April 25, 2019

SECWAC Hosts Speaker in Old Lyme Tonight on ‘America’s Foreign Policy Elite, Decline of U.S. Primacy’

Stephen Walt

The Southeast Connecticut World Affairs Council (SECWAC) presents Stephen Walt to speak on “America’s Foreign Policy Elite and the Decline of U.S. Primacy” at 6 p.m. on Thursday, April 25, at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, Ferry Rd., Old Lyme, CT 06371. Members and guests are encouraged to RSVP via online registration, but walk-ins will be accepted.

In 1992, the United States stood at the pinnacle of world power, and Americans were confident that a new era of peace and prosperity was at hand. Twenty-five years later, those hopes have been dashed. Relations with Russia and China have soured, the European Union is wobbling, nationalism and populism are on the rise, and the U.S. is stuck in costly and pointless wars that have undermined its influence around the world.

The root of this dismal record, Stephen Walt argues in his new book “The Hell of Good Intentions” (signed copies of which will be available for sale after the presentation), is the foreign policy establishment’s stubborn commitment to a strategy of “Liberal Hegemony.” Walt argues for a return to the realist strategy of “Offshore Balancing,” which eschews regime change, nation-building, and other forms of global social engineering.

Walt is Robert and Renée Belfer Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School. He is a contributing editor at Foreign Policy, co-editor of the Cornell Studies in Security Affairs, and was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in May 2005. He received the International Studies Association’s Distinguished Senior Scholar award in 2014.

His writings include The Origins of Alliances (1987), Revolution and War (1996), Taming American Power: The Global Response to U.S. Primacy, and The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy (co-authored with John J. Mearsheimer, 2007). His latest book is The Hell of Good Intentions: America’s Foreign Policy Elite and the Decline of U.S. Primacy (2018).

A reception will begin at 5:30 p.m., with the main event beginning at 6 p.m. The presentation is a part of the SECWAC 2018-2019 Speaker Series. For non-members, tickets ($20) may be purchased at the door; ticket cost can subsequently be applied towards a SECWAC membership. Attendance is free for SECWAC members (and their guests). Pro-rated half-year membership was introduced in February; half-year membership February through June 2019 is $37.50; $12.50 for young professionals under 35; free for area college and high school students.

Immediately following the presentation, attendees have the option for $35 of attending a dinner with the speaker at the Old Lyme Country Club. Dinner reservations are required by the morning of Tuesday, April 23,via pre-registration and making a payment securely online, calling 860-912-5718, or emailing info@secwac.org (vegetarian option available if reserved in advance).

SECWAC is a regional, nonprofit, membership organization affiliated with the World Affairs Councils of America (WACA). The organization dates back to 1999, and has continued to arrange 8-10 Speaker Series meetings annually, between September and June. The meetings range in foreign affairs topics, and are hosted at venues along the I-95 corridor, welcoming members and guests from Stonington to Old Saybrook, and beyond.

SECWAC’s mission is “to foster an understanding of issues of foreign policy and international affairs through study, debate, and educational programming.” It provides a forum for nonpartisan, non-advocacy dialogue between members and speakers, who can be U.S. policy makers, educators, authors, and other experts on foreign relations. Learn more at http://secwac.org.

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LYSB Hosts ‘The Bizz’ Tomorrow, Proceeds Benefit Youth Programs

Lymes’ Youth Services Bureau (LYSB) presents the 22nd annual performance of The Bizz, Friday, April 26, at 6:30 p.m. in the Lyme-Old Lyme High School auditorium. The show celebrates the talent that abounds in the youth of our community and the venue offers increased seating over the middle school auditorium.

The show features more than 20 acts, which include singing, dancing, instrumental and bands, all performed by talented Lyme-Old Lyme youth.

LYSB Director Mary Seidner told LymeLine that possibly a record number of acts auditioned this year, noting,”Unfortunately we didn’t have room for all of them.  We saw many talented performers and we congratulate everyone on their creativity and energy.”

The show has sold out several times in recent years, so early arrival is recommended.

Doors open at 6 p.m. and tickets are $8 at the door.  Tickets can be ordered in advance at this link.

All proceeds from the show benefit LYSB programs.

For more information, call 860-434-7208.

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Thought-Provoking, Comedy Classic, ‘Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner,’ Opens at Ivoryton Playhouse.

Standing beside her fiancé Dr. John Prentice (Marc D. Lyons), Joanna Drayton (Katelyn Nichols) announces the unexpected news of her engagement to her parents, Matt Drayton (Gordon Clapp) and his wife Christina (Kaia Monroe) in Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner at the Ivoryton Playhouse.

Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner opens tonight at the Ivoryton Playhouse.

When the movie, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, began filming in March 1967, it was still illegal for interracial couples to marry in 14 states, mostly in the South. Changing attitudes in the country and the landmark case Loving v. Virginia coincided with the production of the movie and by the end of the year, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Mr. and Mrs. Loving, ruling that marriage is a fundamental human right and effectively ending all anti-miscegenation marriage laws in America.

The Ivoryton Playhouse presents an adaptation of the movie by Todd Kriedler. Set in San Francisco in 1967, the play focuses on Matt and Christina Drayton, a progressive couple whose daughter, Joanna arrives home unexpectedly with her fiancé, Dr. John Prentice, an African-American doctor 11 years her senior. They’re in love and they want the Draytons’ blessing for their marriage – today.

Blindsided by their daughter’s whirlwind romance and fearful for her future, Matt and Christina quickly come to realize the difference between reading about and supporting a mixed-race couple in your newspaper and welcoming one into your family. It’s not long before a multi-family clash of racial and generational difference erupts.  At the end of the day, will love prevail?

This thought-provoking, comedy classic is a witty and insightful reflection on two families confronted by their prejudices.

Taking on the iconic role of Matt Drayton, made famous by Spencer Tracy, is Gordon Clapp*, best known as the Emmy-winning, Tony-nominated actor who charmed audiences as Det. Greg Medavoy on NYPD Blue (1993) and as loudmouth instigator Dave Moss in the 2005 Tony Award-winning Broadway revival of David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross (1992).

Kaia Monroe*, who is an Associate Professor and Chair of Theatre at SCSU will play his wife, Christina and the rest of the cast include Richarda Abrams*, Cedric Cannon*, R. Bruce Connelly*, Krista Lucas, Marc D. Lyons, Kimberlee Monroe* and Katelyn Nichols.

The play is directed by Kathryn Markey, set design by Daniel Nischan, lighting design by Marcus Abbott and costumes by Elizabeth Saylor.

Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner runs through May 12, 2019. Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2pm. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30pm, Friday and Saturday at 8pm. There will be one Thursday matinee on April 25th.

Tickets are $55 adult / $50 senior / $25 student / $20 children 12 and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org  (Group rates and subscriptions are available by calling the box office for information.) The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

*denotes member of Actors Equity

Photographer – Jonathan Steele

  1. Gordon Clapp, Kaia Monroe and Marc D. Lyons
  2. Kaia Monroe and Gordon Clapp
  3. Marc D. Lyons, Katelyn Nichols, Gordon Clapp and Kaia Monroe
  4. Cedric Cannon and Kimberlee Monroe
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Phoebe’s BookCellar at Old Lyme Library Hosts Half Price Sale, Saturday

Phoebe’s BookCellar is a treasure trove of books, all competitively priced — and every single one will be half that price on Wednesday and Saturday this week.

Phoebe’s BookCellar at the Old Lyme-Phoebe Griffin Noyes (OL-PGN) Library is holding a Half-Price Book Sale Saturday, April 27, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

If you have never been to the BookCellar — or haven’t been recently — now is your chance to get some incredible bargains on books, DVDs, CDs and audio books.  The BookCellar is a volunteer-run, used bookstore operating on the lower level of the OL-PGN Library. 

With over 10,000 books in all genres, including History & Biography, Fiction & Mystery, Children’s, Fine Art and Rare & Collectible books, Phoebe’s BookCellar is Old Lyme’s favorite (and only!) bookstore..

All proceeds from the sale benefit the library.

Editor’s Note (i): The Library is located at 2 Library Lane, off Lyme Street. Spring hours are Monday and Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Tuesday and Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call 860-434-1684 or visit www.oldlyme.lioninc.org

Editor’s Note (ii): If the Library’s parking lot is full, additional spaces are available on Lyme Street. There is also a parking lot behind the Old Lyme Memorial Town Hall across the street from the Library.

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Join Old Lyme Churches’ International Community Supper, Saturday; Benefits Work of OL Refugee Resettlement Committee

The Old Lyme Refugee Resettlement (OLRR) Committee – a group of volunteers sponsored by the three churches of Old Lyme, First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church and Christ the King Church – will hold its third annual International Community Supper on Saturday, April 27, at 6 p.m., at Christ the King Church to support the committee’s efforts to relocate the Kazadi family from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The Community Supper will feature a dinner of delicious homemade international recipes, African drumming and dancing, and a silent auction.

Joseph and Martine, and their three children, Miriame (age 17), Drysile (age 13) and Joe (age 9) were forced to flee their home in Kinshasa in 2012. The family lived in refugee camps in Kenya for four years until they were brought to New Haven in 2016 by IRIS (Integrated Refugee & Immigrant Services), a federally recognized refugee-resettlement agency. The OLRR Committee relocated the family to Old Lyme last October, helping them find new housing, support services, jobs and schools, as they started life over here in the U.S.

There is no charge to attend the supper of delicious and authentic international cuisines. Admission is free. However, donations will be accepted at the door, and a silent auction will be held to encourage contributions to the committee’s ongoing efforts to relocate families in need.

In previous years, dinners were held to help support the relocation of the Colon family from Puerto Rico and the Hamou family from Syria. Both of these families will be on hand at this year’s dinner to help welcome Old Lyme’s newest neighbors.

OLRR Committee Volunteer Nancy Mol said, “I invite everyone in Lyme and Old Lyme to join us for this fund-raising supper – it’s going to be an evening filled with the great food, warmth and camaraderie that comes from neighbors helping neighbors. ”

Residents who would like to make a donation to support the OLRR Committee’s relocation efforts can contact any of the church offices via email at fccol@fccol.org.

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‘Drug Take Back Day’ Scheduled for Saturday

On Saturday, April 27, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Lyme Street Fire House, 69 Lyme St., Old Lyme, Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB) and the Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Prevention Coalition will give residents another opportunity to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription and over-the-counter drugs.

This event is free and anonymous — no questions asked.

Since the first Lyme-Old Lyme ‘Drug Take Back’ event in 2011, citizens have returned more than 500 pounds of medications to prevent misuse. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinets. Sadly, prescription drug abuse is on the rise among adults and youth, so this is a great opportunity to dispose of your unwanted medications.

The mission of the LOL Prevention Coalition is to prevent and reduce alcohol and other drug use among youth by collaborating with the community to raise awareness, modify social norms, educate youth and adults, initiate policy change and promote healthy activities.
The group meets on the first Tuesday of the month at LYSB.  Join them at any meeting or contact LYSB at 860-434-7208.  Visit their website to learn more about their programs, L/OL youth survey reports, and resources.

This event is co-sponsored by LYSB, LOL Prevention Coalition, Old Lyme Police Department, Troop F State Police, and Old Lyme Fire Department.

For more information about the Drug Take Back event or the LOL Prevention Coalition, contact LYSB at 860-434-7208 or visit www.lysb.org

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Class of 2019 Holds ‘Shred It’ Fundraiser, Saturday

Shredded_paperOn Saturday, April 27, the Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) Class of 2019 will shred documents for businesses and individuals. Anyone can bring their papers to shred to the LOLHS parking lot from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. for a donation.

Many people have unwanted papers sitting in boxes or on desks around their house.  The papers could be old tax returns, bank statements, bills, credit card statements, newspapers or school ditto sheets.  This fundraiser provides the community an opportunity to securely discard unwanted papers from houses or businesses.

“We are excited to hold this Shred-it Fundraiser because the demand for secure document shredding services is growing.  This fundraiser provides a low cost way to accomplish this community service,” said LOLHS senior Brynn McGlinchey, the event organizer.

Last year, this high school class conducted this same fundraiser.  It collected over 120 bags of unwanted papers and generated over $1,200.

The class used the funds for its class activities. Class activities included three dances and many community service projects throughout town.

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Letter From Paris: Exhibition of Macke & Marc’s Art Unintentionally Makes Powerful Statement on European Current Affairs

Nicole Prévost Logan

The exhibition titled Franz Marc / August Macke. The Adventure of the Blue Rider (der Blaue Reiter) at the Musée de l’Orangerie is the exhibit to see this spring when in Paris.  It is a festival of colors by two German artists, Macke (1887-1914) and Marc (1880-1916), who both died prematurely on the front during World War I more than a century ago.

Long overdue, and shamefully so – I believe all art historians would agree – Macke and Marc have never before been shown in France in an exhibit dedicated exclusively to them. The event opened first at the Neue Galerie of New York, then will remain in Paris until June 17.  The curators have made a few changes, particularly stressing the connection with the Blaue Reiter movement and the relationship with other European avant-gardes, particularly the fauvism and cubism in France.

After writing an article myself on April 11 2015 on this very site, it was pure pleasure to see the original works hanging in the spacious lower level rooms of the Orangerie Museum in the Tuileries gardens.

Franz Marc, The Dream [Der Traum], 1912, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid. Image taken from the Musee de l’Orangerie website.

Although they are shown together, the two artists have distinct personalities and styles. They first met in January 1910 and became close friends until the war.  Macke lived in Bonn on the Rhine in central Germany.  Marc, with the Russian artist Wassily Kandisnky and his companion Gabriel Munter and other members of the Blaue Reiter, loved Bavaria in southern Germany. He settled  first in Mirnau, about 40 miles south of Munich, then on Lake Kochel.

At a time when Europe is currently torn by political fractures, when the closeness of France and Germany is crucial to the survival of the continent, this exhibit has a strong symbolic meaning.  The European Union was founded on a determination to put an end to all wars.  What a powerful message when the art of these two young men is displayed together in an exceptional exhibition in Paris, considering, ironically, both men loved France and its culture, and yet died fighting against the country they revered.

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Child & Family’s 65th Annual Sale is May 2-4 in Waterford

How does it look? Intake for Child & Family’s Annual Sale is Tuesday in Old Lyme.

The Lyme/Old Lyme Auxiliary of Child & Family Agency of Southeastern Connecticut has scheduled its Intake for donations to the Agency’s 65th Annual Sale. Donations will be accepted ONE DAY ONLY, on Tuesday, April 23, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, in the Sheffield Auditorium on Ferry Road.

Note that this will be the only day to bring items for donation in Old Lyme. In addition, because the Annual Sale will be located in a smaller-than-usual venue this year, we must limit our collections and so will only be accepting donations for three hours, 10am to 1pm, on April 23.

Items accepted include art work, men’s, women’s, and children’s clothing; books, records, CDs and DVDs; toys; small appliances; household items; linens; jewelry; tools; and more. All items must be in extremely good condition, i.e., clothes and linens must be clean with no holes or stains, and appliances must be working. A full list of items that we cannot accept will be available at the Intake location.

Child & Family Agency’s 65th Annual Sale will be held at St. Paul Church, 170 Rope Ferry Road, Waterford, May 2–4, 2019.  For more information on the sale, call 860-443-2896 or visit www.childandfamilyagency.org.

Child & Family Agency is a private, nonprofit organization whose mission is to nurture children and families to develop their strengths through service, partnership, and advocacy. With offices in New London, Essex, and Groton, and programs dealing with children’s health care, child abuse, family violence, teen pregnancy, parent education, and child guidance, Child & Family Agency is the largest nonprofit children’s service provider in southeastern Connecticut. Volunteers and supporters are always welcome.

For more information, see www.childandfamilyagency.org.

Questions on the April 23 Lyme/Old Lyme Intake may be directed to cfa.LOLauxiliary@gmail.com.

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More on Earth Day from the Old Lyme Open Space Commission


Today, April 22, is the 49th Earth Day, the most widely celebrated environmental day across the globe, recognized in 192 countries.

It’s a timely, seasonal reminder that, as our lawns, trees and countryside turn green with spring growth, we ourselves can help the planet by also going “green.”

“Green” might mean: recycling; cleaning up litter, especially plastic that may end up in the ocean; or planting native flowers and shrubs to attract butterflies and hummingbirds.

The Old Lyme Open Space Commission suggests celebrating Earth Day by walking the town’s open space and land trust trails, listening to the songs of birds, enjoying newly blossoming wildflowers and breathing in fresh air.

Great walks throughout Old Lyme may be found at the Commission’s web page or at on the Old Lyme Land Trust’s website

Even the sky will celebrate Earth Day!  The annual Lyrid meteor shower is active from about April 16 to 25.  While not the year’s largest meteor shower, it will be the first since January and, fittingly, visible across the globe.

For more information, visit the Earth Day website.

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Celebrate Earth Day with Lyme Land Trust at their Family Festival, Sunday

Looking for bugs at the Earth Day Family Festival 2018. File photo submitted by Lyme Land Trust.

It’s Earth Day today!

Celebrate this important day next Sunday, April 28, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the 2nd Annual Earth Day Family Festival sponsored by the Lyme Land Trust. During this community event at Banningwood Preserve on Town St. in Lyme, there will be a short half-mile walk from parking to Diana’s Field where there will be a host of family-friendly activities.

Scheduled activities are as follows:

  • 11 a.m. Meet for family-friendly forest walk with biologist Jim Arrigoni (meet at entrance to Banningwood Preserve)
  • 12:30-2 p.m. Geology walk with Ralph Lewis (meet Ralph in Diana’s Field)

‘Anytime’ activities include:

  • ‘Bug Discovery’ in Roaring Brook with Pat Young of the Eight Mile River Wild and Scenic Coordinating Committee
  • Fun and games in Diana’s Field with Lyme’s Park and Rec.
  • Live music in Diana’s Field
  • Scavenger Hunt
  • S’mores by the bonfire
  • Bring your own blanket and picnic!
  • Goodie bags

Bring your own water to drink.

For more information, contact stewardship@lymelandtrust.org or visit lymelandtrust.org

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Duck River Garden Club Speaker Presents ‘Foolproof Hydrangeas’ Tonight in Old Lyme, All Welcome

Duck River Garden Club hosts its next program and meeting, Monday, April 22, at Old Lyme Memorial Town Hall.

Lorraine Ballato will present ‘Foolproof Hydrangeas,’ in which she will discuss all aspects of caring for these wonderful plants and the new species hitting the market.  From 18″ container-size shrubs to eight-foot explosions of color, there’s a hydrangea for everyone.
Ballato is an Instructor at the New York Botanical Gardens, the CT Master Gardener Program and the Federated Garden Clubs of CT.
Timing of the evening is as follows:
  • 6:30 pm reception/refreshments in the foyer
  • 7 pm presentation
  • 8 pm business meeting for members
The public is welcome to join the DRGC for this free program.
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Many Easter Church Services Being Held Locally Today, Ecumenical Sunrise Service at Griswold Point Open to All

The sun breaks across the eastern horizon from Griswold Point early on Easter morning. File photo by Emily Fisher.

Tomorrow our local churches will be celebrating Easter with one combined sunrise service at Griswold Point to which all are welcome and then separate services at their individual locations.  Full details of all the services are given below.

Join clergy, members and friends of Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church, Christ the King Church and First Congregational Church of Old Lyme (FCCOL) for an Ecumenical Easter Sunrise Service. Meet at Griswold Point, Old Lyme, at 6 a.m., rain or shine. Follow signs to the location. If you need directions, call the church at 860.434.8686

Christ The King Catholic Church hosts:

  • a Mass of the Lord’s Resurrection at 8 a.m. and with choir and orchestra at 10:30 a.m.

For more information, visit this link

The FCCOL hosts:

  • Worship services at 9 and 11 a.m.

For more information, visit this link .

Saint Ann’s hosts:

  • Festival Holy Eucharist with full choir and instruments at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m.

For more information, visit this link.

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A la Carte: Whether It’s Easter or Passover in Your Home, Lamb is Always Lovely!

Boneless rolled leg of lamb always makes a perfect Easter meal — but, as Lee explains, it doesn’t have to be boneless! Photo by Mike Tinnion on Unsplash

It seems lately that Christian and Jewish holidays seems to happen within weeks, or days, of the year.

For those who think that Hanukkah is like a Jewish Christmas, it is not. And Passover is nothing like Christian Easter either. Rather, the Jewish calendar and the Christian calendar (the latter is actually the Gregorian calendar) are not the same. I was born in the Jewish year 5704. I have no intention of telling you how old I am, but if you ask a Jewish person, perhaps that person will tell you how old I am.

More important, both holidays mean that families usually sit down together for dinner. While many of those who make Easter dinner will chose ham as the entrée of choice. Jewish people will not. But both holidays might choose lamb.

In the early 70s, I bought a book about how to cook French dishes in an American kitchen, meaning that we mostly buy our food at American supermarkets. So when you see the recipe calls for Campbell’s beef consommé, that I what I used for decades. If you do, try to get a canned consommé that is low in sodium. I now use More Than Boullion. I have used many of the recipes in that book, but my favorite is the one below.

Sometimes I buy boneless lamb, but the recipe is pretty much the same. I do suggest that you use a meat thermometer and the internal temperature of the roast should be 120 to 125 degrees for medium-rare, or 130 to 135 for medium.

Gigot d/Agneau a l’Ail (Leg of Lamb with Garlic)

From Charles Virion’s French Country Cookbook (Hawthorn, New York, 1972)

Yield: Serves 6 to 8

1 5- to 7-pound leg of lamb
8 cloves of garlic cut lengthwise into slivers
Salt and freshly ground coarse black pepper
Vegetable oil
3 cups brown sauce or canned beef consommé (I use Campbell’s)
2 cups cream sherry (does not have to be Harvey’s Bristol, but it should be cream sherry)
8 small new potatoes
4 tablespoons sweet butter

  1. Take leg of lamb out of refrigerator 3 to 5 hour before cooking time. Meat must always be at room temperature before roasting or broiling.
  2. Insert pieces of garlic all around the leg by making tiny incisions and pushing the garlic underneath. Season meat with salt and pepper. Pour on a little vegetable oil and let meat marinate until ready to roast.
  3. Meanwhile, simmer together stock or consommé and the cream sherry until liquid is reduced by half. This will be your basting sauce and gravy base.
  4. Place the lamb in a roasting pan and roast in a preheated 450 degree oven with the oven ajar. Turn frequently and baste with vegetable oil and fats accumulated during roasting. When the outside is brown and crisp, approximately 45 minutes later, take the meat out of the oven and place it in another roasting pan. Use the pan with the accumulated lamb fat to roast potatoes (separately from the lamb) for 1 to 1 and a half hours.
  5. Put butter on the meat and let it stand until 1 hour before you are ready to eat.
  6. Reduce oven temp to 300 degrees. The lamb should roast slowly now so that it will remain rare and juicy.
  7. Place lamb in oven and turn it every 10 minutes, basting with the stock-sherry sauce. Compute the approximately roasting time by figuring 20 minutes per pound, subscripting the 45 minutes for the first roasting.
  8. When cooked, take the meat out of the oven and let it stand for 10 minutes. This helps keep the meat juices inside. Then slice the meat and arrange on a hot platter.
  9. You should have approximately 2 cups of gravy left. Pour some of it, piping hot, on top of the roast. The rest should be served in a sauceboat. Surround the meat with vegetables (he suggests lima beans) and potatoes which have been roasted in the lamb fat from the first roasting. Serve immediately.

About the author: Lee White (left), a former resident of Old Lyme, has been writing about restaurants and cooking since 1976.  She has been extensively published in the Worcester (Mass.) Magazine, The Day, Norwich Bulletin, and Hartford Courant.  She currently writes Nibbles and a cooking column called A La Carte for the Shore Publishing newspapers, and Elan, a quarterly magazine, all of which are now owned by The Day.

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SECWAC Hosts Daalder, Lindsay in Old Lyme on “America’s Abdication of Global Leadership,” May 2

$20 for the General Public; Free for SECWAC members, educators and students

The Southeast Connecticut World Affairs Council (SECWAC) presents Ivo H. Daalder and James M. Lindsay to speak on “America’s Abdication of Global Leadership” at 6 p.m. on Thursday, May 2, at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme at 2 Ferry Rd., Old Lyme. Members and guests are encouraged to RSVP via online registration, but walk-ins will be accepted. A reception will begin at 5:30 p.m., with the main event beginning at 6 p.m.

The three pillars of the postwar foreign policy that America created—strong alliances, open markets, and commitment to democracy and human rights—are under threat from a president who sees little value in them, according to Ivo H. Daalder and James M. Lindsayin their new book, The Empty Throne: America’s Abdication of Global Leadership.

Citing the U.S. withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the Paris climate accords, and the Iran nuclear deal; the imposition of tariffs on allies and rivals alike; and Trump’s frequent praise for authoritarian leaders; they observe that “Trump was proposing to shed what he saw as the delusion of global leadership. He wanted a foreign policy that would be more self-promoting, more nationalist, and utterly transactional.”

Meanwhile, “A majority of Americans has consistently favored American engagement abroad,” the authors note. In fact, they argue that public support on issues such as defense of allies and the domestic economic benefits of trade actually increased after Trump took office.

In a complementary essay in the November/December issue of Foreign Affairs, Daalder and Lindsay called for a “G9” of like-minded nations to maintain the rules-based order. “The major allies of the United States can leverage their collective economic and military might to save the liberal world order. France, Germany, Italy, the United Kingdom, and the [European Union] in Europe; Australia, Japan, and South Korea in Asia; and Canada in North America are the obvious candidates to supply the leadership that the Trump administration will not,” they write.

Daalder is President of the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. He served as the US ambassador to NATO from 2009-13. Prior to that he was a senior fellow in foreign policy studies at the Brookings Institution, and an associate professor at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy and director of research at its Center for International and Security Studies. He also served as director for European affairs on President Bill Clinton’s National Security Council staff from 1995-97. Ambassador Daalder is the author and editor of ten books (including two with James Lindsay), and is a frequent contributor to the opinion pages of the world’s leading newspapers. He was educated at the universities of Kent, Oxford, and Georgetown, and received his PhD in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Lindsay is Senior Vice President, Director of Studies, and Maurice R. Greenberg Chair at the Council on Foreign Relations. He was previously the inaugural director of the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas at Austin. He has also held positions at the Brookings Institution and the University of Iowa. From 1996-97 Lindsay was the director for global issues and multilateral affairs on the staff of the National Security Council. He has written widely on various aspects of American foreign policy and international relations and has co-authored two books with Ivo Daalder. Lindsay holds an AB from the University of Michigan, and an MA, MPhil, and PhD from Yale University.

Signed copies of Daalder and Lindsay’s book, “The Empty Throne: America’s Abdication of Global Leadership” will be for sale after the presentation).

The presentation is a part of the SECWAC 2018-2019 Speaker Series. For non-members, tickets ($20) may be purchased at the door; ticket cost can subsequently be applied towards a SECWAC membership. Attendance is free for SECWAC members (and their guests). Pro-rated half-year membership was introduced in February; half-year membership February through June 2019 is $37.50; $12.50 for young professionals under 35; free for area college and high school students.

Immediately following the presentation, attendees have the option for $35 of attending a dinner with the speaker at the Old Lyme Country Club. Dinner reservations are required by the morning of Tuesday, April 30, via pre-registration and making a payment securely online, calling 860-912-5718, or emailing info@secwac.org (vegetarian option available if reserved in advance).

SECWAC is a regional, nonprofit, membership organization affiliated with the World Affairs Councils of America (WACA). The organization dates back to 1999, and has continued to arrange 8-10 Speaker Series meetings annually, between September and June. The meetings range in foreign affairs topics, and are hosted at venues along the I-95 corridor, welcoming members and guests from Stonington to Old Saybrook, and beyond.

SECWAC’s mission is “to foster an understanding of issues of foreign policy and international affairs through study, debate, and educational programming.” It provides a forum for nonpartisan, non-advocacy dialogue between members and speakers, who can be U.S. policymakers, educators, authors, and other experts on foreign relations. Learn more at http://secwac.org.

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Brady Sheffield Named Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber Business Student of the Month

Brady Sheffield (second from right) receives his Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce April 2019 Business Student of the Month award from (left to right) Rich Shriver,, Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce President; Jeanne Manfredi, Lyme-Old Lyme High School Assistant Principal, and Leslie Traver, Lyme-Old Lyme High School Business Department Chair.

Lyme-Old Lyme High School junior Brady Sheffield has been named the Chamber of Commerce Business Student of the Month for April 2019. Brady plans on working for his uncle’s social media company to learn about running a business — a nice tie in to the business classes he has taken.

The Chamber Business Student of the Month program continues the Chamber tradition of recognizing members of the junior class for demonstrating outstanding initiative in and out of the classroom.

The Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce established the N. Rutherford Sheffield Memorial Award for Entrepreneurial Promise & Achievement for Lyme-Old Lyme High School juniors in 1999 as a way to honor Mr. Sheffield, a 50+ year member of the Chamber who was highly regarded in our Lyme-Old Lyme community. Thirty-five juniors at Lyme-Old Lyme High School were recognized through this program.

 

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CT River Museum Hosts Dinner in Old Lyme Tonight With Guest Speaker Jeff Cooley; Benefits Curatorial Fund

Jeff Cooley will be the speaker at the Connecticut River Museum’s Brenda Milkofsky Curatorial Fund benefit event on April 18 at the Old Lyme Country Club.

Would you like to know more about the ins and outs of collecting in the contemporary art world? 

Join the board, administration and members of the Connecticut River Museum Thursday, April 18, at the Old Lyme Country Club when Jeffrey Whitman Cooley of The Cooley Gallery in Old Lyme presents “Outs & Ins: The Art in the Life of an Art Dealer.” The event runs from 6 to 9 p.m. and includes dinner.

Cooley, a Hartford native trained at Harvard, apprenticed in the American Painting Department of Christie’s Auction House and graduated to the American Paintings Department at the Wadsworth Athenaeum will share his stories.

In 1981, Cooley established The Cooley Gallery in a yellow storefront on Lyme Street. There he continues to identify, gather, exhibit and interpret American paintings and painters to numerous different audiences.

He serves as an enthusiastic and committed advisor to the New Britain Museum of American Art, the Mattatuck Museum in Waterbury and the former Lyme Academy College of Fine Art, where he was awarded an honorary degree. Cooley is a board member at the Florence Griswold Museum and an Elector at the Wadsworth Athenaeum. He has been an influential guide to young, talented artists helping many to emerge as professionals.

Proceeds from this evening support the Brenda Milkofsky Curatorial Fund. Organized in 2009 to recognize the work of the Connecticut River Museum’s Founding Director, the fund is restricted to the acquisition and conservation of objects and manuscripts that enhance the historical focus of the Connecticut River Museum’s collections.

Purchases from this fund have included the portrait of a Middletown merchant mariner; a landscape of the oft-painted view of the Ox Bow below Mount Holyoke; the stern board of a Portland-built stone schooner; an Old Lyme hunting scene, and a model of a Blue Line tug-boat.

For more information or to make a reservation, visit this link or call the Connecticut River Museum at 860-767-8269. Tickets are $100 per person.

The Connecticut River Museum is located in Essex, Conn., and is the only museum dedicated to the study, preservation and celebration of the cultural and natural heritage of the Connecticut River and its Valley.  The Connecticut River Museum is located at 67 Main Street, Essex and is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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Inter-denominational ‘Walk to End Hunger’ to be Held This Morning in Old Lyme

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On Friday, April 20, an inter-denominational ‘Walk to End Hunger ‘will be held to benefit the Shoreline Soup Kitchens and Pantries. Gather in the Griswold Room of Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church at 9:45 a.m. for sign-in and prayer. The route follows Shore Rd. to Johnny Cake Hill Rd. to McCurdy Rd., past Christ the King Church to First Congregational Church, and then back again, a distance of approximately three miles.

All ages are welcome and encouraged to to join this reflective walk co-organized by Christ the King Catholic Church, St. Ann’s Episcopal Church, and First Congregational Church of Old Lyme. Even if you are unable to walk, you can contribute by sponsoring a walker. Envelopes for monetary donations can be found on the counter outside the Griswold Room and at the walk. Participants are asked to bring a non-perishable food item.

 

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Local Churches Hold Easter Services, Events During Holy Week; Read Our Full Listing

Photo by Aaron Burden courtesy of Unsplash.com.

Thursday, April 18, Maundy Thursday

Christ The King Church hosts the Mass of the Lord’s Supper at 7 p.m.

Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church hosts a Maundy Thursday Liturgy at 7 p.m. with washing of the feet, Holy Eucharist and Stripping of the Altar.

The First Congregational Church of Old Lyme (FCCOL) hosts the traditional service of Tenebrae at 7:30 p.m.

Friday, April 19, Good Friday

An Inter-denominational Walk to End Hunger will be held for the Shoreline Soup Kitchens and Pantries. Gather in the Griswold Room of Saint Ann’s at 9:45 a.m. for sign-in and prayer. The route follows Shore Rd. to Johnny Cake Hill Rd. to McCurdy Rd., past Christ the King Church to First Congregational Church, and then back again, a distance of approximately three miles.

All ages are welcome and encouraged to come. Even if you are unable to walk, you can contribute by sponsoring a walker. Envelopes for monetary donations can be found on the counter outside the Griswold Room and at the walk. Participants are asked to please bring a non-perishable food item. 

Christ The King Church hosts the Passion of our Lord and Veneration of the Cross at 3 p.m. and the Stations of the Cross at 7 p.m. followed by Confessions.

Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church hosts a Good Friday Liturgy Service at 12 p.m. There will be no celebration of the Holy Eucharist. The veneration of the Cross will take place outside – weather permitting.

Saturday, April 20, Easter Saturday

Christ The King hosts Blessing of the Food at 12 noon and an Easter Vigil Mass at 8 p.m. with choir, organ, timpani, and bells.

Sunday, April 21, Easter Sunday

Join clergy, members and friends of Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church, Christ the King Church and First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, for an Ecumenical Easter Sunrise Service. Meet at Griswold Point, Old Lyme, at 6 a.m., rain or shine. Follow signs to the location. If you need directions, call the church at 860.434.8686

Christ The King hosts:

  • a Mass of the Lord’s Resurrection at 8 a.m. and with choir and orchestra at 10:30 a.m.

For more information, visit this link

The FCCOL hosts:

  • Worship services at 9 and 11 a.m.

For more information, visit this link .

Saint Ann’s hosts:

  • Festival Holy Eucharist with full choir and instruments at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m.

For more information, visit this link.

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Old Lyme Board of Selectmen to Announce 2018 Citizen of the Year Tonight at Special Town Meeting

The Old Lyme Board of Selectmen will hold a Special Town Meeting Tuesday, April 16, to announce the 2018 Citizen of the Year.  The announcement, which is normally made at the end of January, had to be postponed from the previously scheduled date this year.

The meeting will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Meeting Hall of Old Lyme’s Memorial Town Hall at 52 Lyme St.

Also on the agenda will be two additional items as follows:

  • To consider and act on a proposal for the Town of Old Lyme to add 200 s.f. of Town-owned land to the area it is currently leasing out at the Boughton Road Fire Station at 189 Boston Post Rd., in Old Lyme to allow for an additional antenna to be installed on the cell tower now on the site and to make room for supporting equipment to be kept/ installed there.
  • To consider and act on proposed amendments to the Town’s Solid Waste Ordinance.

Copies of the proposed lease amendment and of a plan showing the current and proposed additional leased area and copies of the proposed amendments to the Solid Waste Ordinance are available on the Town website at www.oldlyme-ct.gov, and in the Town Clerk’s office at Town Hall during normal business hours.

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