October 25, 2016

Literacy Volunteers Honor Volunteers with November Book Sale

Literacy Volunteers Valley Shore (LVVS) honors volunteers everywhere with its November book sale. Volunteers are eligible for free books.

You make it possible by purchasing one book at full price and receiving another one free. As a bonus, LVVS will donate a free book to any volunteer who visits during the month of November.

Stop in and see what LVVS is all about — come browse, or just say “Hi”.

The organization is located in the lower level of Westbrook Library,  61 Goodspeed Dr. off Rte. 1. The sale is open from Monday to Friday, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. and 1st and 3rd  Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Visit www.vsliteracy.org  or call 860-399-0280 for more information.

Finished with your book?  Consider donating it to LVVS — all books in good shape 2006 or newer are gratefully accepted.


Lyme-Old Lyme VFW to Distribute ‘Buddy Poppies’ During Next Two Weekends

buddy_poppiesVolunteers with the Lyme/Old Lyme Veterans of Foreign Wars (LOL VFW) Post 1467 will be distributing ‘Buddy Poppies’ during Fridays and Saturdays, Oct. 28-29 and Nov. 4-5, in honor of local veterans. Donations are greatly appreciated and are used 100 percent to assist and support veterans and their families.

The ‘Buddy Poppy’ was adopted as the official memorial flower of the Veterans of Foreign Wars in August 1922. Poppy fields in Belgium were the site of some of the battles in World War I, and the overturned soils allowed the seeds to grow again in the fields and serve as a reminder of the blood shed during the war.

In the past two years, the LOL VFW has helped reunite a homeless veteran from Old Lyme to live with  his daughter in Las Vegas, paid for heating oil to help an Air Force veteran get though the winter, paid rent for an veteran who was about to become homeless, and paid for car repairs along with many other cases of assistance.

This VFW Post may be small but its reach is far — no one does more for local veterans than the VFW.


Lyme-Old Lyme Junior Women Host New Member Social, Wednesday

LOLJWCAre you looking to connect with other women … or give back to your community … or just get out of the house now and then?

The Lyme-Old Lyme Junior Women’s Club (LOLJWC) is holding their annual New Member Social on Wednesday, Oct. 26, at the Otter Cove Restaurant from 7 to 9 p.m.  The invitation is open to all members, current and former, and especially prospective new members interested in finding out more about the organization and assisting club members in their fundraising endeavors throughout the community.

Members will be treated to complimentary food and beverages can be ordered from the bar.  During the evening, guests will learn about the exciting future the LOLJWC has planned for this year and beyond.

The restaurant is located at 99 Essex Rd., Old Saybrook.

For more information, visit loljwc.com


LYSB Hosts Mental Health First Aid Training Course, Friday

Someone you know could be experiencing a mental health challenge or crisis. You can help them. Take this course, save a life, strengthen your community.

Mental healthLymes’ Youth Service Bureau is offering a Mental Health First Aid Training course on Friday, Oct. 28, at LYSB at 59 Lyme St., Old Lyme.  The $50 admission charge includes breakfast, lunch, and materials.

More than 680,000 people across the United States have been trained in Mental Health First Aid.  This is an eight-hour course that teaches you how to identify, understand and respond to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders.

The training gives you the skills you need to reach out and provide initial help and support to someone who may be developing a mental health or substance use problem or experiencing a crisis.  Anyone can take this course.

Mental Health First Aiders learn to:

  • help someone through a panic attack
  • engage with someone who may be suicidal
  • support a person experiencing psychosis
  • help an individual with addictions.

People and groups that should consider taking the Mental Health First Aid course include:

  • All people and organizations that make up the fabric of our community
  • Parents
  • School personnel, nurses, educators
  • Anyone who works the public
  • First responders
  • Friends and family of individuals with mental health challenges or addiction
  • General public

Participants will receive a MHFA Certificate – 8 CEUs available.

Register for the course at www.lysb.org  For further information, call 860-434-7208.

This course is sponsored by Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau and the Child & Family Agency of Southeastern Connecticut


State Senate Candidate Norm Needleman Endorsed by Women’s Health Groups

Yesterday, Norm Needleman announced the endorsements of women’s health groups Planned Parenthood Votes! Connecticut PAC and NARAL Pro-Choice Connecticut PAC in his State Senate campaign in the 33rd District.

Planned Parenthood Votes! Connecticut PAC (PPV!CT PAC) is committed to supporting and endorsing pro-reproductive rights, pro-family planning candidates for state office. Needleman was endorsed along with other candidates for Connecticut state races.

“We are very proud to endorse candidates who are committed to protecting reproductive health care,” said Chris Corcoran, PPV!CT PAC Board Chair. “The candidates we endorsed drive policy on women’s health care. Connecticut women and families should know that these candidates would ensure vital services remain intact.”

“States are the front lines in protecting women’s health and the right to choose,” said Needleman. “In the State Senate I will be an advocate for reproductive rights and access to women’s health care services. I will fight against the extremist elements that have worked their way into Hartford politics.”

NARAL Pro-Choice Connecticut PAC’s mission is to develop and sustain a constituency that uses the political process to guarantee every woman the right to make personal decisions regarding the full range of reproductive choices, including preventing unintended pregnancy, bearing healthy children, and choosing legal abortion.

“We are excited about your support for women, and look forward to your involvement in working to make Connecticut the best state in the nation for reproductive rights,” said Jillian Gilchrest, President, NARAL Pro-Choice Connecticut PAC.

Needleman is challenging incumbent State Senator Art Linares who has earned the endorsement of an extreme organization – the Family Institute – in 2012, 2014 and 2016 for his opposition to common sense women’s health and reproductive rights.

PPV!CT PAC is the Connecticut state political action committee affiliated with Planned Parenthood Votes! Connecticut (PPV!CT). PPV!CT is the advocacy and political arm of Planned Parenthood of Southern New England (PPSNE).

“These candidates support reproductive health, rights and access,” said Susan Yolen, PPV!CT PAC board member and Vice President of Public Policy and Advocacy with PPV!CT. “We are confident each of these candidates will work to preserve and expand  access to full reproductive health care services for the people of Connecticut.”

Needleman is the founder and CEO of Tower Laboratories, a manufacturing business. As CEO, he has built the business over the past 37 years to become a leader in its segment, employing 150 people at facilities in Essex and Clinton. Needleman is in his third term as first selectman of Essex and was first elected as a selectman in 2003.

He is the Democratic candidate for the 33rd State Senate District, which consists of the Town of Lyme along with Chester, Clinton, Colchester, Deep River, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Portland, Westbrook, and part of Old Saybrook.

For more information on Planned Parenthood Votes! Connecticut, visit www.plannedparenthoodvotes.org.

For more information on NARAL Pro-Choice Connecticut PAC, visit www.prochoicect.org.

For more information on Needleman’s campaign, visit www.norm.vote.


Republican State Sen. Linares, Democratic Challenger Needleman Spar in 33rd Senate District Debate

A view of the debate stage from the rear of the Valley Regional High School auditorium

A view of the debate stage from the rear of the Valley Regional High School auditorium

Republican State Senator Art Linares of Westbrook and his Democratic challenger, Essex First Selectman Norman Needleman, sparred Monday in a public debate for the 33rd Senate District contest.

More than 150 voters from the 12 district towns turned out for the 90-minute debate held in the auditorium at Valley Regional High School in Deep River, with the question of which candidate represents the “political class” in Connecticut overshadowing the specific issues where the candidates differed, or nearly as often, concurred.

The session was moderated by Essex Library Director Richard Conroy, who selected questions that had been submitted in advance by district voters.

The debate began with a walk-out by Green Party candidate Colin Bennett of Westbrook. Bennett, who has run previously for the seat and participated in all debates during the 2014 campaign, began with an opening statement where he said his goals are to end hunger, provide access to health care, protect the environment and affirm that black lives matter.

Bennett then claimed that Conroy had attempted to exclude him from the debate based on comments at an Oct. 5 debate in Westbrook where he criticized Needleman and urged people not supporting him to vote for Linares. “I don’t want to be where I am not wanted,” Bennett said before walking off the stage. Linares said later he had told Conroy he would not participate in the debate if Bennett was arbitrarily excluded from the outset.

The term political class entered the discussion soon after the opening statement from Needleman, where the three-term first selectman said he had been urged to run the seat this year by the Senate Democratic leadership because they wanted a candidate with experience in business and municipal government. Needleman said he told party leaders he would not be a rubber stamp, and could become their “worst nightmare,” if elected.

Linares, who was first elected in 2012 and re-elected in 2014, scoffed at the claim, questioning why the Senate leadership would provide Needleman with a full-time campaign manager on leave from the caucus staff if they believed his election would be a nightmare. Linares contended Needleman has been a loyal supporter of Democratic “Governor Dan Malloy and the political class,” contributing funds to Malloy’s two gubernatorial campaigns in 2010 and 2014.

Needleman said Linares is the “career politician,” running for the senate seat at age 23 and laying the groundwork for a future campaign for the 2nd District congressional seat or statewide office.

But despite the sharp exchange, the two rivals agreed on several issues, including support for recently approved incentive package for Sikorsky in Stratford, providing some degree of contract preferences for in-state companies, and reducing, or for Linares eliminating, the estate or inheritance tax. The candidates agreed state employee unions would have to make contract concessions on both wages and pensions if the state faces another large budget deficit in 2017.

From left to right, Norman Needleman (D), incumbent Sen. Art Linares (R) and Colin Bennett (Green Party) make their opening statements at Monday night's debate.

From left to right, Norman Needleman (D), incumbent Sen. Art Linares (R) and Colin Bennett (Green Party) make their opening statements at Monday night’s debate.

Needleman said his experience negotiating contracts with public employee unions in Essex would be helpful in any discussions with state employee unions, though he questioned whether unions could be forced into concession talks. Linares called for mandatory legislative votes on all union contracts, and suggested a need for “additional leverage” to bring unions to the table. “The unions have not come to the table, we’ve tried that, everyone has tried that,” he said.

The candidates differed somewhat on the question of welcoming refugees from war-torn Syria to Connecticut. Needleman said while “vetting is critical,” an arbitrary exclusion based on a refugee’s country of origin or religion is “un-American.” Linares, whose family fled Cuba in the early 1960s, said he would insist on “clearance from the FBI,” because the United States does not have intelligence capabilities in Syria to screen refugees, including those who reach Europe before possible entry in to the United States.

The candidates also differed on possible increases to the state minimum wage, and gun control measures. Needleman said he supports measured increases in the minimum wage, but believes a hike to $15 per hour, as advocated by some Democrats, “is a very bad idea.’ Linares said he favors a national standard for the minimum wage, suggesting that further increases at the state level would hurt small businesses and cost the state jobs. He said the earned income tax credit is a better way to provide assistance to low income workers.

On gun control, Needleman said he is a “2nd Amendment Democrat,” but favors some additional gun control measures. He criticized Linares for opposing legislation approved earlier this year that allows guns to be seized from persons who are subject to a court restraining order where domestic violence is a factor.

Linares said Needleman is “trying to take both sides of the issue,” by referring to gun ownership and the 2nd Amendment. Linares said he opposed the temporary restraining order gun bill because it was an “overreach” that takes away due process for gun owners, and discretion for judges.

The 33rd Senate District includes the Town of Lyme along with Chester, Clinton, Colchester, Deep River, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Portland, Westbrook, and portions of Old Saybrook.

Full Steam Ahead! Cappella Cantorum Hosts Wine & Beer Tasting Fundraiser, 10/29

screen-shot-2016-10-07-at-11-19-30-pmAREAWIDE — Help Cappella Cantorum propel into 50 years of tradition with this new, exciting fundraiser slated for Saturday, Oct. 29, from 6 to 9 p.m.

Enjoy tastes of wines and beers from local and regional sources, as well as delicious hors d’oeuvres and a pasta station, while you peruse lots of great silent auction items, including artwork, many gift certificates to local merchants and some surprise items! 

Live entertainment will also be provided by Cappella’s own Hilltop Four Barber Shop Quartet.

The event is in the River Valley Junction building at the Essex Steam Train, where you will be enveloped by the delightfully preserved, historical space.

Tickets are $40 per person and can be purchased at the door the night of the event. Tell your friends and family.

All proceeds benefit Cappella Cantorum, a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization that is celebrating its 47th year of tradition in the upcoming 2016-2017 concert season, Moving Full Steam Ahead! Into Our Next Half Century of Cappella Cantorum.

For questions and more information, call 860-526-1038 and visit www.cappellacantorum.org.

Cappella Cantorum is the lower Connecticut River Valley and Shoreline’s premiere non-auditioned community choral organization whose primary purpose is to learn, perform and enjoy great choral music while striving for excellence and the enrichment of its singers and audience.

Cappella Cantorum continues because of the support of area businesses and professional people through program advertising; by generous sponsors, our concert audiences, members through dues and hard work, and through the dedication of Music Director Barry Asch, Assistant Music Director Deborah Lyon, and the efforts of the volunteer Board of Directors.


Town of Old Lyme Offers Part-time Land Steward Opportunity

The Town of Old Lyme is seeking a part-time individual to maintain and manage the trail systems on its major preserves. Keeping trails cleared, maintaining markers, kiosks, entrances, parking areas, and managing for wildlife and other natural resources are the priorities.

For more information, visit the job posting on the home page of the Town’s web page at http://www.oldlyme-ct.gov/Pages/index.

To learn about the Open Space Commission and the properties it manages, visit http://www.oldlyme-ct.gov/Pages/OldLymeCT_Bcomm/open_space


Recycling in Old Lyme: Getting Rid of Mattresses

LymeLine.com is pleased to be publishing a series of articles written by Old Lyme’s Solid Waste & Recycling Committee that lay out best recycling practices.  To date, the committee’s articles have covered Old Lyme’s curbside trash and recycling programs; the safe disposal of medications; and paint recycling.  This article covers the recycling of mattresses and box springs.

The International Sleep Products Association (ISPA), which is the trade association for the mattress industry, estimates that 35 to 40 million new mattresses and box springs are sold in the United States every year, and at least 15 to 20 million are discarded.

Unfortunately, mattresses are really hard to throw out; there is just no easy way to dispose of them.  They are difficult to land-fill because they can’t be easily compressed and crushed; they pose challenges for incinerators.

So, disposal of mattresses and box springs at the end of their useful life was difficult for towns to manage. Hartford estimated that mattress disposal cost that city about $400,000 in 2010.  Consequently, they are often illegally dumped and found on vacant lots and roadsides.  As a matter of fact, there was a mattress lawn ornament right here in Old Lyme on Rte. 156. It was only recently removed after gracing our roadside for several months. (Thanks, neighbor!)

Connecticut passed comprehensive mattress stewardship legislation in 2013 (the first state to do so.)  Similar to paint, the law requires mattress manufacturers to establish programs to manage unwanted mattresses and box springs; and, like paint, a fee is assessed at the point of sale to fund the program.  California and Rhode Island have since passed similar mattress stewardship laws.

The Mattress Recycling Council (MRC) was formed by ISPA to operate recycling programs in the states that have such laws. Connecticut’s program launched in May, 2015.  “Bye Bye Mattress” (really!) is the recycling program established by MRC. They provide haulers that pick up and transport mattresses and box springs from drop-off sites to recycling centers. Our local drop-off site is Old Lyme’s transfer station.  There are currently mattress recycling facilities in East Hartford and Bridgeport; ours extends to East Hartford.  Mattresses get recycled through the state’s recycling program regardless of when they were purchased.  Note that most mattress retailers will remove your old mattress on delivery of new.

The industry estimates that nearly 90 percent of used mattress and box springs’ components can be recycled — the metal springs, foam, wood and fibers — and made into new useful products.

Before putting this topic to rest, it’s worthwhile to mention the issue of bed bugs. Infested mattresses require special handling.  If you have concerns regarding bed bugs you can find information and guidance from Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection at http://www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view.asp?a=2714&q=482160&deepNav_GID=1645%20#BedBugs or the Connecticut Coalition Against Bed Bugs at http://www.ct.gov/caes/cwp/view.asp?a=2826&q=437580.

Our next few articles will cover the proper recycling of electronics, tires, and bulky items like appliances and furniture.

If you have questions or comments, contact Leslie O’Connor at alete1@sbcglobal.net or Tom Gotowka at TDGotowka@aol.com.


Artist Jan Dilenschneider Featured in Exhibition at Lyme Academy

"Trees with broken color" by Jan Dilenschneider

“Trees with broken color” by Jan Dilenschneider is a signature painting from the exhibition opening today at the Sill House Gallery in Old Lyme.

Artist Jan Dilenschneider, just back to the U.S. from acclaimed exhibitions in Paris and Monaco, will exhibit upwards of 20 recent works in a major exhibition in the Sill House galleries on the Old Lyme campus of Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts of the University of New Haven.

The exhibition, “The 4th Dimension,” will open on Friday, Oct. 7, with a reception with the artist from 5 to 7 p.m. and is part of Lyme Academy College’s Center for Arts Programming fall events. The exhibition, in the 1817 federal-style Sill House, will be on view through Nov. 12. Gallery hours are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The exhibition is free and open to the public.

“We at Lyme Academy College are very proud to be exhibiting Jan’s exquisite paintings,” said Todd Jokl, campus dean. “Her sensitivity to the lushness, the colors and movements, of the landscape at a certain moment both reminds us of those great painters who first memorialized the Old Lyme area and also looks beyond the moment she captures so imaginatively to the timeless qualities of light and color.”

A classic work by Jan Dilenschneider.

A classic work by Jan Dilenschneider.

In Paris and Monaco, Dilenschneider’s landscape paintings met with critical acclaim. She was the only living American artist who had her work displayed at the recent European Art Fair – Monaco. Marguerite d’Aprile, director of the Center for Arts Programming at Lyme Academy College, noted, “We are quite honored and pleased to host an artist with such an extensive international exhibition record. Ms. Dilenschneider’s paintings, in both subject and color, breathe life into her landscape canvases.”

In an ideal marriage of art and place, Dilenschneider’s vibrant landscape paintings, inspired by a passionate confluence of impressionist and expressionist styles, speak precisely to the Old Lyme landscape that gave birth to American Impressionism.

This idyllic setting is as appealing to artists today as it was when viewed over a century ago by Barbizon School painter Henry Ward Ranger, who called it a “landscape waiting to be painted.” The landscape of Long Island Sound outside her studio windows in Darien, Conn., has provided a similar inspiration for Dilenschneider’s work.

Dilenschneider will also be giving a gallery talk at the exhibition site on Thursday, Oct. 27 (reception 6 p.m. to 7 pm; lecture at 7 p.m.).  The talk is open to the public ($15 per person) and seating is limited. Reservations must be made by contacting Kristen Brady at 860 434 3571 ext. 121kbrady@lymefs.newhaven.edu.

The exhibition and gallery talk are highlights of the fall schedule of the Center for Arts Programming. For more information about the fall schedule of classes, lectures, film screenings and special exhibitions, visit http://www.lymeacademy.edu/index.php/community-engagement.

Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts is a college of the University of New Haven.  Its mission is to educate aspiring artists through a rigorous studio curriculum rooted in figurative and representational art.  The college offers a comprehensive liberal arts education essential for advanced critical and creative thought.  For more information, visit: http://lymeacademy.edu/



Nancy Larson Foundation Opens Applications for 2016 Education Scholarships

The Nancy Larson Foundation is currently accepting applications from college upperclassmen and graduate students preparing to be elementary school teachers.

The Nancy Larson Foundation, which is headquartered in Old Lyme, is dedicated to helping promising students majoring in elementary education.

Since its inception in 2006, the Foundation has awarded more than 50 scholarships to students across the country.

Eachyear the Foundation awards at least five $1,000 scholarships to deserving college students who excel in the classroom and their communities.

Nancy Larson is the author of two nationally successful curriculum programs: Nancy Larson® Science K–4 and Saxon Math K-4.

She feels that it is critical to support the development of young teachers who shape children’s minds and better position our country to become a leader in science and math.

“We want to provide a helping hand to aspiring teachers who have worked hard to position
themselves for anoutstanding career,’’ said Larson. “The Foundation works to positively affect the quality of education forthousands of students taught over the lifetime of our Nancy Larson Foundation Scholars.” Juniors, seniors, and graduate students who have declared an elementary education major are invited to apply.

They should submit a personal narrative about why they want to teach and what will make them excellent teachers.

Applicants are also asked to include community service activities as well as experiences they have had working with children. Applications are accepted from Oct.1 through Nov. 15, 2016. Applications must be completed in full and postmarked by Nov. 15 to be considered.

Scholarship recipients will be notified by Dec. 31, 2016.

Larson, a former teacher and curriculum director, has dedicated her life to advancing elementary education. Her original Saxon Math K–4 program  was developed because teachers needed a classroom-­tested math program that would prepare children for advanced math classes. In recent years, Nancy has used the same approach to develop Nancy Larson Science for kindergarten through fourth grade students.

The program was written to provide in ­depth science content in an easy-to-­teach format.

To learn more about the Nancy Larson Foundation and this scholarship opportunity, visit http://nancylarsonfoundation.org.

The Nancy Larson Foundation, founded in Old Lyme, CT, has a history of 10 years awarding prospectiveelementary educators scholarships to encourage and support their education. The Nancy Larson Foundation awards scholarships to the top entries.

For entry deadlines and requirements, or more information on the Foundation, visit http://nancylarsonfoundation.org.


Buy a Pie! Lyme-Old Lyme Class of 2017 Parents Host Safe Grad Pie Sale

pie-clip-art-pie_cherry_desserts_2929pxParents of theLyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) Class of 2017 are now taking orders for fresh pies, tea breads and cookie dough from Bishop’s Orchards in Guilford, Connecticut.

Deadline for orders is Nov. 8 for Nov. 18 delivery — just in time for the holidays!  Check out the Safe Grad website which has a link to the order form

There is a great tradition in Lyme-Old Lyme that for many years, parents of the LOLHS senior class have hosted an all-night “Safe Graduation Party” for the senior class. The goal is to provide a safe, substance free party in a “secret location” where students have the opportunity to share food, music, entertainment and memories with their classmates. For as long as these parties have been provided for our seniors, the community has enjoyed trouble-free graduation nights.

While the party is hosted entirely by parents of seniors, it takes a community effort to help our children remain safe and supervised while celebrating this wonderful milestone. Funding for the party comes entirely from fundraisers, donations from local businesses, organizations, parent and individual contributions.

Although LOLHS and the Regional School District 18 Board of Education support this event, they do not contribute any financial support. The parent organizers rely on fundraisers and donations from parents of seniors and the community to make this event a success.


Groundbreaking Ceremony Celebrates Start of Long-Anticipated Sound View Improvement Project

From left to right, Sound View Improvement Committee members Bonnie Reemsnyder, Frank Pappalardo, Jim Lampos, and MaryJo Nosal dig a ceremonial shovel in the sand at the groundbreaking on Hartford Ave. held Oct. 3.

From left to right, Sound View Improvement Committee members Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder, Sound View Commission Chairman and SVIC member Frank Pappalardo, SVIC members Angelo Faenza, Jim Lampos and Rob Haramut (from RiverCOG), and Old Lyme Selectmen Mary Jo Nosal and Skip Sibley dig a ceremonial shovel in the sand at the groundbreaking on Hartford Ave. held Oct. 3.

The sun shone brightly as town officials, Sound View Improvements Committee (SVIC) members, design and construction personnel and a handful of Sound View residents cheerfully gathered at the flagpole at the foot of Hartford Ave. for a groundbreaking ceremony to celebrate the start of construction on the long-awaited project to upgrade the street.

Old Lyme residents originally approved $877,000 for the project back in July of this year but this past Tuesday (Sept. 27) increased the amount approved to $911,100 to allow for the bids having come in higher than expected. The improvements comprise the reinstatement of horizontal parking on Hartford Avenue, sidewalks expanded from 3 ft. to 6 ft., lighting, plantings, bike racks and the addition of curbs and bump-outs.

A view up Hartford Ave. looking north prior to the start of the project.

A view up Hartford Ave. looking north prior to the start of the project.

The town expects to receive 80 percent reimbursement on the current project and is still exploring ways to fund the reinstatement of a park (named Sound View Green) and upgraded restrooms, which were originally included in the plan but have both now been removed due to budget overruns.

Construction is scheduled to start Monday, Oct. 10.

Construction is scheduled to start Monday, Oct. 10.

Asked how she felt now that the start of construction is finally imminent, Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder, who also served on the SVIC, responded enthusiastically, “I’m delighted and can’t wait to see everything accomplished.  It’s going to be wonderful and also a great place to walk.”  She commented, “People have been talking about this since I became a Selectwoman in 2003,” adding, “For decades, we’ve talked about this [Sound View] being a ‘diamond in the rough.’ People are tired of talking about it – they want to see some action.”

The theme that the groundbreaking represented the culmination of years of work by many people was echoed repeatedly with Sound View Commission Chairman and SVIC member Frank Pappalardo saying, “It’s been a long time coming … it’s tremendous that we’re actually starting the project.”  He noted that the project represented, “A lot of hard work by a lot of dedicated people.”

From left to right,Ken Golden from B&W Paving and Landscaping, Sound View Commission Chairman and SVIC member Frank Pappalardo, Old Lyme Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal, Kurt Prochorena Principal and Civil Engineer from the engineering design firm The BSC Group, Stuart Greacen and Ed Steward from WMC-the project inspection firm.

The design and construction project personnel gathered for a photo, from left to right,Ken Golden from B&W Paving and Landscaping, Old Lyme Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal, Kurt Prochorena, Principal and Civil Engineer from the engineering design BSC Group, and Stuart Greacen and Ed Steward from WMC, the project inspection firm.

The project’s designer was the BSC Group of Glastonbury, Conn., and its principal Kurt Prochorena, a civil engineer, also noted the evolution of the project had taken a long time but pointed out, “It’s going to really improve the character of the area.”

Recalling that the eight-member SVIC had started meeting every two weeks back in 2014, SVIC Chairman and Old Lyme Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal said, “I am extremely gratified by all the efforts of the [SVIC] committee, the Sound View Commission, residents, town officials and the BSC Group, who have brought this project to fruition. It’s hopefully the start of other great things in this area.”

Sound View residents (from left to right) Frank and Patty Pappalardo, Shirley Annunziata and Joann Lishing are all smiles at the conclusion of the groundbreaking ceremony.

Sound View residents (from left to right) Frank and Patty Pappalardo, Shirley Annunziata and Joann Lishing are all smiles at the conclusion of the groundbreaking ceremony.

Sound View residents Shirley Annunziata and Joann Lishing, who have both lived in Sound View for many years, were on hand to enjoy the celebrations.  Annunziata mentioned that her family has owned in property in Sound View for some 95 years and was the first of Italian descent to buy in the area. Lishing repeated the much used phrase of the day, “This has been a long time coming,” before noting with a broad smile, “I’m so excited. It’s going to be beautiful!”



Old Lyme Registrars Hold Voter Registration Session Today

The Old Lyme Registrars of Voters, Sylvia Peterson (D) and Don Tapper (R), will hold a Voter Registration Session Tuesday, Oct. 4, from 10 a.m. to 4p.m. in their office at Old Lyme’s Memorial Town Hall. The purpose of this session will be to complete the Preliminary Registry List for the upcoming Nov. 8 Presidential Election.

Normal office hours for the registrars are Monday 1 to 4 p.m.

People can register to vote Monday through Friday in the Town Clerk’s office if Registrars are not available.
Absentee ballots are available through the Town Clerk’s office, not through the Registrars. For more information, call the Town Clerk at 434-1605, ext. 221

There are two special voter-making sessions before each election: the third Saturday in October from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., and the Tuesday one week before the election from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. This is the last day a person can register and be able to vote in the election.

The only people who can register and be eligible to vote in the election after that date are those turning eighteen, becoming U.S. citizens, and those who have just moved into town.

For more voter registration information, call (860) 434-1605 x 226 or email registrars@oldlyme-ct.gov


Rockfall Foundation Expands Grant Opportunity to Lyme, Old Lyme

logoThe Rockfall Foundation has announced the expansion of its environmental grants program to include non-profit organizations, schools, and municipal departments in the towns of Lyme and Old Lyme.

The Foundation will consider proposals that contribute to the general environmental education of youth and the public, promote environmental planning, contribute to the preservation of the Connecticut River watershed, or fund an internship with a non-profit organization for an environmental project. Special consideration will be given to projects that benefit pre-K through college-age students or are multi-generational.

Grant awards generally range from $500 to $15,000.  Proposals must have ties to the Lower Connecticut River Valley in order to be considered.  This includes projects or programs based in Chester, Clinton, Cromwell, Deep River, Durham, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Killingworth, Lyme, Middlefield, Middletown, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook, Portland, and Westbrook.

Projects that focus on the Connecticut River corridor or Long Island Sound will also be considered as long as there is a demonstrated impact on the area towns.  The application deadline is 12 pm on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016.

Visit www.rockfallfoundation.org for guidelines and the application form. Awards will be announced and funds distributed early in 2017. Questions may be directed to Tony Marino, Associate Director, attmarino@rockfallfoundation.org or 860-347-0340.

The Rockfall Foundation supports environmental education, conservation programs and planning initiatives in the Lower Connecticut River Valley. Established in 1935, it is one of Connecticut’s oldest environmental organizations whose mission is to be a catalyst– bringing people together and supporting organizations to conserve and enhance the county’s natural environment. Rockfall awards grants each year to organizations, schools and municipalities, and sponsors educational programs and symposia.


Old Lyme’s Shelley Gregory Walks for 10th Year in Terri Brodeur Breast Cancer Foundation’s ‘Walk Across SE CT’

Shelley Gregory takes a well-deserved break from her training for today's 26.2 mile TBBCF walk.

Shelley Gregory takes a well-deserved break from her training for today’s 26.2 mile TBBCF walk.

On Oct. 1, Shelley Gregory of Old Lyme is walking in the 11th annual Terri Brodeur Breast Cancer Foundation’s (TBBCF) ‘Walk Across Southeastern Connecticut.’  Not only is this the 10th year that Shelley will have completed the full 26.2 mile TBBCF walk, but — on a personal basis — it is also her 8th year cancer-free!

If you would like to contribute to Shelley’s fund-raising goal for this year, then click here.  Shelley was honored this past spring by the TBBCF for her incredible fund-raising efforts over the past 10 years.

Congratulations … and Go, Shelley, Go!

The Terri Brodeur Breast Cancer Foundation has funded over $3M in breast cancer research (30 grants of $100,000 each), while raising funds, hopes and dreams for a breast cancer-free future.

The TBBCF is a local non-profit dedicated to providing critical funding to breast cancer research. Their pledge is that 100 percent of gross fundraising dollars goes directly to breast cancer research in the scientific pursuit of medicines and techniques that mitigate cancer treatment and promote disease eradication. Administrative costs are sponsor-supported or volunteer-provided.

Shelley Gregory (right) is often joined by friends on her fundraising walk -- and will be again this year. Julie Edmundsen stand to Shelley's left after completing the walk last year.

Shelley Gregory (right) is often joined by friends on her fundraising walk — and will be again this year. Julie Edmundson stand to Shelley’s left after completing the walk last year.

The organization’s name was chosen to honor the beautiful life and fighting spirit of Terri Brodeur, a local Old Saybrook mother of three young children and victim of breast cancer. The Foundation was established by two friends, Norma Logan and Sandy Maniscalco, who realized the need for a new kind of fundraising organization. After a two-year battle with breast cancer, Brodeur succumbed to the disease in 2005, as did Logan six months later.

Participants take to the streets in the 2014 Walk Across SE CT.

Participants take to the streets in the 2014 Walk Across SE CT.

It is estimated that there will be more than 3,000 cases of breast cancer diagnosed in Connecticut in 2015 and that almost 500 will die from the disease. By walking in the 11th Anniversary Walk Across Southeastern Connecticut, funding of breast cancer research will increase bringing with it with hopes for earlier detection, better treatments and ultimately prevention of this disease.

Friends often form a team in the walk Across SE CT.

Friends often form a team in the walk Across SE CT.

The 11th Anniversary Walk provides a marathon option to suit everyone’s level of ability.

Walks include a seven-mile super quarter marathon, a 13.1 mile half marathon and our signature 26.2 mile full marathon. The full marathon walk begins with 6:30 a.m. opening ceremonies at Saybrook Point, Old Saybrook, with feet on the pavement at 7 a.m.

TBBCF_walk_logo_203This walk follows a scenic route along the shoreline through Old Saybrook, Old Lyme, East Lyme and Waterford. The half marathon walk starts at Capitol Drive, East Lyme at 10 a.m. and the super quarter marathon walk starts at the Niantic Baptist Church, Niantic at 1 p.m. All walks end at the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center, Waterford with closing ceremonies.

The Walk goal is to raise funds for research through walker fundraising commitments. Youth walkers must raise $100 to walk any marathon option. Adult walkers must raise $200 for a super quarter marathon, $250 for a half marathon and $500 for a full marathon.

To register to walk or volunteer, or to contribute to a registered walker, visit www.tbbcf.org, call 860-437-1400 or email info@tbbcf.org.

Funding has assisted researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Yale Cancer Center, the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, and NYU School of Medicine.


Old Lyme Residents Approve Additional Funds for Sound View Project by 26 Votes; Joining Ledge Light Health District by Just Three Votes

Tonight Old Lyme voters approved additional funds for the  Sound View project by 102 to 74 votes. They also approved the town joining the Ledge Light Health District by just three votes, 82-79.


Essex First Selectman Opposes State Takeover of Local Health Departments, Denounces New Cost to Small Towns; Lyme First Selectman Eno Agrees

The following is a press release from Norm Needleman’s campaign office that we received this morning:

Today, State Senate candidate and local businessman Norm Needleman spoke out against the yet-to-be-announced state takeover of local health departments. Needleman opposes the top-down, behind-the-scenes process which includes the elimination of local health departments, the loss of local control, and increased cost to towns in what amounts to a regional property tax.

The draft changes in Connecticut state statutes were distributed to town Health Directors as “draft Local Health Consolidation Statutes” by the Commissioner of Connecticut Department of Public Health Raul Pino.

“This secret state takeover plan is yet another example of the state barreling down the wrong path without input from towns,” said Needleman. “Forced regionalization is terrible policy and causes more unnecessary over-regulation of towns without any proven cost savings. This is a canary in the coal mine for more state and county control.”

Lyme Republican First Selectman Ralph Eno agreed with Needleman.

“I appreciate Norm’s attention to this key issue,” said Eno. “I agree with his position that this is an administrative overreach without any kind of formal hearing process. This is part of what is wrong with state government.”

The changes propose eliminating local health departments and consolidating them under one board and director for each county.

“In Essex we have an efficient and effective Health Department,” said Needleman. “In what world does it make any sense to turn a well managed town office over to the mess in Hartford?”

In addition, the changes propose that each town pay 1.5% of their budget to the new county health department. The draft legislation states: “towns, cities and boroughs of such district appropriate for the maintenance of the health district not less than one and one half percent of their previous fiscal year’s annual operating budgets.”

“As First Selectman of Essex I have kept our Health Department well under 1.5% of our annual town budget with a professionally managed team,” said Needleman. “This proposal will cost more for towns all across the region and amounts to a county tax. If elected State Senator I will fight foolish state overreach like this takeover.”

“The cost is a percentage of the town budget,” said Eno. “So this is a regional property tax to feed the state bureaucracy. Thanks to Norm for being out ahead on this issue and looking forward to his leadership in the State Senate.”

Norm Needleman is the founder and CEO of Tower Laboratories, a manufacturing business. As CEO, he has built the business over the past 37 years to become a leader in its segment, employing over 225 people. Needleman is in his 3rd term as First Selectman of Essex and was first elected as a Selectman in 2003.

“Norm understands the importance of local control as an experienced town leader,” said Campaign Manager Kevin Coughlin. “That is why he has been endorsed by both Republican and Democratic First Selectmen right here in the 33rd district.”

Needleman is the Democratic candidate for the 33rd State Senate District which consists of the towns of Chester, Clinton, Colchester, Deep River, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Lyme, Portland, Westbrook, and part of Old Saybrook.


Old Lyme Debate Sees Linares, Needleman Disagree Sharply on Some Issues, Agree on Others

Norm Needleman (left) and Art Linares

Essex First Selectman Norm Needleman (left) and Sen. Art Linares answered questions on a variety of topics in last night’s debate.

The candidates vying for the 33rd State Senate District seat met last night in front of a relatively small audience of around 75 in the somewhat rarefied atmosphere of Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS).  Rarefied because not a single resident of Old Lyme can vote for either candidate since Old Lyme is part of the 20th State Senate District currently represented by Republican Paul Formica.

Nevertheless, The Day and the Eastern CT Chamber of Commerce selected LOLHS as the location for the first debate of the season in the high profile 33rd State Senate race.  Two-term incumbent Sen. Art Linares (R) faced off against challenger Norman Needleman (D), who is in his third term as first selectman of Essex, in a gentlemanly debate conducted entirely from seated positions.

Linares was first elected in 2012 to the 33rd State Senate District seat, which was held for two decades by the late former State Senator Eileen Daily of Westbrook. He won a second term in 2014, defeating Democrat Emily Bjornberg of Lyme on a 22,762-17,326 vote. Needleman was first elected as an Essex Selectman in 2003


The Day’s Editorial Page editor Paul Choiniere (center in photo above) moderated the debate assisted by retired Day Deputy Managing  Editor Lisa McGinley and Day Staff Writer Brian Hallenback.

The constant theme of both candidates’ responses was the need for the state to control spending and to increase jobs, but they expressed different routes towards achieving that goal interspersed with regular jabs against their respective opponent.


Linares, pictured above, opened the latter theme by saying, “Desperate people do desperate things,” when asked about charges from Needleman that he (Linares) had used constituent names and addresses inappropriately.  Linares said, “They [his opponents] want us to focus on desperate things,” rather than the state’s real problems such as, “Every day we have businesses leaving the state,” declaring emphatically, “I am ready to stand up and fight for you.”

A question about whether the candidates supported the Citizen’s Election Program (CEP) drew one of the most heated exchanges with Linares saying candidates should be encouraged to fund their own election campaigns because, “the CEP is running a deficit year after year.”  Needleman responded immediately, “That’s an absurd and ridiculous statement,” adding that the CEP has proved to be a “leveling-field.”

The issue of a third casino in Connecticut also showed a sharp difference in the candidate’s positions with Linares supporting the proposal in order to “intercept tourists on their way to [the new MGM casino in] Massachusetts,” which he predicted would otherwise take potentially up to $100 million out of state.  Needleman said unequivocally, “I would not support the expansion of casinos in Connecticut.”

Responding to a question about Linares’s March 2016 vote against a measure to reduce the state’s budget deficit, Needleman declared, “That vote pushed me over the edge to run,” and that he was “perplexed,” when he had determined that Linares was one of the three senators who had voted against the proposal.  Linares countered that he had, “stood up against that budget because I knew the next day it would be in deficit,” adding, “We didn’t make the kinds of structural change needed,” concluding firmly, “I’m proud that I stood up against Dan Malloy’s budget.”


Needleman, pictured above, then accused Linares of being something Needleman confessed he had been described as himself when much younger by a teacher, namely, “A master of the obvious.” Needleman agreed, “We all know now we need structural reform,” but argued, “That stand needed to be taken,” long before the actual vote.

The candidates were in relative harmony regarding the recent Connecticut Supreme Court ruling that education funding needs to be more equitable, both agreeing, in Linares’s words, “The legislature must find a fair and concise way to fund education,” and, in Needleman’s, “The judge should not legislate from the bench.”

Similarly, Needleman and Linares found common ground on the subject of how the state should improve its fiscal position with the former saying that the state needed to “control spending and increase jobs,” while the latter added, “… and end wasteful spending.”

Asked which Presidential candidate they were voting for, Needleman mentioned first, “I’ve never seen an election like this one,” then said, “I support Hilary Clinton … albeit at times, reluctantly.” In turn, Linares stated, “I’m voting for Donald Trump,” adding, “I’m voting Republican down the line this year,” commenting, “Our country and our state needs to change direction.”


The candidates responded to several further questions including ones about the ease with which the state can sell or swap state-owned land, how the state should create jobs and the state’s response to the opioid crisis.

In his closing statement, Linares said his goal was, “to take Connecticut to the top again,” since under six year of Malloy’s leadership, “”I have seen the state move backwards.”  He explained that Connecticut Republicans have a plan to achieve that objective called, “A Confident Future,” and urged the audience to review it.

Taking his turn, Needleman said, “I started as a cab driver in New York – I have paid my dues,” adding, “Relationships mean everything to me. I am always telling the truth and not reverting to scripted talking points.” He concluded, “Glory has no role for me.”

Norm Needleman had a significant crowd of supporters, who stood outside the High School prior to the debate.

Norm Needleman had a significant crowd of supporters, who stood outside the High School prior to the debate.

Editor’s Note: The 33rd State Senate District consists of the Town of Lyme along with the Towns of Chester, Clinton, Colchester, Deep River, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Portland, Westbrook, and part of Old Saybrook.


‘Bound for the Sound’ Road Race Benefits Lyme-Old Lyme Education Foundation

And they're off! Runners participating in last year's 10K start the race.

And they’re off! Runners participating in last year’s 10K take their first steps in the race.

The Lyme–Old Lyme Education Foundation’s (LOLEF) 5th annual Bound for the Sound Road Race takes place next Saturday, Sept. 24, starting at 8 a.m., on Hartford Ave., in the Sound View area of Old Lyme.

Runners can choose between a 10K or 5K course, or a one-mile Fun Run. The course travels through the scenic, easy terrain of South Lyme. All proceeds from the race benefit the Foundation’s educational programs in the Lyme-Old Lyme Public Schools.

Runners of all ages are welcome, including those in strollers. Register for the race at http://lolef.org or in person before the race. Registration is $35 for adults, $10 for high school students and younger, with faculty and staff of the Region 18 Schools receiving a $10 discount off the registration fee.

Mary Stone, LOLEF President, commented, “We draw a great crowd each year, especially for the 10K. It’s one of the few 10K races in the region: the course is beautiful and runners really love it.” LOLEF race organizer Chris Staab added, “It’s a great community event that supports public education while promoting health and wellness.”

The LOLEF is a 501(c)(3) non-profit, charitable organization, governed by a volunteer board of directors from the towns of Lyme and Old Lyme.

The LOLEF’s mission is to create, continue, and enhance the valuable educational programs above and beyond those traditionally provided by the Lyme-Old Lyme Public Schools. The Foundation aligns its work with the District’s strategic planning process to encourage innovative and effective learning opportunities for students of all ages. It raises and distributes funds to enhance enrichment programs, support innovative teaching and learning, and build educational partnerships between Lyme-Old Lyme students and the community.