June 20, 2019

Death Announced of Candy Green; Former Innkeeper of Old Lyme Inn, Owner of ‘Rooster Hall’

Candy Green
Photo by Malcolm Denemark/FLORIDA TODAY and published with permission of the Green family.

The death has been announced of the former innkeeper and general manager of the Old Lyme Inn, Catherine (Candy) Clifford Green. Her obituary published by Ammen Family Funeral and Cremation Care  and on LymeLine.com with their permission, reads as follows:

“Catherine (Candy) Clifford Green, was a force of nature. She was a lifelong lover of the arts and an active volunteer committed to public service. On Martin Luther King, Jr. Day in 2016, she was first diagnosed with ovarian cancer, but she never let the disease get the better of her. If her time was going to be limited, she wanted to be sure it was devoted to the things she felt were important – her family, civil rights and the environment.

Two years after her first diagnosis, she was told that the cancer had returned, but she never gave up on anything, and always put up a fight, a legacy she leaves with us. Her battle with ovarian cancer was featured in the October 25, 2018, edition of Florida Today. https://www.floridatoday.com/story/life/2018/10/23/ovarian-cancer-survivor-advocates-sharing-dont-keep-secret/1484361002/

Candy died February 28, 2019, in Melbourne, FL. She was 74.

“Her laughter is what I will miss the most about my mom,” her daughter, Temple Diehl Mecchella, a West Melbourne resident said. “Her contagious laugh could echo through our noise and make you drop everything to find out what you were missing. Her smile would make your heart melt. She had a true natural beauty, with those electric blue eyes.”

She was born on Halloween in South Bend, IN, to Carol (Kidd) and Temple Clifford, both of whom predeceased her.

Along with her daughter, Temple, she is survived by her adored grandchildren Tyler and Rylie Grace of West Melbourne, FL, her sister Julie Clifford (John Hanson), of Alexandria, VA, stepson Josh Green of New York City and her husband Keith Green. Her cousin Madelyn Young and a number of devoted friends provided invaluable support during her illness.

Candy also lived in Atlanta, GA and New York, NY, where she had an award-winning 20-year career in advertising and public relations, which culminated as vice-president for broadcast and music production at Ogilvy and Mather.

She lived in an historic home in Old Lyme, CT, which was later converted to Rooster Hall Bed and Breakfast. She was also innkeeper and general manager of the Old Lyme Inn. She opened them to countless charitable events. Her annual birthday party on Halloween initiated an annual event that children from all over Old Lyme look forward to attending. This spectacular evening ended in a casserole competition judged by local food writers. The event would culminate with trophies for best costume, but somehow she always won “Best Candy.”

Candy was particularly involved with the Child and Family Agency of New London, CT, hosting and chairing the very successful Child and Family Garden Tour. She was named Volunteer of the Year in 2005. She also raised funds for the Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts.

When she moved to West Melbourne in 2011, she continued her volunteer and community betterment activities, serving as a docent and volunteer at the Foosaner Art Museum, vice president and board member of the Space Coast Progressive Alliance, where she was active in planning many programs, and a member of the Brevard County Chapter of the Brandeis National Committee.

Memorial donations may be made to the American Cancer SocietyChild and Family Agency of New London, CT, theBrandeis National Committee, the Space Coast Progressive Alliance or the Foosaner Art Museum.

Celebrations of Candy’s life will be held in Melbourne and Old Lyme.” We will provide details of the latter as soon as they are available.

 

 

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A la Carte: Hard to Believe, But You Can Make Mac & Cheese Glamorous! Lee Shows us How …

The perennially popular mac & cheese. Photo by Hermes Rivera on Unsplash.

I don’t remember tasting mac and cheese until I was 14- or 18-years-old. i.e., high school or college cafeterias. Nobody made it in my house. I remember asking for it when I was fairly little, but at my house it was made with cottage cheese, sour cream, maybe butter, cinnamon and egg noodles. Basically, it was unconstructed noodle kugel.

When I was married the first time, I cooked the boxed Kraft Macaroni and Cheese. When it was done, I put it into a Corning glass pot, sliced a tomato down the middle and ran some breadcrumbs around the tomatoes. For me, that was cooking and garnishing. Then my-then mother-in-law showed me how to make a white sauce and I made mac and cheese from scratch. (She also showed me how to make pork roast on top of sauerkraut, take it out of the oven, take them apart and add applesauce to the sauerkraut. I still make it the same way. It is delicious.)

Of course, almost everyone loves mac and cheese. As I get older, I take a lactase pill before I eat mac and cheese, as many do these days. And I will make sure I have the ingredients to make all the recipes in this month’s Food Network Magazine, of which the one below is the yummiest.

Glam Mac and Cheese

From Food Network Magazine, March 2019, page 48

Yield: serves 4

12 ounces fusilli
Kosher salt
One-third cup diced pancetta
1 small handful of fresh thyme
3 scallions, thinly sliced
3 tablespoon unsalted butter
3 tablespoon all-purpose flour
Pinch of ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon mustard powder\
Three-quarters whole milk (2 percent is fine)
1 and one-quarter cups heavy cream
7 ounces dulcelatte or gorgonzola cheese, crumbled (about 1 cup)
4 ounces parmesan cheese, grated (about 1 and one-half cups)
Freshly ground black pepper
One-quarter cup breadcrumbs
1 handful chopped fresh parsley, for garnish

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water. Cook just less than al dente, as the pasta will be cooked again in the oven. Reserve 1 cup cooking water, then drain pasta, return it to the pot and set aside.

Fry the pancetta in a medium skillet over medium heat until it just starts to brown and crisp up, then add thyme and scallions and cook for an additional 3 minutes. Add the skillet’s contents to the pasta.

For the sauce, put butter, flour, nutmeg and mustard powder in a small saucepan set over medium heat and cook, stirring, until butter has melted. Mix milk and cream together in a pitcher and add a little to the flour and butter in the saucepan, stirring well. Keep adding milk mixture bit by bit, stirring well each time (be sure to get into the “corners”of  the pan, as flour often lurks there). Once the sauce has fully come together, turn up the heat and boil for a minute or two. The sauce will thicken. Remove pan from the heat.

Add two-thirds of both the cheeses to the sauce while it is still hot and combine well. (It may be a bit lumpy, that is fine.) Season to taste with salt and pepper and add to the pasta mix. If the cheese sauce thickens too much, add some of the pasta water. Stir everything together and spoon into 4 large ramekins in a shallow 3-quart casserole.

Sprinkle the top with the rest of the cheese and the breadcrumbs and bake in the oven for about 20 minutes, or until the cheese starts to bubble and the topping goes brown. Sprinkle with chopped parsley and serve.

About the author: Lee White (left), a former resident of Old Lyme, has been writing about restaurants and cooking since 1976.  She has been extensively published in the Worcester (Mass.) Magazine, The Day, Norwich Bulletin, and Hartford Courant.  She currently writes Nibbles and a cooking column called A La Carte for the Shore Publishing newspapers, and Elan, a quarterly magazine, all of which are now owned by The Day. 

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Work by Lymes’ Senior Center Artists on Display at Old Lyme Town Hall Through April

This watercolor by Keiko Kaiser depicting a beautiful flower garden is one of the featured pieces of artwork currently on display in Old Lyme Town Hall.

The Shoreline Artists’ Workshop and the Lymes’ Senior Center’s art classes, under the instruction of Sharon Schmiedel, will combine their artistic talents to present an exhibition at the Old Lyme Memorial Town Hall during the months of March and April. Exquisite pieces of work will reflect a variety of visual media and styles.

All pieces will be for sale, with a portion of any proceeds donated to the Senior Center.

There will be an opening reception on Friday, March 8, from 4 to 6 p.m. at the town hall.

Come celebrate the Senior Center artists for their dedication to support the visual arts and the Senior Center community.

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23 Enthusiastic Volunteers Turn Out to Clean up Rte. 82 in Hadlyme

Many hands make light work … 23 volunteers showed to clean up Rte. 82.

Almost two dozen volunteers from East Haddam, Lyme and beyond turned out on the morning of Saturday, Feb. 23, to clean trash and litter from an eight-mile section of Rte. 82 in Hadlyme.

The community clean-up effort was organized by two Hadlyme residents, Matt Elgart and Humphrey Tyler, and supported by seven Hadlyme civic groups and two local businesses.

An enthusiastic volunteer hard at work.

The 23 volunteers met at the Hadlyme Country Market in the morning and spent the next two hours picking up trash and litter on Rte. 82 from Two Wrasslin’ Cats Coffee House in East Haddam south to the Hadlyme Four Corners in Lyme and east out the Salem-Norwich Road (Rte. 82)  to its intersection with Baker Ln. and Three Bridges Ln.

No space was out of bounds for the trash pick-up!

Trash bags were donated by Shagbark Lumber and Farm Supply, and the Hadlyme Country Market provided free coffee for the volunteers.

The clean-up was supported by Hadlyme Public Hall, Hadlyme North School Society, East Haddam Land Trust, Friends of Whalebone Cove, Lyme Land Conservation Trust, Hadlyme Hall Garden Club, and the Town of Lyme Open Space Office.

All ages participated in the clean-up effort.

The volunteers were Christine Carter, Chih-Wu Su, Dave Schweitzer, Emilia Schweitzer, Mathias Schweitzer, Wendy & Tom Miller, Rob Smith, Joene Hendry, Mel Woody, Curt and Barbara Michael, Maureen and Bernie Gillis, Diana and Will Fiske, Joan Motyka, Greg Miller, Karen Wiswell, Marion Buck, and the organizers, Elgart and Tyler.

This volunteer proudly displays the fruits of his labor.

Elgart and Tyler said they hope to organize future clean-ups of Rte. 82 and the litter conditions along the highway warrant it. Anyone interested in participating can reach them through Friends of Whalebone Cove at fowchadlyme@gmail.com .

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Two Bills Push for Opioid Treatment After Narcan

We thought this article by Jack Kramer and published by our friends at CTNewsJunkie.com would be of interest to many readers in Lyme and Old Lyme in light of the recent presentation in Old Lyme about the use of Narcan.

HARTFORD, CT — Two bills that would allow or require first responders to take someone to an emergency treatment facility after being given Naloxone as an overdose reversal drug have been submitted to the legislature’s Public Health Committee.

The woman whose tragic loss of her son to a drug overdose caught President Donald Trump’s attention believes the bills are big steps forward in the state’s continuing fight to stem the opioid and heroin drug crisis, which killed about three people a day in the state of Connecticut the past two years.

“When a person has been given Naloxone (Narcan), …”  Visit this link to read the full article.

Editor’s Note:CTNewsJunkie.com is a fellow member of the Local Independent Online News (LION) publishers national organization and we are pleased occasionally to cross-publish our stories.

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Become a Middlesex Health Hospice Volunteer

MIDDLETOWN—Middlesex Health’s Hospice Program is looking for volunteers.

Hospice volunteers are an integral part of the Middlesex Health team, and they work with patients and families as they cope with the challenges of terminal illness.

All aspiring volunteers must submit a volunteer application and complete 12 hours of training and a mentorship before they can begin their work. The next training sessions will be held on April 6 from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and April 13 from 8:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Both sessions are mandatory for new volunteers and will be held in the Randy Goodwin, MD Conference Center.

For more information and to request an application, contact a Middlesex Health volunteer coordinator at 860-358-5700. 

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Old Lyme Church Seeks Return of Waterbury Resident to Husband, Two Young Children

During a sermon on Sunday, Jan. 13, the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme (FCCOL) announced it would be working with local immigration experts to return Glenda Cardena Caballero to her husband and two young children in Waterbury while her deportation case winds its way through the lengthy immigration appeals process.

Last August, her husband Miguel Torres pictured above with their two children Nathaly (11) and Keneth (7) – all of whom are U.S. citizens – were forced to watch helplessly as Glenda was taken from them by ICE, placed on an airplane and deported to Honduras.

Glenda had been in the US since 2005; she had complied with all of ICE’s directives; and her case was under appeal in the court system. Despite following immigration rules and regulations, ICE agents deported her suddenly and arbitrarily in front of her children and husband, leaving her family bereft and heartbroken.

The city to which she was deported, San Pedro Sula, is considered the most violent city in the world outside of a war zone. In December, the house where she is living with her mother was strafed with bullets; then, the very next day, she had a gun held to her head and was robbed of her money and phone on the street.

The church’s goal is to bring Glenda home to her family in the U.S. while her case continues to wind its way through the appeals process.  According to Senior Minister Steve Jungkeit, the church is:
>working to get Glenda into a safe, protected space so her husband and children won’t be constantly worried about her health and safety;
>building a case for a humanitarian parole – an exception the State Department can grant that will allow her to return to her family while her case is under appeal;
>building a community of love and support for Miguel, Nathaly and Keneth that they can lean on when the emotional toll of separation is too much to bear.

The Torres family in happier times.

Jungkiet said the church’s humanitarian efforts to help the Torres family are centered in a story from the Book of Genesis, where two family members built a cairn called a Mizpah to symbolize a peace they established after resolving a bitter dispute.  As they parted company, they said words that have become known in Hebrew and Christian beliefs as the Mizpah prayer:  “The Lord watch between thee and me while we are absent one from the other.”

The meaning of the words has evolved over time to symbolize an unbreakable emotional bond between people who have been painfully separated, and the cairn has become symbolic of a place of sanctuary where people meet during emergencies.

The church will be chronicling its humanitarian efforts on its website (www.fccol.org/BringGlendaHome) and Facebook page (www.facebook.com/congregationalchurchofoldlyme).

Donations to help the family bring Glenda home can be sent to FCCOL.  Checks should be made out to FCCOL with “Immigration Assistance Fund” written on the comment line – and mailed to 2 Ferry Road, Old Lyme, CT 06371.   Contributions are tax deductible to the extent allowable by law.

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Old Lyme DTC Issues Statement on Federal Shut-Down, Starts Donation Drive for Impacted Residents

Jane Cable, Old Lyme Democratic Town Committee (DTC) Chairman, has issued the following statement on behalf of the Old Lyme DTC regarding the US Federal Government partial shut-down and how the committee is responding to it locally.

‘The U.S. government has been partially shut down since Dec. 22, over President Trump’s demand for more than $5 billion for a U.S.- Mexico border wall. The Old Lyme Democratic Town Committee believes this action is intolerable for the country, and heartless toward the affected federal workers.

The Old Lyme DTC membership is donating cash and food cards to the Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB) to assist residents affected by the shutdown. To date, we have collected over $800 dollars in donations for the LYSB. Our commitment to provide assistance will continue until the conclusion of the shutdown.

If you would like to join us build a bridge of support, donations can be sent to the LYSB at 59 Lyme Street, P.O. Box 589, Old Lyme, CT 06371 or to
The Town of Old Lyme, Social Services at 52 Lyme St., Old Lyme, CT 06371.

If you need a donation picked up, please email us to arrange this.”

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College Steps Offers New Program at Conn. College

College Steps is launching a new program for Fall 2019 at Connecticut College to provide supports for young adults living with social, communication, or learning challenges through a unique, individualized, and peer-based model serving high school transition students interested in a college experience prior to graduation, those exiting high school, as well as students already enrolled in college.

College Steps’ primary goal is to prepare students for meaningful careers and autonomy after graduation from college, placing a strong emphasis on self-advocacy, social competencies, employment, and independent living skills. Students work with trained peer mentors who are supported by a full-time, on-site Program Coordinator at Connecticut College.

Prospective students, families, school district personnel, and advocates interested in learning more about this exciting new initiative are invited to attend public information sessions hosted by Family Wise Solutions on Friday, Jan. 11 and Saturday, Jan. 12, with light fare catered by Mystic Market.

Register at admissions@collegesteps.org to confirm attendance.

Attendees will learn about specific services offered, including the individualized support model, admissions process and associated costs.

These information sessions will be held at Family Wise Solutions at 4 Broadway Avenue Extension (3rd Floor), Mystic, CT 06378. *The location is on the 3rd floor of the building and unfortunately there is no elevator access. Reach out at admissions@collegesteps.org to arrange an individualized meeting if
this does not meet your needs.

The priority application deadline for Fall 2019 enrollment with College Steps at Connecticut College is March 1, 2019.

Additional information is available at www.CollegeSteps.org.

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Towns Take Lead Pushing Plastic-Bag Ban

Fueled by environmentalists and frustrated by state inaction, a growing number of Connecticut communities are taking or considering action on their own to ban single-use plastic bags at grocery stores to help protect the environment.

Currently only Westport and Greenwich have banned single-use plastic bags but …

Read the full article at this link.  It was written by Jack Kramer and published Jan. 4 on CTNewsJunkie.com

Plastic bags in use at Stop & Shop. Photo by Jack Kramer courtesy of CTNewsJunkie.com

Editor’s Note:  CTNewsJunkie.com and LymeLine.com are both proud members of the Local Independent Online News (LION) publishers group.  We are glad to offer links to each other’s articles.

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Come Sing with Con Brio!

At the sold-out Sunday, Dec. 9 Christmas concert, the Con Brio Choral Society performed Zelenka’s Te Deum with three professional soloists and the Con Brio Festival Orchestra under the direction of conductor Dr. Stephen Bruce. The event was at Christ the King R.C. Church in Old Lyme, CT. Photo by Peter Coffey.

Perhaps you have sung in church choirs, or in school or community choruses and wonder if you’re ready for a new musical challenge. If so, even if it has been a few years since you last sung regularly, why not audition for Con Brio Choral Society? If accepted, you would join the group’s 66 singers in rehearsals each Tuesday evening from Jan. 8 through March 31.

Auditions will be held on Wed., Jan. 2 starting at 7 p.m. at St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church at 56 Great Hammock Rd., Old Saybrook.

The Con Brio Choral Society begins rehearsing music for the spring Sunday, March 31, concert (start time – 4 p.m.) on Tuesday, Jan. 8, at 7 p.m at St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church at 56 Great Hammock Rd. in Old Saybrook.  

The spring concert will include Mozart’s Mass in C Minor and Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue, featuring renowned pianist Mihae Lee performing with the chorus and orchestra.

For more information about Con Brio or the audition process, call Sue at 860-526-5399 or visit conbrio.org.

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Ledge Light Offers Free Program to Help People Quit Tobacco

Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) is offering a free program aimed to reduce tobacco use in Southeastern Connecticut. The goal of the program is to remove common barriers people face by offering quit aids, coaching and social support at no cost. Programs are open to those who live or work in Southeastern Connecticut.

The program uses the American Lung Association’s “Freedom from Smoking®” curriculum to help participants quit tobacco in seven weeks. Free nicotine replacement therapy will be offered to participants. FDA- approved prescription medication like Varenicline (Chantix) will be made available to participants, should they prefer to use it, if their insurance doesn’t cover it.

“Quitting tobacco is a huge step towards improving your health and preventing disease. Ask any former tobacco-user, it’s the best decision they’ve ever made,” said LLHD Senior Health Program Coordinator and Tobacco Treatment Specialist Carolyn Wilson. “Sometimes it takes several attempts to be successful but creating a plan, seeking support and developing a set of strategies is the best course of action. It’s important to never give up on the journey to becoming tobacco-free.”

The 2019 Tobacco-Free LLHD program is made possible through a partnership with Uncas Health District and funding is from the Preventive Health & Health Services Block Grant (PHHSBG), Grant # 1NB01OT009192-01-00, fromthe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The first program of 2019 will begin Jan. 2 and run through Feb. 13. The “Quit Day” is Jan. 23.  Individual counseling is available by appointment if those interested can’t attend the group program. Tobacco-Free LLHD will be offering at least 2 more group programs in 2019.

For more information or to register for the program, visit this link and/or contact Senior Health Program Coordinator Carolyn Wilson at (860) 446-3062 or at cwilson@llhd.org.

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On Winter Solstice, Old Lyme Open Space Commission Reflects on 2018, Anticipates 2019

On Friday, Dec. 21, at 5:23 p.m. EST to be exact, it was the Winter Solstice in Connecticut — the darkest day of the year, with just over nine hours of light.  

The year of 2018 started out dark for the Old Lyme Open Space Commission. Diana Atwood Johnson, who served as chair for nearly 20 years, passed away on Jan. 1, after a long illness.

After the Solstice, however, days start to become lighter, and nature resumes its cycle of renewal as spring approaches. In January, Amanda Blair and William Dunbar became the new Open Space Commission co-chairs, and every member pitched in. 

The first order of business was to continue the care of Old Lyme Open Space property.  A land steward was hired; members personally walked trails to survey conditions; a service was hired to remove unsafe trees and branches; safety plans were discussed with the town fire marshal; new signage and trail markers were added; a new parking area for Champlain North was created; and the commission reached out to the Old Lyme Land Trust to work on mutual projects.  

Renewed educational efforts were also made.  For the first time, the Commission staffed a booth at the Midsummer Festival; news releases were issued; and the Open Space Commission web site was updated.

Early in 2019, the Commission expects to have some very exciting news! And work on substantial projects will accelerate – boxes of documents and correspondence on open space will be categorized, and conservation easements reviewed, as an antecedent to the drafting of a new Open Space Plan.

The Commission’s message remains: “Take a Hike!”  Don’t let winter keep you inside.  The trails are now in great shape for hiking, and when covered by snow, they’ll still be fun to snowshoe or cross-country ski.  

As weather warms in the New Year, volunteers will be gratefully welcomed for trail assistance.

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Six Years Ago Today …

Today is the sixth anniversary of the tragic shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) issued the following statement,

“Today is an awful day. I’ll think a lot about my youngest son, who went off to his first grade classroom this morning, as I remember the precious children and brave educators whose lives were unimaginably taken six years ago.”

He continued, “I’ve had the honor of representing, and becoming friends with, many of the families of the victims. Nothing we do can ever bring those kids back, but we should be inspired by Newtown’s efforts to make the world a kinder, more loving place. We can reach out to one another and help those in need.”

Caitlin Nosal (center), elder daughter of Old Lyme Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal, and her friend (right), a resident of Newtown, Conn., along with former Old Lyme Selectman Mervin Roberts (left) visited Newtown in late December 2012 to pay their respects to the victims of the horrific shooting that had taken place Dec. 14 at Sandy Hook Elementary School that same month. In this file photo, they are seen looking at some of the memorials to the 26 teachers and students killed

Murphy noted that this morning he is delivering meals to families in need in New Haven and commented, “I hope everyone takes some time to do their own act of kindness – big or small – in their communities.”

He concluded, “We will never stop remembering, and honoring, and fighting for the lives senselessly lost six years ago. We have to keep going. For me, that means I will never give up trying to change our broken gun laws to keep our kids safe from gun violence.”

“A national movement for stronger gun laws started six years ago today, and today I feel more confident than ever before that Congress will listen and act on changing our gun laws next year. We would not be here without the voices of so many of the family members from Newtown who want us to honor their loved ones with action,” Murphy added.

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Remembering Chip

Chip Dahlke

UPDATED 12/12: There is now a wonderfully appropriate commentary on Chip’s passing at this link, written (we presume) by his children.

We are deeply saddened to hear the news of Chip Dahlke’s passing this past weekend.  Chip, who founded the Lyme Farmers Market back in 2001 — or thereabouts, was a larger-than-life character with an even bigger heart.

There have been numerous Facebook tributes at this link recalling Chip’s friendship, wit, kindness, and the fact he was “one of a kind.”  One writer said wistfully — undoubtedly expressing a sentiment shared by many — that, “Summer Saturdays will not be quite the same.”

We do not have any details of his obituary or services at this time, but will publish both as soon as they are received.

Mary Stone, who was intimately involved in the continuation of the Market once Chip decided to move into the background of the operation, told LymeLine, “Chip loved his children and Ashlawn Farm. He regarded the farm as a town treasure to be shared with all of us at concerts in the field, farm-to-table dinners, the Tour de Lyme, and the Lyme Farmers Market.”

She added, “Chip ran the Market out of his back pocket, where any paperwork resided. For 14 years, he coordinated vendors and musicians and publicity with little apparent effort. The Market had been started as a way to draw more customers to the coffee shop, but it soon became apparent that the coffee shop drew people to the field. In the Market newsletter, he gained many fans with his curmudgeonly skewering of trends, fads, local vendors, and a reliable rant against over-pampered pets and kale in any form.”

Stone summed up Chip beautifully in these words, saying, “He was a true original, a devoted father and friend, who loved to share his home and land.”

A Note from our Publisher: On a personal note, we would like to add that Chip was an early and fervent supporter of LymeLine.com.  Back in 2004, he summoned me to Ashlawn Farm to explain in his own inimitable way that he respected our efforts and wanted to know how he could help. 

He started contributing a monthly financial column and then continued to advertise the Lyme Farmers Market with us (when he didn’t really need to!) for many years. 

His support when we were just a fledgling business was not only extremely generous but also incredibly important to us in terms of convincing us that we were doing something worthwhile. We will be forever indebted to Chip for giving us such tangible — and intangible  — support.

We send our sincere condolences to Chip’s family on his passing and agree with so many others that the world will just not be the same without him.

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Legal News You Can Use: Are Connecticut Roads Prepared for Winter?

Snow’s so pretty but are the roads — and you and your vehicle — ready for the next winter storm? Photo by Korey Moore on Unsplash

SPONSORED POST by Suisman Shapiro Attorneys-at-Law.

Connecticut’s first winter storm of the season in mid-November caught many people off-guard, including the Department of Transportation. Snow blanketed many areas of the state just as people left work. Although the DOT salted the roads, it wasn’t enough.

Crashes and stuck cars closed three highways, causing major back-ups. A man from Florida died when he left his spun-out vehicle and another car hit him. Connecticut is no stranger to snow and winter driving, so what went wrong this time?

More snow than expected

First, the state received more snow than expected, but not by a huge amount. Fairfield County took the brunt of it, but many areas received over half a foot. This may have been enough to cause trouble. Drivers knew there would be snow, but didn’t expect quite so much of it. Connecticut drivers are used to driving in snow, and they may have thought they could handle it.

Bad timing

The storm’s timing did not help matters, either. Anytime bad weather coincides with the rush hour commute, you have a terrible combination. Commuters hurrying to make it home blocked the plows trying to clear the roads. Police had to escort them out of traffic.

Operations center failure

Unfortunately, the storm also caught Governor Malloy off-guard. He was speaking on prisoner reforms in California at the time of the storm and did not activate the emergency operations center. Nor did his chief of staff, Brian Durand, who sought advice from the Transportation Commissioner.

Are you prepared?

If you haven’t done your winter car check, now is the time to do it. You should check the following before hitting the snowy roads:

  • Battery. Many garages can test your battery. Carry jumper cables, even if you have a good battery. You may be able to save a neighbor in need.
  • Fluids. Top them off, especially windshield washer fluid and anti-freeze. Keep your gas tank at least half-full, as well.
  • Tires. Switch to winter tires if you have them. Otherwise, make sure your all-weather tires are in good condition.
  • Lights. It gets dark much earlier, and you want other drivers to see you.
  • Emergency kit. Make sure you fully stock your winter car kit with flashlights, water, snacks, a warm blanket, a first aid kit and kitty litter or sand.

Winter has only just begun. We will see more snow before the season is over. Stay safe and make sure you are prepared for the next winter storm. 

Visit the Law Firm of Suisman Shapiro  at this link for more information.

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Holiday Music, Movies and More at ‘the Kate’ in December

Lunasa and vocalist Ashley Davis will play traditional Irish holiday music, Dec. 13.

From classic holiday films to live theater, to music of many genres and family programs, there is plenty to see and enjoy at the Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center (the Kate) this December!

Celebrate the season with several Christmas-themed events, including traditional Irish holiday music with Lunasa and vocalist Ashley Davis on the 13th. 

Community traditions continue with:

>the Old Lyme Town Band’s Holiday Concert on the 12th

>Cappella Cantorum’s annual Messiah Sing or Listen on the 16th.

>the films Home Alone and White Christmas will be shown on the 9th and 20th, respectively, on the Kate’s big screen with surround sound

>an encore viewing of the Bolshoi Ballet’s stunning production of The Nutcracker takes place on the 22nd. 

Rounding out the month are performances by:

>The Weight playing the music of The Band on the 14th

>songwriter/guitarist/blueseman Chris Smither on the 15th

>the John Poussette-Dart Band on the 21st

>NRBQ on the 22nd

>singer-songwriter Dar Williams on the 30th. 

For information and tickets for all shows at the Kate, visit www.thekate.org or call 860-510-0453. 

The Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center is a non-profit performing arts organization located in an historic theatre/town hall on Main Street in Old Saybrook. Originally opened in 1911 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Center has been renovated with public funds from the Town of Old Saybrook and donations raised by the Trustees of the Center.

It includes a 250-seat theatre and a small museum honoring Katharine Hepburn, Old Saybrook’s most celebrated resident. As befits an organization born of such a public/private partnership, programming is eclectic, offering something for all ages and income levels on the Connecticut shore and in the lower river valley.

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Tesla Technology Aids Autoimmune Conditions; Pop-Up Event on Revolutionary AmpCoil at OL Library

This photo shows Aaron Bigelow’s wife holding the AmpCoil, while Aaron and the couple’s daughters share the moment.

Join an AmpCoil pop-up event this Sunday, Dec. 2, at 1 p.m. at the Old Lyme Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library.

One of the cofounders of the AmpCoil technology will be speaking about his battle with Lyme Disease and how necessity for his own wellness was the mother of his invention. Aaron Bigelow from Nevada City, Calif., wanted to see the place from which Lyme Disease acquired its name and is visiting Lyme and Old Lyme to speak about his journey with this disease.

The AmpCoil is a modern wellness tool that combines bio-feedback, bio-resonance and a customized coil based on Tesla technology. The use of this technology has transformed Bigelow’s life and he is anxious to share this approach to wellness, which can be applied to numerous autoimmune conditions.

This is a free event with demonstrations for those hoping to open the door to a new level of wellness.

For more information, contact Sandy Garvin at 860-391-3088. 

Visit www.AmpCoil.com to learn more.

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A la Carte: Got Leftovers? How About a Turkey Casserole?

Perhaps you are reading this column on the morning after Thanksgiving as you drink your cup of coffee or tea. It has been quite a few years since I sat with the newspaper and figured out which I should do first. I have been in my condo for almost five years and only created Thanksgiving dinner once, and only for around six or seven of us.

Many, many years ago, when my own daughter was still in elementary school, there would have been at least four little ones (two nieces, one nephew and Darcy) or up to 10 or more (more nephews, nieces, two step-sons, one step-daughter and all their parents). Even when the little ones became high schoolers, we still did Thanksgiving. Although there were extra bedrooms, there were sleeping bags filled with humans on floors everywhere.

The last Thanksgiving enormous dinner was in Old Lyme, just a few months before I sold the house and moved into my condo. That crowd included more than 20 friends and family. Many of the family members stayed over the weekend, and, except for a few sandwiches, there were no leftovers.

These days turkey day happens at my daughter-in-law’s condo in Newburyport. My stepson and Nancy have divorced, but it is amicable. My Massachusetts granddaughters will be there (one already graduated from college and living in Boston, the middle a senior at Clark in Worcester and the baby now a freshman at UMass in Amherst.) There will be leftovers, but I will leave them in Massachusetts, because I bought two Butterballs at BJs.

As you read this, one is thawing in my refrigerator, the stuffing is in the freezer, the gravy is made (with an Ina Garten recipe made with no turkey juice, which she calls a base. I will add that base to the basting as Mr. Tom comes out of the oven. With the mashed potatoes, vegetables, gravy, stuffing, turkey and cranberry (I love the canned kind for this casserole), I will make at least two or three casseroles.

Because I never grew up with casseroles, I actually like these better than the original meal. Here is my go-to recipe for this and any kind of meat leftover this winter.

Photo by Jonathan Pielmayer on Unsplash

Turkey Leftover Casserole

3 to 4 pounds of turkey, dark or white meat, slices or chunked, divided
2 pounds of vegetables (beans, turnips, Brussels sprouts, corn or squash), divided
2 to 3 pounds of mashed white potatoes and/or sweet potatoes, divided
1 to 2 pounds stuffing, divided
1 can of cranberry sauce (or made-scratch) cranberry sauce, divided
Leftover gravy from Thanksgiving, or packaged or carton gravy

In a large casserole dish (or a big gratin dish or a big Tupper-type holder), begin to layer the ingredients. I begin with a little mashed potato, then turkey, some gravy, vegetables, mashed potatoes, stuffing and a few slices of cranberry sauce. I end with mashed potatoes and drizzled with gravy, if you still have some. Each casserole will feed at least four to six people.

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Happy Thanksgiving! Let’s Count Our Blessings


Editor’s Note: We wish a very Happy Thanksgiving to all our readers, their families and friends, and hope everyone enjoys a wonderful day today! 

We are delighted to republish another column by our friend and talented writer, Linda Ahnert, of Old Lyme, which celebrates this day of thankfulness.

If you said the name “Wilbur Cross” to Connecticut residents, they would most likely think of the parkway that bears his name.  But our older readers will remember that he was governor of our state for eight years—from 1931 to 1939, to be exact.

On Nov. 12, 1936, Wilbur Cross issued an eloquent Thanksgiving Proclamation, which has gone down in the annals of Connecticut history.  Many generations of school children either were read the Proclamation in class or required to memorize it … or both!

For the benefit of our younger readers, we reprint it here:

Time out of mind at this turn of the seasons when the hardy oak leaves rustle in the wind and the frost gives a tang to the air and the dusk falls early and the friendly evenings lengthen under the heel of Orion, it has seemed good to our people to join together in praising the Creator and Preserver, who has brought us by a way that we did not know to the end of another year.  In observance of this custom, I appoint Thursday, the twenty-sixth of November, as a day of Public Thanksgiving for the blessings that have been our common lot and have placed our beloved State with the favored regions of earth—for all the creature comforts: the yield of the soil that has fed us and the richer yield from labor of every kind that has sustained our lives—and for all those things, as dear as breath to the body, that quicken man’s faith in his manhood, that nourish and strengthen his spirit to do the great work still before him: for the brotherly word and act; for honor held above price; for steadfast courage and zeal in the long, long search after truth; for liberty and for justice freely granted by each to his fellow and so as freely enjoyed; and for the crowning glory and mercy of peace upon our land;—that we may humbly take heart of these blessings as we gather once again with solemn and festive rites to keep our Harvest Home. 

It’s no wonder that Wilbur Cross knew how to use words.  In 1889, he earned a Ph.D. in English literature from Yale.  Before he became governor, he taught English at Yale, was a well-known literary critic, and wrote several books.

By 1941, just five years after Cross wrote about the “mercy of peace upon our land,” the United Sates would be fighting in World War II.

In 1976, another Connecticut governor—Ella Grasso—reissued the proclamation from 40 years earlier and called it a “masterpiece of eloquence.” 

Today, Wilbur Cross’s words still stir our spirits.  We are thankful that we live in this “favored region of earth” and for the freedoms that we enjoy.  And, yes, we are grateful for the glory of the English language. 

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