December 16, 2018

Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm Hosts 29th Annual ‘Farm Day’ Today, All Welcome

Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm Annual ‘Farm Day’ always draws a large number of visitors.

Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm will host their 29th Annual ‘Farm Day’ on Saturday November 24th from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 139 Beaver Brook Rd. in Lyme, Conn. The annual event is a Lyme tradition, bringing families together to celebrate the heritage of the 101-year-old farm.  The open house ‘Farm Day’ is a free event and features activities for people of all ages.

The Sankows invite the public to see the animals; including over 600 sheep, learn the history of the Sankow farm, and to discover how the farm products are produced and used.   Suzanne Sankow says “Stan and I continue to encourage families to learn the importance of farming and local agriculture.  We greatly enjoy seeing the next generations explore the farm, pet a cow, try a sheep’s cheese or just have fun being outdoors before the winter cold arrives”.

Activities for the family include wagon hayrides, wool spinning and sock making demonstrations.  Live music will be performed by The Locomotives, a folk/blues/rock band, who will be playing songs from the 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s in addition some originals.

Visitors can shop from a few local vendors including Four Root Farms who will be onsite selling holiday wreaths and swags made with all-Connecticut grown evergreens, rose hips and berries.

The Farm Market and Wool Shop will be open during the event and will feature a variety of artisanal sheep and cow’s milk dairy products and meats as well as new wool products including wool socks, pillows, blankets, capes and sweater capes. Complimentary tastings of sheep’s and cow’s cheese will be available including the Award-Winning BIG E ‘Best in Class’ Feta Pesto.

Lamb and chicken sausage sandwiches, Abbey, Pleasant Cow and Pleasant Son mac & cheese, lamb and white bean chili, chicken corn chowder, hot chocolate and cider will be available for purchase.

Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm, is a 175 acres sheep and dairy farm located in Lyme, CT.  The 101 year old farm is home to a dozen Jersey Cows alongside the 450-600 sheep – Frislands, Romneys and natural coloreds.

Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm is the largest sheep farm in Connecticut and the only licensed producer of sheep’s milk in Connecticut.  They make and sells artisanal sheep and cow’s milk cheeses as well as yogurts, milk, and gelato.

The Wool Shop on the farm features wool garments including socks, scarves, sweaters, hats, vests, and blankets as well as cones of yarn made from their own wool. They offer fresh lamb meats at their farm store beside homemade entrees such as white bean chili and lamb curry stew.

Visit www.beaverbrookfarm.org for more information.

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Roger Tory Peterson Estuary Center Hosts ‘Turkey Walk’ Today

Photo by Peter Lloyd on Unsplash

Take a Turkey Walk on Saturday!

Join a guide from the Roger Tory Peterson Estuary Center on Saturday, Nov. 24, from 9 to 10 a.m. for their yearly post-Thanksgiving walk at the Jewett Preserve in Lyme. Topics of discussion will include turkeys, Thanksgiving and more during this relaxed hour-long walk while enjoying the fall foliage and outdoor family time.

Register at https://www.ctaudubon.org/2018/10/register-turkey-walk/

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A la Carte: From Lee With Love — Thanksgiving Recipes Galore!

Editor’s Note: We are running three of Lee White’s wonderful columns together today to give readers a chance to savor a selection of her wonderful Thanksgiving recipes in one place.  Happy Thanksgiving to all!

For more years than I can remember, I have been writing about turkey at Thanksgiving. I get every food magazine every month and every single month, in October, a turkey is on the covers.

My mother never cooked a turkey. We had Thanksgiving at an aunt and uncle’s home in Kinderhook, New York. There was no gravy and no stuffing and the sweet potatoes were stuffed into oranges, which made the sweet potatoes taste like oranges. The first Thanksgiving with my husband and daughter was in Houston, and I ordered turkey and sides from a restaurant. The gravy was white. In following years I made turkey and sides it myself, sometimes on 20 or more friends and family. The first few times, I called the Butterball Hot Line for help.

Some years later I stopped using the throwaway aluminum pans and bought a $200 roasting pan, which I still use for every kind of roast I have ever made. It was one terrific buy. Over the years I brined turkey in a huge cooler. I bought organic turkeys. Last year I went to a friend who made a heritage turkey. I made all kinds of stuffing and once placed slices of bacon on top of the fowl. A few times I put buttered cheesecloth on the turkey. But these days I buy the least expensive turkey I can get and I buy it frozen. I make my stuffing the night before and put it in the refrigerator in an enormous plastic bag. The next morning I stuff as much dressing as possible into the thawed (but cold) turkey’s cavity. I put the rest in a casserole and when the roasted turkey come out of the oven, I add some juice to the casserole and bake it.

Forget all those other “new” ways to make turkey for Thanksgiving. Here is my favorite recipe. 

Turkey

1 14- to 16-pound turkey
salt
1 stick butter
½ (one-half) cup good white wine

Gravy

¼ (one-quarter) cup all-purpose flour
cold water
Gravy Master (optional)
salt and pepper to taste

Remove giblets from turkey (I don’t use them; instead, I boiled them for the kitties, less bones). Rinse and dry turkey inside and out. Rub salt inside cavity of bird. Fill cavity with cold stuffing made the night before or early morning. Place bird in a rack (or upside glass pie pan) atop a large, heavy-duty roasting pan. Place in a 350-degree oven.

Add butter and wine in a saucepan, bring to a boil, then simmer for about 10 to 15 minutes. Open oven, pour wine-butter over turkey and close oven. Every half hour baste liquid over turkey. Bake until turkey is done (when the thermometer plunged into the thickest part of the thigh registered 175 to 180 degrees, 10 to 12 minutes per pound if not stuffed or 12 to 15 minutes stuffed).

Turn off the oven, remove turkey from the oven, Place the turkey on a platter and spooned the Stuffing into a bowl; cover each with aluminum foil and return both to still-warm oven. (Extra stuffing can be heated in a casserole dish; it is not as tasty but if you spoon some juice on the dish before heating, it’s pretty good.)

Remove grease from roasting pan. and place the pan on the stove. Turn heat to medium. In a large jar, add all-purpose flour and about 2 cups of water. Screw jar cover and shake. When the brown bits are hot, add flour-water mixture and, over medium-high heat, whisk constantly. If you need more water, add some. Once the gravy is ready, add and stir in Gravy Master to taste (optional). Add salt and pepper to taste.

STUFFING AND SAUCE

Cranberry, grape and apple sauce.

This was a very busy but very pleasant week.

First was a lovely party for the retirement of Betty Anne Reiter at the Mystic Museum of Art. Betty Anne and I have worked together for quite a few years, she as librarian at the Groton Public Library, creating a couple of food series at the library. She and her staff made the series such fun that I hope we will do it every May.

Then there was cookbook time. Rose Levy Birnbaum, food writer extraordinaire, was on a book tour with her newest ???????? and we had a nice lunch at Olio before she and her assistant, Woody, went to their next signing and demo in Paramus, New Jersey. A few days later,, I went to RJ Julia in Madison to listen to Dorie Greenspan (who has a house on our shoreline), talk about her newest book, Everyday Dorie. I think this may be the best of her many best cookbooks and one of the best I have read by anyone in the last five years.

I had dinner that night with Madison friends at Elizabeth’s, a new one for me. The food was delicious, the service very professional and , service just  lovely.  If the chef will share a recipe with me, I will share the  house made gnocchi in a Gorgonzola cream sauce  topped with frizzled onions. Four of us shared that appetizers, and then we ordered another.

But I digress. I will have Thanksgiving with family in Newburyport and then drive back to Connecticut have another turkey dinner the next day in Durham. For the one with my family, I will make the turkey stuffing and a new side, so here is an old and a new; none is blue but one is borrowed.

Roasted Grape, Apple and Cranberry Sauce

From Cooking Light, November 2018
Serves 12

Cooking spray
2 cups seedless black grapes (about 10 ounces)
1 and three-quarter cups chopped Honeycrisp apple (or Gala or ????)
2 tablespoons chopped scallop
1 cup fresh or frozen whole cranberries
1 and one half tablespoons unsalted butter
3 and one-half teaspoons pure maple syrup
One-eighth teaspoon kosher salt
One-quarter teaspoon fresh thyme leaves or sprigs (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Lightly coat a rimmed baking sheet with spray. Place grapes, apple and shallot on prepared baking sheet and lightly coat with cooking spray. Bake until shallots begin to soften, about 5 minutes.

Add cranberries to baking sheet. Bake at 425 degrees until cranberries burst, apple is tender and grape skins are beginning to burst, about 20 more minutes. Remove from oven and transfer mixture to a medium bowl. Stir in butter, maple syrup and salt. Cool completely, about one hour. Sprinkle with thyme, if desired.

Stuffing

I make the stuffing at least the day ahead,, because it should be cold when you put it in the turkey, which is also cold. This is probably more stuffing you will use. You can put the rest in a casserole and bake for Thanksgiving, or freeze it for another turkey or chicken dinner.

I large Pepperidge Farms herb-seasoned stuffing mix
6 to 8 tablespoons butter
1 cup onions, minced
1 cup celery, minced
1 small can of diced mushrooms
1 cup walnuts, chopped (I chop it with my hands because I don’t want it chopped fine)
salt and pepper, to taste
Bell’s seasoning, to taste

Make Pepperidge Farms stuffing according to package instructions.

In a skillet, add butter and melt over medium heat. Add onions, celery, mushrooms and walnuts. Saute for about 10 minutes. Add salt, pepper and Bell’s seasoning to taste. Add to stuffing mix and stir. Refrigerate until cold (I often put the stuffing in a large plastic bag and put it in the porch, since I rarely have much space in my refrigerator.)

SPICE CAKE

Old-fashioned spice cake

A couple of weeks ago, I flew to Pittsburgh to see my brother. Now, for those of you readers who are men, don’t send me letters and say I am not correct when I say that widows learn how to take care of themselves, but widowers are often reattached in weeks or months.

My sister-in-law died in March of 2018, the memorial service was in April and a few months ago my brother mentioned that he wanted me to meet Lois. As I walked down the Pittsburgh airline’s escalator, I saw them holding hands. And I am here to tell you that my brother has found, very simply, the nicest person I have ever met. In addition, she is around his age (he is 83) and they met playing duplicate bridge.

(There is that story, possibly apocryphal, about the fact that one of two duplicate bridge partners shot the other after a bad bid. My brother does take bridge that seriously, nor does Lois, but neither has a gun)

Anyway, I had a wonderful few days. One evening we had dinner at an inn where we shared oil-truffled French fries with a ramekin of srirachi. My entree was a small pork tenderloin with mashed potato side so delicious I had to ask what was in it: the sous chef said it was maple syrup and chipotle.

The second night, Lois’s three daughters and their husbands brought pot-luck to my brother’s house and called it a party. Lois’s daughters are as nice as she is, as are their husbands, although one of them showed me a picture of a 10-point buck he’d killed that afternoon.

Now I am home and the holidays have begun. For the past two columns, I gave you my recipes for turkey, gravy, stuffing and a new cranberry sauce. Although pies are de rigueur, why not make a lovely autumn cake and, if you have some extra, make a trifle? I will be driving to Newburyport, Mass., for the day, but feel free to e-mail me if you run into problems.

And my next column will include recipes for turkey leftovers.

Old Fashioned Spice Cake

Adapted from Linnea Rufo of San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
Yield: serves 10 to 12 people
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 10-inch tube pan.

1 cup sugar
one-half cup (1 stick) butter
one-half cup currants or raisins or dried cherries (optional)
one-half cup candied ginger, chopped
2 eggs
2 tablespoons molasses
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cinnamon
one-quarter teaspoon cloves
one-half teaspoon ginger
one-teaspoon salt
1 cup milk

Preheat oven to 350º F. Grease a 10-inch tube pan.

Cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs, one at a time, blending well after each addition.

Whisk together flour, baking soda, cinnamon, cloves, ginger and salt. Stir dry ingredients into egg mixture alternately with milk, beginning and ending with dry ingredients.

Pour batter into prepared tube pan. Set on the middle rack of the oven and bake for 1 hour and 5 minutes, or until cake pulls away from sides of pan and a tester inserted in the center comes out clean.

Cool cake in the pan, set on a rack, for 10 minutes. Remove cake from pan and spread on icing at once, while cake is still warm.

Espresso Icing

1 and one-half cups of confectioners’ sugar
1 tablespoon of espresso (use a teaspoon or so of cold coffee)
1 tablespoon milk

Whisk icing ingredients together.

About the author: Lee White has been writing about restaurants and cooking since 1976 and has been extensively published in the Worcester (Mass.) Magazine, The Day, Norwich Bulletin, and Hartford Courant. She currently writes Nibbles and a cooking column called A La Carte for LymeLine.com and the Shore Publishing and the Times newspapers, both of which are owned by The Day.

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Saint Ann’s Hosts Annual Ecumenical, Community Thanksgiving Service This Evening

Happy-Thanksgiving-Cornucopia-3

The annual Community Service of Thanksgiving, sponsored by the churches of Lyme and Old Lyme, will take place at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 20, at Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church.

All are welcome to attend this ecumenical service of prayer and song, which will feature music by the choirs of First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, St. Ann’s Episcopal Church, and Christ the King Church. Clergy from the various faith communities will participate, as will lay members and community leaders.

A free-will offering will be taken up during the service to benefit the New London Homeless Hospitality Center, and donations of nonperishable foods will be collected for the Shoreline Food Pantry, to help our neighbors in need.

Everyone, regardless of religious affiliation, is welcome to attend the Ecumenical Thanksgiving Service.

For more information, visit www.saintannsoldlyme.org.
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Needleman Wins 33rd Senate District After Recount, This Time by 83 Votes

State Senator-Elect Norm Needleman

UPDATED 11/20, 8:50AM — Essex First Selectman Norm Needleman has been declared the winner of the 33rd State Senate District by 83 votes after a nail-biting recount involving all the towns in the district, which include Lyme.

He was originally announced as the victor by 303 votes but a subsequent correction in Essex’s vote count reduced the margin of victory to a number that requires a recount by Connecticut law.

Asked his reaction to the recount result, Needleman responded, “I welcomed the recount, because it assured everyone that every vote cast was counted. I am grateful to the election workers throughout the district who worked so hard to make the recount fair and accurate. We can now move on to the task of being the credible advocate the towns in our district badly need in Hartford.”

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Old Lyme Wildcats Meet Immaculate in Class S State Final Today in Middletown

The Wildcats celebrate their 3-1 victory over East Hampton in traditional style. Photo by Jennifer Alexander.

11/16 UPDATE:  Due to the anticipated inclement weather Saturday, the CIAC Class S state final has now been rescheduled to Sunday, Nov. 18, at 5:30 p.m at Middletown High School.

11/15 UPDATE: The final will be played Saturday at Middletown High School at 3 p.m. 

Mya Johnson put the ball in the net three times last night in Old Lyme’s Class S CIAC semifinal against East Hampton. Her hat-trick takes Paul Gleason’s girls into the state final for the fourth time in as many years.

Gleason’s girls respond to the thrill of the final whistle!

The final against Immaculate will be played on Saturday at a location and time to be announced.

GO WILDCATS!!!  The whole LOL community is rooting for you …

Editor’s Note: Read a full report by The Day’s Vickie Fulkerson, which was published  Monday evening, at this link.

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Old Lyme PD’s Thanksgiving Food Drive Continues Today

Food Drive fun on Wednesday outside Big Y!

Food Drive fun outside Big Y in Old Lyme!  File photo by M. Garvin.

Old Lyme Police Officers will continue their annual Thanksgiving Food Drive on Wednesday, Nov. 14, from 3 to 7 p.m. at the Old Lyme Marketplace on Halls Road near the Big Y.

The final collection day will be Saturday, Nov. 17, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the same location.

All food donated will be forwarded to the Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB) for distribution to families in need. Food will also be given to stock the mini-pantries at Lymes’ Senior Center and the Town of Old Lyme Social Services.  After local needs are met, all remaining food is given to Shoreline Soup Kitchens.

Donations of non-perishable food can be taken directly to the Old Lyme Police Department at 294 Shore Rd., or to LYSB at 59 Lyme St. between Nov. 12 and  Nov. 16.

Families in need of food should contact LYSB at www.lysb.org/holidaygiving or 860-434-7208.

 

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Win Tickets to ‘Hamilton,’ Four Other Shows in Cappella Cantorum’s Holiday Raffle

Cappella Cantorum offers an opportunity to win two tickets to the Broadway smash hit “Hamilton” when it plays at The Bushnell in Hartford in December. Through its Holiday Happenings Raffle Fundraiser, participants may win two seats to “Hamilton” as well as tickets to four other theater productions over the holidays.

The four other prizes include a family four-pack of tickets to the “Wizard of Oz” at the Shubert Theatre in New Haven, a gift certificate for two to attend the Goodspeed Opera House in East Haddam, four tickets to “A Christmas Hour” at the Ivoryton Playhouse featuring Broadway star David Pittsinger and Patricia Schuman, and tickets to “A Connecticut Christmas Carol” at the Norma Terris Theatre in Chester. Raffle tickets are $40.

The raffle will run now through Monday, Nov. 19, and tickets will be sold by Cappella members or on-line at CappellaCantorum.org. Only 500 tickets will be sold, so odds for winning are much better than for any lottery. Drawing will be Sunday, Nov. 25, 6 p.m. at the Ivory Pub and Restaurant, 1 Kirtland St., Deep River. Winners need not be present at the drawing.

Cappella Cantorum is the valley-shore’s premier community chorus and has been performing great classical choral works with a professional orchestra for 49 years. Simon Holt is the music director.

Its upcoming concert on Sunday, Dec. 2, will feature Puccini’s “Messa di Gloria” and Saint-Saens’ “Christmas Oratorio” and will inspire a holiday spirit. Check CappellaCantorum.org for details.

For more information, call 860-526-1038.

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Return of ‘The Movie Man’: ‘Beautiful Boy’ Reveals Realities of Relationships Controlled by Addiction

Editor’s Note: We welcome Kevin Ganey back to LymeLine.com. We have missed his stimulating, thought-provoking, intensely personal reviews of movies and are thrilled he has returned

Author’s Note: It seems that in the last two years, I’ve fallen off the edge of the earth when it comes to keeping up with current films. In this time, I’ve skipped the Oscars, and have not even watched trailers to highly anticipated future features. I’m also too intimidated to watch whichever new Marvel film has been released, due to fear of being unable to follow the story. But I have spent a great deal of time immersing myself in older ones, and I owe a great deal to the Criterion Collection for this. But make no mistake, I intend to continue critiquing films for the readers situated in the Connecticut River and Long Island Sound.

The cover of the book on which the movie is based.

I left the screening of Beautiful Boy in a depressed mood.

The film, starring Steve Carell and Timothée Chalamet, depicts the relationship of a father and son, David and Nic Sheff, during the latter’s tumultuous period of drug addiction. While many fans of Dunder-Mifflin’s greatest regional manager will take delight in seeing that Nic’s mother is played by none other than Amy Ryan (Michael Scott’s wife), this will not contain any of the goofy humor we saw on the iconic sitcom. It deals with the gut-wrenching and horrific truths of what addiction is.

This is a true story, based on the memoirs of both father and son.

It captures the grim reality of addiction. From Nic’s days of smoking weed (with his father, on occasion) to his bodily dependency on heroin and crystal meth. In several points, Nic gets sober (at one point lasting over a year without using anything), only to fall into relapse.

The film captures the ugly truth of addiction’s harm to the user, and to the user’s loved ones; depicting Nic stealing prescription medicine from his girlfriend’s family, as well as taking the only money his younger half-brother has (a mere $8).

Along with addiction, this film also brilliantly depicts the relationship between David and Nic. We get to see things through David’s perspective as he watches his son spiral out of control and sends him to rehab time after time after time. We clearly see David’s frustration as he wants what is best for his son, whom he loves more than everything.

While I never struggled with drug addiction, I could see myself in Nic pleading to David in regards to numerous subjects, asking his father to have faith in him, and David’s stern responses, all in vigilance to protecting Nic’s well-being. For once, I could understand the mindset in which my parents denied my numerous requests throughout youth, and I could see the arrogance in the “What do they know?” reaction I would give.

This is not a film to see on the basis of pure entertainment. I could hardly imagine any filmmaker with a sound conscience taking addiction as a subject with the intent of making a light-hearted humorous project. I was also dissatisfied with the story’s editing and basic setup.

Without giving away the ending, I was unable to perceive the narrative had finished until the credits began to roll. The performances were stellar, and I would not be surprised if any of the cast receives award nominations, Chalamet, in particular.

Editor’s Note: This is the opinion of Kevin Ganey.

Kevin Ganey

About the Author: Kevin Ganey has lived in the Lyme/Old Lyme area since he was three-years-old, attended Xavier High School in Middletown and recently graduated from Quinnipiac University with a degree in Media Studies. Prior to his involvement here at LymeLine.com, he worked for Hall Radio in Norwich, as well as interned under the Director of Communications at High Hopes Therapeutic Riding Center. Kevin has a passion for movies, literature, baseball, and all things New England-based … especially chow

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Free Business Website Audit Offered During ‘Ignite’s’ Office Hours at Innovations Commons, Nov. 28

Ignite, a program of Thames River Innovation Place, will hold its monthly Office Hours program Wednesday, Nov. 28, when it will  host website and graphic designer Cheney Giordano from This is Fine Design. Business owners and entrepreneurs are invited to schedule a one-on-one appointment between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. by emailing ignite@thamesriverinnovation.org. There is no fee to participate. All appointments will be held at the Innovation Commons, 93 Shennecossett Rd, Groton.

For more information, visit www.bit.ly/OfficeHours112818.

This is Fine Design is a full-service, high-touch agency. In the mentor sessions, Cheney Giordano is available to audit your business’s online presence and offer suggestions for improvements to reach your business goals. This is Fine Design designs logos, a new look for an established website, documents and presentations, and WordPress transfers. The company can also create a complete business presence on the internet including website and social media pages. This is Fine Design has designed websites for New London Community Land Trust, Robert Frank Designs and Ignite Thames River, among others.

Ignite is designed to spur new ideas, businesses, and innovative growth in the Thames River region by producing events, sponsoring education, and connecting entrepreneurs into the business development support system. The Ignite program is established under the Thames River Innovation Place and is made possible by support from CTNext.

Office Hours with Mentors is offered monthly on the last Wednesday and is just one of many programs regularly held by Ignite. In December, Marcum Accountants and Advisors will offer tax help.

For more information, visit www.IgniteThamesRiver.org

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Recount Called in 33rd State Senate District Race

Secretary of the State Denise Merrill’s office said on Thursday that another state Senate race will be subject to a recount.

State election officials said a recent correction to a reporting error in Essex has put the contest for the 33rd District [which includes the Town of Lyme] within a margin that requires a recount. The new tally leaves Essex’s Democratic First Selectman Norm Needleman leading East Haddam Republican state Rep. Melissa Ziobron by 137 votes.

John Heiser of the Essex Registrar of Voters office said …

Read the full article by Clarice Silber, which was published today on CTMirr0r.orgat this link.

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LOL High School Safe Grad Committee Hosts Fundraiser Tonight at Jonathan Edwards Winery; All Welcome

The Lyme-Old Lyme High School Safe Grad Committee is hosting a fundraising event at Jonathan Edwards Winery in North Stonington, Conn., this coming Friday, Nov. 16.  The event will run from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. 

All ticket sales benefit the graduation night event for the Class of 2019.  Tickets include a glass of wine of your choice, food and fun.

In addition to ticket sales, the winery is donating 25 percent of all wine sales that evening (either for consumption that evening or wine purchased as gifts or for the holidays to take home) back to Safe Grad.

Tickets can be purchased online at http://lolgradnight.com/jonathan_edwards_winery/

Food for the event has been generously donated by Cloud Nine Catering, Coffee’s Country Market, Dock 11 Café, Fromage Fine Foods, The Hideaway Restaurant & Pub and The Public House.

The event is open to anyone who would like to attend and help support a safe graduation for the Class of 2019.

The philosophy and ideals behind the Safe Grad Night party are interlinked with providing an evening that is fun, memorable and safe. More than “just a party,” the event is a commitment by parents to conduct a great, “once in a lifetime” extravaganza for the graduating seniors. 

Grad Night is alcohol- and drug-free and allows the senior class to have one final evening together as a class to celebrate their graduation.  The event lasts through the whole night and the seniors have no idea where the event will be held until they are on board the buses. History has shown that a significant majority of the senior class attends the event every year.

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Charles Sennott, Founder of The GroundTruth Project, to Speak Tonight at SECWAC Meeting

Seen here reporting in Afghanistan, Charles Sennott will be the speaker at the SECWAC meeting at Connecticut College on Wednesday

The Southeast Connecticut World Affairs Council (SECWAC) hosts Charles M. Sennott on Wednesday, Nov. 14  when he will speak on “GroundTruth in a Post-truth Era,” at 6 p.m. The talk will be held in the Ernst Common Room at Blaustein Hall in Connecticut College.

An award-winning foreign correspondent and founder of The GroundTruth Project, Sennott will discuss the work of this non-profit news organization around the world. Specifically, Sennott will look at the assault on a free press in the US and globally and how it is impacting international coverage. A crisis in journalism is becoming a crisis for democracy.

Sennott is an award-winning correspondent, best-selling author, and editor with 30 years of experience in international, national and local journalism. A leading social entrepreneur in new media, Sennott started GroundTruth in 2014, and in 2017 launched the non-profit organization’s new, local reporting initiative, Report for America.

Reporting on the front lines of wars and insurgencies in at least 20 countries, including the post-9/11 conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq and the 2011 Arab Spring, Sennott began his career in local news covering cops, courts, and municipal government. Sennott’s deep experience reporting led him to dedicate himself to supporting and training the next generation of journalists to tell the most important stories of our time.

Sennott is also the co-founder of GlobalPost, an acclaimed international news website.

Previously, Sennott worked for many years as a reporter at the New York Daily News and then the Boston Globe, where he became Bureau Chief for the Middle East and Europe, and a leader of the paper’s international coverage from 1997 to 2005.

Sennott has also served as a correspondent for PBS Frontline and the PBS NewsHour. He has contributed news analysis to the BBC, CNN, NPR, MSNBC and others. He is a graduate of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University.

A reception will begin at 5:30 p.m., with the main event beginning at 6 p.m. The presentation is a part of the SECWAC 2018-2019 Speaker Series. For non-members, tickets ($20) may be purchased at the door; ticket cost can subsequently be applied towards a SECWAC membership. Attendance is free for SECWAC members (and their guests). Membership September 2018 through June 2019 is $75; $25 for young professionals under 35; free for area college and high school students.

Immediately following the presentation, SECWAC meeting attendees have the option for $35 to attend a dinner with the speaker at Tony D’s Restaurant, New London. Reservations are required at 860-912-5718.

The Ernst Common Room at Blaustein Hall, Connecticut College, 270 Mohegan Avenue, New London, CT 06320. (MAP HERE)

SECWAC is a regional, nonprofit, membership organization affiliated with the World Affairs Councils of America (WACA). The organization dates back to 1999, and has continued to arrange eight to 10 Speaker Series meetings annually, between September and June. The meetings range in foreign affairs topics, and are hosted at venues along the I-95 corridor, welcoming members and guests from Stonington to Old Saybrook, and beyond.

SECWAC’s mission is “to foster an understanding of issues of foreign policy and international affairs through study, debate, and educational programming.” It provides a forum for nonpartisan, non-advocacy dialogue between members and speakers, who can be U.S. policy makers, educators, authors, and other experts on foreign relations. Learn more at http://secwac.org.

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Local Chambers Host ‘State of the Shoreline’ Business Breakfast This Morning

Join a regional “state of” address tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 13, from 7:45 to 9:15 a.m. to hear a discussion from municipal leaders about successes and challenges of the past year, as well as current issues that affect the business community.  The event will be held at Flanders Fish Market & Restaurant, East Lyme.

If you live or work in Old Lyme, East Lyme, or Waterford, take this great opportunity to gather information, ask questions, and get involved in your community.
Speakers include:

  • Mark Nickerson, East Lyme First Selectman
  • Bonnie Reemsnyder, Old Lyme First Selectwoman
  • Dan Steward, Waterford First Selectman

This event is presented by the Chamber of Commerce of ECT in partnership with the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce  

Chamber Member Admission: $12

Includes coffee and continental breakfast.

Registration required at this link: https://info.chamberect.com/events/details/state-of-the-shoreline-old-lyme-east-lyme-waterford-11716

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Learn How to Enhance Your Habitat for Songbirds, Beneficial Insects

Learn how to make your yard more desirable to hummingbirds like the one pictured above.

Join Audubon CT, Lyme Land Trust, and the Town of Lyme Tuesday, Nov. 13, at Lyme Public Hall to learn about enhancing your land for songbirds, wild turkeys, and beneficial insects.  At 7 p.m., DEEP wildlife biologist Peter Picone will share a fascinating presentation of his knowledge and insights on creating and improving wildlife habitat in your surroundings. 

The program is part of a project launched by Audubon Connecticut in the Important Bird Area (IBA) called the “Lyme Forest Block,” which spans forested habitat in six towns in southeastern Connecticut. The goal of the project is to teach you how to enhance your land to attract and nourish forest birds.

Lyme Public Hall is located at 249 Hamburg Rd. (Rte 156), Lyme,

For more information, email openspace@townlyme.org or visit http://www.lymelandtrust.org/event/enhancing-habitat-for-songbirds-and-beneficial-insects/

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Defending Champs Old Lyme Girls Storm Into State Soccer Semis; Face East Hampton Tonight

On to the semis! The Wildcats celebrate their 2-0 win over Portland in traditional style.  Photo by B. Butler Danes.

Defending Class S champions Old Lyme defeated Portland 2-0 Friday afternoon in the CIAC Class S quarterfinals.  Britney DeRoehn scored both Wildcat goals with one assisted by her sister Emily DeRoehn. Both goals were scored in the second half.

Britney DeRoehn scored both goals in Old Lyme’s quarter final against Portland. File photo.

Sam Gray was in goal for Old Lyme and notched eight saves, while Kelly Boutin tended goal for Portland making 13 saves.

Old Lyme, seeded #14, now advance into the semifinals and will face seventh-seeded East Hampton Monday evening at 6:30 p.m. at Fitzgerald Sports Complex in West Haven.  The other semifinal will be between #4 Immaculate and #17 Coginchaug and will also be played on Monday.

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Letter to the Editor: Needleman Says, “The Election Is Over … Let’s Get To Work”

To the Editor:

The voters of the 33rd District have chosen me to be their advocate in the State Senate for the next two years. The depth of my gratitude to the voters and to the hundreds of volunteers who helped throughout the campaign is beyond my ability to express.

The electioneering is finished, and now we will confront the hard work: get the state back on track, and secure a fair share of support for the towns in our district.  My opponent and I differed in our approach to addressing those issues, but we agreed that the core challenge is restoring the state’s financial health and economic vitality. There is no quick fix, but in my view the path we must travel is clear.

First, we have to bridge the partisan divide that stands in the way of good ideas and sensible solutions. Partisan politics have crippled our state, and it should be obvious by now that retreating to an ideological corner is lethal to the kind of cooperation we badly need. As I said throughout the campaign, I will work with anyone who is committed to finding real solutions, regardless of political affiliation.

Second, renovating our approach to developing revenue projections and budgets is vitally important, but is not the only component of the path to recovery. As importantly, the state needs a comprehensive economic development plan that clearly defines strategies and tactics for creating jobs. We need a plan that builds a compelling and durable appeal to businesses of all sizes…a plan that creates a marketing and communications framework for coalescing the state’s many attributes and advantages into a compelling message. Without a comprehensive plan, the road to economic vitality will be random and reactive, instead of well directed and focused.

Third, I will tirelessly advocate to make certain that every town in our district receives its fair share of support from Hartford. The perspective I have gained from real world experience in budgeting and managing town and business operations will add both credibility and impact to the voice our towns have in the State Senate.

But we also need to address issues that go beyond the state’s finances. We can never stop advocating for measures that address the quality of life in our towns: women’s issues; primary, secondary, and higher education; benefits to our seniors; support for small businesses; and job training for the thousands of unfilled, high paying technical and manufacturing jobs.

I make the same pledge to those who voted for me and to those who didn’t: I will listen to your concerns, I will give you straight answers, and I will never stop working for you. The challenges and the issues that concern you will always be my focus.

It is time to bridge the partisan gap and start on the road to finding solutions. I’m optimistic, because I believe all of us recognize that we have to set aside our differences and truly work together.  That’s the approach and the attitude I will bring to Hartford as your state senator.

Thanks to all of you for your encouragement and support.

Sincerely,

Norm Needleman,
Essex.

Editor’s Note: The author is the first selectman of Essex and state senator-elect for the 33rd Senate District.

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Lyme Veteran’s Memorial Committee Hosts Veteran’s Day Ceremony at 11am Today; All Welcome

The Lyme Veteran’s Memorial Committee is proud to present a Veteran’s Day Ceremony commemorating the 100th Anniversary of the Armistice Day signifying the end of World War I and honoring all those from Lyme, who served during that war and all that have served since or are currently in uniform in the US Armed Forces.

Twenty-eight residents of Lyme served in uniform during the First World War — a significant number considering the very small size of the town.

The event will start at the 11 a.m., the exact time the Armistice was signed, and will include Lyme’s First Selectman Steve Mattson and New York University’s Rolf Wolfswinkel, Modern History Professor, World War I authority, and a resident of Lyme.

The outdoor Ceremony will be on Veteran’s Day, Nov. 11, at 11 a.m. at the Lyme Veteran’s Memorial next to Lyme Town Hall at 480 Hamburg Rd. (Rte. 156). All are welcome.

In case of inclement weather, the event will be held in the Meeting Hall at Lyme Town Hall at the same address.

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Lyme Public Hall Hosts Annual Chowder Dinner This Evening

Join your neighbors for a hearty old-fashioned meal at the Lyme Public Hall for their Annual Chowder Dinner, Saturday, Nov. 10, from 5 to 7 p.m.

The menu features Connecticut clam chowder, corn chowder, new-fangled cole slaw, cheddar cheese, delicious breads and homemade desserts.

The cost is $15 for adults; $10 for children 7 to 12; and free for children 6 and under. The Hall is located at 249 Hamburg Road (Rt. 156) in Lyme.

For more information, email wdenow@comcast.net.

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Lyme-Old Lyme HS Presents ‘Midsummer/Jersey’ Comedy Tonight

Lyme-Old Lyme High School presents ‘Midsummer/Jersey’ tonight, (Nov. 10) in the high school auditorium. All are welcome. Tickets are $12 for adults and $8 for students and seniors.  Doors open at 7 p.m.

The play is the hilarious, high-octane re-telling of Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream set on the boardwalk of a seaside town in modern-day New Jersey.

The story revolves around the impending marriage of the Governor of New Jersey, the love affairs of four beach-bound high school crushes, a lively crew of fairies and the staff of the local beauty salon (run by Patti Quince and Stylist Nikki Bottom).

The night takes a magical turn when Oberon and the impish Puck arrive on the scene armed with a powerful love potion and a desire for mischief making.

With several weddings and the acting careers of six beauticians hanging in the balance, the lovers take to the boardwalk, backed by pop music and an iPhone-obsessed wood sprite.

For more information and to reserve tickets , call the high school at 860-434-1651.

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