 29
  7. Male, age 40
  8. Male, age 53
  9. Female, age 60
  10. Male, age 45
  11. Female, age 20
  12. Female, age 43
  13. Female, age 48
  14. Male, age 70
  15. Male, age 67
  16. Female, age 68
  17. Male, age 50
  18. Male, age 21
  19. Female, age 48
  20. Female, age 34
  21. Male, age 20
  22. Male, age 28
  23. Male, age 74
  24. Male, age 61
  25. Female, age 19
  26. Male, age 31
  27. Female, age 25
  28. Male, age 61
  29. Male, age 35
  30. Female, age 38

Old Lyme First Selectman Timothy Griswold has previously noted that the 21-year-old female with a confirmed case (#2 in the list immediately above) was tested in Florida, but used an Old Lyme address although she does not live here. Because she gave the Old Lyme address, Griswold said that LLHD must report her as an Old Lyme resident.

Residents and businesses are urged to access up-to-date information regarding the pandemic from reputable sources including the Ledge Light Health District website (www.llhd.org), Facebook (@LedgeLightHD), Twitter (@LedgeLightHD), and Instagram (@LedgeLightHD).

Editor’s Note: Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) serves as the local health department in southeast Connecticut for the towns of Lyme and Old Lyme as well as East Lyme, Groton, Ledyard, New London, North Stonington,  Stonington and Waterford. As a health district, formed under Connecticut General Statutes Section 19a-241, LLHD is a special unit of government, allowing member municipalities to provide comprehensive public health services to residents in a more efficient manner by consolidating the services within one organization.

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It’s the End of the Season for ‘The Farmer’s Market’ at Tiffany Farms This Morning

View of The Farmer’s Market at Tiffany Farms in Lyme.

LYME —‘The Farmer’s Market at Tiffany Farms’ in Lyme is open this Saturday, Oct. 16, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. This will be the final day of the season for 2020.

Vendors this morning include

  • Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm
  • Bittersweet Farm
  • Biscotti & Beyond
  • Chatfield Hollow Farm
  • Dondero Orchards
  • Falls Brook Organic Farm
  • From the Farm
  • Long Table Farm
  • TALK Seafood
  • Traveling Italian Chef
  • Wave Hill Breads

Jennifer Tiffany, who runs the market with her husband Bill Hurtle, told LymeLine by phone, “We really struggled with whether to open at all this year, but in the end, we decided that we’re not going to let the community down, we’re not going to let the farmers down and we’re not going to let our family down.”

Bill Hurtle and Jen Tiffany who are preparing to open ‘The Farmers Market at Tiffany Farms’ on June 15.

The pair therefore continued with their plans to open the market but putting new guidelines into place in view of the COVID-19 situation. They are asking all prospective visitors to the market to, “wear a mask” and also — in a delightful turn of phrase — “to keep one cow-length apart.” Tiffany adds that they hope people will also recognize the need, “to stay home if you are not feeling well.”

“The Heart Seen ‘Round Lyme” looks out at the community from the silo at Tiffany Farms.

And as a visual for the positive attitude they would like to convey to the community, Tiffany noted that the silo at the farm now has a huge heart — which was painted by her daughter Lisa Simiola — affixed to it thanks to the volunteer efforts of Wilcox Tree Experts. Tiffany said that Wilcox, “helped their neighbors lift the “Heart Seen ‘Round Lyme.”

Editor’s Note: We wish Jen and Bill the very best on Opening Day and throughout the season, which lasts until mid-October.

Visit this link to read an article we published last year about the inaugural season at The Farmer’s Market.

 

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Old Lyme Boys Continue Unbeaten Run, Defeat Coginchaug 6-1

OLD LYME — Allyson Gleason’s Old Lyme boys continued their unbeaten run with a convincing 6-1 win over Coginchaug Thursday afternoon on the Lyme-Old Lyme High School home field.

Tim O’Brien, Jesper Silberberg and David Evers each had a goal for Old Lyme while Anders Silberberg, Avery Welch and Luke Celic each had a goal and an assist for the ‘Cats.

Coginchaug’s lone goal was scored by Shane Buckheit unassisted.

Jonah Lathrop was in goal for Old Lyme and made eight saves; Dylan Zolnik was in goal for Coginchaug and notched six saves

Old Lyme’s record is now 4-0-1.

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Both Old Lyme Soccer Teams Crush North Branford Opponents; Girls Win 7-0, Boys 6-0

A corner taken by Abby Manthous (center) led to Old Lyme’s second goal against North Branford and she also assisted the third goal scored by the Wildcats. Photo by E. Mauro.

LYME/OLD LYME — In a remarkable display of strength and skill, both Old Lyme soccer teams came away with convincing victories over their North Branford counterparts Wednesday afternoon. Playing at home, the Old Lyme girls won 7-0 while the boys, playing away, handed a 6-0 defeat to the Thunderbirds.

First half goals in the girl’s game were scored by Mackenize Machnik assisted by Alexis Fenton with 27:59 on the clock and then Grace Lathrop headed in the second goal off of a corner kick by Abby Manthous with 15:21 remaining.

Alexis Fenton scored 1 minute and 50 seconds into the second half with an Abby Manthous assist followed by a Livie Bass goal with 28:02 left in the half. Alexis Fenton had the assist on the second goal in the second half.

Ella Curtis-Reardon assisted Kayla O’Leary’s goal with 10:31 on the clock and Maddie McCullouch scored the sixth goal unassisted with 8:21 remaining.

Maddie McCullouch (center) scored the sixth goal for Old Lyme unassisted. Photo by E. Mauro.

The seventh and final goal came when Alexis Fenton scored a penalty after she had been tripped in the box with around six minutes left in the game.

Sam Grey made two saves for the Wildcats in goal.

The boy’s game saw both Anders Silberberg and Jesper Silberberg contribute two goals and an assist each, while Owen Macadam and Tim O’Brien also both scored a goal apiece.

Avery Welch, Nevin Joshy and Lucas Dasilva each added assists for the Wildcats.

Jonah Lathrop was in goal for Old Lyme and made one save.

Michael Virginelli was in goal for North Branford and notched seven saves.

Old Lyme’s record is now 3-0-1.

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Mile Creek Bridge Reopens

Celebrating the opening of the now refurbished Mile Creek Bridge over the Black Hall River are, from left to right, Lauren Girasoli and daughter Cecilia, Michele Dickey, Buttons (Tim Griswold’s dog), Randie Kahrl, Old Lyme First Selectman Tim Griswold and Old Lyme Town all Office Manager Michele E. Hayes. Photo by Tim Griswold. Girasoli, Dickey and Kahrl are all near-neighbors of the bridge.

OLD LYME — 3:45pm UPDATE: The bridge is now OPEN! A small celebration was held Friday afternoon featuring the group gathered in the photo above when the Mile Creek Bridge was officially reopened to traffic again after an extended closure.

A delighted Old Lyme First Selectman Timothy Griswold called LymeLine.com to share the news. He said Lyme-Old Lyme Schools were, “Looking forward to rolling over the new bridge again on Monday.”

Old Lyme First Selectman Timothy Griswold announced in his newsletter issued today that the Mile Creek bridge will officially re-open later today.

He notes, “As you pass over the bridge, you will notice new pavement on each side and the shiny, new guard rails on each side of the road.”

The new, carved inscription on the Mile Creek Bridge, which reopens today. This photo by Christopher Read was taken before the bridge was completed.

Griswold extended thanks to, “Todd and Tom Machnik and their staff at Machnik Bros. Construction for their hard work in completing this project,” adding, “Thank you also to residents for your patience and understanding as the project took longer to complete than originally anticipated due to delays by the company that fabricated the bridge decking.”

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Wildcat Boys Start Soccer Season With Big 3-1 Win Over Morgan

LYME/OLD LYME — Starting the season in great form, Old Lyme defeated perennial Shoreline Conference rival Morgan of Clinton 3-1 today at home.

Avery Welch scored two goals for the Wildcats with assists from Anders Silberberg and Owen Macadam. Mike Milazzo scored for Old Lyme with an assist from Avery Welch.

Alex Gallardo scored Morgan’s only goal.

In net for Old Lyme was Jonah Lathrop who had five saves, while Bailey Goss was in goal for Morgan and made eight saves.

Old Lyme is now 1-0-0.

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Diebolt Clarifies His Plans for 220 (Approx.) Apartments on Hatchetts Hill (Includes 70 Affordable Housing Units); Says “It’s 100% Good for the Town”

The boundary marked on this map indicates the perimeter of the 20.6 acres owned by Mark Diebolt, which is the proposed site of a housing development. The site is already zoned for multi-family housing.

OLD LYME — Describing his proposed housing development off Hatchetts Hill Rd. in Old Lyme as, “A one hundred percent good thing for the town,” Mark Diebolt went on to give an detailed outline of the ambitious proposal during a phone conversation with LymeLine last Monday (Sept. 22.)

The plan, which is still in draft form and has not yet been released, calls for construction of 11 buildings, which will offer a total of between 216 and 224 one- and two-bedroom apartments. The precise number is not yet finalized but Diebolt anticipates it will be around 220.

The intention is for roughly a third of the apartments — between 70 and 75 — to be made available as ‘Affordable Housing,’ which means the plans can be submitted under the state’s 8-30g regulations that facilitate the process of obtaining approvals.

Diebolt described his vision for the development, which, apart from the apartments, is also slated to include a pool, gym. movie theater and clubhouse, as being, “Somewhere people want to live” and “Having the feel of its own little community.” He believes, “A diverse group of residents” will be attracted to the community, which will be both attractive and “completely safe.” and emphasized, “There will be ways for people to interact and socialize, if they wish.”

Drawing a comparison with the recent Saybrook Station development in Old Saybrook, he said he similarly envisaged, “New England-style building … and making it like a small village.” He emphasized, however, a significant difference between the Saybrook project and this one in Old Lyme in terms of the building density. Diebolt pointed out, “They have a lot less land,” noting that the former has 186 units in nine buildings on 1o acres whereas in Old Lyme, he is looking at 220 units in 11 buildings on just over 20 acres.

Noting it is a “unique location,” and “all rural around that area,” Diebolt explained that the uneven topography, which includes “lots of rock,” allows opportunities “to use the natural contours of the property” both for underground parking and also, in some cases, to offer views of Long Island Sound from the apartments. The parcel of land comprising 20.6 acres, which he has owned for many years and is already zoned for multi-family use, lies at the eastern end of Hatchetts Hill and is bordered to the north by Hatchetts Hill Rd. and to the east by Four Mile River Rd.

Diebolt stressed several times during the conversation, “This is not low-income housing,” adding, “There is a real misconception about it [Affordable Housing.]” He noted that the developers would be following the state rules for the number of units that would be offered at different percentages of the median income for the town. Significantly, the apartments designated as affordable housing will be intermingled with all the other units in this development and built to exactly the same standard.

Pointing out that the investors in the project will likely become, “One of the largest taxpayers in town,” Diebolt noted that, at the same time, he does not expect, “Too many kids,” to be entering Lyme-Old Lyme Schools as a result of the development due to the size of the individual apartments being offered.

Diebolt also notes another positive for Old Lyme is that the development will roughly double the amount of affordable housing in the town. Currently Old Lyme has around 1.5 percent of affordable housing and this project will take that percentage to around 3 percent. The town is under a long-term, statewide mandate to achieve a goal of having 10 percent of its total housing as affordable housing.

Asked the names of his fellow investors, Diebolt, who acknowledges he is, “The face of the project,” said they did not wish to be named at this point, but commented they are, “Connecticut residents and professionals,” adding, “I’m not a land developer.”

Questioned as to the intended name of the development, Diebolt chuckled and said that, as with the investor names, it was still under wraps. But he then shared that he is an amateur ornithologist and said that might possibly impact their choices as they, “Play around with names.”

In terms of location, Diebolt notes the site is extremely conveniently situated for on- and off-ramps going in both direction at Exit 71 of I-95. He also remarks that the single exit from the project will be onto Hatchetts Hill Rd. and will only allow a right-turn — there will be no exit onto the much busier Four Mile River Rd.

Regarding next steps, the plan has already been presented in a preliminary fashion to the Old Lyme Water Pollution Control Authority (WPCA). This was, in Diebolt’s words, to let them know that, “Basically our [Diebolt’s] professional engineers are in discussion with East Lyme WPCA engineers about connecting to water and sewer lines on Colton Rd. in East Lyme.” The property being proposed for development is only approximately 100 meters from those East Lyme  water and sewer lines and the possibility of connecting to them seems likely to be critical to the project moving forward.

Following that, Diebolt expects to submit a formal plan to Old Lyme’s Inland Wetlands Commission in December or January, which will kick off the official approval process with the Town.

Last Monday, Diebolt discussed the project with the Old Lyme Affordable Housing Committee (OLAHC), again for information purposes. After giving a brief overview of the project, Diebolt answered questions from the committee ranging from how many stories would the buildings have (Diebolt said a maximum of three) and would all the units be rented (yes – there will be no opportunity to purchase apartments) to whether pets will be allowed (yes, definitely – Diebolt again stressed the developers wanted these to be, “Homes people are proud to have” adding, “Pets are part of our culture.

Committee member Karen Winters spoke positively about the fact that, “The work force is intermingled,” so, as Diebolt clarified, “No one will know who’s who,” meaning those renting under Affordable Housing policies will not be identifiable from those who are not. Winters said, “I think that’s a win.”

Tom Ortoleva, another committee member, asked how many acres of the total were buildable. Diebolt responded, “It’s a tough site. One of the more expensive items [in the project] is site work.” He emphasized, “We have it all laid out. We could have put 274 units on the site … but we didn’t want it crowded.”

Committee member Tammy Tinnerello and Ortoleva questioned why Diebolt was not planning any three-bedroom units to which Diebolt replied, “Our market research indicates there is no demand for them,” or only minimal demand, but he also noted the developers would be willing to look into the matter further.

Overall, in Diebolt’s opinion, “The project was well received,” [by the committee] and, “The members seemed encouraging,” but prior to entertaining questions OLAHC Chairman Michael Fogliano had emphasized to committee members that they were there, “To listen and learn,” and not to consider a formal application nor take a vote.

Diebolt ended his session with the committee saying optimistically, “A thing of this magnitude is going to take a while to get going … but hopefully it will come to fruition.”

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Residents Turn Out to Support Resolution on Racism at Old Lyme Board of Selectmen’s Meeting

OLD LYME — Almost a dozen residents showed up at the Sept. 22 Old Lyme Board of Selectmen’s Special Meeting to voice their support for the proposal made by Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal that the board of selectmen should sign a Resolution on racism. There were several more who expressed the same opinion when First Selectman Timothy Griswold opened up the phone lines in Public Comment.

During the meeting, Nosal had again reviewed with her fellow board members the draft Resolution, which she introduced at the Aug. 8 meeting. It was not on the agenda at the Aug. 17 meeting, but was discussed at the Sept. 8 meeting and then again at the Sept. 22 meeting.

Summarizing the key points of the draft Resolution, which originated from the Town of Windsor, Conn. and is printed in full below, Nosal noted particularly that the Resolution asserts, “… racism is a public health crisis affecting our town and all of Connecticut.” Mentioning it has now been passed by a number of other towns in the state, Nosal reported that she had received, “A lot of feedback in favor of signing.”

She also commented that in previous discussions, other members of the board had said, “The tone [of the Resolution] seemed disagreeable.” Nosal therefore asked them for their latest thoughts.

Griswold opened by saying, “We all feel strongly that racism is a bad thing … but Old Lyme does a very good job. This document has a very negative tone.”

He added, “I’m still not comfortable with this type of a Resolution. I personally don’t see that there’s a problem in Old Lyme.” Elaborating on that opinion, he said, “I hesitate to have a Town Resolution with this language. I think our major purpose is to manage the town and not to sign on to Resolutions like this.”

Selectman Christopher Kerr asked Nosal where the closest towns (geographically) were that had already signed the Resolution. She responded that New London and New Haven had both signed the document, but also Old Saybrook and Lyme currently had it under consideration. He then indicated agreement with Griswold’s opinion, but commenting, “I’m not saying never.”

Kerr added, “I wouldn’t mind seeing what Lyme and Old Saybrook say.” Nosal reacted rapidly to that statement with the words, “I’d like us to be a leader rather than a follower.” She went on to say, “There is significant support that we acknowledge the problem,” pointing out that some different formats of the Resolution have been presented by members of the community.

Nosal distributed a shorter version of the Resolution and asked Griswold and Kerr to “Take a peek” at it. Saying that doing nothing was, “Similar to ignoring the pandemic,” Nosal urged the board, “… to use this as an educational moment,” adding, “I would really appreciate if you’d read this and give it some thought.”

Rev. Dr. Stephen Jungkeit, Senior Minister of the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, was one of the first speakers during public comment. He said there were three reasons the board should sign the Resolution, the first being that there are members of black and brown communities living in Old Lyme, and, “Signing this resolution sends a message that we care.”

Secondly, Jungkeit suggested that endorsing the Resolution would, “Send a signal that we understand [the issue of racism] … and are in a relationship with other parts of the state.”

Finally, he reminded the board that “Racism is built into our history,” with over 100 named enslaved people identified in Old Lyme and around 60 unnamed. He cited Jane, who was “sold off” in the town at age three to be, “Used, possessed and enjoyed.”

Another speaker commented that regardless of whether there was a racism problem in Old Lyme, “We have a responsibility as a nation [on this matter.] It doesn’t matter how small we are,” while another noted, “We have an opportunity to affirm our position with this Resolution … we can affirm we act fairly and justly to all.”

Candace Fuchs spoke passionately on the subject of “micro-aggression,” declaring “Our white authority does not give us the right to ignore the scourge of racism.”

Recalling her youth growing up in Old Lyme, Kim Thompson explained, “The issues were not discussed here. What I learned about diversity, I learned outside Old Lyme. She continued, “Supporting this [Resolution] would be a first step in showing we agree racism is a problem.”

The overriding message from all the speakers was echoed in another’s words, “We need more diversity here. We need to have a statement like this [Resolution] to show where we want to be.”

In a voice filled with emotion, Nosal then said she wanted to, “Thank everybody that came tonight,” and express the wish that, “We can make amends and make our community healthier.”

Griswold opened the phone lines and Megan Nosal was the first to speak. Reminding the board of the famous quote, “In a racist society, it is not enough to be non-racist, we must be ant-racist,” she continued, “Old Lyme should lead a positive change,” adding, “Your town and your people are looking for change.”

Another resident who grew up in Old Lyme, Anna Reiter, called in to say if the Resolution were not signed, it “Would be an incredible disservice,” whereas approving it, “Would help us going forward as a town.”

Reiter concluded firmly, “I encourage the entire board of selectmen to tailor this Resolution,” [to something, which can be approved] urging them to be, “The leaders on the Shoreline,” and reminding them, “This is not going away.”

***

The following is the original DRAFT Resolution that Nosal presented for discussion:

WHEREAS, racism is a social system with multiple dimensions: individual racism that is interpersonal and/or internalized or systemic racism that is institutional or structural, and is a system of structuring opportunity and assigning value based on the social interpretation of how one looks;

WHEREAS race is a social construct with no biological basis; 

WHEREAS racism unfairly disadvantages specific individuals and communities, while unfairly giving advantages to other individuals and communities, and saps the strength of the whole society through the waste of human resources; 

WHEREAS racism is a root cause of poverty and constricts economic mobility; 

WHEREAS racism causes persistent discrimination and disparate outcomes in many areas of life, including housing, education, employment, and criminal justice, and is itself a social determinant of health; 

WHEREAS racism and segregation have exacerbated a health divide resulting in people of color in Connecticut bearing a disproportionate burden of illness and mortality including COVID-19 infection and death, heart disease, diabetes, and infant mortality; 

WHEREAS Black, Native American, Asian and Latino residents are more likely to experience poor health outcomes as a consequence of inequities in economic stability, education, physical environment, food, and access to health care and these inequities are, themselves, a result of racism; 

WHEREAS more than 100 studies have linked racism to worse health outcomes; and 

WHEREAS the collective prosperity and wellbeing of TOWN depends upon equitable access to opportunity for every resident regardless of the color of their skin: 

Now, therefore, be it Resolved, that the TOWN Board of Selectmen

(1) Assert that racism is a public health crisis affecting our town and all of Connecticut; 

(2) Work to progress as an equity and justice-oriented organization, by continuing to identify specific activities to enhance diversity and to ensure antiracism principles across our leadership, staffing and contracting;

(3) Promote equity through all policies approved by the Board of Selectmen and enhance educational efforts aimed at understanding, addressing and dismantling racism and how it affects the delivery of human and social services, economic development and public safety;

(4) Improve the quality of the data our town collects and the analysis of that data—it is not enough to assume that an initiative is producing its intended outcome, qualitative and quantitative data should be used to assess inequities in impact and continuously improve;

(5) Continue to advocate locally for relevant policies that improve health in communities of color, and support local, state, regional, and federal initiatives that advance efforts to dismantle systemic racism;

(6) Further work to solidify alliances and partnerships with other organizations that are confronting racism and encourage other local, state, regional, and national entities to recognize racism as a public health crisis;

(7) Support community efforts to amplify issues of racism and engage actively and authentically with communities of color wherever they live; and

(8) Identify clear goals and objectives, including periodic reports to the Board of Selectmen, to assess progress and capitalize on opportunities to further advance racial equity.

 

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Death of Patricia Bugbee of Old Lyme Announced; Lifelong Resident, ‘Beloved Fixture at LOL High School’ for 21 Years (Neviaser)

Patricia Ann Bugbee, 1953-2020.

OLD LYME — UPDATED 5:30pm: It is with deep sadness that we share news of the passing of Patricia Ann Bugbee.

“Ms. Bugbee,” as she was known to generations of Lyme-Old Lyme High Schoolers, will be deeply missed.

Asked his reaction to the news of Ms. Bugbee’s passing, Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser responded to LymeLine.com, “Ms. Bugbee was a beloved fixture at Lyme-Old Lyme High School. Her cheerful demeanor and great sense of humor were recognized by many in the 21 years she served our district. We extend our deepest condolences to her family.”

In our experience, Pat was a wonderful person, always going out of her way to help and comfort those in need. With her bright personality and sharp sense of humor, she brightened everyone’s day at the high school.

We at LymeLine.com also extend our deepest sympathies to all Pat’s family.

Her full obituary reads:

Patricia Ann Bugbee, 67, of Old Lyme passed away Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020, at Shoreline Clinic.

Patricia was born at L+M Hospital March 10, 1953. She grew up in Old Lyme attending Elementary, Middle and High School. Upon graduation, she worked for Chesebrough-Ponds for over two decades. She took an early retirement from there, and after a few other careers, became the Administration Assistant to the Vice Principal at the Lyme-Old Lyme High School for over 21 years.

She will be sadly missed by her father Donald S. Bugbee Sr; brother Donald S. Bugbee Jr; son John Duddy and his wife Melinda; and son-in-law Edward Wysocki. Patricia’s grandchildren were the light of her life, Eric J. Wysocki, Alexandra M. Duddy, Kelly A. Wysocki and Elizabeth M. Duddy. She loved being their Nana. Patricia was surrounded by a very large family of cousins, nieces, nephews, aunts and uncles, and amazing lifelong friends and coworkers that were all loved by her. Patricia is predeceased by her mother Dorothy K. Bugbee; sister Deborah Rutty and daughter Heather Ann (Duddy) Wysocki.

She was a lifelong resident of Old Lyme and loved being a part of her community. She was seen out at band and chorus concerts, years of theatrical productions, many years of supporting the districts sporting events but especially volleyball and softball games and soccer matches in East Haven. She was known for her kindness, laugh, work ethic and her desire to help. Family and friends have reached out to her for recipes for all types of foods. She was called upon, for decades, to help many with her seamstress abilities. There are many quilts, blankets, prom and wedding dresses, dolls and needlepoint pieces with her heart sewn in each piece.

There will be a private viewing for family held Saturday, Sept. 26, at the Fulton Theroux Funeral Home at 13 Beckwith Lane, Old Lyme. There will a public burial service at 11 a.m. the same day, Sept. 26, at the Laysville Cemetery in Old Lyme, at the Intersection of Grassy Hill and Boston Post Road. Social distancing and Masks will be required. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, there will be a celebration of her life at some point in the future.

The family asks that in lieu of flowers, donations be made to the American Heart Association or the Old Lyme Fire Department in her name.

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Old Lyme Selectmen Discuss Resolution on Racism Presented by Nosal; Griswold, Kerr Express Reservations

Old Lyme Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal (File photo)

OLD LYME — At the Sept. 8 Old Lyme Board of Selectmen’s regular meeting, Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal again raised the question of whether the board would be willing to sign a Resolution on racism, which she noted several other towns in Connecticut have already done.

She had originally introduced the idea with a draft Resolution at the Aug. 8 meeting but it was not discussed further in the Aug. 17 meeting.

Nosal summarized the draft Resolution, which is printed in full below and originated from the Town of Windsor, Conn., noting, “There’s a lot of community support to do something,” and reminding her fellow board members that, “Our nation is talking about this.”

She also emphasized that the discussion was “only a first step,” and that some comments on the wording of the Resolution had already been received.

Nosal also mentioned that when she had first introduced the Resolution, Old Lyme First Selectman Timothy Griswold had expressed a concern about the tone of the document. Selectman Christopher Kerr echoed that opinion when he gave his comments on the Resolution, saying, “I somewhat agree with Tim … it seems like your saying the town is racist.”

Nosal responded immediately, “Where do you see that?” Kerr answered, “It has that tone,” adding, “Maybe there are ways to tone it down.”  Nosal asked Kerr what he would suggest to which he responded, “I don’t know,” saying he would have to read the Resolution again along with a new draft from a different source that Nosal had brought, and see if he could perhaps amend them together.

When his turn came to comment, Griswold said, “It seems to me we’re a small town. I think we have a very good record in our town,” adding he had “trouble” with use of the expression, “Racism is a public health crisis affecting our town and all of Connecticut.”

He stated, “I just don’t see the link like that unless it’s very indirect,” summarizing his opinion as, “I just hesitate to have the board sign onto this … it’s very negative about our country.”

Expanding on his view, Griswold continued with the question, “Can we all do better?” to which he responded firmly, “Yes,” noting, “We all want to endorse the idea of harmony,” while acknowledging, “There are instances where there are terrible situations.”

He concluded, “It seems this is more than we need to do … It’s hard for me to accept this.”

Nosal took a conciliatory tone after Griswold and Kerr had commented, saying, “I think it’s unusual for a board of selectmen in Old Lyme to deal with this. I’m proud of us that we’re facing the fact that it makes us uncomfortable. It’s not an easy subject for any of us to talk about.”

She remarked, “Once we start talking about it and addressing it, it will become better … our society will be better.” She urged the board to keep discussing the subject because, “Our objective is to look at what we can do to make our community healthier.”

Next steps were not agreed specifically but seemed likely to include further review of the wording of the Resolution.

Nosal concluded positively, “I appreciate the board looking at it and considering it … and acknowledge it makes us uncomfortable.”

The following is the DRAFT Resolution that Nosal presented for discussion:

WHEREAS, racism is a social system with multiple dimensions: individual racism that is interpersonal and/or internalized or systemic racism that is institutional or structural, and is a system of structuring opportunity and assigning value based on the social interpretation of how one looks;

WHEREAS race is a social construct with no biological basis; 

WHEREAS racism unfairly disadvantages specific individuals and communities, while unfairly giving advantages to other individuals and communities, and saps the strength of the whole society through the waste of human resources; 

WHEREAS racism is a root cause of poverty and constricts economic mobility; 

WHEREAS racism causes persistent discrimination and disparate outcomes in many areas of life, including housing, education, employment, and criminal justice, and is itself a social determinant of health; 

WHEREAS racism and segregation have exacerbated a health divide resulting in people of color in Connecticut bearing a disproportionate burden of illness and mortality including COVID-19 infection and death, heart disease, diabetes, and infant mortality; 

WHEREAS Black, Native American, Asian and Latino residents are more likely to experience poor health outcomes as a consequence of inequities in economic stability, education, physical environment, food, and access to health care and these inequities are, themselves, a result of racism; 

WHEREAS more than 100 studies have linked racism to worse health outcomes; and 

WHEREAS the collective prosperity and wellbeing of TOWN depends upon equitable access to opportunity for every resident regardless of the color of their skin: 

Now, therefore, be it Resolved, that the TOWN Board of Selectmen

(1) Assert that racism is a public health crisis affecting our town and all of Connecticut; 

(2) Work to progress as an equity and justice-oriented organization, by continuing to identify specific activities to enhance diversity and to ensure antiracism principles across our leadership, staffing and contracting;

(3) Promote equity through all policies approved by the Board of Selectmen and enhance educational efforts aimed at understanding, addressing and dismantling racism and how it affects the delivery of human and social services, economic development and public safety;

(4) Improve the quality of the data our town collects and the analysis of that data—it is not enough to assume that an initiative is producing its intended outcome, qualitative and quantitative data should be used to assess inequities in impact and continuously improve;

(5) Continue to advocate locally for relevant policies that improve health in communities of color, and support local, state, regional, and federal initiatives that advance efforts to dismantle systemic racism;

(6) Further work to solidify alliances and partnerships with other organizations that are confronting racism and encourage other local, state, regional, and national entities to recognize racism as a public health crisis;

(7) Support community efforts to amplify issues of racism and engage actively and authentically with communities of color wherever they live; and

(8) Identify clear goals and objectives, including periodic reports to the Board of Selectmen, to assess progress and capitalize on opportunities to further advance racial equity.

 

 

 

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Old Lyme Zoning Delays Decision on LOL Schools’ Proposed Artificial Athletic Field Pending Drainage Review, ‘It’s All About Drainage’ (Cable)

This image, courtesy of Milone & MacBroom, shows the current field behind Lyme-Old Lyme High School (left) and the proposed synthetic turf field (right.)

OLD LYME — The Old Lyme Zoning Commission listened patiently in their meeting held Monday evening via Zoom to a presentation by representatives from Milone & Macbroom on the proposed synthetic turf multi-purpose field, which Lyme-Old Lyme Schools plan to build to the rear of Lyme-Old Lyme High School. The first part of the meeting constituted a Public Hearing for the project.

The new field, priced at approximately $2.5 million, will be built on top of the existing geothermal system and the presenters agreed the selected contractor would have to perform, “Pre-construction tests to make sure the the geothermal system isn’t compromised.”

They also detailed how, “The premise is that water is going completely through the carpet [the synthetic turf]” and then drained away through a vast system of pipes.

Asked whether there was any danger of pollution from the drained water, the presenter replied, “Because of the way we design the system, the water running off is clearer than the rain going in,” adding, “There’s chemicals in there, but the materials do not ever leach out. We don’t see any environmental impacts.”

He noted that the use of recycled tires for the production of synthetic turf also, “Saves tires going into landfills.”

Asked by commission member Jane Marsh how long the artificial field could be expected to last, the presenter responded, “Eight years is the expected life … I’ve seen up to 14 years. He concluded, “The fields should easily last 12 years.”

When the time comes to replace the field, the presenter explained, “All the infrastructure below the turf [the geothermal system] will remain. Just the turf will be replaced.”

There were no questions or comments from the public and so the commission voted unanimously to close the Public Hearing.

The commission then went on to discuss the project as an item of business in their regular monthly meeting and that was when things took an unexpected turn. Long-term commission member Jane Cable stated, “I don’t feel competent to evaluate the drainage. This should automatically have gone to Tom [Metcalf – the Town Engineer.]”

Commission member Maria Martinez agreed with Cable saying, “We should do due diligence and double-check.”

Cable said pragmatically, “It’s all about drainage.”

Marsh added, “My breath is being taken away by the cost of this thing,” but Martinez reminded her that the commission’s job is not to consider the cost of the project but rather, “We have to approve [its] safety.”

Members of the commission concurred that the Old Lyme Inland Wetlands Commission had already approved the project but with a condition relating to the permeability of the walkway. They requested that Land Use Coordinator Dan Bourret should send the plans to Metcalf for his review, to which Bourret agreed.

Cable then proposed a motion, “… that we put our decision off to next month to get the review from Tom.” The motion to continue the discussion to next month’s meeting was unanimous.

Editor’s Note: Visit this link for more information about the proposed synthetic turf field, 

 

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Meet a (Hula-Hooping) Moose in Cushman’s Enchanting Story of Being ‘Soaked’

LymeLine.com publisher Olwen Logan reads ‘Soaked’ by Abi Cushman to her grandson, William Logan, who assisted significantly with this book review.

“Soaked” is quite simply an enchanting book that captivates and delights youngsters from the first page to the last.

I can say that with some authority since I ‘tested’ the book on my two-year-old grandson William and his response to it was nothing short of remarkable. He not only asks for the book by name every time he sees me but also  — or so his parents tell me — at almost every bedtime.

Moreover, he has renamed it!

And the reason he did that is because the only word in the whole book that he didn’t understand was, by coincidence, its title … ‘Soaked.’ By the way, the inside cover states the book is for, “Age 3 and up,” but William, at two, lapped it up.

When I finished reading ‘Soaked’ to him for the very first time, William desperately wanted to hear it again and, without hesitation, asked me to read the “Rain Book,” which is, in fact, a wonderfully apt title.

That is now what it will be known as henceforward in our family since we took a copy on a family vacation recently and by the end of the week, every member of the family had read the ‘Rain Book’ to William multiple times!

First-time author-illustrator Abi Cushman of Niantic, Conn. is an extraordinarily talented illustrator. (Full disclosure, I know Abi, but primarily in a professional capacity.) Although she remains remarkably unassuming about the fact she is now a published author, she should be extremely proud of that achievement — and perhaps even more so, of the beautiful book that is the root of her new-found fame.

She has created four characters, Bear, Badger, Bunny and Moose, whom you feel you’ve known your whole life … in the same way that we all know Winnie-the-Pooh. Their respective personas come through loud and clear though Cushman uses very little narrative to convey them.

Moose is far and away William’s favorite character in the story.

Well, of course he is … who couldn’t be drawn to a Hula-Hooping moose? You’ve never heard of a Hula-Hooping moose? Neither had we, but he fits so perfectly into this delightful story, you take him completely for granted as though it’s perfectly normal for a moose to have a set of hula-hoops at which he is adept at using.

The hula-hoops are, in fact, key to this simple tale, cleverly linking its various elements and locations. The story travels from sad scenes in the depressing rain through to Bear’s dry cave (where there is insufficient space for Moose to hula-hoop, but he does it anyway!) followed by the rescue of a hula-hoop from a high branch (which involves a great deal of precarious standing on shoulders) and then the jovial collapse of the tower of animals.

All the animals, who topple together after successfully retrieving the hula-hoop, surface cheerfully in a mass of water and are thoroughly “soaked.” This jolly scene leads to the idea that Bear should try hula-hooping.

Now Bear, who is the story narrator, is a pretty grumpy fellow and anxious to maintain his negative outlook on the world, regardless of what befalls him. He does not want to enjoy hula-hooping but it is abundantly clearly from the charming illustrations that Bear takes to it like (and forgive the pun!) a duck to water, urged on by the ever-present, cheery Badger (with the bumble-bee umbrella) and bounce-along Bunny.

There are a variety of morals that can be drawn from this simple story and the reader can choose which one is most age-appropriate. It could be a deeper one like the value of true friends or the strength of teamwork, or simply that you don’t have to have sun to have fun.

There are other possibilities too and another strangely wonderful thing about this book is that there are many places in the text where you can fill in the story details as you wish, making it possible to create new twists to the story with every reading

I won’t be a spoiler and divulge the surprising ending to the story.

You’ll have to buy — or borrow — the book for yourself. And I strongly recommend you do just that because this is a very special book, which I predict will stand the test of time … perhaps even lasting as long as that beloved Pooh!  The illustrations on their own justify the purchase of the book.

This may be the humble Cushman’s first book but I’m confident it certainly won’t be her last. I sincerely hope we’ll soon be hearing more about the adventures of Bear, Badger, and Bunny and not forgetting, that Hula-Hooping Moose!

Editor’s Note: Visit Abi Cushman’s website for more information about the book and details of where to purchase it.

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Bidding Now Open on FloGris Museum’s Annual Benefit Auction, ‘Benefit in a Box’ Also on Sale

Purchase a ‘Benefit in a Box’ to support the Florence Griswold Museum’s ‘Annual Benefit Reimagined.’

OLD LYME — The Florence Griswold Museum’s 38th annual Benefit Auction & Dinner Dance — traditionally held in September — may have been cancelled but Museum staff have renamed the now exclusively online event as the Annual Benefit Reimagined and come up with a variety of inspired ideas to compensate for the ability to gather in person.

The first item in the online auction is this painting by Nelson H. White titled, ‘Bagno La Salute.’

The traditional Benefit Auction has a vast selection of artwork, decorative items, experiences, and travel, and bidding is now open online at this link through Sept. 26 at 8 p.m. Bids can be placed from your phone or home computer.

The Museum is also offering the opportunity to purchase a Benefit in a Box, which can be enjoyed in your own home. Describing this as, “… your very own portable party,” each box provides, “Wine, chocolate, the works” so that purchasers can “Celebrate the Museum and support its mission from a safe distance.”

Visit this link to order your Benefit in a Box(es).

All proceeds from the event will support educational programming at the Museum.

Rebekah Beaulieu, Executive Director of the Museum, comments, ” Your support of this event and the work it makes possible has never been more needed or appreciated.”
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So Much on Offer at Lymes’ Senior Center — Even When It’s Closed!

Lymes’ Senior Center Board Chair Jeri Baker (right) and Carole Diffley (left), the Center’s Kitchen Manager, take some well-deserved time out while helping at the Drive-Thru Pick-Up Parade held at the Center last month.

LYME/OLD LYME — September is National Senior Center Appreciation Month and Jeri Baker, who serves as chair of the Lymes’ Senior Center Board of Directors, would like the communities of Lyme and Old Lyme to celebrate the fact that they have a thriving, buoyant Senior Center in their midst.

She is quick to point out, however, that this is in spite of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has created major challenges for the Center since March of this year in terms of both its danger to the health of seniors and the fact the Center has been forced to close because of it.

Lymes Senior Center Director Stephanie Gould

Baker comments, “It is hard to believe that there could be much to celebrate during this pandemic; but under the tireless efforts of Director Stephanie Gould, the Lymes’ Senior Center is still a huge part of the lives of seniors in our communities.” 

She explains, “It is now a model virtual world of opportunities and vital information.  Stephanie, our volunteers and staff maintain constant contact with our members online and in person through calls and mailings.” 

Asked to expand on the ways in which the Center has kept engaged with the Lyme-Old Lyme senior community during its closure, Baker notes that the center currently offers 15-23 exercise classes weekly, and these are also open to the greater communities regardless of membership.  Over 200 residents participate at this point.

She also notes that with a monthly calendar collaboration with other centers throughout the state, 75 additional free programs are also offered through Zoom. These offers include lectures, entertainment, virtual games, discussions, and other group activities in an effort to keep or seniors connected and entertained.  

Baker is effusive in her praise for how Gould has responded to the pandemic, saying, “At the very beginning of the pandemic and once the center physically closed, Stephanie sprang into action to conduct outreach to our members, especially those most vulnerable and who may not have online access.”

Baker adds, “Right now, volunteers, staff and the director personally keep in touch with weekly calls to 200 seniors through this effort and 70 more through direct mailing,” and in fact, online communications, personal contacts and the Center’s newsletter reach all members every month at minimum.

Another event that sparked a really positive response happened in August. Baker explains, “Last month we held a Drive-Thru Pick-Up Parade, at which seniors, who were required to followed all safety precautions, drove around the building to greet us as we dropped several useful and entertaining items into a bag for them. Some members even dressed up and decorated their cars.” 

Baker says enthusiastically, “This was the first in-person event held since the pandemic started, and it was such a pleasure to see so many friendly faces!”

The exterior of the Lymes’ Senior Center on Town Woods Rd. in Old Lyme.

There are numerous other ways that the Center is helping its members and these include volunteers, who deliver books and puzzles to members. Another is a table outside the Senior Center building, which has free books, puzzles, magazines, word circle and crossword puzzle packets for seniors to pick up and borrow.

And a third is that, in conjunction with the Estuary Council of Seniors, Lymes’ Senior Center continues to serve over 50 residents weekly through their Meals on Wheels and “Grab and Go” food curbside program. 

Baker concludes positively, “Since there is no projected reopening for the Center at this time, we will maintain our efforts and expand them as well to reach all members and to inform the greater community about our work.” 

Editor’s Note: For more information about the Center and all the opportunities it offers, contact Lymes’ Senior Center Director Stephanie Gould at 860 434-1605 ext. 240 or seniorcenter@oldlyme-ct.gov. Reach Jeri Baker, Chair of the Lymes’ Senior Center Board of Directors, at 860 434-0781 or Jbaker262@comcast.net.

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Hoelzel of Old Lyme Participates in the ‘Great Cycle Challenge’, Raises Funds to Beat Children’s Cancer

Chris Hoelzel. Photo submitted.

OLD LYME — Chris Hoelzel of Old Lyme has a very good reason for participating in the Great Cycle Challenge this month, because when he was six-years-old, he was diagnosed with a brain tumor.

He was extremely fortunate to recover and tells LymeLine, “I will be 38 this year and I’m still going strong!”

Hoelzel isn’t taking things easy though. Determined to give back to the cause closest to his heart, this is now the third year in succession that he has joined the Great Cycle Challenge.

The Challenge raises money to benefit the Children’s Cancer Research Fund, enabling them to continue their work to develop lifesaving treatments. The organization’s ultimate hope is to find a cure for childhood cancer.

Hoelzel, who has lived his whole life in Lyme and Old Lyme — first attending Lyme Consolidated and then graduating from Lyme-Old Lyme High School — has set himself a goal of riding 99 miles during September.

Chris Hoelzel as a boy, around the time he was diagnosed with a brain tumor. Now he rides to support research into childhood cancer.

He joins 133,366 other riders throughout the US, who together  — as at today’s date — have already ridden a total of 946,603 miles and raised an astonishing $7,664,391.

After setting himself a personal target of raising $2,500.00 by the end of September, Hoelzel is delighted to report that he has already ridden more than 35 miles and raised almost $1,500.00.

Hoelzel says enthusiastically, “Getting out on a bike riding and raising money to fight kids cancer is a win-win. Every dollar counts when it comes to this cause.”

Expanding on why he feels so passionate about the cause for which he is riding, Hoelzel notes, “Right now, cancer is the biggest killer of children from disease in the United States. Over 15,700 children are diagnosed every year, and sadly, 38 children die of cancer every week.”

He adds, “Kids should be living life, not fighting for it,” urging people to donate to his ride because, “Your support will change little lives.”

If readers would like to support Hoelzel’s Great Cycle Challenge and his ride to fight kids’ cancer, visit his fundraising page at this link.

Editor’s Note: Go, Chris … we’re so proud of you!

 

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New COVID-19 Case Confirmed in Old Lyme, Total Now 24 Including Two Fatalities

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

OLD LYME/LYME — A new COVID-19 case has been identified in Old Lyme where the number of confirmed cases now rises to 24 including two fatalities. Ten of the surviving cases are male and the remaining 12 are female. The two fatalities were a 61-year-old female and an 83-year-old male.

To demonstrate the growth in confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme, the table below is a summary of the cases that LymeLine.com has reported since March 31 when the first case was announced and also includes both fatalities.

DateCumulative no. of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme
March 311
April 44
April 96
April 107
April 1510
April 1812
May 113
May 1515
May 2616
June 817
June 1018
June 1419
June 2221
June 2422
July 1722
July 2823
Sept. 224
Sept. 426
Sept. 1527
Oct. 128
Oct. 829
Oct. 1630
Oct. 1631
Oct. 1632

Details of all Old Lyme’s confirmed surviving cases to date are now as follows:

  1. Female, age 64
  2. Female, age 21
  3. Male, age 27
  4. Female, age 53
  5. Female, age 61
  6. Female, age 29
  7. Male, age 40
  8. Male, age 53
  9. Female, age 60
  10. Male, age 45
  11. Female, age 20
  12. Female, age 43
  13. Female, age 48
  14. Male, age 70
  15. Male, age 67
  16. Female, age 68
  17. Male, age 50
  18. Male, age 21
  19. Female, age 48
  20. Female, age 34
  21. Male, age 20
  22. Male, age 28

Griswold has previously noted that the 21-year-old female with a confirmed case (#2 in the list immediately above) was tested in Florida, but used an Old Lyme address although she does not live here. Because she gave the Old Lyme address, Griswold said that LLHD must report her as an Old Lyme resident.

There have been no new COVID-19 cases confirmed in Lyme since our last report when the cumulative total in that town was seven.

The latest case, which was reported Aug. 24, is a male, aged 68. The seven cases comprise two females and five males ranging in age from one- to 68-years-old.

Gender and age details of the confirmed cases in Lyme to date are:

  1. Male, age 34
  2. Female, age 61
  3. Female, age 34
  4. Male, age 1
  5. Male, age 34
  6. Male, age 20
  7. Male, aged 68

Residents and businesses are urged to access up-to-date information regarding the pandemic from reputable sources including the Ledge Light Health District website (www.llhd.org), Facebook (@LedgeLightHD), Twitter (@LedgeLightHD), and Instagram (@LedgeLightHD).

Editor’s Note: Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) serves as the local health department in southeast Connecticut for the towns of Lyme and Old Lyme as well as East Lyme, Groton, Ledyard, New London, North Stonington,  Stonington and Waterford. As a health district, formed under Connecticut General Statutes Section 19a-241, LLHD is a special unit of government, allowing member municipalities to provide comprehensive public health services to residents in a more efficient manner by consolidating the services within one organization.

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Now Five Weeks Behind Schedule, Griswold Gives Update on Mile Creek Bridge Replacement Project

The first stage of the Mile Creek Bridge installation. Photos by T. Griswold.

OLD LYME — The Mile Creek Bridge replacement project finally moved forward again this past Monday when the bridge decking over the Black Hall River was installed. A large crane lowered each section into place and Machnik Bros. Construction is now in the process of completing the final installation.

The second stage of the Mile Creek Bridge installation.

Old Lyme First Selectman Tim Griswold told LymeLine.com that at this point, the project is about five weeks behind schedule, noting, “The fabricator in Massachusetts had told Tom Machnik there were a variety of problems, including COVID.”

Griswold commented, “That is behind us now, but frustrating nonetheless.”

The third and final stage of the Mile Creek Bridge installation.

Due to the delay, Griswold said the project is now scheduled to, “Wind up in the first half of October.”

Stressing that,  “The delay is not in any way related to the Machnik Brothers’ performance,” Griswold added, “The board of selectmen thank the affected residents, who must detour the bridge, for their understanding and patience.”

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Old Lyme Land Use Official Confirms Diebolt Has Discussed 200+ Apartment Proposal Off Hatchetts Hill

OLD LYME — Old Lyme Land Use Coordinator Dan Bourret confirmed to LymeLine.com by phone Thursday that he has had a, “Very preliminary discussion,” with Mark C. Diebolt about the proposal Diebolt is planning to submit for a development of apartments on a substantial piece of land off Hatchetts Hill Rd. towards the eastern perimeter of the Town of Old Lyme.

Asked how many units were being proposed, Bourret said he believed it was, “A low 200’s number of apartments.”

Bourret stressed, “I don’t know much. I only have a little bit of an overview. There are no plans submitted at this point.” He emphasized he would know much more about the project, ” … when we get an application.”

Responding to a question regarding whether Zoning would be the first Commission to receive the application if it is ultimately submitted, Bourret explained it would have to be reviewed by the Old Lyme Wetlands Commission initially if the proposed development were within 100 ft. of an Upland Review Area. Without an application, Bourret said he did not know at this point whether that would be the case, though he was aware, “There is a stream to the west of the property.”

Bourret noted that Diebolt had indicated the proposal would be submitted under Connecticut’s 830-g Affordable Housing Statute, which can, “circumvent the zoning process” and therefore how the application would move forward is “a little bit of an unknown.”

Stating that Diebolt is the contact for the proposal, Bourret said he did not know the names of any other investors in the project. Asked when he anticipated receiving the application, Bourret replied that he had, “No indication of when plans are coming.”

The next meeting of the Old Lyme Affordable Housing Committee is scheduled for Monday, Sept. 21, at 5:30 p.m. in Old Lyme Town Hall.  The agenda for that meeting has not yet been published, but a member of the committee has confirmed to LymeLine.com that Diebolt plans to discuss his proposal at that meeting.

Editor’s Note: Mark C. Diebolt is the President/CEO of Diebolt & Company, manufacturers and designers of Specialty Hose Products since 1991. The Connecticut Corporate Headquarters are located at 18 Riverview Drive, Old Lyme, CT 06371. For more information, visit this link.

 

 

 

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