August 24, 2019

Kinship & Respite Fund Grants Available to Help Guardians With School Expenses

Saybrook Probate Judge Jeannine Lewis

LYME — With adults already thinking back-to-school, District of Saybrook Probate Judge Jeannine Lewis reminds court-appointed guardians to apply for grants for school supplies. The State of Connecticut Saybrook District Court includes the Town of Lyme along with the Towns of Chester, Clinton, Deep River, Essex, Haddam, Killingworth, Old Saybrook and Westbrook.  

Probate Courts have been awarding grants from the state Kinship Fund and Respite Fund to court-appointed guardians for more than a decade.  As of last October, eligibility for the grants was expanded beyond relatives serving as guardians to all those appointed by the Probate Courts who meet low-income guidelines.

A guardianship case typically arises in the Saybrook District Probate Court when parents are unable to care for their children due to mental illness, substance abuse or incarceration. In most cases, Probate Courts appoint a grandparent or other relative to care for the children. In some cases, courts appoint a close family friend, who has a long-standing relationship with the child. While foster parents receive funds from the state, court-appointed guardians do not; guardians who meet eligibility requirements can receive some assistance through the Kinship and Respite Fund grants.

“Grandparents, aunts and uncles, and neighbors, who keep children in their familiar environments instead of going to foster care, offer an enhanced quality of life to the children in their care and simultaneously save the state tens of millions of dollars. In many cases, the guardians don’t really have extra money to spend on a child’s basic needs,” said Judge Lewis. “Kinship and Respite Grants are there to help bridge the gap and make a huge difference to the households who apply for, and receive them.” 

The Kinship Fund assists guardians in paying for necessities such as school supplies, clothing, eyeglasses, school trips and sports fees. Often such expenses are paid directly to the providers. Kinship grants are capped at $500 per child or $2000 per family per year.

The Respite Fund helps guardians with the cost of child care, housing, transportation and food. These grants are capped at $2000 per year.

Guardians who meet income requirements can apply to both funds. Previous recipients must reapply to receive funds each year. Applications are posted at ctprobate.gov under the Children’s Matters tab.

Share

Nearly New Shop in Old Lyme Seeks New Store Manager

OLD LYME — The Nearly New Shop, a rapidly growing consignment store associated with St. Ann’s Church in Old Lyme, is looking for a new manager.

The position entails managing volunteers and staff, assisting with inventory management and pricing, visual merchandising, overseeing the day-to-day operations, daily and weekly revenue reporting and bank deposits and tax reporting as required by the State of Connecticut.

Qualified candidates should have previous retail sales experience, computer skills and familiarity with POS software, be professional and punctual. Candidates must be highly motivated with excellent communication skills , customer-oriented and interested in helping the store continue to grow and flourish.

The position is for 25+ hours per week and the person appointed must be able to work several weekdays as well as some Saturdays. Hourly rate will be based on experience.

Send resume and references to office@saintannsoldlyme.org

For more information about the store, visit this link. 

Share

Death of Mariette Elizabeth Hogan Announced, Mother of WFSB News Anchor Kevin Hogan

Mariette Gauvin Hogan 1926-2019

Mariette Elizabeth Hogan

Our Mom lived her 93 years of life with faith in GOD and for her loving family. She died suddenly the morning of Thursday, August 15, 2019 at home on the Feast of the Assumption. Her energy and enthusiasm never wavered.

Born in Quebec and raised in Hamden, Mariette graduated from Hamden High and worked for a New Haven Insurance company prior to meeting Army Veteran, Dan Hogan. They married on May 28, 1949 in Hamden and celebrated their 70th anniversary together this spring along with her four boys and their families.

While Mariette was a mother, aunt, grandmother and great grandmother to her family for 48 years, she was also known to hundreds of students and faculty at Assumption School in Ansonia as Mrs. Hogan, the school’s first secretary. She enjoyed life and volunteering; Assumption Church, Cub Scout Pack 19 Den mother, The Red Hat Society, Dancing lessons with Dad, Cruises to Alaska, The Caribbean and day trips.

Mom worked hard at making her home welcoming to family and friends whether creating a full Thanksgiving/Christmas dinner or just cheese and crackers. If you popped in unannounced she would be the first to offer cookies in the cookie jar.

As we begin to celebrate her long life and contributions to everyone she encountered, we know she is reunited now with her parents, Ernest and Marguerite Gauvin; brothers, Lucien and Raymond Gauvin and other loved ones.

Mariette leaves behind her beloved Dan; sons, David (Pat), Mark, John, and Kevin; grandchildren, David (Danielle), Stephen (Danielle), Shawn, Christopher, Carina, Ryan (Danielle), Meredith, Taylor, and Connor Hogan; great grandchildren; Michaela, David, Ava, Devyn, Brooklyn Hogan, and Anja Czaja; and sister, Jeannine Gauvin Saller (Bill), as well as nieces and nephews.

A Wake to celebrate Mariette’s life will take place Monday, August 19, 2019, from 4:00 to 7:00 pm at the Wakelee Memorial Funeral Home, 167 Wakelee Avenue, Ansonia. A Mass of Christian Burial (Meeting Directly at Church) will be held on Tuesday, August 20, 2019, 10:00 am in the Church of the Assumption, 61 North Cliff Street Ansonia. Interment will follow in All Saints Cemetery, North Haven.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Assumption School, Ansonia. Online condolences may be made at www.wakeleememorial.com.

To send flowers to the family of Mariette Hogan, please visit Tribute Store

Share

Old Lyme’s EDC Working on New Economic Development Strategy for Town, Invites All Residents, Business Owners to Complete Survey

Economic Development Commission Co-Chair and Halls Rd. Improvement Committee member Howard Margules discussed ideas for the future of Halls Rd. with visitors at the recent Old Lyme Midsummer Festival. Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

OLD LYME — Old Lyme Economic Development Commission (EDC) Co-Chair Justin Fuller describes the objective of the commission as being on the one hand, “to ensure the economic condition of our town remains strong.” while, at the same time, “… doing our small part to help maintain the charm and character of Old Lyme, and protect the town’s natural and cultural resources.”

Howard Margules, EDC Co-Chair and a member of the Halls Rd. Improvement Committee, adds that the EDC believes that the town should be pro-active with economic development by attracting new investments and supporting local businesses. He says, “The commission intends to do this by promoting a “smart growth” strategy,” which he explains is focused on the three areas of 1) retaining existing businesses, 2) attracting new investments (especially in available commercial properties that are presently abandoned and/or neglected), and 3) promoting entrepreneurship — since local business owners who live in Old Lyme have a vested interest in the community.

The EDC has identified three activities that will help the town begin the development of a formal economic development strategy, as follows:

  1. Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) workshop to obtain input from a variety of stakeholders and determine overarching goals to help guide the prioritization of further collaborative economic development efforts;
  2. Local business survey to learn about their challenges and explore how an economic development strategy could best support their long-term success;
  3. Free informational workshop to help answer questions about economic and community development.

The EDC is working with a nonprofit economic development firm, the Connecticut Economic Resource Center (CERC) to assist the EDC and the town in implementing these identified goals.

One tool the EDC is using in their efforts is a survey that CERC has developed, which is now being distributed to all Old Lyme residents and/or people who own or operate a business in the town. The survey includes, but is not limited to, input regarding the Halls Road neighborhood.

The objective of the survey, the second of the three activities listed above, is  to encourage local businesses and residents to give their thoughts and feedback on the town’s current and future economic condition.  For example, the EDC would like to understand what attracted both residents and business to Old Lyme in the first place, and what they consider are the most important issues facing the town.

In respect of business owners, the EDC would also like to hear how the town can better support them both now and in the future.

The Old Lyme EDC has asked us here at LymeLine.com to help spread the word about the survey, and we are pleased to do that.

We therefore urge all our readers who either live, work or own a business in Old Lyme to take a few minutes to complete this important online survey by scanning the QR code to the left or visiting www.research.net/r/OldLymeCT

The purpose of the business survey is to 1) gain perspective on how the business community perceives the economic condition of Old Lyme, 2) identify perceived and real challenges that local businesses face, 3) identify companies that are “at-risk” of leaving Old Lyme, and, 4) obtain feedback about how the town can better support businesses to improve business retention and support their long-term success.

The purpose of the resident survey is to obtain feedback about the perceived current economic condition of Old Lyme, and obtain information that will help guide a future economic development strategy for the town.

Asked for his reaction to the increased attention being directed to economic development in Old Lyme, Halls Road Improvement Committee Chairman BJ Bernblum responded, ” “The Old Lyme Board of Selectmen is taking seriously the economic health of the town.  A few years ago it formed the Halls Road Improvements Committee and this year it revitalized the Economic Development Commission.” He continued, “Under the dynamic leadership of co-chairs Howard Margules and Justin Fuller, the EDC is working with the Connecticut Economic Resource Center to analyze the current state of Old Lyme’s economy and to recommend ways to ensure a sound future.”

Bernblum added, “CERC’s first undertaking is a town-wide survey of businesses and residents, critical to getting an accurate understanding of how our taxpayers feel about the status quo and the issues that need to be addressed,” concluding, “I strongly encourage everyone to complete this survey.”

The EDC collaborated with CERC to identify the specific survey questions and CERC will collect the survey results, carry out the analysis, and prepare a summary report.

The survey results, combined with other ongoing initiatives, will help define the town’s economic development strategy. All responses will be kept confidential, and the results will be presented in a final report prepared by the EDC.

 

 

 

Share

Death of Suzanne Brown Announced; Memorial Service to be Held in Old Lyme, Aug. 25

Suzanne Brown

ESSEX — Suzanne “Suzie” Brown, our mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, and friend, passed away Aug. 5, 2019, from complications after a fall in her home. She joins her beloved husband, Templeton “Temp” Brown of 58 years. We will celebrate them both by living their example of truth, love, and commitment.

Suzie celebrated beauty in life by picnicking in the countryside, arranging flowers from her garden, traveling the world, and savoring languages, cuisine, literature, colors, and the natural world. She cherished her family. We all have cultivated deep artistic roots because she showed us how to appreciate beauty in everything around us, every day of her life.

Suzie lived in Winnetka, Ill. for over three decades, and then returned to her childhood state of Connecticut to begin a new adventure with our dad, Temp, in Lyme. She had a wonderful group of friends, old and new, first from her many years in Illinois, and then more recently centered in Lyme and at the Essex Meadows Senior Retirement Community, in Essex. Suzie loved and appreciated the connections she made in Essex Meadows with her neighbors, staff, care-team, and her dear friend, Len Lonnegren.

Suzie will be remembered forever by her family, daughter Lisa Brown and her husband Mark Lellman; grandson Matt Lellman; and granddaughters, Leah Lellman (husband Josh Hisley) and Heidi Lellman (husband Jake Bonnerup); and great-grandson, Theo Bonnerup; daughter Suzanne Butz and her husband Ted Butz; grandsons Teddy Butz and Robert Butz (wife Jen Butz); and great-granddaughter, Hayden Butz; and daughter Maren Brown and her wife Patricia Morrison.

A Memorial Service will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 25, at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme.

In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts can be made to the Lyme Land Trust, which was dear to both mom and dad’s deep appreciation of preserving nature for future generations to enjoy.

Share

‘Cabaret’ Opens at Ivoryton Playhouse, Runs Through Sept. 1

Katie mack stars in ‘cabaret’ at the Ivoryton Playhouse as Sally Bowles.

IVORYTON – “There was a cabaret and there was a master of ceremonies and there was a city called Berlin in a country called Germany. It was the end of the world … and I was dancing with Sally Bowles and we were both fast asleep.” So begins the international classic musical and winner of eight Tony awards –  Cabaretwhich opened last night in Ivoryton to rave reviews. The show runs through Sept. 1.

Join other members of the audience at the Kit Kat Club as the Emcee takes us back to those tumultuous times with unforgettable musical numbers including,  “Wilkommen,” “Cabaret,” and “Maybe This Time.”

This Broadway classic is set in 1931 Berlin as the Nazis are rising to power. Cabaret focuses on the nightlife at the seedy Kit Kat Klub, and revolves around American writer Cliff Bradshaw and his relationship with English cabaret performer, Sally Bowles, as the world spins out of control.

The original 1966 Broadway production became an instant hit, winning eight Tony Awards in 1967 and four in 1998.  The show has inspired numerous subsequent productions in London and New York, as well as the 1972 film of the same name.

Cabaret is an unusual musical that has changed many times over the past 50 years to reflect the changes in the world, but the musical’s implicit warning about the temptations of fascism, nationalism and prejudice — the way they can sneak up on you when you’re having fun — has never seemed dated or irrelevant.

“It’s such an important piece of theatre, in what it says about the world and how quickly things can change,” says Playhouse Artistic Director, Jacqui Hubbard. “I think it is even more relevant today than when it was first performed over 50 years ago. Underneath the humor, the sex and the fabulous music is a constant alarm sounding, telling us to pay attention.”

Sam Given takes the lead male role in ‘Cabaret.’

The production stars Sam Given* as the Master of Ceremonies. Sam has appeared in Ivoryton in Godspell, A Chorus Line, I Hate Musicals: The Musical and in his own one-person show with his alter ego, Millie Grams. He has recently been seen as Ziggy Stardust inRebel Rebel: The Many Lives of David Bowie. 

Katie Mack* as Sally Bowles and Andy Tighe* as Cliff will be making their Ivoryton debuts. The cast also includes Will Clark, Carlyn Connolly*, Corrie Farbstein, Taavon Gamble*, Jade Genga, Aliah James, John Little*, Amanda Luppachino, Amani Pope, Carolyn Popp*, Renee Sutherland, Emerson Valentina, Max Weinstein and Jayke Workman. 

The production is directed and choreographed by Todd Underwood and musical directed by Michael Morris with set design by Daniel Nischan, lighting design by Marcus Abbott and costume design by Katie Bunce.

Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.

Additional matinee performances are on Saturday, Aug. 17, and Aug. 31, at 2 p.m.

Tickets are $55 for adults; $50 for seniors; $25 for students and $20 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org 

(Group rates are available by calling the box office for information.) The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

Pictures courtesy of Ivoryton Playhouse

*denotes member of Actors Equity

Share

Griswold Placed on November Ballot as Republican Old Lyme First Selectman Candidate

Former Old Lyme First Selectman Tim Griswold

Tim Griswold, who served as Old Lyme First Selectman from 1997-2011, was today officially placed on the November ballot as the Republican candidate for Old Lyme First Selectman.

This followed certification earlier this morning of 189 petition signatures by the Republican Old Lyme Town Registrar Cathy Carter, which involved checking each signature for authenticity and confirming the signer’s current membership of the Republican Party.  Tim Griswold and Barbara Crowley then both pledged that they had witnessed the signatures when they were taken.

The final step in the process occurred when Old Lyme Town Clerk Vicki Urbowicz called the Secretary of State’s Office to notify them of the petition and the number of signatures.  That office then checked there was no candidate already endorsed by the Old Lyme Republican Town Committee and since there was none, the Secretary of State’s Office confirmed that Urbowicz should place Griswold’s name on the ballot using the State Elections Program. Urbowicz has now completed that task.

This means there will be no Republican Primary in September because no other Old Lyme Republicans submitted petitions and today is the deadline submission day.

Share

Help Phoebe Clear her Shelves! BookCellar Hosts Pre-Renovation Half-Price Sale Through Aug. 17

As part of the Old Lyme Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library Renovation Project, the BookCellar will be closing down on Aug. 17 and relocating in September to temporary, smaller space. 

Therefore everything in the Cellar, including artwork and Rare & Collectibles, is currently half price. 

There will be bargains galore with this pricing, so don’t miss this opportunity to stock up on your summer reading and more.

Your purchases will help the Library prepare for the new and improved Phoebe’s BookCellar coming soon.

Share

Happy 70th Birthday to Old Lyme’s Volunteer Ambulance Association!

All photos by Doris Coleman.

OLD LYME — Members of Old Lyme’s Volunteer Ambulance Association proudly hold the General Assembly Official Citation with which the organization was presented to celebrate 70 years of service to Old Lyme. The citation was presented by State Senator Paul Formica (R-20th) and State Rep. Devin Carney (R-23rd) and stated, “For the past 70 years you have been answering the call of Old Lyme citizens in need, Dedicated individuals and local support have made these past 70 years a success and ensured that Old Lyme has one of the best volunteer companies in Connecticut.”

The citation concluded, “Here’s to another 70 wonderful years and many more! The entire membership [of the Connecticut Congress] extends its very best wishes on this memorable occasion and expresses hope for continued success.”

A day of festivities for family, friends, and neighbors was held at Cross Lane Park to celebrate the occasion.

There was food …

fun…

and there were things to go up …

things to come down …

things to see — like the contents of an ambulance …

things to jump up and down on …

things to read …

things to view …

tickets to sell …

and smiles …

and more smiles …

and still more smiles — this is the Cody family …

and yet more smiles from all ages  all round!

Many thanks to Doris Coleman, pictured above in action, for all the photos!

And finally, thank you Old Lyme Volunteer Ambulance folks and all Emergency Personnel for your dedicated service to our town.

 

Share

Griswold Petition to Run on November Ballot as Old Lyme First Selectman Has More Than 80 of 85 Signatures Required, Expects to Meet Goal by Tonight

Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder. File photo.

Former Old Lyme First Selectman Tim Griswold. File photo.

UPDATED 08/02, 3:17pm : see text in bold — After their meeting last week to endorse a slate of candidates for the November election, the Old Lyme Republican Town Committee (RTC) entered “No Endorsement” against the position of First Selectman. Just over a week later, former Old Lyme First Selectman Timothy C. Griswold is petitioning to be the Republican candidate and has almost collected the required number of signatures to submit to the state.

Asked in a phone conversation yesterday why he was running, Griswold told LymeLine, “I didn’t plan to run but when I looked around at the recent landscape, it seemed as if someone should mount a challenge for the position of First Selectman. It appeared wrong that the voters didn’t have a choice on the ballot.” Alluding to his previous 14 years as Old Lyme First Selectman, Griswold added with a chuckle, “I think I can still find the office.”

Although he has already been endorsed by the Old Lyme RTC to run as Town Treasurer  — a position in which he already serves — Griswold noted he would be unable to serve as Town Treasurer if he were elected First Selectman in November.

The “recent landscape,” on which Griswold did not elaborate, is presumed to be the request last week from Governor Ned Lamont for incumbent First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder to resign from the position of Connecticut Port Authority Chairman amid growing concerns about how the quasi-state agency has been operating.

Incumbent First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder, who has already been endorsed by the Old Lyme Democratic Town Committee to run for a fifth term with fellow incumbent Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal, shared with LymeLine in an email last night, “Tim and I have worked together on things and run against each other in the past. I will run on my record of accomplishments.”

Christine Gianquinto, Old Lyme Democratic Town Committee Chairman, said in a statement to LymeLine last week, “We believe it is important that she [Reemsnyder] should continue her leadership and the positive progress that has led to significant accomplishments for the benefit of the Town of Old Lyme.”

According to the state’s timeline, Griswold needs signatures from 5 percent (around 85) of the registered Republicans in Old Lyme by Wednesday, Aug. 7.  In order to verify all the signatures for legitimacy, Republican Town Registrar Cathy Carter has requested that signatures be submitted by Monday for her review. She shared with LymeLine today in a phone call that she had also also recommended those collecting signatures should aim at 150 to allow for some signatures being rejected during the review process.

Barbara Crowley, the owner of The Chocolate Shell on Lyme Street, has confirmed to us this morning in a phone call that she collected 54 signatures yesterday while Griswold has confirmed to us in an email shortly after that he has 27, also noting, ” a couple of others also have petitions.”  He added in a further email just an hour ago, “We may hit our goal by the end of today.”

The petition can be signed at The Chocolate Shell today and tomorrow between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m.  The store will be closed on Sunday and Monday.

 

Share

Tim Griswold Petitioning to Run as First Selectman in November, Signatures Required by Wednesday

Former First Selectman Tim Griswold is petitioning to be on the ballot in November. File photo.

UPDATED 8/2, 07:08am :  Tim Griswold has now confirmed to us that he is petitioning to be on the ballot in November. Petitions are available for signature at various locations around town. More to follow later this afternoon.

Old Lyme Republican Town Committee Chairman David Kelsey has confirmed to LymeLine.com that it is his understanding that former Old Lyme First Selectman Tim Griswold is petitioning to run as a Republican for the position of First Selectman in November.

We now understand that the required number of signatures, which we believe is around 100, must be submitted by Wednesday, Aug. 7.

Share

Old Lyme DTC Stands by Endorsement of Reemsnyder for First Selectman; “We Believe it is Important That She Should Continue Her Leadership,” Gianquinto

Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder

OLD LYME — We received the following response this afternoon from the Old Lyme Democratic Town Committee (DTC) Chairman Christine Gianquinto.

We had asked yesterday for a comment on how the Old Lyme DTC feels about their endorsed candidate for Old Lyme First Selectman resigning yesterday from her position as chair of the Connecticut Port Authority at the Governor’s request (see this article by Stephen Singer published yesterday on the Hartford Courant website titled Chairwoman of Connecticut Port Authority, pressured by Gov. Ned Lamont, resigns after agency spent $3K on photographs taken by her daughter.

Gianquinto wrote, “The fact that the endorsement by members of the Old Lyme Democratic Town Committee of Bonnie Reemsnyder for the position of First Selectman was unanimous speaks for itself.  The endorsement was based on a record of proven accomplishment and the knowledge that she will continue to provide strong municipal leadership for all of the residents of Old Lyme.  We believe it is important that she should continue her leadership and the positive progress that has led to significant accomplishments for the benefit of the Town of Old Lyme.”

Share

Mattson, Kiker to Run for Reelection in Lyme; Lyme DTC Announces Full Slate of Candidates for November Election

Lyme First Selectman Steve Mattson (right) and Lyme Selectman John Kiker, both Democrats, are both running for reelection in November 2019. File photo.

LYME –- The Lyme Democratic Town Committee (DTC) announced yesterday that a local Democratic caucus last night nominated and approved a slate of Democratic candidates to run in the November 5 municipal elections.

Lyme First Selectman Steven Mattson and Selectman John Kiker received the unanimous endorsement of the caucus for reelection. Caucus participant and former State Representative Claire Sauer said, “Steve and John have done an excellent job of serving our town, while keeping our mill rate among the lowest in the state.”

The Democratic caucus also nominated seven other Lyme residents to run for public office in November, each of whom received unanimous endorsements.

Lyme DTC Nominating Committee Chairperson Ann Rich said, “Our committee has been actively interviewing Lyme residents with the potential to serve our town in various capacities. We identified a number of individuals who are not only highly qualified, but also extremely interested in serving the town we all love and cherish.”

Running for election this year will be:

• Jarrod Leonardo for Board of Finance
• Susan Tyler for Board of Finance Alternate
• Bob House for Board of Finance Alternate
• Carol House for Planning & Zoning Commission
• Michael James for Library Board
• Anna González James for Zoning Board of Appeals Alternate

Running for reelection will be:

• Steven Mattson for First Selectman
• John Kiker for Selectman and Zoning Board of Appeals
• Judy Ulrich for Library Board

The Lyme DTC’s mission is to support and strengthen the Democratic Party in the Town of Lyme and the State of Connecticut. The committee typically meets on the third Thursday of every month at 7:30 p.m. in the Lyme Town Hall. These meetings are open to the public and all registered Democrats are encouraged to attend.

Share

2019 Summer Senior Studio Exhibition on View at Lyme Academy Through Aug. 8

“Vanitas Under Stained Glass’ by McKenzie Graham is a signature work in the 2019 Summer Senior Studio Exhibition that opens tonight at Lyme Academy.

Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts of the University of New Haven hosts an opening reception from 5 to 8 p.m. this evening in the Chauncey Stillman Gallery for its 2019 Summer Senior Studio Exhibition.  All are welcome.

The seniors whose work is featured in the exhibition have completed accelerated studies for a Bachelor of Fine Arts or a Post-Baccalaureate degree and will graduate in August 2019. This will be the final exhibition of student portfolios submitted for degrees before the Lyme Academy ceases to be a degree-granting college subsequent to the University of New Haven’s withdrawal.

The Senior Studio experience at the College allows students to refine their vision and develop a skill set in order to create a body of work that exemplifies their individual interests, talents, and artistic sensibilities.

The 2019 Senior Studio Exhibition reflects the culmination of this project.  Students will be present at the opening reception and available to discuss their work.

The exhibition will be on view in the gallery through Aug. 8.  Admission is free Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The sponsor of the exhibition is Saybrook Point Inn/Fresh Salt.

Lyme Academy of Fine Arts is located at 84 Lyme St. in Old Lyme.

Share

Old Lyme HS Seeks Volunteers to Assist in Creating Map of Duck River Cemetery Graves, July 24

Can you help? Graves in the Victorian section of Duck River Cemetery in Old Lyme need recording to create a digital record of them for reference purposes.

Updated 7/9/2019: One of the most frequent requests the Old Lyme Historical Society (OLHS) receives is for information about a person’s ancestor and their gravesite. While on the face of it, it may appear to be a simple task, in many cases, this is not the case since there are many graves in Old Lyme, which are undocumented.

Therefore, in order to be able to respond to queries from all of the communities served, the OLHS has undertaken the task of creating a digital record of gravesites in Old Lyme cemeteries. No overall survey of the gravesites has been undertaken since the work of the WPA in the 1930s. Gravestones deteriorate with time and so the intent is to gather as much information as possible from the present for the benefit of those who follow.

Thanks to the volunteer efforts of Old Lyme resident and University of Connecticut history major, James Kolb, the OLHS is well on its way to completing the task at Duck River Cemetery. Kolb is creating a GIS database linking the information on each grave to its precise geographic location. While Kolb has done a herculean task over the past 18 months, the OLHS would now like to supplement his efforts by completing the “Victorian” section of the cemetery, which contains at least 800 gravesites.

In order to move this project forward, the OLHS is looking for volunteers to record all possible information about the individual gravesites in this section. The dates and times assigned for this effort are from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. on each of the following days:

  • Saturday, July 13
  • Friday, July 19
  • Wednesday, July 24

All you need to bring is a clipboard, pen or pencil, and a block of your time on the dates listed above. The usual preparations for working on any July day such as water, maybe a snack, a folding chair (break time!), insect spray, sunscreen, and a hat are recommended. The OLHS will supply the organizational tools to assist you and accomplish this community activity as efficiently as possible.

To respond to this request and/or to request more information, email info@oldlymehistorical.org with “Cemetery Project” in the Subject line. Be sure to include your name, email, home phone and/or cell phone and choice of date(s) for volunteering. The OLHS will confirm by email and answer any questions.

Individuals and any youth organizations are welcome to volunteer.

More information on this project will be provided to volunteers on the days of the event, which the OLHS is calling the “Duck River Cemetery Hunt.”

Save the date, Aug. 21, for Kolb’s presentation of this project at the OLHS facilities at 55 Lyme Street, when he will also talk about the larger implications of this type of research.

Share

CT Audubon Hosts Coastal Creatures Program Tomorrow Morning

Children investigate the contents of their Touch Tanks!

Photo credit: CT Audubon

OLD LYME — The Roger Tory Peterson (RTP) Estuary Center presents a program titled Coastal Creatures tomorrow, Wednesday, July 17, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. and again on Saturday, July 20, from 9 to 11 a.m.

Get up close and personal with crabs, fish and more. See and touch live animals from Long Island Sound and estuary at the RTP Estuary Center on Halls Rd. in Old Lyme.

Open to all ages. Admission is $25 member; $30 non-members;$15 children ages 2-15.

July 17 – Register here

July 20 – Register here

Share

Newly-Independent Lyme Academy Plans Its Re-Birth With Exciting Schedule of Fall Classes

File photo of the Chandler Academic Center at the now independent and renamed Lyme Academy of Fine Arts.

As of the end of last month, the renamed Lyme Academy of Fine Arts in Old Lyme became an independent entity once again with all ties to the University of New Haven (UNH) severed. Moreover, contrary to a number of rumors circulating around town, the Academy is not about to close, but rather is entering an exciting new phase in its evolution.

On Thursday, the Lyme Academy Board of Trustees Chairman Steven Tagliatela and the newly-appointed Interim Director of the Academy, Frank Burns, met with The Day to discuss the future of the institution. Also present was Kim Monson, an instructor of sculpture, anatomy and drawing at the school, who has been deeply involved in plans to retain the institution as a viable concern.

Lyme Academy College alumna and instructor Kim Monson who has been intimately involved in efforts to keep the Academy as a fully operational institution and is now designing the fall programs.

Monson was authorized to speak to LymeLine.com after the meeting to share an overview of its content. She explained that the overarching message that Tagliatella gave was that the Academy is most definitely not about to shutter its doors, nor to become a generic “Art Center.” She explained that the upcoming academic year is being treated in many ways as a ‘rebuilding’ year during which the Academy will determine the optimum way to move forward. A new program of serious art classes will begin in late September and Monson stressed there is also a strong desire to re-engage the local community in terms of its role as both students and donors.

A vibrant summer program is currently running at the Academy (visit this link for details) and the curriculum is currently being finalized for regular ‘core’ classes to start in late September. These will all adhere firmly to the original mission of the school as defined by its founder, the late Elisabeth Gordon Chandler, who believed passionately in what Monson describes as “observational training.”

Designed by Monson, these core classes comprising six hours per week for six weeks will be offered in Drawing, Painting, Sculpture and Printmaking. They will be modeled on the format followed by the Arts Student’s League in which students work with a model for the first part of the class followed by time with their instructor when he/she gives feedback.  Monson commented that this is the format followed by Lyme Academy College when she studied there as an undergraduate.

There will also be a Portfolio Prep course held over weekends between late September and November for students aged 14 and up.  Classes will include Art of the Cast (Drawing), The Skull- Sculpture), and Shades of Gray (Value Painting.)

Finally, a number of Masterclasses are planned in subjects including Animal Sculpture and Stone Carving.

Publicity postcard for the upcoming 2019 Senior Studio Summer Exhibition, which opens with a reception, July 19.

Marketing will be key to the success of the Academy’s re-birth and an agency is in the process of being hired.  This agency will be responsible for creating a new, engaging website and all ongoing marketing operations related to the fall classes.

Several of the current faculty are being retained by UNH including Randy Melick, Nancy Gladwell and Roland Becerra, who all predate the UNH take-over. The Academy is looking to retain an MFA-qualified faculty in general.

Monson’s enthusiasm for these new programs is palpable — on a personal basis, she said that she is thrilled to see the Academy “return to its roots.” She also mentioned that there are plans to upgrade the academy’s digital studio — a move she feels will enhance the Academy’s already outstanding art teaching spaces even further. Monson added that partnerships with other art colleges are still being explored.

In terms of the wider spectrum of facilities, Monson described the objective as being “how to best utilize the campus … in order to fulfill Elisabeth’s mission.” The townhouses built across the street from the Academy have been returned to the developer with the expiry of the current lease and the administrative space in the Chandler building will be offered for rent.

The Academy’s Board of Trustees will serve as an active board once again rather than in the advisory capacity in which they acted under UNH’s tenure. Monson paraphrased Tagliatella in describing how the board now felt about their task going forward, saying it was as if, “a weight had been lifted.” After a year of uncertainty about where the academy was going, the path forward is now clear, and perhaps more importantly, Monson noted, the message from the meeting was that there is an overwhelming determination to achieve success.

The first event being held under this new administration is the Opening Reception for the 2019 Summer Senior Studio Exhibition next Friday, July 19, from 5 to 8 p.m. in the Chauncey Stillman Gallery at the Academy.The public is welcome to attend and view the work of the 29 graduating students, who have completed an accelerated program in order to complete their BFA’s while the College still held its accreditation.

Editor’s Note: Visit this link to read an article by Mary Biekert of The Day, who was present at the meeting with Lyme Academy officials, and describes its content in more detail. The article was published on theday.com yesterday and printed in The Day today.

Share

Reemsnyder, Nosal Officially Announce Re-Election Campaign 

Incumbents First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder (right) and Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal have just announced their re-election campaign. (File photo)

Yesterday, Democratic First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder and Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal officially announced they will be running for re-election. Bonnie Reemsnyder has served on the Board of Selectmen since 2003 and was elected First Selectman in 2011. Mary Jo Nosal joined Reemsnyder as a member of the Board of Selectmen in 2011.

“Since first being elected, our number one priority has always been finding innovative ways to improve our town while not putting an unfair burden on taxpayers,” Reemsnyder stated, “and this year, we were proud to be able to sustain a low tax base while actually expanding services and building infrastructure through planning and grants. We continue to build towards a future of financial stability and while we are proud of our accomplishments so far, we know there is still work to be done.”

“I don’t think people fully appreciate the work that Bonnie and Mary Jo do for the town of Old Lyme,” Old Lyme resident Pamelia Parker stated. “Bonnie and Mary Jo have spent their entire time in office advocating for policies that will preserve the character of our town while adapting to a changing state. Going back to their fight to prevent the train coming through our historical district, they have shown time and again that they listen to our concerns and are proactive in providing a voice to everyday people. I love living in Old Lyme and I’m supporting this team because they have shown they have the work ethic and vision to lead us to a better future.”

Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal took the opportunity to speak about their past two years in office. “Keeping taxes low, securing over $1 million in state funding to fix our roads, and supporting our schools and nonprofits are all accomplishments that represent our values and vision as a team,” Nosal commented. “Old Lyme is a special place and the opportunity to continue to serve the people of this town is an honor.”

Share

High Hopes Needs You! Organization Has Urgent Need for Volunteers; Training Sessions Planned, July 23, Aug. 13

High Hopes depends on volunteers for all its programs and events.

High Hopes is an oasis in Old Lyme, where people of all ages come together with a very special herd of therapeutic horses to improve the lives of people with physical, cognitive and emotional disabilities. The organization currently has an urgent need for more volunteers with a wide range of opportunities available. Everyone is invited to get involved, regardless of gender or age (14 or older).

“Although we hold programs all year round,” says Executive Director, Kitty Stalsburg, “summer is one of our busiest times when we open High Hopes to the wider community through five weeks of all-inclusive horse camp as well as providing our regular programs. We are looking for volunteers of all ages but would particularly encourage middle and high school students, seasonal residents, and active retirees in particular. Just one hour a week, or one week during summer camp can make all the difference to one of our campers.”

One of the many tasks that volunteers undertake at High Hopes is to side-walk horses while program participants ride.

“No experience with horses is needed,” says Lesson Manager, Marie Manero, “we provide general orientation and side-walker training for all of our volunteers, and those that want to do more work with the horses can do additional training in horse-handling and barn activities.”

Manero continues, “

Over the course of a year High Hopes, an internationally recognized therapeutic riding and horsemanship center, relies on the help of over 650 volunteers to supplement its small staff and provide programs for a wide range of individuals and groups as well as support it’s fundraising activities.”

Participants at High Hopes include children and adults with physical disabilities, veterans living with PTSD, children grieving the loss of a parent, families recovering from domestic violence and individuals and their families supporting a loved one with a life-long cognitive disability.

All volunteers must attend a General Orientation prior to volunteering.  The General Orientation begins in the classroom with an overview of High Hopes Therapeutic Riding, who we serve, our horses, and our policies and procedures.  It also includes a tour of the facility.

At the General Orientation, volunteers will choose a role(s) they are interested in and will be scheduled for additional training specific to that role. Roles may include sidewalker, horse leader (experience required), feeder, office volunteer, etc.

Sidewalker training includes more in-depth information about providing service to the High Hopes participants and an opportunity to practice hands-on sidewalking techniques that will prepare new volunteers to begin working with riders.

Two Volunteer General Orientation and Sidewalker Training sessions will be held on the following dates and times:

Tuesday, July 23,  4 to 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 13, 4 to 7 p.m.

For those with horse experience interested in becoming horse leaders, additional training opportunities will be available to learn and practice our leading techniques.

For more information, to meet a few of our volunteers, and to express your interest in this event, register at https://highhopestr.org/volunteers/prospective-volunteers/

If your organization supports community volunteering and you would like to bring a group of volunteers to High Hopes for the day, the High Hopes team would also like to talk to you.

For further information about volunteering or to discuss any questions, e-mail Rachel Butler, Volunteer Coordinator, at rbutler@highhopestr.org

High Hopes is located at 36 Town Woods Rd., Old Lyme CT 06371. For further information, visit their website or call 860-434-1974.

Share

Sen. Needleman Joins Gov. Lamont for Signing of Invasive Species Bill

State Senator Norm Needleman (standing, fifth from right) joins a coalition of political and regional leaders as Governor Ned Lamont signs legislation into effect better protecting Connecticut waterways from invasive species.

AREAWIDE – Today, State Senator Norm Needleman (D-33rd) joined Governor Ned Lamont for the signing of legislation designed to fight invasive species and preserve Connecticut’s lakes, ponds and rivers. This step is intended to protect Connecticut’s natural wildlife and environment while also benefitting the beautiful bodies of water that draw so many from the state and beyond.

The 33rd Senate District includes the Town of Lyme.

“Too many bodies of water around Connecticut experience significant environmental damage by invasive species. A simple weed or piece of algae stuck to a boat’s hull can, in time, create a massive threat to a lake or river’s ecosystem, rapidly multiplying. That can harm fishing and recreation, even making the body of water unusable,” said Sen. Needleman. “There’s a reason this legislation received overwhelming support from both environmental groups and lake and boating associations – it will help protect our state against these dangerous threats, keeping our waterways clear. It’s great to see this issue receive the attention it deserves.”

The legislation in question will create a boat stamp, with proceeds helping to fund removal of invasive species from state waterways. Connecticut residents will be charged $5, while out-of-state residents will be charged $25. The collected funds will be deposited into the Connecticut Lakes, Rivers and Ponds Preservation Fund to support programming on eradicating invasive species, education and public outreach programs to better educate the public, and grants to study better management of bodies of water.

The bill passed the House and Senate on bipartisan votes of 131-10 and 34-2, and in March, dozens of residents supported it at a public hearing. Towns in the 33rd District including East Hampton, Lyme and Old Lyme have experienced growth of invasive weeds and algae in their waterways and bodies of water.

The new law takes effect January 1, 2020.

Share