October 28, 2020

Old Lyme Town Clerk’s Office Changes Hours to Handle Volume of Absentee Ballot Requests

OLD LYME — The Old Lyme Town Clerk’s office is closed until further notice for walk-in business from the hours of 1  to 4 p.m. The office will remain open to the public from the hours of 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

This change is needed to accommodate the high volume of absentee ballot requests received for the Nov. 3, election.

Appointments are required for marriage licenses, title searchers and funeral directors.  Call 860-434-1605 ext. 220 or 221 to make an appointment.

Land recordings and vital record requests should continue to be mailed in or dropped off in the secure drop box located in the center front door of Old Lyme’s Memorial Town Hall.

Applications for absentee ballots can be mailed to the Town Clerk’s Office or dropped in the Official Ballot Drop Box in front of the town hall.

The Town Clerk wishes to express her appreciation for resident’s patience as her office works through processing the large number of absentee ballot requests.

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Wildcat Sports Notes: Soccer Boys Draw at Portland, X-Country Girls Lose to East Hampton

LYME/OLD LYME — Boy’s soccer: The Old Lyme boys tied 2-2 with Portland Monday, Oct. 5, at Portland High School.

Mike Milazzo scored a goal and also had an assist, while Anders Silberberg notched a goal and Avery Welch an assist.

Jonah Lathrop was in net and made seven saves.

Old Lyme is now 1-1-0.

Girl’s Cross-Country: The Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) girls cross-country team hosted East Hampton Friday, Oct. 3, on the LOL home course. The teams raced safely and it was a competitive event. The Old Lyme girls were defeated 21-52.

Top runners for Old Lyme were 1st place finisher sophomore Maddy Morgado, junior Anne Colangelo and sophomore Alyssa Spooner

The full results are at this link.

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Lyme Church Sanctuary Open to All Monday Evenings for Quiet Contemplation

The Sanctuary at the First Congregational Church of Lyme.

LYME — This fall the sanctuary of the First Congregational Church of Lyme will be open on Monday evenings from 6 to 7 p.m.

Church leaders invite anyone who wishes to stop by, say a prayer, or simply sit in the peaceful quiet of this historic building.

Masks and social distancing are required, along with adherence to the rules displayed on the door.

There is no limit on how long you stay within the prescribed timeframe.

For further information and/or any questions, contact Emily Bjornberg at EmilyABjornberg@gmail.com

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Jack Collins of Old Lyme Presented With Lifetime Achievement Award by CT Law Tribune

Atty. John “Jack” A. Collins III has been presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award by the Connecticut Law Tribune.

OLD LYME — John ‘Jack’ A. Collins III of Old Lyme has been honored by the Connecticut Law Tribune with a Lifetime Achievement Award.

As Managing Partner of Suisman Shapiro Attorneys-at-Law for more than 20 years, Atty. Collins was primarily responsible for the evolution of the business from a small practice to the largest law firm in eastern Connecticut. He has mentored many young lawyers to become leaders in their fields.

Suisman Shapiro serve as the Town Attorneys for Old Lyme. Atty. Collins frequently represents Suisman Shapiro in that capacity at both Town meetings and in giving legal advice to the Town.

View Collins’s’s award at 38:30 on this virtual broadcast at https://bit.ly/3cQJ75K .

Here at LymeLine.com, we send heartiest congratulations to Jack!

#connecticutlegalawards

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Letter to the Editor: Carney Displays Sound Reasoning, Common Sense, Compassion; Deserves Re-election

To the Editor:

I am voting to re-elect Rep. Devin Carney for the Connecticut State House of Representatives in the 23rd District. Devin, like many of his constituents, grew up in the district, attended local public schools, and has worked here for years. Devin Carney is Connecticut shoreline through and through and he understands what it takes to represent this area. I see how hard he works on legislation and policy and how much time and dedication he puts into the communities he represents. Many of his nights and weekends are spent meeting with constituents, attending events or state and local public hearings, or volunteering.

As a senior in college and a proud 2017 Lyme-Old Lyme graduate, I would like Connecticut to be a place where I can have opportunity and Devin has worked on legislation to make that a reality. He supports the “Learn Here, Live Here” program to help local young people purchase their first home, he supports increasing job training opportunities for in-demand careers, and he will continue to advocate for our schools, our safety, our health, and our beautiful coastline.

I believe that Devin will usher in a more modern Connecticut with his millennial views on social and business values. Devin created the bipartisan young legislators caucus and the bipartisan clean energy caucus and continues to be active in the national bipartisan Millennial Action Project where he represents Connecticut. Devin Carney is a man that I respect and am thankful for because in times of conflict, division, and malice, Devin still believes that there is more that unites us than divides us and will continue to work towards compromise. He votes using sound reasoning, common sense and compassion to make Connecticut the best state it can be. I urge you to vote to re-elect Devin Carney, our State Representative.  

Sincerely,

Corey Knepshield,
Old Lyme.

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Subscribe to Lyme-Old Lyme HS Athletics YouTube Channel to Watch LiveStreamed Games This Season


LYME/OLD LYME —
10/03 UPDATE: The Lyme Old Lyme High School Athletics YouTube channel now has 1,100 subscribers! Many thanks to all the LymeLine readers who subscribed and supported the LOLHS athletes in this way.

Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools are permitting spectators at home sports games this season but several other schools are not. Consequently, the LOL Schools Athletic Department is trying to find a way to live-stream games so that students, parents, friends and supporters of any team can watch a game that is being played at a school where spectators are not permitted.The Athletic Department has determined the best way to do this is via YouTube, but in order to be able to livestream from an i-Pad or i-Phone at any school other than LOL High School, YouTube requires a minimum of 1,000 subscribers to your YouTube channel.

The LOL Schools Athletic Department is therefore asking all those interested in watching LOL athletic games this season via a live-stream on YouTube to subscribe to the Lyme Old Lyme High School Athletics YouTube channel at this link.

As at publication time, the channel has 489 subscribers — let’s help them get to the 1,000 they need!
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Old Lyme Reports New COVID Case, Takes Total to 28 Including Two Fatalities; Lyme Holds at Nine Cases

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

OLD LYME/LYME — Old Lyme First Selectman Timothy Griswold informed us this morning of another confirmed case of COVID-19 in Old Lyme. The case was confirmed Oct. 1 and is a 31-year-old male.

This takes the total number of cases in Old Lyme to 28 including two fatalities. The number of surviving cases in Old Lyme now comprise equal numbers of both males and females with 13 of each ranging in age from 19- to 82-years-old. The two fatalities were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

We have not heard of any new cases in Lyme where nine cases comprising four females and five males ranging in age from one- to 68-years-old have been reported to date. There have been no fatalities in Lyme.

Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) will issue their COVID-19 summary for the week ending Oct. 2 later today. This report covers cases by town for all the towns in the LLHD — both Lyme and Old Lyme are included in the district. LLHD states their data may conflict with what DPH reports on their website, as there is often a delay in posting data at the state level. The data LLHD reports is current as of noon on the Friday on which it is issued.

We will report any additions from today’s report in either Lyme or Old Lyme as soon as we receive the report.

Gender and age details of the confirmed cases in Lyme to date are:

  1. Male, age 34
  2. Female, age 61
  3. Female, age 34
  4. Male, age 1
  5. Male, age 34
  6. Male, age 20
  7. Male, aged 68
  8. Female, age 21
  9. Female, age 62

To demonstrate the growth in confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme, the table below is a summary of the cases that LymeLine.com has reported since March 31 when the first case was announced and also includes both fatalities.

DateCumulative no. of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme
March 311
April 44
April 96
April 107
April 1510
April 1812
May 113
May 1515
May 2616
June 817
June 1018
June 1419
June 2221
June 2422
July 1722
July 2823
Sept. 224
Sept. 426
Sept. 1527
Oct. 128
Oct. 829
Oct. 1630
Oct. 1631
Oct. 1632

Details of all Old Lyme’s confirmed surviving cases to date are as follows:

  1. Female, age 64
  2. Female, age 21
  3. Male, age 27
  4. Female, age 53
  5. Female, age 61
  6. Female, age 29
  7. Male, age 40
  8. Male, age 53
  9. Female, age 60
  10. Male, age 45
  11. Female, age 20
  12. Female, age 43
  13. Female, age 48
  14. Male, age 70
  15. Male, age 67
  16. Female, age 68
  17. Male, age 50
  18. Male, age 21
  19. Female, age 48
  20. Female, age 34
  21. Male, age 20
  22. Male, age 28
  23. Male, age 74
  24. Male, age 61
  25. Female, age 19
  26. Male, age 31

Old Lyme First Selectman Timothy Griswold has previously noted that the 21-year-old female with a confirmed case (#2 in the list immediately above) was tested in Florida, but used an Old Lyme address although she does not live here. Because she gave the Old Lyme address, Griswold said that LLHD must report her as an Old Lyme resident.

Residents and businesses are urged to access up-to-date information regarding the pandemic from reputable sources including the Ledge Light Health District website (www.llhd.org), Facebook (@LedgeLightHD), Twitter (@LedgeLightHD), and Instagram (@LedgeLightHD).

Editor’s Note: Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) serves as the local health department in southeast Connecticut for the towns of Lyme and Old Lyme as well as East Lyme, Groton, Ledyard, New London, North Stonington,  Stonington and Waterford. As a health district, formed under Connecticut General Statutes Section 19a-241, LLHD is a special unit of government, allowing member municipalities to provide comprehensive public health services to residents in a more efficient manner by consolidating the services within one organization.

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Death of Beverly M. Nickerson of Old Lyme Announced, Worked as Cook for LOL Schools for More Than 30 Years

Beverly M. Nickerson

OLD LYME – On Tuesday, September 29, 2020, loving wife, Mother, Nana and Great Nana, Beverly M. Nickerson, peacefully passed away while surrounded by family at Lawrence and Memorial Hospital in New London.

Our beloved Beverly was born on October 10, 1935, in Old Lyme, CT. She was married to Harold J. Nickerson, with whom she had four sons, David, John, Peter and Paul. She would go on to have nine grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

Amongst Beverly’s greatest joys were her family, the beach, sunshine and sand between her toes. She was a devoted mother, nana and great nana. A true matriarch of her family that brought laughter, smiles, quick wit and a listening ear wherever she went. You were guaranteed to find her set up at White Sands Beach or Hammonasset Beach during the summer. She was also very active in the Old Lyme community, having worked in the school system for over thirty years. She loved serving the children of the Lyme-Old Lyme School District, and took such pride in their achievements. She was known for her spirited personality, and joy of life. She was also known to wrangle a cow, her pony, or her grandkids when needed.

Beverly was preceded in death by her husband, Harold Nickerson, father William Mathiason and mother, Bessie King, brothers: William and Christian Mathiason, sisters: Elizabeth Dimock and Barbara Simmons. She is survived by her brother, Howard Mathiason, her four children: David and Robin Nickerson of Summerville, SC, John and Katherine Nickerson of Old Lyme, Peter and Kelly Nickerson of East Haddam, Paul and Amy Nickerson of Old Lyme, her grandchildren; Matthew Nickerson, Colleen Nickerson, Kourtney Nickerson-Flavahan, Jaymie Nickerson-Buckmaster, Samantha Nickerson-Linderman, Bailey Nickerson, Jessica Nickerson, Logan Nickerson, Emily Nickerson and two great-granddaughters, Claire Juniper Flavahan and June Beverly Buckmaster. She will be dearly missed.

Calling hours are Saturday, October 3, 2020 5-7pm at Fulton-Theroux in Old Lyme. A funeral service will be held on Sunday, October 4, 2020 at the Duck River Cemetery, by the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, at 2 o’clock p.m. When attending either service please wear a mask and follow social distancing guidelines. In honor of her wonderful life, flowers may be sent to 13 Beckwith Ln, Old Lyme, CT 06371 or please consider giving a donation in her honor to the Old Lyme Ambulance or the Old Lyme Fire Department.

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Musical Masterworks Opens 30th Season Virtually, Video of First Concert Available Nov. 7, Tickets on Sale Now

Musical Masterworks’ October performers James Ehnes and Andrew Armstrong. Photo by Benjamin Ealovega.

OLD LYME — Musical Masterworks launches its 30th Anniversary Season by offering a new way for chamber music aficionados to enjoy its concerts in the form of professionally-produced video.  Concert-goers can watch from the comfort of their homes on the screens of their choice. 

Artistic Director Edward Arron explains, “We have adjusted our season in order to bring our five concert programs to our devoted concertgoers virtually, through recordings made by an award-winning team of videographers and audio technicians. While restrictions remain in place for in-person gatherings, we are thrilled that our performances can be filmed in our usual concert space.”

Musical Masterworks will begin the 2020-21 season with two all-Beethoven programs.

October will see pianist Andrew Armstrong join renowned violinist James Ehnes to perform three sonatas by Beethoven. 

In December, the month of Beethoven’s actual 250th birthday, James Ehnes, Amy Schwartz Moretti, Che-Yen Chen and Edward Arron will perform three Beethoven String Quartets.

The spring Musical Masterworks concert will welcome back a number of favorite artists, including Rieko Aizawa, Todd Palmer, Jeewon Park, Randall Scarlata, Gilles Vonsattel, and Tessa Lark, featuring musical treasures from Bach to Corigliano.

The season’s first concerts will be filmed at the end of October and the link to the virtual concert will be made available to ticket buyers Nov. 7.  The video can be enjoyed for three weeks and watched as many times as one wishes. 

Ticket-holders will be able to experience Musical Masterworks as never before: the audio-video production team will create an intimate concert experience, providing a virtual seat on the stage.

Arron shared his thoughts about this unusual season, saying, “The experience of living through this unsettling period has reinforced my belief that the arts and live performance are essential to humanity and are an indispensable part of a healthy society.”

He adds, “It gives me great pride that our organization has committed to presenting a full season of concert programs as we celebrate the 30th season of Musical Masterworks.”

Musical Masterworks’ season runs October 2020 through May 2021.  To purchase a video ticket subscription ($150 each), a video mini-subscription ($100 each), individual video tickets ($40 each), or student tickets ($5 each), visit Musical Masterworks at Musical Masterworks at www.musicalmasterworks.org or call 860.434.2252

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Lyme Academy Offers Wide Range of Fall Classes, All Welcome

OLD LYME — Lyme Academy of Fine Arts is offering an exciting selection of classes, which bridge the skills of the past with the inspiration of the future.

A full listing of all the classes and workshops on offer is given below. If you would like to obtain further information on any of the classes or workshops, visit lymeacademy.edu or call 860.434.5232.

INSTRUCTED STUDIO

Lyme Academy alumna and now teacher works on a sculpture.

Facilitator: Kimberly Monson
Tuesdays/Thursdays 9 a.m.-12 p.m.
Six weeks
Tuesday Instructed, Thursday Open Studio
$450
Independent lessons are collaborative in order to best serve the student in reaching developmental goals in drawing, painting and sculpture.

AFTERNOON LANDSCAPE
Taught by: Michael Viera
Thursdays, Oct. 2 – 23
1-4 p.m.
$350
Lessons focus on navigating pictorial composition, color selection and mixing, value, temperature and light. The class will be held on various on-site locations in Lyme and Old Lyme to experience the exceptional regional landscape.

CAST DRAWING
Taught by: Rick Lacey
Mondays, Oct. 19 – Nov. 23
6-9 p.m.
$350
In this course, instructor Rick Lacey provides a framework to plot and map the cast on the page. Special attention is paid to construction, line work and quality, and the importance of value.

FIGURE DRAWING IN VINE CHARCOAL 
Taught by: Hollis Dunlap
Tuesdays, Oct. 6 – Nov. 10
6-9 p.m.
$400
Over the six classes, students will learn to revise the drawing by examining proportions and angles in order to get the most out of their abilities.

ART OF THE STILL LIFE 
Taught by: Justin Wiest
Oct. 16-18
9-4 p.m.
$450
This workshop will make the contention that: The set-up has to look like a painting before the artist begins to paint.
The methods and materials will be thoroughly discussed.

Lyme Academy alumnus and now teacher Michael Viera will be leading a class titled, ‘Afternoon Landscape,’ this fall.

CLASSES & WORKSHOPS
RELIEF SCULPTURE
Three Day Workshop with Kellie Pereira
Oct. 23, 24 and 25
9-4 p.m.
$500
This course provides instruction on how to produce a bas-relief sculpture, a silicone mold from the sculpture produced in class and plaster casts.

ENCAUSTIC
Two-day workshop with Kathryn Bevier
November 7 – 8
10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
$350
In this workshop, attention will be given to a more classical painting approach with encaustic exploring monochromatic and a la prima practices. Working from a simple still life or landscape imagery, Bevier will guide you through several exercises to help you hone in on a fresh and energetic composition of color.

CRAFTING THE PORTRAIT- DRAWING
Three-Day Workshop with Tyler Berry
April 23 to 25
9-4 p.m.
$475
In this three-day workshop, artists will learn the fundamentals of portrait drawing. With an emphasis on structure and anatomy, Tyler will help students in understanding likeness through careful observation of proportion, skeletal landmarks, and abstract shape-design. Artists will also learn to create a sculptural quality to their portraits through in-depth analysis of the light source and how it interacts with the forms of the face.

ONLINE CLASSES
Color Mentorship – Online Learning with West Fraser
Zoom Discussions,
Tuesdays, Oct. 6 to 27
Beginning at 4:30 p.m.
$400
Gain familiarity with color concepts for yourself or in preparation for West’s on-site workshop “Going Beyond Theory of Color to Application” set for the Spring of 2021.

Fundamentals of Illustration with Greg Mursko
Mondays, Oct. 19 to Nov. 23
1-4 p.m.
$350
This course introduces the basic principles being an illustrator. The majority of work created in the medium of your choice (graphite, colored pencil, acrylic paint, etc.)

Graphic Arts
Fundamentals of Imaging Software with Greg Mursko
Mondays, Oct. 19 to Nov. 23
9-12 p.m.
$350
This class will introduce the basics of imaging software, including the user interface, working with layers, color, type, tools, filters, masks, and more.

Value in the Landscape
Online Learning with Thomas Caleb Goggans
Tuesdays, Nov. 3 to 24, at 4:30 p.m.
$350
Caleb Goggans will demonstrate and guide a progressive exercise designed to give students the knowledge and confidence to compose compelling, well organized, and beautiful paintings.

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Letter to the Editor: Rubino Will Not Be Restricted by Party Lines in His Quest For Solutions That Benefit Local Community

To the Editor:

I am writing to encourage your readers to support and vote for Dave Rubino, the democratic candidate for the 23rd House District to represent Lyme, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook and Westbrook. I have had the opportunity to meet Dave, and talk with him about the issues that drive him as a person and a professional. Dave is a lawyer, with both business and human rights experience. His work on international voting rights demonstrated a shift in him professionally, putting his money where his mouth is, and fighting for what he valued.

While the national election for President captures the most attention, it is our local representatives that have the biggest impact on our lives on a day-to-day basis. David’s international legal work was bi-partisan in nature, working under both republican and democratic presidents. We need that willingness to work towards solutions – regardless of party – that bring progress to our community.

Dave has stepped up in recent years to volunteer and work in his community as a member of the Old Lyme Economic Development Commission. As our state and community work our way towards recovery and navigating the COVID crisis, we will need leaders willing to listen and represent the interests of our small businesses and navigating what is best for our community from a public health standpoint. As a member of the Old Saybrook Board of Selectman and chair of the
Economic Development Commission, I am confident in David’s ability to provide that for our community.

Sincerely,

Matt Pugliese,
Old Saybrook.

Editor’s Note: The writer is an Old Saybrook Selectman and Chair of Old Saybrook Economic Development Commission.

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Diebolt Clarifies His Plans for 220 (Approx.) Apartments on Hatchetts Hill (Includes 70 Affordable Housing Units); Says “It’s 100% Good for the Town”

The boundary marked on this map indicates the perimeter of the 20.6 acres owned by Mark Diebolt, which is the proposed site of a housing development. The site is already zoned for multi-family housing.

OLD LYME — Describing his proposed housing development off Hatchetts Hill Rd. in Old Lyme as, “A one hundred percent good thing for the town,” Mark Diebolt went on to give an detailed outline of the ambitious proposal during a phone conversation with LymeLine last Monday (Sept. 22.)

The plan, which is still in draft form and has not yet been released, calls for construction of 11 buildings, which will offer a total of between 216 and 224 one- and two-bedroom apartments. The precise number is not yet finalized but Diebolt anticipates it will be around 220.

The intention is for roughly a third of the apartments — between 70 and 75 — to be made available as ‘Affordable Housing,’ which means the plans can be submitted under the state’s 8-30g regulations that facilitate the process of obtaining approvals.

Diebolt described his vision for the development, which, apart from the apartments, is also slated to include a pool, gym. movie theater and clubhouse, as being, “Somewhere people want to live” and “Having the feel of its own little community.” He believes, “A diverse group of residents” will be attracted to the community, which will be both attractive and “completely safe.” and emphasized, “There will be ways for people to interact and socialize, if they wish.”

Drawing a comparison with the recent Saybrook Station development in Old Saybrook, he said he similarly envisaged, “New England-style building … and making it like a small village.” He emphasized, however, a significant difference between the Saybrook project and this one in Old Lyme in terms of the building density. Diebolt pointed out, “They have a lot less land,” noting that the former has 186 units in nine buildings on 1o acres whereas in Old Lyme, he is looking at 220 units in 11 buildings on just over 20 acres.

Noting it is a “unique location,” and “all rural around that area,” Diebolt explained that the uneven topography, which includes “lots of rock,” allows opportunities “to use the natural contours of the property” both for underground parking and also, in some cases, to offer views of Long Island Sound from the apartments. The parcel of land comprising 20.6 acres, which he has owned for many years and is already zoned for multi-family use, lies at the eastern end of Hatchetts Hill and is bordered to the north by Hatchetts Hill Rd. and to the east by Four Mile River Rd.

Diebolt stressed several times during the conversation, “This is not low-income housing,” adding, “There is a real misconception about it [Affordable Housing.]” He noted that the developers would be following the state rules for the number of units that would be offered at different percentages of the median income for the town. Significantly, the apartments designated as affordable housing will be intermingled with all the other units in this development and built to exactly the same standard.

Pointing out that the investors in the project will likely become, “One of the largest taxpayers in town,” Diebolt noted that, at the same time, he does not expect, “Too many kids,” to be entering Lyme-Old Lyme Schools as a result of the development due to the size of the individual apartments being offered.

Diebolt also notes another positive for Old Lyme is that the development will roughly double the amount of affordable housing in the town. Currently Old Lyme has around 1.5 percent of affordable housing and this project will take that percentage to around 3 percent. The town is under a long-term, statewide mandate to achieve a goal of having 10 percent of its total housing as affordable housing.

Asked the names of his fellow investors, Diebolt, who acknowledges he is, “The face of the project,” said they did not wish to be named at this point, but commented they are, “Connecticut residents and professionals,” adding, “I’m not a land developer.”

Questioned as to the intended name of the development, Diebolt chuckled and said that, as with the investor names, it was still under wraps. But he then shared that he is an amateur ornithologist and said that might possibly impact their choices as they, “Play around with names.”

In terms of location, Diebolt notes the site is extremely conveniently situated for on- and off-ramps going in both direction at Exit 71 of I-95. He also remarks that the single exit from the project will be onto Hatchetts Hill Rd. and will only allow a right-turn — there will be no exit onto the much busier Four Mile River Rd.

Regarding next steps, the plan has already been presented in a preliminary fashion to the Old Lyme Water Pollution Control Authority (WPCA). This was, in Diebolt’s words, to let them know that, “Basically our [Diebolt’s] professional engineers are in discussion with East Lyme WPCA engineers about connecting to water and sewer lines on Colton Rd. in East Lyme.” The property being proposed for development is only approximately 100 meters from those East Lyme  water and sewer lines and the possibility of connecting to them seems likely to be critical to the project moving forward.

Following that, Diebolt expects to submit a formal plan to Old Lyme’s Inland Wetlands Commission in December or January, which will kick off the official approval process with the Town.

Last Monday, Diebolt discussed the project with the Old Lyme Affordable Housing Committee (OLAHC), again for information purposes. After giving a brief overview of the project, Diebolt answered questions from the committee ranging from how many stories would the buildings have (Diebolt said a maximum of three) and would all the units be rented (yes – there will be no opportunity to purchase apartments) to whether pets will be allowed (yes, definitely – Diebolt again stressed the developers wanted these to be, “Homes people are proud to have” adding, “Pets are part of our culture.

Committee member Karen Winters spoke positively about the fact that, “The work force is intermingled,” so, as Diebolt clarified, “No one will know who’s who,” meaning those renting under Affordable Housing policies will not be identifiable from those who are not. Winters said, “I think that’s a win.”

Tom Ortoleva, another committee member, asked how many acres of the total were buildable. Diebolt responded, “It’s a tough site. One of the more expensive items [in the project] is site work.” He emphasized, “We have it all laid out. We could have put 274 units on the site … but we didn’t want it crowded.”

Committee member Tammy Tinnerello and Ortoleva questioned why Diebolt was not planning any three-bedroom units to which Diebolt replied, “Our market research indicates there is no demand for them,” or only minimal demand, but he also noted the developers would be willing to look into the matter further.

Overall, in Diebolt’s opinion, “The project was well received,” [by the committee] and, “The members seemed encouraging,” but prior to entertaining questions OLAHC Chairman Michael Fogliano had emphasized to committee members that they were there, “To listen and learn,” and not to consider a formal application nor take a vote.

Diebolt ended his session with the committee saying optimistically, “A thing of this magnitude is going to take a while to get going … but hopefully it will come to fruition.”

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A la Carte: Hold on to Summer, Make Your Own Luscious Ice Cream, Sorbets

Lee White

Last week I missed getting the last peaches available at Whittle’s. This made me sad because, even though it is late September, I guess I am not ready for fall.

In any case, I did find delicious peaches at Big Y and made two crisps (like cobblers but made with nuts, oat, butter, flour and sugar). Of course, I gave the desserts away because, once I have a portion at home, the rest of it disappears … into my tummy.

Instead of making a dessert for myself, I ate two Lindy’s ices, which I keep in my kitchen freezer. The ones I have now are orange and taste like a popsicle, At 110 calories, they keep my cravings at bay.

But I realized I can make my own ices, sorbet and ice cream and used to do so. My late husband loved to have an ice cream sundae after dinner—any flavor, chocolate syrup, whipped cream and a shower of salted peanuts.

I am not likely to make ice cream too often, but if you want to make ice cream, I have included a wicked recipe from Al Forno, too.

I will, however, make sorbet and ices soon. I just ordered an inexpensive ice cream maker from Amazon and it may be here this week. Both these recipes are splendid.

Berry Sorbet

(From Jack Bishop: Secrets of Creamy Fruit Sorbets, “Cook’s Illustrated,” August, 1995, pp. 24-25)

If you do not want to add the vodka, the sorbet will be a bit icy, like a granita,

2 cups fruit puree or juice
1 cup sugar
1 tablespoon lemon juice (for blueberry sorbet, use two tablespoons of lemon juice)
1 tablespoon vodka 

Combine all ingredients in large bowl. Stir on and off for several minutes until sugar has dissolved. If mixture is not cold, pour into small container, seal and refrigerate until mixture is no more than 40 degrees. Pour chilled mixture into container of ice cream machine (following manufacturer’s directions) and churn until frozen. Scoop frozen sorbet into a container, seal, and freeze for at least several hours. (Sorbet can be kept frozen for up to three days.)

Buttermilk Sorbet

(From Martha Stewart Living, February 2000, page 193)

Yield: 1 1/2 quarts

This is one of the most luscious sorbets I have ever tasted.

1 3/4 cups sugar
2 cups water
2 cups buttermilk
1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

Combine sugar in a medium saucepan with 2 cups water. Stir over medium heat until sugar dissolves completely, about 10 minutes. Increase heat, and bring just to a boil. Remove from heat and let cool.

In a large bowl, combine sugar syrup with buttermilk and vanilla. Transfer mixture to an ice cream maker and follow manufacturer’s instructions to freeze. When freezing is complete, transfer sorbet to an airtight container and place in freezer for at least 1 hour. Sorbet will keep, frozen, for up to 2 weeks.

Photo by Malicki M. Beser on Unsplash.

Al Forno’s Cinnamon Ice Cream

from Cucina Simpatica by George Germon and Johanne Killeen (HarperCollins Publishers, New York, 1991)

2 cups heavy cream
1 cup milk
2/3 cup sugar
4 cinnamon sticks
8 espresso or French-roast coffee beans

Combine all ingredients in a saucepan. Scald over medium-high heat, stirring often, until sugar dissolves. Set aside, uncovered, for 1 hour to steep.

Strain, chill, and freeze in an ice-cream maker according to the manufacturers’ instructions.

About the author: Lee White has been writing about restaurants and cooking since 1976 and has been extensively published in the Worcester (Mass.) Magazine, The Day, Norwich Bulletin, and Hartford Courant. She currently writes Nibbles and a cooking column called A La Carte for LymeLine.com and the Shore Publishing and the Times newspapers, both of which are owned by The Day.

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Death Announced of Nancy MacVane Roche; Registrar of Voters for Lyme Democrats, Lyme Cemetery Commission Chair

LYME — Nancy MacVane Roche, 86, of Lyme, passed away peacefully Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, at Essex Meadows Health Center  …

They moved back East to Old Lyme, and settled on Tantumorantum Road, where they lived for the last 54 years; a wonderful town and beautiful location to live and raise a family. They had three daughters, Lesley Allene Lowe, Lynn Ellen Roche (deceased) and Suzanne Elizabeth Morelli. They had no grandchildren, but lots of grand-doggies and kitties …

Nancy served as registrar of voters for the Democratic Party. Nancy was a longstanding member of the Lyme Garden Club. She was also the chairman of the Lyme Cemetery Commission for many years …

Visit this link to read the full obituary published Sept. 27 on The Day.com.

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Ledge Light Confirms No New COVID-19 Cases in Past Week in Lyme, Old Lyme; Current Totals are 9 in Lyme, 27 in Old Lyme

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

LYME/OLD LYME — Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) issued their COVID-19 summary for the week ending Sept. 25 just after 7 p.m. Friday evening.

The report showed nine cases for Lyme and 27 cases for Old Lyme including two fatalities. These are same totals that LymeLine reported on Monday, Sept. 21.

This report covers cases by town for all the towns in the LLHD — both Lyme and Old Lyme are included in the district. LLHD states their data may conflict with what DPH reports on their website, as there is often a delay in posting data at the state level. The data LLHD reports was current as of noon Friday.

The most recent case in Lyme was a 62-year-old female, while Old Lyme’s was reported Sept. 15 and is a 19-year-old female.

The nine cases in Lyme comprise four females and five males ranging in age from one- to 68-years-old.

Gender and age details of the confirmed cases in Lyme to date are:

  1. Male, age 34
  2. Female, age 61
  3. Female, age 34
  4. Male, age 1
  5. Male, age 34
  6. Male, age 20
  7. Male, aged 68
  8. Female, age 21
  9. Female, age 62

The number of surviving cases in Old Lyme ranges in age from 19- to 82-years-old and comprises 12 males and 13 females. The two fatalities were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

To demonstrate the growth in confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme, the table below is a summary of the cases that LymeLine.com has reported since March 31 when the first case was announced and also includes both fatalities.

DateCumulative no. of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme
March 311
April 44
April 96
April 107
April 1510
April 1812
May 113
May 1515
May 2616
June 817
June 1018
June 1419
June 2221
June 2422
July 1722
July 2823
Sept. 224
Sept. 426
Sept. 1527
Oct. 128
Oct. 829
Oct. 1630
Oct. 1631
Oct. 1632

Details of all Old Lyme’s confirmed surviving cases to date are as follows:

  1. Female, age 64
  2. Female, age 21
  3. Male, age 27
  4. Female, age 53
  5. Female, age 61
  6. Female, age 29
  7. Male, age 40
  8. Male, age 53
  9. Female, age 60
  10. Male, age 45
  11. Female, age 20
  12. Female, age 43
  13. Female, age 48
  14. Male, age 70
  15. Male, age 67
  16. Female, age 68
  17. Male, age 50
  18. Male, age 21
  19. Female, age 48
  20. Female, age 34
  21. Male, age 20
  22. Male, age 28
  23. Male, age 74
  24. Male, age 61
  25. Female, age 19

Old Lyme First Selectman Timothy Griswold has previously noted that the 21-year-old female with a confirmed case (#2 in the list immediately above) was tested in Florida, but used an Old Lyme address although she does not live here. Because she gave the Old Lyme address, Griswold said that LLHD must report her as an Old Lyme resident.

Residents and businesses are urged to access up-to-date information regarding the pandemic from reputable sources including the Ledge Light Health District website (www.llhd.org), Facebook (@LedgeLightHD), Twitter (@LedgeLightHD), and Instagram (@LedgeLightHD).

Editor’s Note: Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) serves as the local health department in southeast Connecticut for the towns of Lyme and Old Lyme as well as East Lyme, Groton, Ledyard, New London, North Stonington,  Stonington and Waterford. As a health district, formed under Connecticut General Statutes Section 19a-241, LLHD is a special unit of government, allowing member municipalities to provide comprehensive public health services to residents in a more efficient manner by consolidating the services within one organization.

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A New Rule for Comments

UPDATED SEPT. 26, 2020 — We welcome comments, but when you submit one, please be sure to enter your name and an email address that we can verify. We will no longer publish comments under a pseudonym.

We have a number of comments sitting in the hopper that we can’t publish because they have — how shall we say this? — ‘creative’ e-addresses.

Examples of such e-addresses are ones like idontsharemyemail@gmail.com, noneofyourbusiness@gmail.com, and customerservice@abc.com.

We always invite commenters, who’ve used questionable emails, to resubmit their comments with a verifiable e-address, so if this message is resonating with you, we look forward to hearing from you!

Also please remember we will not publish comments that are abusive, defamatory, indecent, libelous, obscene, off-topic, pornographic, profane, threatening, unlawful, vulgar, or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks on anyone or any group or organization, especially on other commenters, are not permitted.

We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Comments that are long and/or include code of any kind, or include hyperlinks to objectionable material will not be posted.

Thank you for respecting these rules, which have been in place for almost 17 years, and almost never been abused.

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Around 80 Participate in Partnership for Social Justice’s March, Teach-In Wednesday in Old Lyme


LYME/OLD LYME — Around 80 people showed up for the Lyme-
Old Lyme (LOL) Partnership for Social Justice and the Old Saybrook March for Justice march and “teach-in” focused on desegregating Connecticut, which was held  Wednesday, Sept. 23, in front of the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme.

Speakers who addressed the crowd included:

  • Fionnuala Darby-Hudgens from CT Fair Housing
  • Luke Reynolds from Desegregate CT
  • Tony Lyons from the HOPE Partnership
  • Sadie Frankel, a local high school student
  • Dave Rubino, candidate for District 23 State Representative
  • Rev. Steve Jungkeit from the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme

The LOL Partnership’s mission is to educate residents on important topics of social justice and call attention to opportunities where citizens can support local, state and national social-justice efforts. 

For more information, visit the Partnership’s Facebook page at this link or send an email to LOLPartnership4SJ@gmail.com

The Old Saybrook March for Justice is an inclusive and welcoming coalition of friends and neighbors, who care deeply about basic human rights.

Their mission statement states, ” We are outraged by centuries of structural racism in this country. We stand with Black Lives Matter. We listen, learn and act. We understand that silence is not an option. We aim to be allies and antiracist. We are respectful, nonpartisan and inclusive. We welcome all who share our values. We educate ourselves and join in weekly marches.”

The schedule for subsequent marches is as follows:

Wednesday, Sept. 30:  Deep River – in front of Town Hall with speaker Professor O’Leary.

Wednesday, Oct. 7: Old Saybrook – in front of the Kate with speaker Professor Blight, the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of Frederick Douglass.
All marches are on Wednesdays from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
For further information and to raise any questions, email osbmarch@gmail.com with any questions.
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Letter to the Editor: Carney Deserves Re-election, No One Works Harder for Lyme-Old Lyme Community

To the Editor:

Rep. Devin Carney is a champion for Lyme and Old Lyme at the State Capitol. Among his many accomplishments, he has worked to defeat the high-speed train from decimating our community,  helped secure funding for Old Lyme’s library and open space in Lyme, and supported local parents in their fight to stop state-mandated school regionalization.

Locally, Devin is active in Old Saybrook Rotary, which provides scholarships to Lyme–Old Lyme students; he’s a member of the Lyme–Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce; and he serves on the Old Lyme Zoning Board of Appeals.  No one works harder for our community!

Over his six years in office, Devin has amassed a successful record of fighting for his constituents; he knows his district and he knows his way around the capitol. There is still work to be done, and with his committee assignments and House leadership status, Devin Carney is the right person to continue representing the 23rd District in Hartford. He has my vote and I hope he can count on yours.

Sincerely,

Ellen Cole,
Old Lyme.

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All You Need to Know About Registering to Vote, Applying for an Absentee Ballot and VOTING!

LYME/OLD LYME — Tuesday, Sept. 22, marked the 9th annual National Voter Registration Day – a nonpartisan and collaborative effort that involves partners of all stripes and sizes across the country to register voters ahead of the November election.

One in four eligible Americans is not registered to vote, and National Voter Registration Day seeks to make voter registration calls to action impossible to ignore, so that as many citizens as possible are empowered to participate in our democracy.

There are two simple ways to register to vote:

  • You can register online here.  To register online, you must have a current, valid driver’s license, learner’s permit or non-driver photo ID card issued by the state’s Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) and a signature on file with DMV.
  • If you are a Lyme resident, you can register in person any weekday during normal business hours (9 a.m. to 4 p.m.) at the Lyme Town Hall at 480 Hamburg Road.
  • If you are an Old Lyme resident, you can register to vote Monday through Friday (9 a.m. to 4 p.m.) in the Registrar’s Office or in the Town Clerk’s office if the Registrars are not available.

If you are not sure if you are registered, you can check your current voting status by visiting the link here and entering your name, town of residence and date of birth.

Latest Information on Absentee Ballots for Nov. 3 Election From our Towns

Town of Lyme

The Secretary of the State’s office has mailed absentee ballot applications to every registered voter in Connecticut for the November 3, 2020, General Election.  Registered voters in Lyme began receiving their absentee ballot applications in the mail on Thursday, September 17.  If you wish to use the absentee ballot application you received in the mail, follow the directions on the insert included with the application, which are also listed here:

  1. Check that your personal information is correct in Section 1.
  2. Select a reason for voting by absentee ballot in Section 2. All voters may choose “COVID-19.”
  3. Sign your application in Section 3.
  4. Seal it in the envelope and drop it in the secure Official Ballot Drop Box at Lyme Town Hall on the sidewalk (preferred) or mail it in the postage-paid envelope included.

Things to remember:

  • If you have already submitted an absentee ballot application to the Lyme Town Clerk for the General Election on November 3, please destroy the application you receive from the State.
  • If you submitted an absentee ballot application for the Primary in August, that application was only for the Primary. If you wish to vote by absentee in the General Election in November, you must submit an absentee ballot application for the General Election.
  • Be sure to sign your application in Section 3, not Section 4. If someone assisted you in completing the application, that person would sign in Section 4.  You will not receive a ballot if you do not sign the application in Section 3.
  • Deposit your application in the Town of Lyme Official Drop Box only, not in the drop box of any other town. Residents should only deposit their applications in the drop box for the town where they are registered voters.
  • Absentee ballots will be sent out starting October 2.

Should you have any questions, contact the Town Clerk by phone at 860-434-7733, Mondays through Fridays, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Town of Old Lyme

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 crisis, all voters will be permitted to vote by absentee ballot rather than appear in person in the Nov. 3, 2020 Election.

For those who wish to appear in person, the polling place located at the Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School, 53 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, CT will be open from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Election Day to cast your ballot.

The Secretary of the State’s (SOTS) office will be mailing Applications for Absentee Ballot to all registered voters beginning mid-September.  The completed Applications can then be sent to the Town Clerk’s office and absentee ballots will be issued by the Old Lyme Town Clerk’s office.

You may also drop your completed Application in our Official Ballot Drop Box located in the front of the Town Hall.

The Old Lyme Town Clerk’s office will begin mailing out Absentee Ballots on Friday, Oct. 2, 2020.

As great numbers of voters wishing to vote absentee are anticipated, the following is recommended:

  • Do not use the Application for Absentee Ballot which was mailed to you for the Aug. 11, 2020 Primaries as it will be rejected. You will receive a new one specifically for the Nov. 3, 2020 election.
  • Applications for Absentee Ballots will be mailed to you from the SOTS beginning mid-September.
  • If you do not receive your Application for Absentee Ballot for the Nov. 3, 2020 election in the mail by Sept. 30,  contact the Old Lyme Town Clerk’s office or you may visit the link here to obtain one.
  • If you have previously filed an Application for Absentee Ballot for the Nov. 3, 2020 election with the Town Clerk’s office, disregard the one received from the SOTS.  Your initial Application will be processed.
  • Completed Applications for Absentee Ballot can be mailed to the Old Lyme Town Clerk’s office or dropped in the Official Ballot Drop Box located in front of the Old Lyme Town Hall.
  • Absentee Ballots will be mailed by the Old Lyme Town Clerk’s office beginning Oct. 2, 2020.
  • Once you have received your Absentee Ballot and cast your vote, you may mail it to the Old Lyme Town Clerk’s office or drop it into the Official Ballot Drop Box located in front of the Old Lyme Town Hall.  As time is of the essence, do not wait to deliver it to us as the Old Lyme Town Clerk’s office will need time to process it.

Should you have any additional questions concerning the upcoming election, contact the Town Clerk’s office at (860) 434-1605 Ext. 220 (Vicki) or Ext. 221 (Courtney).

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New COVID-19 Cases Confirmed in Lyme, Old Lyme

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

OLD LYME/LYME — UPDATED SEPT. 21: Old Lyme First Selectman Timothy Griswold has informed LymeLine.com that a new COVID-19 case has been confirmed in Old Lyme. He said that this new case was reported Sept. 15 and is a 19-year-old female.

Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) also confirmed a new case of COVID-19 in Lyme in their weekly report issued Friday, Sept. 18. This report covers cases by town for all the towns in the health district they cover. Both Lyme and Old Lyme are included in that district.

Ledge Light Health District has now confirmed that the new case in Lyme is a 62-year-old female.

Old Lyme now has a total of 27 cases including two fatalities while Lyme has a total of nine.

The number of surviving cases in Old Lyme ranges in age from 19- to 82-years-old and comprises 12 males and 13 females. The two fatalities were a 61-year-old female and an 82-year-old male.

The nine cases in Lyme comprise four females and five males ranging in age from one- to 68-years-old.

To demonstrate the growth in confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme, the table below is a summary of the cases that LymeLine.com has reported since March 31 when the first case was announced and also includes both fatalities.

DateCumulative no. of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Old Lyme
March 311
April 44
April 96
April 107
April 1510
April 1812
May 113
May 1515
May 2616
June 817
June 1018
June 1419
June 2221
June 2422
July 1722
July 2823
Sept. 224
Sept. 426
Sept. 1527
Oct. 128
Oct. 829
Oct. 1630
Oct. 1631
Oct. 1632

Details of all Old Lyme’s confirmed surviving cases to date are as follows:

  1. Female, age 64
  2. Female, age 21
  3. Male, age 27
  4. Female, age 53
  5. Female, age 61
  6. Female, age 29
  7. Male, age 40
  8. Male, age 53
  9. Female, age 60
  10. Male, age 45
  11. Female, age 20
  12. Female, age 43
  13. Female, age 48
  14. Male, age 70
  15. Male, age 67
  16. Female, age 68
  17. Male, age 50
  18. Male, age 21
  19. Female, age 48
  20. Female, age 34
  21. Male, age 20
  22. Male, age 28
  23. Male, age 74
  24. Male, age 61
  25. Female, age 19

Griswold has previously noted that the 21-year-old female with a confirmed case (#2 in the list immediately above) was tested in Florida, but used an Old Lyme address although she does not live here. Because she gave the Old Lyme address, Griswold said that LLHD must report her as an Old Lyme resident.

Gender and age details of the confirmed cases in Lyme to date are:

  1. Male, age 34
  2. Female, age 61
  3. Female, age 34
  4. Male, age 1
  5. Male, age 34
  6. Male, age 20
  7. Male, aged 68
  8. Female, age 21
  9. Female, age 62

Residents and businesses are urged to access up-to-date information regarding the pandemic from reputable sources including the Ledge Light Health District website (www.llhd.org), Facebook (@LedgeLightHD), Twitter (@LedgeLightHD), and Instagram (@LedgeLightHD).

Editor’s Note: Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) serves as the local health department in southeast Connecticut for the towns of Lyme and Old Lyme as well as East Lyme, Groton, Ledyard, New London, North Stonington,  Stonington and Waterford. As a health district, formed under Connecticut General Statutes Section 19a-241, LLHD is a special unit of government, allowing member municipalities to provide comprehensive public health services to residents in a more efficient manner by consolidating the services within one organization.

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