October 16, 2019

Old Lyme’s Bourque Brings Home Top Brewing Honors in Hartford Beer Festival

Noah Webster House & West Hartford Historical Society Executive Director Jennifer Matos stands with cask champion and Old Lyme resident Shane Bourque of Stony Creek Brewery at the fifth annual Noah Webster Real Ale Harvest Fest. held Sept. 7. Photo credit: Ben Scott. (Courtesy photo submitted)

Shane Bourque is seen here selecting the plants and herbs, which would go on to become key ingredients in his award-winning brew. Photo by C. Bourque.

OLD LYME — Each year, the Noah Webster Real Ale Festival is held at the Noah Webster House in West Hartford, and entrants are supposed to make each signature ale in a cask using only a base ale and whatever ingredients can be found in the garden of the home. In other words, they can only use ingredients that would have been available in the 1800s.

Breweries from across Connecticut come to show off their home brewed creations, and this year’s festival winner was presented to a watermelon sour craft beer brewed by Old Lyme resident Shane Bourque.

Bourque has been a resident of Old Lyme for 27 years. He went to school at Central Connecticut State University, where he studied criminology and history, and has been in the beer industry for about four or five years.

Starting out as a beer manager at …

Read the full article titled, Old Lyme resident brews success at ale festival at the link given. The article was written by Paul Garrett and published Sept. 30, on TheDay.com.

Editor’s Note: Shane Bourque is the son of David and Carey Bourque of Old Lyme.

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State Rep. Devin Carney Offers More Information on Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) and How to Protect Yourself

We received an updated version of the following email from State Representative Devin Carney (R-23rd) at 6:53 p.m. this afternoon, and believe it is important to share it with our readers as soon as possible.

Precautions for dealing with Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE)

As many of you know, two people from Southeastern CT (East Lyme & Old Lyme) have recently passed away after being diagnosed with Eastern Equine Encephalitis (“EEE”) caused by a mosquito bite from an infected mosquito. Our hearts go out to the families affected.

Due to the recent EEE cases, state and local officials are urging folks to take the necessary precautions to protect themselves and their families. The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station is also adding additional monitoring sites in Lyme/Old Lyme and East Lyme in light of the recent tragedies.

During a call with Stephen Mansfield of Ledge Light Health District, I was told that infected mosquitoes were found near Blood St/Avenue B in Lyme and Old Lyme. So be extra cautious in those areas. However, this is an issue is endemic to Southeastern CT, so it is important to take precautions everywhere.

Here are some responses to frequently asked questions from the State of CT Mosquito Management Program:

What is Eastern Equine Encephalitis?

Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) is a rare but serious disease caused by the EEE virus.

How is Eastern Equine Encephalitis spread?

EEE is spread through contact with adult mosquitos.  The virus is generally carried by an exclusive bird-biting mosquito that live in freshwater swamps called Culiseta melanura. The highest risk of getting EEE is from late July through September. It has been found in 9 others mosquito species in CT, 6 of which are known to bite.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms usually occur from 3 to 10 days. Most people who have been infected with the EEE virus do not become ill. Symptoms can range from mild fever and headache to coma. Other symptoms include high fever, fatigue, muscle aches, neck stiffness, tremors, or confusion. More severe cases can lead to death.

Is there a vaccine or/any treatment?

No. There is no cure for EEE, and 3 of every 10 people who get the disease die from it. Doctors provide supportive treatment, lower the fever, and ease the pressure on the brain and spinal cord. Some people who survive this disease will be permanently disabled and only about half recover completely. There isn’t currently any vaccine because the EEE virus occurs so infrequently in people.

How is EEE spread?

Mosquitoes spread the EEE virus. The virus is carried by birds that live in freshwater swamps and is generally found only in these birds and in mosquitoes that feed on birds but not people. In some years, however, many birds get infected and other types of mosquitoes pick up the virus that also bite people and horses. The risk of getting EEE is highest from late July through September. The virus is spread by adult mosquitoes, which are killed by frost in the fall. The EEE virus is not spread by people and horses with the disease.

Can any mosquito spread EEE to people?

No. In Connecticut, there are 52 different mosquito species. Since 1996, EEE virus has been isolated from mosquitoes in Connecticut every year except 1999, usually during September and early October. The virus is generally maintained by an exclusive bird-biting mosquito called Culiseta melanura, but has been found in 9 other mosquito species in Connecticut, 6 of which are known to bite people.

What can I do to protect myself or my family?

According to the CDC, you should do the following:

  • Minimize time spent outdoors around dusk and dawn when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Use insect repellent with one of the active ingredients below
    • DEET Picaridin (known as KBR 3023 and icaridin outside the US)
    • IR3535
    • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE)
    • Para-menthane-diol (PMD)
    • 2-undecanone

** Do not use products containing oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or para-menthane-diol (PMD) on children under 3 years old**

**Do not apply insect repellent to a child’s hands, eyes, mouth, cuts, or irritated skin**

Adults: Spray insect repellent onto your hands and then apply to a child’s face.

  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants
    • Use permethrin to treat clothing and gear (such as boots, pants, socks, and tents) or buy permethrin-treated clothing and gear.
    • Permethrin is an insecticide that kills or repels mosquitoes.
    • Permethrin-treated clothing provides protection after multiple washings.
  • Take steps to control mosquitoes indoors and outdoors
        • Use screens on windows and doors. Repair holes in screens to keep mosquitoes outdoors.
        • Use air conditioning, if available.
        • Stop mosquitoes from laying eggs in or near water.
        • Once a week, empty and scrub, turn over, cover, or throw out items that hold water, such as tires, buckets, planters, toys, pools, birdbaths, flowerpots, or trash containers.

For additional information on EEE, visit the following link from Ledge Light Health Center District –“Mosquitoes in Lyme and Old Lyme Test Positive for Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Editor’s Note: If you have additional questions on this topic, or would like to speak with Rep. Carney about a concern regarding state government, email him at Devin.Carney@housegop.ct.gov or call 800-842-1423.

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Update From Old Lyme Town Hall Regarding Eastern Equine Encephalitis

OLD LYME — The following e-mail was sent out from Old Lyme Town Hall at 7:15 p.m. Tuesday evening.

A message from First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder:

Today we learned that a resident of Old Lyme has become the second victim of the mosquito-borne illness, Eastern Equine Encephalitis, or the Triple-E virus. The Town of Old Lyme sends heartfelt condolences to the family of the victim. While we do not have the identity of the person at this time, I am sure that the loss is felt by all of the residents of Old Lyme.

Many have asked what the Town is doing with this threat in mind, so here is an update:

The Selectman’s Office has been in regular contact with Ledge Light Health District, has participated in scheduled conference calls with the State Dept. of Public Health, which provides updates on tests and recommendations, and is following all of the recommendations to date. The next conference call is scheduled for this Thursday.

Since Friday of last week, we have warned all outdoor sports activities to end by 5:30 PM (which may get earlier as the days grow shorter) and warned people to move indoors well before dusk.

We post all updates from Ledge Light Health District on our website.

The Town currently contracts with Innovative Mosquito to manage our plan to address nuisance mosquitos, which are primarily daytime-biting mosquitos. We regularly use non-chemical dunks in our catch basins, and monitor the mosquito population along the marshland of the shoreline neighborhoods. When warranted, backpack adulticide spraying is done to reduce the population. But these daytime-biting mosquitos have not tested positive for EEE virus. It is the night time mosquitos that have tested positive, and so far, none of the mosquitos tested from Old Lyme have been positive for the virus.

With the latest victim from Old Lyme, our contractor has increased trapping in the freshwater areas of town to assess the population, and the State Dept. of Agriculture has done the same, testing those caught for the virus. Those results are not yet available, but based on the outcome, recommendations will be made and followed by us.

If spraying is recommended, we will follow up immediately, and are prepared to do so.

We continue to stay in touch with our Health District and the State Dept. of Health, and will follow all recommendations that they give us.

We urge all residents to take this threat seriously, and take all precautions to avoid mosquitos.

Once again, our heartfelt condolences are sent to the family whose loved one has succumbed to this tragic illness.

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Old Lyme Boys Still Unbeaten After Tying Tough Game Against Old Saybrook

OLD LYME — The Old Lyme boys retained their unbeaten record Tuesday afternoon after battling to a 1-1 draw against defending Class S state soccer champions Old Saybrook.

Jack Colella scored an unassisted goal first for the Rams and Avery Welch equalized for the Wildcats with an assist from Michael Milazzo.

Ryan Tetreault was in goal for Old Lyme and made a total of 12 saves, while Matthew Rothman, in goal for Old Saybrook, only had to make one save.

Ally Gleason, in her first year as varsity coach, has now taken the boys to 3-0-1 overall and 1-0-1 in the Shoreline Conference.

Read Vickie Fulkerson’s article published on TheDay.com at this link for a full report with photos of the game.

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Old Lyme Girls Retain Unbeaten Record Against Shoreline Rival Old Saybrook in Local Derby

OLD SAYBROOK — Playing away yesterday at Old Saybrook High School, Paul Gleason’s  Old Lyme girls defeated the home team 2-0 in a local soccer derby.

Lydia Tinnerello and Kaylee Armenia scored for the Wildcats, with both goals unassisted.

Sam Gray was in goal for the Wildcats and made four saves, while Sophia Barker was in net for Old Saybrook and notched 11 saves.

Old Lyme is now 4-0-0 overall and 3-0-0 in the Shoreline Conference.

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Old Lyme Library’s BookCellar Opens in New Location to Make Space for Library Renovation Project to Begin


The Old Lyme-Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library’s BookCellar opened in their temporary location at 44 Lyme St. (across the street from the Library) Wednesday, Sept. 18.  Over the past three months, a 10,000 volume bookstore of gently used books and media housed in the basement of the Old Lyme Library has been condensed into this temporary space across the street. The rest of the contents went into storage.

The space is still an art gallery so customers can peruse the art while purchasing books.

BookCellar Co-Manager Joan Overfield notes, “We expect to move back to our renovated space after the New Year. Our 60+ dedicated volunteers staff the BookCellar Wednesdays and Saturdays. Visit us if you are in the area.  Stop by to browse a hand-picked selection of books or drop off your donations during their regular business hours.”

Overfield’s fellow co-manager Claudia Condon adds, “Wednesday was a great day for Phoebe’s!  We are excited to be in our temporary space.  It is very bright and cozy–feels like a little book shop!  Our volunteers are thrilled with the space.  We had steady traffic all day with those bringing donations and shoppers.  Some of the shoppers were Library  patrons, who have been awaiting our reopening–we were closed for a month–and others were new customers strolling down Lyme Street and stopping in to see what we were all about.”

Condon also said enthusiastically, “We think the space will give us excellent retail exposure and maybe some new customers will follow us when we move back to the Library.”

All proceeds from the BookCellar benefit the Library.  The BookCellar is open Wednesdays 10am-6pm and Saturdays 10am-2pm. Parking is on the street or behind Town Hall or the Library. New volunteers are always welcome at the BookCellar — drop in to discuss options with the current volunteers or call the library to find out more at 860-434-1684.

The move has taken place to allow the renovation project at the library to begin.

Yesterday, movers began work on the main floor of the Library.  The room adjacent to the historic Reading Room (housing fiction and biography collections) has been cleared to make way for construction to begin soon.  The attic spaces have been cleared, and most of the artwork has been removed from the Library to keep it safe during the duration of the project.

Phase I of the project will address the spaces listed above, as well as the lower level BookCellar.  The precise start date of the project is yet to be finalized but is expected shortly.

The Library will remain open for the duration of the project, but it is anticipated that some services will have to be reduced or adjusted as the project proceeds. The Library’s website will always have the most current news.
Library Director Katie Huffman, who is eagerly anticipating the start … and end … of the project, comments, “We appreciate your patience as we work to renew our Library.”
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SECWAC Presents “A Refugee Story” by Old Lyme Resident Mohammed Hamou, Sept. 26

AREAWIDE – In an effort to expand program offerings, the Southeast Connecticut World Affairs Council (SECWAC) has announced a new Community Partnership Program with Essex Meadows.

Essex Meadows is a retirement community committed to helping residents embrace lifelong learning, and often hosts educational programs that meet SECWAC’s mission to foster an understanding of issues of foreign policy and international affairs, including the Foreign Policy Association’s “Great Decisions” Program.

To launch the 2019-2020 season, SECWAC’s September 2019 programs will include:

  • Sydney Williams, local author, presented his new book, ‘Dear Mary: Letters Home from the 10th Mountain Division, 1944-1945’ on Thursday, Sept. 12, in Hamilton Hall at Essex Meadows, 30 Bokum Rd, Essex, CT 06426.
    More information available at http://secwac.org/press-release-sydney-williams/
  • Gordon Chang, Journalist and Author, returns to SECWAC to present, ‘America’s Grandest Wager: China’ at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 17, in the 1941 Room, Crozier Student Center, Connecticut College, 270 Mohegan Avenue, New London, CT 06320.
    More information available at http://secwac.org/press-release-gordon-chang-china/
  • Will Kneerim (IRIS, New Haven) and Mohammed Hamou (Old Lyme Resident and Syrian Refugee) will present, ‘Coming to America: A Refugee Story’ at 3 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 26, in Hamilton Hall at Essex Meadows.
    More information available at http://secwac.org/press-release-great-decisions-coming-to-america-a-refugees-story/

All meetings are free for SECWAC members and their guests; events taking place at Essex Meadows are free for residents, as well. Membership for SECWAC’s 2019-2020 season (September 2019 through June 2020) is $85 per person; $25 for young professionals under 35; free for local students and educators; a corporate rate of $1,000 is also available, with unlimited access for employees of the member organization. Membership information and online registration available at http://secwac.org/membership/.

Editor’s Notes: i) Founded in 1988, Essex Meadows is a lifecare retirement community committed to helping residents continue to enjoy an active lifestyle and embrace lifelong learning. Through Great Decisions and other ongoing programming such as their popular Arts & Exploration Lecture Series, Essex Meadows provides residents, and often the broader community, opportunities to engage in probing, thought-provoking discussions about issues of local and global importance. Learn more at https://www.essexmeadows.com.

ii) SECWAC is a regional, nonprofit, membership organization affiliated with the World Affairs Councils of America (WACA). The organization dates back to 1999, and has continued to arrange 8-10 Speaker Series meetings annually, between September and June. The meetings range in foreign affairs topics, and are hosted at venues along the I-95 corridor, welcoming members and guests from Stonington to Old Saybrook, and beyond. SECWAC’s mission is “to foster an understanding of issues of foreign policy and international affairs through study, debate, and educational programming.” It provides a forum for nonpartisan, non-advocacy dialogue between members and speakers, who can be U.S. policy makers, educators, authors, and other experts on foreign relations. Learn more at secwac.org.

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Hear Old Lyme’s Suzanne Thompson’s Interview with ‘Tossing Lines’ Author John Steward Anytime on WLIS Website

Radio host Suzanne Thompson shares a moment with John Steward in the WMRD/WLIS studio after recording the interview with him, which will be broadcast twice this weekend.

OLD LYME — If you’re a fan of John Steward, a regular contributor to Lyme Times, you can hear how his Tossing Lines column came about on CT Outdoors with Old Lyme’s Suzanne Thompson this weekend. Steward, a Groton native, reflects on a wide range of topics, from local history to his bicycle rides through New London County.

Look for his reflections on the 50th anniversary of Woodstock in this week’s Lyme Times or online at theday.com  (Olwen, here’s the full link) https://www.theday.com/article/20190910/NWS01/190919999
Listen to CT Outdoors with Suzanne Thompson, Saturday, Sept. 14, 1-1:30 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 15, 7-7:30 a.m., on WLIS 1420 AM/Old Saybrook & WMRD 1150 AM/Middletown, streaming at http://www.wliswmrd.net. Or play back John’s interview on your PC or Mac from the website On Demand archives. Click on the microphone icon, look for pop-up screen from radio.securenetsystems.net, and scroll to CT-Outdoors-91019—John-Steward-Tossing-Lines.
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Gil Boro of Old Lyme’s ‘Knot Theory’ Exhibition on View at Lyman Allyn Through Oct. 27

Sculptor Gil Boro in his studio in Old Lyme.

OLD LYME/NEW LONDON — The Lyman Allyn Art Museum in New London will host an opening reception this evening from 5 to 7 p.m. for Gilbert Boro’s exhibition titled, Knot Theory: Sculptural Works by Gilbert Boro. All are welcome.

Boro, who lives and works in Old Lyme, is a sculptor, architect, educator, and international design consultant, whose sculptures focus on the interplay of space, place, and scale. His studio is located at 80-1 Lyme St., where his private residence is also found. Both are set within four and a half acres of beautifully landscaped grounds on which more than a 100 sculptures are on display. The majority of the sculptures are by Boro himself with the remainder being by guest artists. The Sculpture Grounds are open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and offer free admission.

‘Flat Bar Knot’ is one of the featured sculptures in ‘Knot Theory’ on view at the Lyman Allyn Museum.

Knot Theory is the latest exhibit in Lyman Allyn’s Near :: New contemporary series. As the name suggests, Knot Theory will highlight Boro’s  knot sculptures, exploring their intricate shapes and figures. The exhibition will be on view in Glassenberg Gallery through Oct. 27.

‘Bowline Knot’ by Gilbert Boro.

Knots have dual associations for Boro: their indispensable applications in sailing, which he learned as a teenager living on Long Island Sound and their symbolism of unity, which is seen in the synergy created from weaving different strands to form a strong bond. Boro’s knots simultaneously expose the inherent power and strength of their construction with the smoothness and elegance of their grace.

A sailboat cannot navigate challenging weather without a crew working in unison to ensure the knots and lines are correctly placed. It is this dual bond between strength and grace that creates a universal harmony — as in art and in life. Unlike the tautness of a sailor’s knot, the voids floating between Boro’s strands recognize that we still need space to expand and thrive while exploring our common bonds through sculpture.

The Lyman Allyn Art Museum is located at 625 Williams Street, New London, CT 06320.

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Old Lyme’s Former Dance Hall Owner Advances Demolition Plans for Sound View Building

OLD LYME — The owner of Sound View’s O’Connor’s Dance Hall, also known for a while as Kiddieland, says he’s moving forward with plans to demolish the building — which has sat abandoned and blighted on Hartford Avenue for several years — in hopes to develop the property into housing.

Describing the building as an eyesore Monday, property owner Frank Noe said …

Read the full article titled, “Owner moving to tear down former dance hall in Old Lyme,” by Mary Biekert of The Day and published Aug. 29, on theday.com.

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Raccoon in Old Lyme Tests Positive for Rabies, Public Urged to Avoid Interaction With Wild, Stray Animals

Young raccoon in the wild. Photo by Gary Bendig on Unsplash.

OLD LYME — Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) has announced that a raccoon from the Long Acre Lane area of Old Lyme was tested this past Tuesday (Aug. 27) and found to be positive for rabies

Ledge Light stresses that the public should refrain from feeding or approaching any wild or stray animals. Rabies is a deadly disease caused by a virus that can infect all warm-blooded animals, including people. It is spread mostly by wild animals, but stray cats and dogs may also become infected and spread the virus.

The rabies virus lives in the saliva and brain tissue of infected animals. Rabies can be spread by scratches from infected animals or when infected saliva comes into contact with open wounds, breaks in the skin or mucous membranes (eyes, nose, mouth, etc.)

If you have any questions or concerns, contact LLHD at 860-448-4882, ext. 1307 or the Old Lyme Animal Control Officer at 860-437-3047.

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Old Lyme Officer Recognized by Board of Selectmen for Quick Response

Officer Rankin pursued the car into Lyme, and ultimately East Haddam, apprehending all four when they stopped for gas. The selectmen believed that had he not responded immediately, it is likely the fugitives would have succeeded in escaping justice.

After expressing her thanks to Officer Rankin, First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder commented, “It is because of Police Officers like you that Old Lyme continues to be a safe place for us all.”

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Kinship & Respite Fund Grants Available to Help Guardians With School Expenses

Saybrook Probate Judge Jeannine Lewis

LYME — With adults already thinking back-to-school, District of Saybrook Probate Judge Jeannine Lewis reminds court-appointed guardians to apply for grants for school supplies. The State of Connecticut Saybrook District Court includes the Town of Lyme along with the Towns of Chester, Clinton, Deep River, Essex, Haddam, Killingworth, Old Saybrook and Westbrook.  

Probate Courts have been awarding grants from the state Kinship Fund and Respite Fund to court-appointed guardians for more than a decade.  As of last October, eligibility for the grants was expanded beyond relatives serving as guardians to all those appointed by the Probate Courts who meet low-income guidelines.

A guardianship case typically arises in the Saybrook District Probate Court when parents are unable to care for their children due to mental illness, substance abuse or incarceration. In most cases, Probate Courts appoint a grandparent or other relative to care for the children. In some cases, courts appoint a close family friend, who has a long-standing relationship with the child. While foster parents receive funds from the state, court-appointed guardians do not; guardians who meet eligibility requirements can receive some assistance through the Kinship and Respite Fund grants.

“Grandparents, aunts and uncles, and neighbors, who keep children in their familiar environments instead of going to foster care, offer an enhanced quality of life to the children in their care and simultaneously save the state tens of millions of dollars. In many cases, the guardians don’t really have extra money to spend on a child’s basic needs,” said Judge Lewis. “Kinship and Respite Grants are there to help bridge the gap and make a huge difference to the households who apply for, and receive them.” 

The Kinship Fund assists guardians in paying for necessities such as school supplies, clothing, eyeglasses, school trips and sports fees. Often such expenses are paid directly to the providers. Kinship grants are capped at $500 per child or $2000 per family per year.

The Respite Fund helps guardians with the cost of child care, housing, transportation and food. These grants are capped at $2000 per year.

Guardians who meet income requirements can apply to both funds. Previous recipients must reapply to receive funds each year. Applications are posted at ctprobate.gov under the Children’s Matters tab.

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Nearly New Shop in Old Lyme Seeks New Store Manager

OLD LYME — The Nearly New Shop, a rapidly growing consignment store associated with St. Ann’s Church in Old Lyme, is looking for a new manager.

The position entails managing volunteers and staff, assisting with inventory management and pricing, visual merchandising, overseeing the day-to-day operations, daily and weekly revenue reporting and bank deposits and tax reporting as required by the State of Connecticut.

Qualified candidates should have previous retail sales experience, computer skills and familiarity with POS software, be professional and punctual. Candidates must be highly motivated with excellent communication skills , customer-oriented and interested in helping the store continue to grow and flourish.

The position is for 25+ hours per week and the person appointed must be able to work several weekdays as well as some Saturdays. Hourly rate will be based on experience.

Send resume and references to office@saintannsoldlyme.org

For more information about the store, visit this link. 

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Death of Mariette Elizabeth Hogan Announced, Mother of WFSB News Anchor Kevin Hogan

Mariette Gauvin Hogan 1926-2019

Mariette Elizabeth Hogan

Our Mom lived her 93 years of life with faith in GOD and for her loving family. She died suddenly the morning of Thursday, August 15, 2019 at home on the Feast of the Assumption. Her energy and enthusiasm never wavered.

Born in Quebec and raised in Hamden, Mariette graduated from Hamden High and worked for a New Haven Insurance company prior to meeting Army Veteran, Dan Hogan. They married on May 28, 1949 in Hamden and celebrated their 70th anniversary together this spring along with her four boys and their families.

While Mariette was a mother, aunt, grandmother and great grandmother to her family for 48 years, she was also known to hundreds of students and faculty at Assumption School in Ansonia as Mrs. Hogan, the school’s first secretary. She enjoyed life and volunteering; Assumption Church, Cub Scout Pack 19 Den mother, The Red Hat Society, Dancing lessons with Dad, Cruises to Alaska, The Caribbean and day trips.

Mom worked hard at making her home welcoming to family and friends whether creating a full Thanksgiving/Christmas dinner or just cheese and crackers. If you popped in unannounced she would be the first to offer cookies in the cookie jar.

As we begin to celebrate her long life and contributions to everyone she encountered, we know she is reunited now with her parents, Ernest and Marguerite Gauvin; brothers, Lucien and Raymond Gauvin and other loved ones.

Mariette leaves behind her beloved Dan; sons, David (Pat), Mark, John, and Kevin; grandchildren, David (Danielle), Stephen (Danielle), Shawn, Christopher, Carina, Ryan (Danielle), Meredith, Taylor, and Connor Hogan; great grandchildren; Michaela, David, Ava, Devyn, Brooklyn Hogan, and Anja Czaja; and sister, Jeannine Gauvin Saller (Bill), as well as nieces and nephews.

A Wake to celebrate Mariette’s life will take place Monday, August 19, 2019, from 4:00 to 7:00 pm at the Wakelee Memorial Funeral Home, 167 Wakelee Avenue, Ansonia. A Mass of Christian Burial (Meeting Directly at Church) will be held on Tuesday, August 20, 2019, 10:00 am in the Church of the Assumption, 61 North Cliff Street Ansonia. Interment will follow in All Saints Cemetery, North Haven.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Assumption School, Ansonia. Online condolences may be made at www.wakeleememorial.com.

To send flowers to the family of Mariette Hogan, please visit Tribute Store

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Old Lyme’s EDC Working on New Economic Development Strategy for Town, Invites All Residents, Business Owners to Complete Survey

Economic Development Commission Co-Chair and Halls Rd. Improvement Committee member Howard Margules discussed ideas for the future of Halls Rd. with visitors at the recent Old Lyme Midsummer Festival. Photo by Suzanne Thompson.

OLD LYME — Old Lyme Economic Development Commission (EDC) Co-Chair Justin Fuller describes the objective of the commission as being on the one hand, “to ensure the economic condition of our town remains strong.” while, at the same time, “… doing our small part to help maintain the charm and character of Old Lyme, and protect the town’s natural and cultural resources.”

Howard Margules, EDC Co-Chair and a member of the Halls Rd. Improvement Committee, adds that the EDC believes that the town should be pro-active with economic development by attracting new investments and supporting local businesses. He says, “The commission intends to do this by promoting a “smart growth” strategy,” which he explains is focused on the three areas of 1) retaining existing businesses, 2) attracting new investments (especially in available commercial properties that are presently abandoned and/or neglected), and 3) promoting entrepreneurship — since local business owners who live in Old Lyme have a vested interest in the community.

The EDC has identified three activities that will help the town begin the development of a formal economic development strategy, as follows:

  1. Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) workshop to obtain input from a variety of stakeholders and determine overarching goals to help guide the prioritization of further collaborative economic development efforts;
  2. Local business survey to learn about their challenges and explore how an economic development strategy could best support their long-term success;
  3. Free informational workshop to help answer questions about economic and community development.

The EDC is working with a nonprofit economic development firm, the Connecticut Economic Resource Center (CERC) to assist the EDC and the town in implementing these identified goals.

One tool the EDC is using in their efforts is a survey that CERC has developed, which is now being distributed to all Old Lyme residents and/or people who own or operate a business in the town. The survey includes, but is not limited to, input regarding the Halls Road neighborhood.

The objective of the survey, the second of the three activities listed above, is  to encourage local businesses and residents to give their thoughts and feedback on the town’s current and future economic condition.  For example, the EDC would like to understand what attracted both residents and business to Old Lyme in the first place, and what they consider are the most important issues facing the town.

In respect of business owners, the EDC would also like to hear how the town can better support them both now and in the future.

The Old Lyme EDC has asked us here at LymeLine.com to help spread the word about the survey, and we are pleased to do that.

We therefore urge all our readers who either live, work or own a business in Old Lyme to take a few minutes to complete this important online survey by scanning the QR code to the left or visiting www.research.net/r/OldLymeCT

The purpose of the business survey is to 1) gain perspective on how the business community perceives the economic condition of Old Lyme, 2) identify perceived and real challenges that local businesses face, 3) identify companies that are “at-risk” of leaving Old Lyme, and, 4) obtain feedback about how the town can better support businesses to improve business retention and support their long-term success.

The purpose of the resident survey is to obtain feedback about the perceived current economic condition of Old Lyme, and obtain information that will help guide a future economic development strategy for the town.

Asked for his reaction to the increased attention being directed to economic development in Old Lyme, Halls Road Improvement Committee Chairman BJ Bernblum responded, ” “The Old Lyme Board of Selectmen is taking seriously the economic health of the town.  A few years ago it formed the Halls Road Improvements Committee and this year it revitalized the Economic Development Commission.” He continued, “Under the dynamic leadership of co-chairs Howard Margules and Justin Fuller, the EDC is working with the Connecticut Economic Resource Center to analyze the current state of Old Lyme’s economy and to recommend ways to ensure a sound future.”

Bernblum added, “CERC’s first undertaking is a town-wide survey of businesses and residents, critical to getting an accurate understanding of how our taxpayers feel about the status quo and the issues that need to be addressed,” concluding, “I strongly encourage everyone to complete this survey.”

The EDC collaborated with CERC to identify the specific survey questions and CERC will collect the survey results, carry out the analysis, and prepare a summary report.

The survey results, combined with other ongoing initiatives, will help define the town’s economic development strategy. All responses will be kept confidential, and the results will be presented in a final report prepared by the EDC.

 

 

 

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Death of Suzanne Brown Announced; Memorial Service to be Held in Old Lyme, Aug. 25

Suzanne Brown

ESSEX — Suzanne “Suzie” Brown, our mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, and friend, passed away Aug. 5, 2019, from complications after a fall in her home. She joins her beloved husband, Templeton “Temp” Brown of 58 years. We will celebrate them both by living their example of truth, love, and commitment.

Suzie celebrated beauty in life by picnicking in the countryside, arranging flowers from her garden, traveling the world, and savoring languages, cuisine, literature, colors, and the natural world. She cherished her family. We all have cultivated deep artistic roots because she showed us how to appreciate beauty in everything around us, every day of her life.

Suzie lived in Winnetka, Ill. for over three decades, and then returned to her childhood state of Connecticut to begin a new adventure with our dad, Temp, in Lyme. She had a wonderful group of friends, old and new, first from her many years in Illinois, and then more recently centered in Lyme and at the Essex Meadows Senior Retirement Community, in Essex. Suzie loved and appreciated the connections she made in Essex Meadows with her neighbors, staff, care-team, and her dear friend, Len Lonnegren.

Suzie will be remembered forever by her family, daughter Lisa Brown and her husband Mark Lellman; grandson Matt Lellman; and granddaughters, Leah Lellman (husband Josh Hisley) and Heidi Lellman (husband Jake Bonnerup); and great-grandson, Theo Bonnerup; daughter Suzanne Butz and her husband Ted Butz; grandsons Teddy Butz and Robert Butz (wife Jen Butz); and great-granddaughter, Hayden Butz; and daughter Maren Brown and her wife Patricia Morrison.

A Memorial Service will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 25, at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme.

In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts can be made to the Lyme Land Trust, which was dear to both mom and dad’s deep appreciation of preserving nature for future generations to enjoy.

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‘Cabaret’ Opens at Ivoryton Playhouse, Runs Through Sept. 1

Katie mack stars in ‘cabaret’ at the Ivoryton Playhouse as Sally Bowles.

IVORYTON – “There was a cabaret and there was a master of ceremonies and there was a city called Berlin in a country called Germany. It was the end of the world … and I was dancing with Sally Bowles and we were both fast asleep.” So begins the international classic musical and winner of eight Tony awards –  Cabaretwhich opened last night in Ivoryton to rave reviews. The show runs through Sept. 1.

Join other members of the audience at the Kit Kat Club as the Emcee takes us back to those tumultuous times with unforgettable musical numbers including,  “Wilkommen,” “Cabaret,” and “Maybe This Time.”

This Broadway classic is set in 1931 Berlin as the Nazis are rising to power. Cabaret focuses on the nightlife at the seedy Kit Kat Klub, and revolves around American writer Cliff Bradshaw and his relationship with English cabaret performer, Sally Bowles, as the world spins out of control.

The original 1966 Broadway production became an instant hit, winning eight Tony Awards in 1967 and four in 1998.  The show has inspired numerous subsequent productions in London and New York, as well as the 1972 film of the same name.

Cabaret is an unusual musical that has changed many times over the past 50 years to reflect the changes in the world, but the musical’s implicit warning about the temptations of fascism, nationalism and prejudice — the way they can sneak up on you when you’re having fun — has never seemed dated or irrelevant.

“It’s such an important piece of theatre, in what it says about the world and how quickly things can change,” says Playhouse Artistic Director, Jacqui Hubbard. “I think it is even more relevant today than when it was first performed over 50 years ago. Underneath the humor, the sex and the fabulous music is a constant alarm sounding, telling us to pay attention.”

Sam Given takes the lead male role in ‘Cabaret.’

The production stars Sam Given* as the Master of Ceremonies. Sam has appeared in Ivoryton in Godspell, A Chorus Line, I Hate Musicals: The Musical and in his own one-person show with his alter ego, Millie Grams. He has recently been seen as Ziggy Stardust inRebel Rebel: The Many Lives of David Bowie. 

Katie Mack* as Sally Bowles and Andy Tighe* as Cliff will be making their Ivoryton debuts. The cast also includes Will Clark, Carlyn Connolly*, Corrie Farbstein, Taavon Gamble*, Jade Genga, Aliah James, John Little*, Amanda Luppachino, Amani Pope, Carolyn Popp*, Renee Sutherland, Emerson Valentina, Max Weinstein and Jayke Workman. 

The production is directed and choreographed by Todd Underwood and musical directed by Michael Morris with set design by Daniel Nischan, lighting design by Marcus Abbott and costume design by Katie Bunce.

Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.

Additional matinee performances are on Saturday, Aug. 17, and Aug. 31, at 2 p.m.

Tickets are $55 for adults; $50 for seniors; $25 for students and $20 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org 

(Group rates are available by calling the box office for information.) The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

Pictures courtesy of Ivoryton Playhouse

*denotes member of Actors Equity

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Griswold Placed on November Ballot as Republican Old Lyme First Selectman Candidate

Former Old Lyme First Selectman Tim Griswold

Tim Griswold, who served as Old Lyme First Selectman from 1997-2011, was today officially placed on the November ballot as the Republican candidate for Old Lyme First Selectman.

This followed certification earlier this morning of 189 petition signatures by the Republican Old Lyme Town Registrar Cathy Carter, which involved checking each signature for authenticity and confirming the signer’s current membership of the Republican Party.  Tim Griswold and Barbara Crowley then both pledged that they had witnessed the signatures when they were taken.

The final step in the process occurred when Old Lyme Town Clerk Vicki Urbowicz called the Secretary of State’s Office to notify them of the petition and the number of signatures.  That office then checked there was no candidate already endorsed by the Old Lyme Republican Town Committee and since there was none, the Secretary of State’s Office confirmed that Urbowicz should place Griswold’s name on the ballot using the State Elections Program. Urbowicz has now completed that task.

This means there will be no Republican Primary in September because no other Old Lyme Republicans submitted petitions and today is the deadline submission day.

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Help Phoebe Clear her Shelves! BookCellar Hosts Pre-Renovation Half-Price Sale Through Aug. 17

As part of the Old Lyme Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library Renovation Project, the BookCellar will be closing down on Aug. 17 and relocating in September to temporary, smaller space. 

Therefore everything in the Cellar, including artwork and Rare & Collectibles, is currently half price. 

There will be bargains galore with this pricing, so don’t miss this opportunity to stock up on your summer reading and more.

Your purchases will help the Library prepare for the new and improved Phoebe’s BookCellar coming soon.

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