December 13, 2018

Tesla Technology Aids Autoimmune Conditions; Pop-Up Event on Revolutionary AmpCoil at OL Library

This photo shows Aaron Bigelow’s wife holding the AmpCoil, while Aaron and the couple’s daughters share the moment.

Join an AmpCoil pop-up event this Sunday, Dec. 2, at 1 p.m. at the Old Lyme Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library.

One of the cofounders of the AmpCoil technology will be speaking about his battle with Lyme Disease and how necessity for his own wellness was the mother of his invention. Aaron Bigelow from Nevada City, Calif., wanted to see the place from which Lyme Disease acquired its name and is visiting Lyme and Old Lyme to speak about his journey with this disease.

The AmpCoil is a modern wellness tool that combines bio-feedback, bio-resonance and a customized coil based on Tesla technology. The use of this technology has transformed Bigelow’s life and he is anxious to share this approach to wellness, which can be applied to numerous autoimmune conditions.

This is a free event with demonstrations for those hoping to open the door to a new level of wellness.

For more information, contact Sandy Garvin at 860-391-3088. 

Visit www.AmpCoil.com to learn more.

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Musical Masterworks Presents ‘Winterreise’ Concert This Afternoon

Cellist Edward Arron and pianist Jeewon Park

Musical Masterworks will ring in the winter with the beautiful song cycle by Franz Schubert titled Winterreise — which translates to a winter’s journey – on Saturday, Dec. 1, at 5 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 2, at 3 p.m.

Baritone, Randall Scarlata and pianist, Jeewon Park will perform this remarkable piece of music.

Join Artistic Director, Edward Arron, one hour before each concert for a pre-concert talk about Schubert’s life and his composition of this masterpiece.

Musical Masterworks’ season runs through May 2019.  Mini subscriptions are available for $100 each or individual tickets are $40 for adults and $5 for students. visit Musical Masterworks at www.musicalmasterworks.org or call 860.434.2252.

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‘Elephants in Winter’ Sale Continues Tuesday During LBS Luncheon

xmas_sale_compressedThe annual ‘Elephants in Winter’ Sale in the Fellowship Hall at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme (FCCOL) at 2 Ferry Rd. will be held Saturday, Dec.1, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. This is the Christmas version of the extremely popular White Elephant Sale hosted annually by the church in July.

The sale continues after the Sunday, Dec. 2 services at 9 and 11 a.m. from 10 to 11 a.m. and 12 to 1 p.m.   There will be no half-price sale this year.

Christmas decorations and gifts along with handmade items from the Sewing Group will be on sale.  Items will also be on sale from the many FCCOL mission partnerships: from the Lakota Reservation at Green Grass on the Cheyenne River in South Dakota, from Haiti, and from Palestine.

Coffee and doughnuts will be available.

Items will also be on sale during the Ladies Benevolent Society’s (LBS) luncheon on Tuesday, Dec. 4.

Enjoy some holiday shopping for a great cause at this event.

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Old Lyme Library ‘Holiday Book Sale’ Continues Today, Includes Jolly Holiday Breakfast

Wine Reception on Friday with Gift Quality & Collectible Books in Festively-Decorated Reading Room, Everything Half Price in BookCellar; Sale Continues Saturday with Mary Poppins at a Jolly Holiday Breakfast

Rare books like these will be available for purchase throughout both days of the sale.

The BookCellar at the Old Lyme-Phoebe Griffin Noyes (OLPGN) Library is pleased to invite the community to its annual Holiday Book Sale on the evening of Friday, Nov. 30, and during the day on Saturday, Dec. 1.  Kick off this year’s holiday season by choosing books as gifts and supporting your local library at the same time!

More than 5,000 books carefully sorted by category, including many rare and collectible books, will be offered for sale in two different locations in the library.   Upstairs in the festively-decorated Reading Room, the focus this year is on gift quality and collectible books, along with DVD’s and CD’s.  Prints of historic local maps from 1868 of towns in New London County will also be on sale.

Downstairs in the BookCellar’s usual  home, all the books will be half-price or less. The BookCellar is including its extensive collection of rare, collectible, and first edition fiction books in this year’s sale.

The Opening Reception and Sale, which features a reception with refreshments, will be held on Friday, Nov. 30, from 4 to 7 p.m. Shop to the merry acoustic tunes of Strum, Strum from the Charles’ Music Center in Old Lyme.

The sale continues on Saturday, Dec. 1, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.   Start the day with a Jolly Holiday Breakfast with Simply Enchanted’s Mary Poppins, who will offer a spoonful of fun with your favorite English nanny and plenty of photo opportunities!

Historic maps of local towns including Old Lyme make perfect holiday gifts.

There will be books from all genres – from Children’s and Young Adults to Art and Photography, the Classics, History and Biography, small gift books and large coffee table books.  There is a large collection of First Edition hardcover books, many with protective Mylar covers.

Dealers are welcome and there are no buyer restrictions.  Most prices will range from $2 to $5, with a special bargain table with books priced under one dollar.  All proceeds benefit the Library.

The Library is located at 2 Library Lane, off Lyme Street. Library hours are Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m.to 7 p.m.;  Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. If the Library’s parking lot is full, additional spaces are available on Lyme Street. There is also a lot behind the Old Lyme Memorial Town Hall across the street from the Library.

For more information about the library or questions about the sale, call 860-434-1684 or visit www.oldlyme.lioninc.org.

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See Santa in Old Lyme This Morning!

Santa will be in Old Lyme on Saturday.

We just heard that Santa will be dropping into the Old Lyme Town Hall tomorrow morning between 10 a.m. and 12 noon and would love to meet as many children as possible during his visit!

Moreover, children can have their photo taken with Santa at no charge.

Donations to the Lyme Youth Service Bureau’s Youth Advisory Council scholarship fund will be accepted.

And Santa is even bringing some of his elves with him, who will help little ones write their own letters to the North Pole!

Don’t miss him … he has a hectic schedule and won’t be able to stay past noon!

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‘Cookie Walk’ at Old Lyme Town Hall This Morning Benefits Child & Family Agency

What shall I buy? Customers are spoiled for choice at Child & Family's Annual Cookie Walk.

What shall I buy? Customers are spoiled for choice at Child & Family’s Annual Cookie Walk.

Don’t have time to bake but want beautiful, homemade holiday cookies to enjoy at family gatherings? Tired of pre-made cookie trays with cookies you might not want?

Come to Child & Family Agency’s Holiday Cookie Walk on Saturday, Dec. 1, from 9 a.m. to 12 noon (or as long as the cookies last!) at its new location in Old Lyme Town Hall, and create your own cookie assortment!

At the Cookie Walk, you decide which cookies — and how many — you want to purchase. Cookies are then weighed and boxed for purchase. Get there early for the best selection!

Also available for sale will be sets of note cards depicting local scenes of Lyme and Old Lyme, ornaments, tote bags, and Child & Family Agency cookbooks.

Proceeds benefit the programs and projects of Child & Family Agency of Southeastern Connecticut.

This year’s Cookie Walk at the Old Lyme Town Hall on Lyme Street will be located along with LYSB’s Santa. While you’re choosing cookies, the kids can get a picture taken with Santa (donations to LYSB, the Lymes Youth Service Bureau) There will be much to do along Lyme Street that day, all part of the “Light Up Old Lyme” festival.

Child & Family Agency is a private, nonprofit organization whose mission is to nurture children and families to develop their strengths through service, partnership, and advocacy.

With offices in New London, Essex, and Groton, and programs dealing with children’s health care, child abuse, family violence, teen pregnancy, parent education, and child guidance, Child & Family Agency is the largest nonprofit children’s service provider in southeastern Connecticut. Volunteers and supporters are always welcome.

For more information, see www.childandfamilyagency.org.

Questions on the Cookie Walk should be directed to CFA.LOLauxiliary@gmail.com.

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‘Deck the Walls’ on View at Lyme Art Association Through Jan. 4

‘Chandelier’ by Karen Israel  is one of the signature paintings of the exhibition.

The Lyme Art Association’s festive art exhibition, the annual Deck the Walls holiday show, is on view through Jan. 4, 2019. More than 200 original works of art by member artists will be on display and priced to sell as holiday gifts.

‘Snowy Perch’ (oil) by Melanie Watrous is the signature work in this year’s ‘Deck The Walls’ exhibition.

The opening reception on Friday, Nov. 30, from 5-7 pm, is free to the public and will feature live music. All painting purchases from 5 p.m. on Nov. 30 through 5 p.m. Dec. 1, will be tax-free.

“For Deck the Walls, the Lyme Art Association features a wide variety of appealing subjects at affordable prices that are great for holiday shopping. We hope to help solve those gift giving dilemmas – a beautiful piece of artwork is always appreciated!” says Jocelyn Zallinger, Gallery Manager.

The Lyme Art Association is open Wednesday through Sunday, from 10 am – 5 pm, and by appointment.

The Association is located at 90 Lyme Street in Old Lyme, at the corner of Halls Road.

Call (860) 434-7802 for more information, or visit www.lymeartassociation.org.

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LYSB Launches Holiday Giving Program

The holiday season is a time for caring and sharing, but can be especially difficult for families facing extreme financial challenges.

It is the generosity of individuals and organizations that makes our community a special place.  Donors can “adopt” a family or make a general contribution toward the program.

If you would like to help struggling neighbors in our community during the holidays, contact Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau at 860-434-7208.

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Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce Hosts Community Tree Lighting, Carol Sing This Afternoon

Christmas-TreeThe Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce hosts the Community Tree Lighting outside Center School starting at 4 p.m. this afternoon, which kicks off the “Light Up Old Lyme” weekend. Parents and community members are welcome.

Under the baton of Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School (LOLMS) Music Director, Carrie Wind, the LOLMS Band will play seasonal music and the LOLMS Chorus will lead the singing of carols.

The Old Lyme Holiday Tree outside the Town Hall will be lit at 4:30 p.m.

The Chamber will serve cookies and hot chocolate, which are generously sponsored by Essex Savings Bank, to all the performers.

A number of events immediately follow the tree lighting. We have published separate articles on LymeLine about them and provide a link to them here so readers can gain more detailed information about these events.

Holiday Book Sale: Preview Night with Wine Reception hosted by theOld Lyme Library’s BookCellar from 5 to 7 p.m.
Old Lyme-Phoebe Griffin Noyes (OL-PGN) Library: $10 admission.  Refreshments and wine. Books from all genres, including rare and collectible books, first edition fiction, and more. All books half-price or less. Benefits the library.

Opening Reception for ‘Deck the Walls’ at Lyme Art Association from 5 to 7 p.m.

Holiday Concert by the Old Lyme Town Band at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme at 7:30 p.m.

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Lyme-Old Lyme High School, Middle School Announce Q1 Honor Rolls

Lyme-Old Lyme High School  Honor Roll    Quarter 1    2018-19

High Honors

Grade 12: Teresa Allan, Kendall Antoniac, Kathryn Atkinson, Jacqueline Barry, Casey Blue, Mackenzie Blue, Gary Bocian, Claire Britton, Cassandra Burrows, Ann Cote, Thomas Creagan, Noah Crolius, Emma Danes, Britney DeRoehn, Corey Drummond, Olin Frederiks, Zachary Gidius, Emily Grenier, Kylie Hall, Colin Hallahan, Sarah Hayward, Haley Heath, Kate Hickie, Liam Holloway, Aoife Hufford, Mya Johnson, Jess Kegley, Ciara Klimaszewski, Sophie Kyle, John Manthous, Brynn McGlinchey, Hannah Morrison, Leah Neithamer, Emily O’Brien, Jacob Olsen, Katherine Reid, Nicholas Roth, Noah Rumm, Kellie Sablone, Caroline Sagristano, Anna Sather, Justin Shaw, Penelope Small, Eli St.Germain, Emily Tan, Caroline Wallace, Colleen Walsh, Alexander Williams

Grade 11: Audrey Berry, Faith Caulkins, Rory Cavicke, Emilia Cheesman, Elizabeth Cravinho, Isabel Dean-Frazier, Arianna DelMastro, Maria Denya, Raymond Doll, Samuel Dushin, Theodore Enoch, Araselys Farrell, Nicholas Fava, Tanner Griffin, Sophia Griswold, Kamber Hamou, Lauren Huck, Jeffy Joshy, Renate Kuhn, Rachael Larson, Brenna Lewis, Jacqueline Malizia, Melissa Mauro, Thomas McCarthy, Ryan McTigue, Chandler Munson, Kyle Myers, Samantha Olson, Sofia Pecher-Kohout, Carter Popkin, Jared Ritchie, Jane Scheiber, Brady Sheffield, Garrett Smith, Emily Speckhals, Evan St.Louis, Olivia Stack, Haley Stevens, Philip Sweeney, Olivia Tetreault, Ryan Tetreault, Lydia Tinnerello, Kiera Ulmer, Megan VanSteenbergen, Theodore Wayland, Trevor Wells, Anna Williams, Maggie Wisner, Conner Wyman, Katherine Zelmanow

Grade 10: Sophia Arnold, Juliette Atkinson, Rachel Barretta, Ava Berry, Emma Boardman, Sadie Bowman, Kyuss Buono, Kate Cheney, John Cox, Megan Cravinho, George Danes, Bianca Dasilva, Emily DeRoehn, Corah Engdall, Leslie Farrell, Sadie Frankel, Fiona Frederiks, Lillian Grethel, Catharine Harrison, Isabella Hine, Regan Kaye, Paige Kolesnik, Grace Lathrop, Owen Macadam, Mackenzie Machnik, Elle McAraw, Emma McCulloch, Emma Meekhoff, Marina Melluzzo, Riley Nelson, Sophia Ortoleva, Connie Pan, Olivia Papanier, Anwyn Paynter, Lauren Pitt, Ezra Pyle, Ethan Rivera, Hayden Saunders, Tait Sawden, Jesper Silberberg, Tessa St.Germain, Jake Stewart, Lian Thompson, Angus Tresnan, Lauren Wallace, Kelly Walsh, Alison Ward, Ellery Zrenda

Grade 9: John Almy, Grace Arnold, Hannah Britt, Mackenzie Bussolotti, Evan Clark, Ryan Clark, Anne Colangelo, John Conley, Grace Coverdale, James Creagan, Caroline Crolius, Elias D’Onofrio, Elise DeBernardo, Elizabeth Duddy, Eleanor Dushin, Liam Fallon, Victoria Gage, Samantha Geshel, Aiden Goiangos, Andrew Hedberg, Madison Hubbard, Fiona Hufford, Julia Johnston, Nevin Joshy, Kian Kardestuncer, Cora Kern, Michael Klier, Felse Kyle, William Larson, Alex Lee, Reese Maguire, Abigail Manthous, Langley Marshall, Grace McAdams, Jacob Meyers, Samuel Mullaney, Elle Myers, Brendan O’Brien, Michael O’Donnell, Bella Orlando, Adeline Riccio, Margaret Rommel, Frank Sablone, Olivia Schaedler, Calvin Scheiber, Abigail Sicuranza, McLean Signora, Matthew Snyder, Abby Speckhals, Meghan Speers, Drew St.Louis, Nikolai Stephens-Zumbaum, Victoria Stout, Maverick Swaney, Olivia Turtoro, John Videll, Aidan Ward, Melanie Warren, Ellie Wells, Mary Wholean, Avery Wyman

Honors

Grade 12: Catherine Battalino, Lauren Birk, Paige Britton, Jocelyn Campbell, Liam Clark, John Coughlin, Lily Cox, Jacob Curtis, Grace Edwards, Marlena Elmoznino, Dylan Hettick-Harlow, Riley Jacobson, Warren Jones, Andrea Kathe, Jillian Kus, Henry Lahm, Elyza Learned, Joshua Liefeld, Peter Macadam, Lilah McAndrew, Danielle McCarthy, Sydney Ogden, Thomas Pennie, Eaven Rivera, James Rollins, Sadie Rubitski, Olivia Rugg, Robert Sedlatschek, Carson Swope, Adam Syed, Ethan Tracano

Grade 11: Alexandra Alpha, Anabella Arias, Emily Balocca, Emma Bass, Jean-Luc Bolduc, Chloe Cahill, Madison Cann, Ethan Carrion, Sarah Conley, Emily Evers, Jada Fuentes, Katherine Funaro, Lucy Gilbert, Grace Hanrahan, Quinn Hickie, Connor Hogan, Parker Hubbard, Daniel Kendall, Caroline King, Dylan Mulligan, Jenna Porter, Chase Reneson, Andre Salkin, Taylor Sedlatschek, Colby Sides, Summer Siefken, Taylor Thompson, Sydney Trowbridge, Jackson Warren, Katelyn Wells

Grade 10: Paige Alpha, Colbe Andrews, Kaylee Armenia, Olivia Bartlett, Truman Boller, Keenan Burr, Hunter Collins, Emerson Colwell, Axel Cruz, Michael Cushman, Trube Dean, Francette Donato, Eveliz Fuentes, Jackson Goulding, Samantha Gray, Schuyler Greenho, Emma Griffith, Destiny Kus, Gabriel Lavoie, Justen Lessard, Madelyn Maskell, Brendan McTigue, Michael Milazzo, Timothy O’Brien, Gavin Porter, Aidan Powers, Jacob Quaratella, Nicholas Vandette, Katrina Wallace, Avery Welch

Grade 9: Nicholas Adeletti, Andrew Bennett, Nihad Bicic, Ethan Carr, Lauren Creagan, Mischa Elmoznino, Shawn Grenier, Nicolette Hallahan, Jackson Harris, Zoe Jensen, Owen Kegley, Olivia Lecza, Mikayla Masilotti, Stephanie Mauro, James Mazzalupo, Colin McCarthy, Emily Mesham, Evan Morgan, Alexander Roth, Madison Thompson, Evan Visgilio, Aden Wilson, Paige Winchell, Ryan Zbierski

Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School     Honor Roll     Q1 2018-19

High Honors

Grade 8: Bridget Allan, Olivia Alpha, William Barry, Callie Bass, Livie Bass, Jillian Beebe, Jordan Beebe, Cooper Bowman, Ava Brinkerhoff, Jamie Bucior, Gretchen Burgess, Sarah Burnham, Hayley Cann, Liam Celic, Luke Celic, Alexander Chrysoulakis, Grace Colwell, Marjorie Curtis, William Danes, Anna Davis, Cole Dobratz, John Eichholz, Alexis Fenton, Matthew Grammatico, Karissa Huang, Owen Ingersoll-Bonsack, Aidan Kerrigan, Celia LaConti, Jonah Lathrop, Monique Lavoie, Jacob Lopez-Bravo, Ford Macadam, Marielle Mather, Madalyn McCulloch, Caden Monte, Calvin Monte, Cooper Munson, Alexander Olsen, Allott Patterson, Alain Pecher-Kohout, Olivia Powers, Kelsey Pryor, Izzadora Reynolds, Benjamin Roth, Rhyleigh Russell, Eli Ryan, Anders Silberberg, Alyssa Spooner, Samantha Tan, Tova Toriello, Kaitlyn Ward, Harry Whitten, George Williams, Quinn Williams

Grade 7: Peighton Andrews, Emma Bayor, Oliver Berry, Alis Bicic, Elliot Bjornberg, Drew Brackley, Natalie Buckley, Jackson Bullock, Sarah Colangelo, Ava Cummins, Ella Curtiss-Reardon, Eva D’Onofrio, Eric Dagher, Lucas DaSilva, Mulanga Drysile, Amelia Gage, Ryder Goss, Sydney Goulding, Nyla Goulis, Alexis Grasdock, Justin Green, Douglas Griswold, Katherine Gryk, Abby Hale, Nathaniel Heon, Leland Hine, Sedona Holland, Agatha Hunt, Beatrice Hunt, Sabina Jungkeit, Emmerson Kaye, Dakota Kotzan, Brodie Lippincott, Matthew Mazzalupo, Anna McAdams, Griffin McGlinchey, Elaina Morosky, Katherine Mullaney, Delaney Nelson, Isabelle O’Connor, Dylan Paynter, Giovanna Parnoff (for Q4 of 2017-18), Grace Phaneuf, Jack Porter, Luisa Raby, Ava Roth, Charles Sahadi, Kylie-Jean Sevigny, Sydney Siefken, Owen Snurkowski, Hannah Thomas, Gabriel Tooker, Keara Ward, Louisa Warlitz, Mason Wells, Tyler Wells, Summer Wollack

Grade 6: Emma Arelt, Ella Austin, Oliver Avelange, Natalie Barndt, Micah Bass, Molly Boardman, Samuel Bocian, Justin Bonatti, Mark Burnham, Chase Calderon, Tabitha Colwell, Gloria Conley, Chloe Datum, Andrea DeBernardo, Autumn Dionne, Erin Durant, Shane Eastman-Grossel, Zoe Eastman-Grossel, Caeli Edmed, Anna Eichholz, Trinity Empie-Jones, Ella Evans, Davis Fallon, Grace Ferman, Hoshena Gemme, Marcella Gencarella, Ava Gilbert, Henry Griswold, Jonathan Harms, Hannah Johnston, Shyla Jones, Simon Karpinski, Aven Kellert, Olivia Kelly, Ella Kiem, Ada LaConti, James Lahot, Brenden Landry, Elise Leonardo, Evan LeQuire, Andrew Liu, Colette Marchant, Max Novak, Abigail O’Brien, Kanon Oharu, Filip Pecher-Kohout, Sophie Pennie, Charles Pitt, Shannon Pryor, Mutia Quarshie, Trinity Rando, Ysabel Rodriguez, Kelly Sheehan, Andrew Sicuranza, Drea Simler, Josephine Small, Audrey Spiegel, Morgan Standish, Madeline Supersano, Charlotte Tinniswood, Kathleen Walsh, Ava Wilcox, Ava Wood-Muller

Honors

Grade 8: Whitney Barbour, Gillian Bradley, Reece Guillet, Makenna Harms, Clarence Hinckley, Dylan Hovey, Madison Krol, Phoebe Lampos, Theodore Lampos, Karleigh Landers, Kennedy McCormick, Joseph Montazella, Jack Morgan, Jacob Rand, Jenna Schauder, Ned Smith, Joseph Steinmacher, Marco Supersano

Grade 7:  Morgan Bell, Macklin Cushman, Audrey LeCour, Luke Legein, Avra Montazella, Kalea VanPelt

Grade 6: Christopher Anderson, Dominic Clark, Rowan Hovey, Kyle Ingersoll-Bonsack, Peter Kuhn, Nathan Morgan

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‘The Magic of Christmas’ on View at FloGris Museum Through Jan. 6

All ages can enjoy the beautiful Palette Christmas Trees at the ‘Magic of Christmas’ exhibition

The holiday season is always something to celebrate at the Museum when”The Magic of Christmas” happens!

During the period, the Florence Griswold House will be decorated in the holiday finery of yesteryear with a new addition to the Magic—Marvelous Mantels. In the historic areas, the mantels over each fireplace are abundantly festooned with lush greens and festive ornaments that reflect the painting that hangs above.

In the Krieble Gallery, visitors can delight in the painted palettes on Miss Florence’s Artist Trees. Nearly 200 noted artists from across the country have donated works to this one-of-a-kind holiday icon. The palette artists’ styles and subject matter are as varied as the individuals. Oils, acrylics, watercolors, ceramics, glass, and collage are used to transform the palettes into traditional holiday scenes, delightful landscapes, and more than a few surprises.

And don’t forget Christmastime Teas are offered in Café Flo and there’s always a wonderful selection of gifts in The Shop.

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A la Carte: Got Leftovers? How About a Turkey Casserole?

Perhaps you are reading this column on the morning after Thanksgiving as you drink your cup of coffee or tea. It has been quite a few years since I sat with the newspaper and figured out which I should do first. I have been in my condo for almost five years and only created Thanksgiving dinner once, and only for around six or seven of us.

Many, many years ago, when my own daughter was still in elementary school, there would have been at least four little ones (two nieces, one nephew and Darcy) or up to 10 or more (more nephews, nieces, two step-sons, one step-daughter and all their parents). Even when the little ones became high schoolers, we still did Thanksgiving. Although there were extra bedrooms, there were sleeping bags filled with humans on floors everywhere.

The last Thanksgiving enormous dinner was in Old Lyme, just a few months before I sold the house and moved into my condo. That crowd included more than 20 friends and family. Many of the family members stayed over the weekend, and, except for a few sandwiches, there were no leftovers.

These days turkey day happens at my daughter-in-law’s condo in Newburyport. My stepson and Nancy have divorced, but it is amicable. My Massachusetts granddaughters will be there (one already graduated from college and living in Boston, the middle a senior at Clark in Worcester and the baby now a freshman at UMass in Amherst.) There will be leftovers, but I will leave them in Massachusetts, because I bought two Butterballs at BJs.

As you read this, one is thawing in my refrigerator, the stuffing is in the freezer, the gravy is made (with an Ina Garten recipe made with no turkey juice, which she calls a base. I will add that base to the basting as Mr. Tom comes out of the oven. With the mashed potatoes, vegetables, gravy, stuffing, turkey and cranberry (I love the canned kind for this casserole), I will make at least two or three casseroles.

Because I never grew up with casseroles, I actually like these better than the original meal. Here is my go-to recipe for this and any kind of meat leftover this winter.

Photo by Jonathan Pielmayer on Unsplash

Turkey Leftover Casserole

3 to 4 pounds of turkey, dark or white meat, slices or chunked, divided
2 pounds of vegetables (beans, turnips, Brussels sprouts, corn or squash), divided
2 to 3 pounds of mashed white potatoes and/or sweet potatoes, divided
1 to 2 pounds stuffing, divided
1 can of cranberry sauce (or made-scratch) cranberry sauce, divided
Leftover gravy from Thanksgiving, or packaged or carton gravy

In a large casserole dish (or a big gratin dish or a big Tupper-type holder), begin to layer the ingredients. I begin with a little mashed potato, then turkey, some gravy, vegetables, mashed potatoes, stuffing and a few slices of cranberry sauce. I end with mashed potatoes and drizzled with gravy, if you still have some. Each casserole will feed at least four to six people.

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Happy Thanksgiving! Let’s Count Our Blessings


Editor’s Note: We wish a very Happy Thanksgiving to all our readers, their families and friends, and hope everyone enjoys a wonderful day today! 

We are delighted to republish another column by our friend and talented writer, Linda Ahnert, of Old Lyme, which celebrates this day of thankfulness.

If you said the name “Wilbur Cross” to Connecticut residents, they would most likely think of the parkway that bears his name.  But our older readers will remember that he was governor of our state for eight years—from 1931 to 1939, to be exact.

On Nov. 12, 1936, Wilbur Cross issued an eloquent Thanksgiving Proclamation, which has gone down in the annals of Connecticut history.  Many generations of school children either were read the Proclamation in class or required to memorize it … or both!

For the benefit of our younger readers, we reprint it here:

Time out of mind at this turn of the seasons when the hardy oak leaves rustle in the wind and the frost gives a tang to the air and the dusk falls early and the friendly evenings lengthen under the heel of Orion, it has seemed good to our people to join together in praising the Creator and Preserver, who has brought us by a way that we did not know to the end of another year.  In observance of this custom, I appoint Thursday, the twenty-sixth of November, as a day of Public Thanksgiving for the blessings that have been our common lot and have placed our beloved State with the favored regions of earth—for all the creature comforts: the yield of the soil that has fed us and the richer yield from labor of every kind that has sustained our lives—and for all those things, as dear as breath to the body, that quicken man’s faith in his manhood, that nourish and strengthen his spirit to do the great work still before him: for the brotherly word and act; for honor held above price; for steadfast courage and zeal in the long, long search after truth; for liberty and for justice freely granted by each to his fellow and so as freely enjoyed; and for the crowning glory and mercy of peace upon our land;—that we may humbly take heart of these blessings as we gather once again with solemn and festive rites to keep our Harvest Home. 

It’s no wonder that Wilbur Cross knew how to use words.  In 1889, he earned a Ph.D. in English literature from Yale.  Before he became governor, he taught English at Yale, was a well-known literary critic, and wrote several books.

By 1941, just five years after Cross wrote about the “mercy of peace upon our land,” the United Sates would be fighting in World War II.

In 1976, another Connecticut governor—Ella Grasso—reissued the proclamation from 40 years earlier and called it a “masterpiece of eloquence.” 

Today, Wilbur Cross’s words still stir our spirits.  We are thankful that we live in this “favored region of earth” and for the freedoms that we enjoy.  And, yes, we are grateful for the glory of the English language. 

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Giving Thanks: Community’s Food Drive Donations Exceed Expectations

Photo by B. Groth.

This year’s Thanksgiving Food Drive held by the Old Lyme Police Department and Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB) was extremely successful. Pictured above taking a a brief break from sorting the huge amount of food donated by Lyme and Old Lyme residents during the Thanksgiving Food Drive are LYSB Director Mary Seidner (center), LYSB staff member Arleen Sharp (left) and LYSB community volunteer Leslie Massa. Pictured below, Arleen and Leslie continue the good work.

Photo by B. Groth.

All the food donated is distributed to families in need. Food will also be given to stock the mini-pantries at Lymes’ Senior Center and the Town of Old Lyme Social Services.

After local needs are met, all remaining food is given to Shoreline Soup Kitchens.

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A la Carte: From Lee With Love — Thanksgiving Recipes Galore!

Editor’s Note: We are running three of Lee White’s wonderful columns together today to give readers a chance to savor a selection of her wonderful Thanksgiving recipes in one place.  Happy Thanksgiving to all!

For more years than I can remember, I have been writing about turkey at Thanksgiving. I get every food magazine every month and every single month, in October, a turkey is on the covers.

My mother never cooked a turkey. We had Thanksgiving at an aunt and uncle’s home in Kinderhook, New York. There was no gravy and no stuffing and the sweet potatoes were stuffed into oranges, which made the sweet potatoes taste like oranges. The first Thanksgiving with my husband and daughter was in Houston, and I ordered turkey and sides from a restaurant. The gravy was white. In following years I made turkey and sides it myself, sometimes on 20 or more friends and family. The first few times, I called the Butterball Hot Line for help.

Some years later I stopped using the throwaway aluminum pans and bought a $200 roasting pan, which I still use for every kind of roast I have ever made. It was one terrific buy. Over the years I brined turkey in a huge cooler. I bought organic turkeys. Last year I went to a friend who made a heritage turkey. I made all kinds of stuffing and once placed slices of bacon on top of the fowl. A few times I put buttered cheesecloth on the turkey. But these days I buy the least expensive turkey I can get and I buy it frozen. I make my stuffing the night before and put it in the refrigerator in an enormous plastic bag. The next morning I stuff as much dressing as possible into the thawed (but cold) turkey’s cavity. I put the rest in a casserole and when the roasted turkey come out of the oven, I add some juice to the casserole and bake it.

Forget all those other “new” ways to make turkey for Thanksgiving. Here is my favorite recipe. 

Turkey

1 14- to 16-pound turkey
salt
1 stick butter
½ (one-half) cup good white wine

Gravy

¼ (one-quarter) cup all-purpose flour
cold water
Gravy Master (optional)
salt and pepper to taste

Remove giblets from turkey (I don’t use them; instead, I boiled them for the kitties, less bones). Rinse and dry turkey inside and out. Rub salt inside cavity of bird. Fill cavity with cold stuffing made the night before or early morning. Place bird in a rack (or upside glass pie pan) atop a large, heavy-duty roasting pan. Place in a 350-degree oven.

Add butter and wine in a saucepan, bring to a boil, then simmer for about 10 to 15 minutes. Open oven, pour wine-butter over turkey and close oven. Every half hour baste liquid over turkey. Bake until turkey is done (when the thermometer plunged into the thickest part of the thigh registered 175 to 180 degrees, 10 to 12 minutes per pound if not stuffed or 12 to 15 minutes stuffed).

Turn off the oven, remove turkey from the oven, Place the turkey on a platter and spooned the Stuffing into a bowl; cover each with aluminum foil and return both to still-warm oven. (Extra stuffing can be heated in a casserole dish; it is not as tasty but if you spoon some juice on the dish before heating, it’s pretty good.)

Remove grease from roasting pan. and place the pan on the stove. Turn heat to medium. In a large jar, add all-purpose flour and about 2 cups of water. Screw jar cover and shake. When the brown bits are hot, add flour-water mixture and, over medium-high heat, whisk constantly. If you need more water, add some. Once the gravy is ready, add and stir in Gravy Master to taste (optional). Add salt and pepper to taste.

STUFFING AND SAUCE

Cranberry, grape and apple sauce.

This was a very busy but very pleasant week.

First was a lovely party for the retirement of Betty Anne Reiter at the Mystic Museum of Art. Betty Anne and I have worked together for quite a few years, she as librarian at the Groton Public Library, creating a couple of food series at the library. She and her staff made the series such fun that I hope we will do it every May.

Then there was cookbook time. Rose Levy Birnbaum, food writer extraordinaire, was on a book tour with her newest ???????? and we had a nice lunch at Olio before she and her assistant, Woody, went to their next signing and demo in Paramus, New Jersey. A few days later,, I went to RJ Julia in Madison to listen to Dorie Greenspan (who has a house on our shoreline), talk about her newest book, Everyday Dorie. I think this may be the best of her many best cookbooks and one of the best I have read by anyone in the last five years.

I had dinner that night with Madison friends at Elizabeth’s, a new one for me. The food was delicious, the service very professional and , service just  lovely.  If the chef will share a recipe with me, I will share the  house made gnocchi in a Gorgonzola cream sauce  topped with frizzled onions. Four of us shared that appetizers, and then we ordered another.

But I digress. I will have Thanksgiving with family in Newburyport and then drive back to Connecticut have another turkey dinner the next day in Durham. For the one with my family, I will make the turkey stuffing and a new side, so here is an old and a new; none is blue but one is borrowed.

Roasted Grape, Apple and Cranberry Sauce

From Cooking Light, November 2018
Serves 12

Cooking spray
2 cups seedless black grapes (about 10 ounces)
1 and three-quarter cups chopped Honeycrisp apple (or Gala or ????)
2 tablespoons chopped scallop
1 cup fresh or frozen whole cranberries
1 and one half tablespoons unsalted butter
3 and one-half teaspoons pure maple syrup
One-eighth teaspoon kosher salt
One-quarter teaspoon fresh thyme leaves or sprigs (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Lightly coat a rimmed baking sheet with spray. Place grapes, apple and shallot on prepared baking sheet and lightly coat with cooking spray. Bake until shallots begin to soften, about 5 minutes.

Add cranberries to baking sheet. Bake at 425 degrees until cranberries burst, apple is tender and grape skins are beginning to burst, about 20 more minutes. Remove from oven and transfer mixture to a medium bowl. Stir in butter, maple syrup and salt. Cool completely, about one hour. Sprinkle with thyme, if desired.

Stuffing

I make the stuffing at least the day ahead,, because it should be cold when you put it in the turkey, which is also cold. This is probably more stuffing you will use. You can put the rest in a casserole and bake for Thanksgiving, or freeze it for another turkey or chicken dinner.

I large Pepperidge Farms herb-seasoned stuffing mix
6 to 8 tablespoons butter
1 cup onions, minced
1 cup celery, minced
1 small can of diced mushrooms
1 cup walnuts, chopped (I chop it with my hands because I don’t want it chopped fine)
salt and pepper, to taste
Bell’s seasoning, to taste

Make Pepperidge Farms stuffing according to package instructions.

In a skillet, add butter and melt over medium heat. Add onions, celery, mushrooms and walnuts. Saute for about 10 minutes. Add salt, pepper and Bell’s seasoning to taste. Add to stuffing mix and stir. Refrigerate until cold (I often put the stuffing in a large plastic bag and put it in the porch, since I rarely have much space in my refrigerator.)

SPICE CAKE

Old-fashioned spice cake

A couple of weeks ago, I flew to Pittsburgh to see my brother. Now, for those of you readers who are men, don’t send me letters and say I am not correct when I say that widows learn how to take care of themselves, but widowers are often reattached in weeks or months.

My sister-in-law died in March of 2018, the memorial service was in April and a few months ago my brother mentioned that he wanted me to meet Lois. As I walked down the Pittsburgh airline’s escalator, I saw them holding hands. And I am here to tell you that my brother has found, very simply, the nicest person I have ever met. In addition, she is around his age (he is 83) and they met playing duplicate bridge.

(There is that story, possibly apocryphal, about the fact that one of two duplicate bridge partners shot the other after a bad bid. My brother does take bridge that seriously, nor does Lois, but neither has a gun)

Anyway, I had a wonderful few days. One evening we had dinner at an inn where we shared oil-truffled French fries with a ramekin of srirachi. My entree was a small pork tenderloin with mashed potato side so delicious I had to ask what was in it: the sous chef said it was maple syrup and chipotle.

The second night, Lois’s three daughters and their husbands brought pot-luck to my brother’s house and called it a party. Lois’s daughters are as nice as she is, as are their husbands, although one of them showed me a picture of a 10-point buck he’d killed that afternoon.

Now I am home and the holidays have begun. For the past two columns, I gave you my recipes for turkey, gravy, stuffing and a new cranberry sauce. Although pies are de rigueur, why not make a lovely autumn cake and, if you have some extra, make a trifle? I will be driving to Newburyport, Mass., for the day, but feel free to e-mail me if you run into problems.

And my next column will include recipes for turkey leftovers.

Old Fashioned Spice Cake

Adapted from Linnea Rufo of San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
Yield: serves 10 to 12 people
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 10-inch tube pan.

1 cup sugar
one-half cup (1 stick) butter
one-half cup currants or raisins or dried cherries (optional)
one-half cup candied ginger, chopped
2 eggs
2 tablespoons molasses
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cinnamon
one-quarter teaspoon cloves
one-half teaspoon ginger
one-teaspoon salt
1 cup milk

Preheat oven to 350º F. Grease a 10-inch tube pan.

Cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs, one at a time, blending well after each addition.

Whisk together flour, baking soda, cinnamon, cloves, ginger and salt. Stir dry ingredients into egg mixture alternately with milk, beginning and ending with dry ingredients.

Pour batter into prepared tube pan. Set on the middle rack of the oven and bake for 1 hour and 5 minutes, or until cake pulls away from sides of pan and a tester inserted in the center comes out clean.

Cool cake in the pan, set on a rack, for 10 minutes. Remove cake from pan and spread on icing at once, while cake is still warm.

Espresso Icing

1 and one-half cups of confectioners’ sugar
1 tablespoon of espresso (use a teaspoon or so of cold coffee)
1 tablespoon milk

Whisk icing ingredients together.

About the author: Lee White has been writing about restaurants and cooking since 1976 and has been extensively published in the Worcester (Mass.) Magazine, The Day, Norwich Bulletin, and Hartford Courant. She currently writes Nibbles and a cooking column called A La Carte for LymeLine.com and the Shore Publishing and the Times newspapers, both of which are owned by The Day.

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It’s Thanksgiving … So Let’s Talk Turkey

As you busy yourself making plans for Thursday’s feast, we are delighted to take the opportunity to republish a topical article about the evolution of this quintessential American meal that our dear friend — and wonderful writer — Linda Ahnert of Old Lyme wrote for us all the way back in 2007.  Enjoy!

Who Doesn’t Love Thanksgiving?

Giving thanks_bookA few years ago, a book entitled “Giving Thanks: Thanksgiving Recipes and History, from Pilgrims to Pumpkin Pie” was published.  The co-authors are Kathleen Curtin, food historian at the Plimoth Plantation, Mass., and Sandra L. Oliver, food historian and publisher of the newsletter “Food History News.”

The book is a fascinating look at how an autumnal feast evolved into a “quintessential American holiday.”

Most Americans, introduced to the story of the Pilgrims and Indians during childhood, assume there is a direct link between the traditional holiday menu and the first Thanksgiving.  But we learn from the book that many of those food items—such as mashed potatoes and apple pie—were simply impossible in Plymouth, Mass., in 1621.  Potatoes were not introduced to New England until much later and those first settlers did not yet have ovens to bake pies.

What we do know about the bill of fare at the first celebration in 1621 comes from a letter written by colonist Edward Winslow to a friend in England:  “Our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a special manner rejoice together after we had gathered the fruit of our labors.”

Later 90 Indians joined the party with “their great king Massasoit whom for three days we entertained and feasted.”  Then the Indians “went out and killed five deer which they brought to the plantation.”

So venison was a principal food on the menu.  It also seems safe to assume that mussels, clams, and lobsters (all in plentiful supply) were served as well.   According to other journals of the colonists, the “fowl” that Winslow described were probably ducks and geese.  But wild turkeys were also bountiful in 1621, and so it is very likely that they were on the Pilgrims’ table.  Thank goodness for that.

Throughout the New England colonies, it became common to proclaim a day of thanksgiving sometime in the autumn.  In period diaries, there are many descriptions of food preparation—such as butchering and pie baking—followed by the notation that “today was the general thanksgiving.”

By the 19th century, Americans were taking the idea of a “thanksgiving” to a whole new level.  The religious connotations were dropping away in favor of a holiday celebrating family and food.  Roast turkey had become the centerpiece of these fall celebrations.

Turkeys, of course, were native to North America.  (Benjamin Franklin, in a letter, had even proposed the turkey as the official U.S. bird!)  And turkey was considered to be a fashionable food back in the mother country.  Just think of the significance of turkey in Charles’ Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol.”  When Scrooge wakes up in a joyful mood on Christmas morning, he calls to a boy in the street to deliver the prize turkey in the poulterer’s shop to the Cratchit family.  (Earlier in the story, the poor Cratchits were dining on goose.)

It is thanks to a New England woman that Thanksgiving became an American holiday.  Sarah Hale was a native of New Hampshire and the editor of “Godey’s Lady’s  Book,”  a popular women’s magazine.  She lobbied for years for a national observance of Thanksgiving.  She wrote editorials and sent letters to the president, all state governors, and members of Congress.

Finally, in 1863, she convinced Abraham Lincoln that a national Thanksgiving Day might help to unite the Civil War-stricken country.   The fourth Thursday in November was now officially on the American calendar.

“… that endless variety of vegetables …”

Connecticut’s own Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote this description of a New England Thanksgiving in one of her novels—“But who shall . . .describe the turkey, and chickens, and chicken pies, with all that endless variety of vegetables which the American soil and climate have contributed to the table . . . After the meat came the plum-puddings, and then the endless array of pies. . .”

The autumnal feast became a national holiday, but each region of the country put its own spin on the menu.   Not to mention that immigrants have also added diversity.  The result is a true “melting pot” of America.  The second half of “Giving Thanks” contains recipes that reflect what Americans eat for Thanksgiving in the 21st century.

In the South, for instance, the turkey might be stuffed with cornbread and there would be pecan and sweet potato pies on the table.  In New Mexico, chiles and Southwestern flavors may be added to the stuffing.

There’s the “time-honored traditional bread stuffing” recipe.  There’s also one for a Chinese American rice dressing and directions for a Cuban turkey stuffed with black beans and rice.  Desserts run the gamut from an (authentic) Indian pudding to an (exotic) coconut rice pudding.  Old-fashioned pumpkin pie is included as well as the newfangled pumpkin cheesecake.

But no matter what food items grace our Thanksgiving tables, it seems that we all end up stuffing ourselves silly.  Perhaps overeating started at that very first harvest celebration in 1621.  In Edward Winslow’s letter describing the feast with the Indians, he noted that food was not always this plentiful. But he wrote his friend in England “ … yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want that we often wish you partakers of our plenty.”

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Saint Ann’s Hosts Annual Ecumenical, Community Thanksgiving Service This Evening

Happy-Thanksgiving-Cornucopia-3

The annual Community Service of Thanksgiving, sponsored by the churches of Lyme and Old Lyme, will take place at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 20, at Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church.

All are welcome to attend this ecumenical service of prayer and song, which will feature music by the choirs of First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, St. Ann’s Episcopal Church, and Christ the King Church. Clergy from the various faith communities will participate, as will lay members and community leaders.

A free-will offering will be taken up during the service to benefit the New London Homeless Hospitality Center, and donations of nonperishable foods will be collected for the Shoreline Food Pantry, to help our neighbors in need.

Everyone, regardless of religious affiliation, is welcome to attend the Ecumenical Thanksgiving Service.

For more information, visit www.saintannsoldlyme.org.
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Old Lyme Wildcats Meet Immaculate in Class S State Final Today in Middletown

The Wildcats celebrate their 3-1 victory over East Hampton in traditional style. Photo by Jennifer Alexander.

11/16 UPDATE:  Due to the anticipated inclement weather Saturday, the CIAC Class S state final has now been rescheduled to Sunday, Nov. 18, at 5:30 p.m at Middletown High School.

11/15 UPDATE: The final will be played Saturday at Middletown High School at 3 p.m. 

Mya Johnson put the ball in the net three times last night in Old Lyme’s Class S CIAC semifinal against East Hampton. Her hat-trick takes Paul Gleason’s girls into the state final for the fourth time in as many years.

Gleason’s girls respond to the thrill of the final whistle!

The final against Immaculate will be played on Saturday at a location and time to be announced.

GO WILDCATS!!!  The whole LOL community is rooting for you …

Editor’s Note: Read a full report by The Day’s Vickie Fulkerson, which was published  Monday evening, at this link.

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Old Lyme PD’s Thanksgiving Food Drive Continues Today

Food Drive fun on Wednesday outside Big Y!

Food Drive fun outside Big Y in Old Lyme!  File photo by M. Garvin.

Old Lyme Police Officers will continue their annual Thanksgiving Food Drive on Wednesday, Nov. 14, from 3 to 7 p.m. at the Old Lyme Marketplace on Halls Road near the Big Y.

The final collection day will be Saturday, Nov. 17, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the same location.

All food donated will be forwarded to the Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB) for distribution to families in need. Food will also be given to stock the mini-pantries at Lymes’ Senior Center and the Town of Old Lyme Social Services.  After local needs are met, all remaining food is given to Shoreline Soup Kitchens.

Donations of non-perishable food can be taken directly to the Old Lyme Police Department at 294 Shore Rd., or to LYSB at 59 Lyme St. between Nov. 12 and  Nov. 16.

Families in need of food should contact LYSB at www.lysb.org/holidaygiving or 860-434-7208.

 

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After Thursday’s Snow, Opening Reception for Cooley Gallery’s ‘Holiday Sale of Art in All Sizes’ Continues Today

Editor’s Note: We hear from our friends at The Cooley Gallery that they will be staying open tomorrow (Saturday) until 7 p.m. to welcome all the folk who were unable to attend their Opening Reception Thursday due to the inclement weather.

‘Winter Afternoon’ by Alfred T. Bricher (1837-1908) is featured in The Cooley Gallery Annual Holiday Sale opening Thursday.

The Cooley Gallery ‘s annual holiday sale featuring historic and contemporary art in all sizes opens with a celebration of the season on Thursday, Nov. 15, from 5 to 7 p.m., at 25 Lyme Street in Old Lyme. All are welcome.

In this holiday sale The Cooley Gallery will exhibit newly discovered paintings by Old Lyme colony artists Louis Cohen (1857-1915), William S. Robinson (1861-1945), Wilson Irvine (1869-1936), and Charles Ebert (1873-1959) and Connecticut artist Charles Foster (1850-1931) as well as exquisite watercolors and drawings by numerous Connecticut artists.

“The prices will be commensurate with the spirit of the season,” says Jeff Cooley, owner of the gallery. Also featured are colored woodcuts – as seen on the invitation, by Gertrude Nason (1890-1969), an accomplished painter and printmaker who lived in Greenwich Village and summered in Lyme.

A select group of contemporary artists will be included in the show.

Curly Lieber’s delicate and exquisite botanical drawings are among the highlights of The Cooley Gallery’s Holiday Show opening Thursday.

Botanical artist Curly Lieber has works in the exhibition, which also includes paintings of New York City by Michael Budden and Walter Rane, intimate still-lifes by realist Barbara Kacicek, abstract works by Helen Cantrell, and landscapes by Al Barker.

Small works by trompe l’oeil painter extraordinaire Michael Theise will be exhibited near the watercolor abstractions by Pat Smith among so many more.

The Cooley Gallery is proud to introduce the works of three new artists for the gallery: Jac Lahav, a figurative painter who will have a solo exhibition at The Florence Griswold Museum in 2019, Jeanine Pennell, a ceramic artist whose sympathetic characters are sure to delight, and Ed Bishop, whose hyper-realist paintings will please the most discerning art lover.

Don’t miss the The Cooley Gallery’s opening reception, Thursday, November 15th, from 5-7 p.m.; a great gathering to launch the holiday season. This exhibition runs through Jan. 6, 2019.

Located in the beautiful little village of Old Lyme, The Cooley Gallery is an ideal spot to enjoy among the best of American art while celebrating the season with a great New England tradition. 

Founded in 1981 and located in the heart of historic Old Lyme, the Cooley Gallery specializes in fine American paintings from the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries, including the Hudson River School, American Impressionism, and select contemporary artists.

Gallery hours: Thursday through Saturday 12 – 5 and Sunday 12 – 4 or online anytime at www.cooleygallery.com

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