August 24, 2019

Tickets on Sale for Gillette Castle State Park’s 100th Anniversary ‘Speakeasy Gala,’ Sept. 7

Visit with William Gillette as portrayed by Harold Niver at the ‘Speakeasy Gala,’ Sept. 7.

HADLYME — The Friends of Gillette Castle State Park are hosting a 100th Anniversary Roaring 20’s-themed ‘Speakeasy Gala’ at Gillette Castle, Saturday Sept. 7, to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the completion of Gillette Castle’s construction.

Gillette Castle, where the Speakeasy Gala will be held Sept. 7.

The event will be held at the castle and its grounds located at 67 River Rd., East Haddam and run from 5 to 9:30 p.m. Guests can stop by a “Speakeasy” for a wine tasting, courtesy of Staehly Farm & Winery. Afterwards, they can head up to the castle, which will be open for self-guided tours. Castle staff will be available to answer questions and give demonstrations.

While up at the castle, guests will be able to enjoy the musical stylings of flutist, Erin Vivero.

Back at the gala tent, they will toast the castle in celebration of its 100th year and enjoy high-end appetizers and hors d’oeuvres along with special Roaring 20’s themed cocktails.

Guests can then dance the night away to the music of the Screamin’ Eagles Jazz Band. During the evening, a silent auction will take place with many great items.

Participants will also have the opportunity to meet William and Helen Gillette portrayed by Harold and Theodora Niver. Photography services for the event will be provided by Cherish the Moment Photography.

The details of the program are subject to change in the event of inclement weather. Wear your best Roaring 20’s costume, but plan to walk uneven ground between the parking lot and castle.

Tickets are $100 each and can be purchased at https://www.gillettecastlefriends.org/event-registration-speakeasy-gala. Space is limited.

This milestone event is made possible with help from sponsors: Cherish the Moment Photography, Dutch Oil Co. Inc., Eastern Rental, Erin Vivero-Flute, Hadlyme Country Market, Northeast Printing Network LLC, Quicksilver Communication, Screamin’ Eagles Jazz Band, and Staehly Farm and Winery.

Sponsorships are still available. Contact the Friends for details.

All proceeds from this event benefit The Friends of Gillette Castle State Park.

The Friends of Gillette Castle State Park is a nonprofit, all-volunteer organization founded in 1998 that is dedicated to preserving the castle’s heritage. Membership information for the Friends of Gillette State Park will be available at the event.

For more information on the Friends of Gillette Castle, visit their website. Call Paul or Wendy at 860-222-7850 or email info@gillettecastlefriends.org with questions.

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Old Lyme Historical Society Presents its 2019 Board of Trustees

Board members of the Old Lyme Historical Society for the coming year gathered for a photo recently in the OLHS building on Lyme Street. Photo by James Meehan.

The Old Lyme Historical Society has announced its 2019-20 board of trustees. They are pictured in the photo above:

Back Row: John Pote, Nicholas Westbrook, Ross W. Higgins, Mark Lander, Jill Pilgrim, Mark Terwilliger, Mary Ellen Jewett, Cynthia Taylor, Michaelle Pearson, Robert DiNapoli and James Meehan.

Middle Row: Skip Beebe, Kevin Cole, Alison Mitchell, Sandra Joncus and Ted Freeman.

Front Row: Dawn McCarthy, Edith Twining, Ann Marie Jewett, Katie Balocca and Elaine Stiles.

Missing from photo are: Tim Griswold, Matthew LaConti, Todd Machnik and Andi Williams.

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In Case You Forgot, it’s Sales Tax-Free Week in CT Through Tomorrow!

It’s Sales Tax-Free Week in Connecticut Aug. 17-24.  Photo by Charles 🇵🇭 on Unsplash

Just a quick reminder that it’s Sales Tax-Free Week in Connecticut this week through Saturday, Aug. 24.

Clothing and shoes valued at $100 or less are exempted from sales tax with only specific types of clothing such as sports uniforms and shoes (e.g., cleats and specialty boots) still at full cost.  Details of exempted items are at this link.

It’s estimated Connecticut shoppers will save a collective $4.9 million during this week.

For more information on Sales Tax-Free Week, visit this link.

 

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Reemsnyder Firmly Denies Wrongdoing at CT Port Authority, Explains Absence at Transportation Hearing

Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder

OLD LYME — As has been widely reported, Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder did not appear in person at the state Transportation Committee’s hearing regarding the Connecticut Port Authority (CPA) on Tuesday.

She did, however, submit written testimony (published in full at the link below) in which she stated categorically in reference to the purchase by the CPA of photographs from her daughter, “Consistent with the State’s Ethics Code governing conflicts of interest, I had no involvement in any aspect of the sale, including no role in the initial decision, negotiations, payment, bookkeeping, or accounting for the transaction, and I did not benefit in any way financially from the transaction.”

Reemsnyder gave LymeLine.com the following explanation for her absence from the hearing in an e-mail Wednesday evening, in which she said, “I received the “invitation to attend” on Sunday night, as I was away the weekend, and the Town was committing to a bond for the Library. On Tuesday, I had to coordinate the signatures of the Term Sheet to secure the rate that was offered in a bid. So between reviewing the term sheet documents, accepting changes from the bank, and coordinating with the Treasurer for signatures, it tied up my morning.”

She continued, “In addition, I had an afternoon meeting that was already scheduled, and a Board of Finance meeting that night, which I take a considerable time to prepare for,” adding, “I did take the time on Monday, a day that I had a 4 PM Board of Selectmen meeting that I carefully prepare for, to articulate my written testimony.”

Visit this link to read Reemsnyder’s written testimony to the Transportation Committee.

 

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‘Silver Cornet Band’ Plays Final Concert of Sound View Season Tonight

The Silver Cornet Band is always a welcome addition to the Sound View Independence Day parade. File photo.

OLD LYME — The Town of Old Lyme and the Sound View Commission are sponsoring a family-friendly concert series at Sound View Beach this summer.

The final event in the 2019 series will be held Thursday, Aug.22, starting at 7 p.m. and will feature the Silver Cornet Band. Featured annually at the Norwich “Taste of Italy,” the Silver Cornet Band will present an enjoyable evening of all your favorite Italian songs and more. This concert is presented by arrangement with the American Federation of Musicians LOCAL #: 285-403

This free outdoor concert will be held on Hartford Ave. by Sound View Beach in Old Lyme, CT, at the flagpole from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

Bring your lawn chair and enjoy a great evening of music!

The rain location, if required, is the Shoreline Community Center at 39 Hartford Ave.

For more information about the concert, contact the Sound View Commission at www.oldlyme-ct.gov

 

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Kinship & Respite Fund Grants Available to Help Guardians With School Expenses

Saybrook Probate Judge Jeannine Lewis

LYME — With adults already thinking back-to-school, District of Saybrook Probate Judge Jeannine Lewis reminds court-appointed guardians to apply for grants for school supplies. The State of Connecticut Saybrook District Court includes the Town of Lyme along with the Towns of Chester, Clinton, Deep River, Essex, Haddam, Killingworth, Old Saybrook and Westbrook.  

Probate Courts have been awarding grants from the state Kinship Fund and Respite Fund to court-appointed guardians for more than a decade.  As of last October, eligibility for the grants was expanded beyond relatives serving as guardians to all those appointed by the Probate Courts who meet low-income guidelines.

A guardianship case typically arises in the Saybrook District Probate Court when parents are unable to care for their children due to mental illness, substance abuse or incarceration. In most cases, Probate Courts appoint a grandparent or other relative to care for the children. In some cases, courts appoint a close family friend, who has a long-standing relationship with the child. While foster parents receive funds from the state, court-appointed guardians do not; guardians who meet eligibility requirements can receive some assistance through the Kinship and Respite Fund grants.

“Grandparents, aunts and uncles, and neighbors, who keep children in their familiar environments instead of going to foster care, offer an enhanced quality of life to the children in their care and simultaneously save the state tens of millions of dollars. In many cases, the guardians don’t really have extra money to spend on a child’s basic needs,” said Judge Lewis. “Kinship and Respite Grants are there to help bridge the gap and make a huge difference to the households who apply for, and receive them.” 

The Kinship Fund assists guardians in paying for necessities such as school supplies, clothing, eyeglasses, school trips and sports fees. Often such expenses are paid directly to the providers. Kinship grants are capped at $500 per child or $2000 per family per year.

The Respite Fund helps guardians with the cost of child care, housing, transportation and food. These grants are capped at $2000 per year.

Guardians who meet income requirements can apply to both funds. Previous recipients must reapply to receive funds each year. Applications are posted at ctprobate.gov under the Children’s Matters tab.

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Letter to the Editor: ‘The Battle of the Beaches’; Who’s Oldest, How to Resolve it … Annually

To the Editor:

Both Revere Beach in Revere, Massachusetts; and Sound View Beach in Old Lyme proclaim themselves as “America’s oldest public beach”. Sound View history is well-documented in Jim Lampos’ wonderful “Rum Runners …”

Revere’s public beach dates back to 1896, with a rail link that actually began in 1875. Revere remains accessible today via the MBTA’s blue line. Revere was declared a national historic landmark in 2003.

Sound View Beach, on the other hand, claims that its public beach actually began in 1892, subsequent to H. J. Hilliard’s deeding of the beach property to the “unorganized general public for its perpetual use”; thus, making Sound View America’s oldest public beach.

Bad math? I don’t think so. Revere is less than 10 miles (as the drone flies) from both Harvard and M.I.T.

Incompetent Massachusetts historians? I don’t know. Perhaps a team from Yale’s Archaeologic Studies Program can sift through the ruins and ash of the Antique Shanty and corroborate our claim.

I believe that there is an opportunity to settle the issue right on the sand with an annual beach volleyball tournament between Revere and Sound View. In time this might rival both “The Race” between Harvard and Yale’s heavyweight rowers (which began in 1859); and “The Game” between Harvard and Yale’s football teams (which began in 1875). Otherwise, our respective Chambers of Commerce should get involved and resolve the dispute.

Sincerely,

Thomas D. Gotowka,
Old Lyme.

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Old Lyme Historical Society Presents Lecture Tonight on GIS Mapping of Duck River Cemetery

James Kolb presents a lecture titled, ‘Duck River Cemetery Project : GIS mapping of Historic Cemetery,’ Wednesday, Aug. 21. This photo shows graves in the Victorian section of Duck River cemetery in Old Lyme.

OLD LYME — On Wednesday, Aug. 21, the Old Lyme Historical Society (OLHS) presents a lecture by James Kolb titled, ‘Duck River Cemetery Project : GIS mapping of Historic Cemetery.’ The event will be held at the OLHS building at 55 Lyme St., Old Lyme, starting at 7 p.m.

One of the distinctive memorials in Duck River Cemetery.

Kolb is a senior History major at U Conn with a double minor in Geography and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). He lives in Old Lyme and attended Lyme-Old Lyme Schools.

For the past year and a half, he has been working to create a complete GIS mapping of the gravestones and monuments in the historic Duck River Cemetery in Old Lyme. GIS databases allow us to link text and visuals with precise geographic coordinates. Pick a place and ask “what’s here” or pick a text string (such as a name or date) and ask “where is it?” — GIS can answer.

This coming Wednesday, Kolb will present his project and explain its historical and cultural importance.

All are welcome. Admission is free. Donations are welcome with the proceeds benefitting the OLHS.

On Sept. 26, at 7 p.m., Ellis Jewett will present the final lecture of the 2019 series, “The History of Old Lyme Fire Department.”

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Explore ‘Essential Oils 101’ This Evening at Old Lyme Library


OLD LYME —
The Old Lyme Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library presents ‘Essential Oils 101’ on Wednesday, Aug. 21, at 6:30 p.m. with Alison Williams.

You may know about the beautiful scents that essential oils have, but do you know of their other benefits?  Attend a brief lecture on how these oils can play a role in your daily life to enhance mood, maintain healthy skin, and ward off seasonal threats.
Admission is free but registration is requested here for planning purposes.
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Nearly New Shop in Old Lyme Seeks New Store Manager

OLD LYME — The Nearly New Shop, a rapidly growing consignment store associated with St. Ann’s Church in Old Lyme, is looking for a new manager.

The position entails managing volunteers and staff, assisting with inventory management and pricing, visual merchandising, overseeing the day-to-day operations, daily and weekly revenue reporting and bank deposits and tax reporting as required by the State of Connecticut.

Qualified candidates should have previous retail sales experience, computer skills and familiarity with POS software, be professional and punctual. Candidates must be highly motivated with excellent communication skills , customer-oriented and interested in helping the store continue to grow and flourish.

The position is for 25+ hours per week and the person appointed must be able to work several weekdays as well as some Saturdays. Hourly rate will be based on experience.

Send resume and references to office@saintannsoldlyme.org

For more information about the store, visit this link. 

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Death of Mariette Elizabeth Hogan Announced, Mother of WFSB News Anchor Kevin Hogan

Mariette Gauvin Hogan 1926-2019

Mariette Elizabeth Hogan

Our Mom lived her 93 years of life with faith in GOD and for her loving family. She died suddenly the morning of Thursday, August 15, 2019 at home on the Feast of the Assumption. Her energy and enthusiasm never wavered.

Born in Quebec and raised in Hamden, Mariette graduated from Hamden High and worked for a New Haven Insurance company prior to meeting Army Veteran, Dan Hogan. They married on May 28, 1949 in Hamden and celebrated their 70th anniversary together this spring along with her four boys and their families.

While Mariette was a mother, aunt, grandmother and great grandmother to her family for 48 years, she was also known to hundreds of students and faculty at Assumption School in Ansonia as Mrs. Hogan, the school’s first secretary. She enjoyed life and volunteering; Assumption Church, Cub Scout Pack 19 Den mother, The Red Hat Society, Dancing lessons with Dad, Cruises to Alaska, The Caribbean and day trips.

Mom worked hard at making her home welcoming to family and friends whether creating a full Thanksgiving/Christmas dinner or just cheese and crackers. If you popped in unannounced she would be the first to offer cookies in the cookie jar.

As we begin to celebrate her long life and contributions to everyone she encountered, we know she is reunited now with her parents, Ernest and Marguerite Gauvin; brothers, Lucien and Raymond Gauvin and other loved ones.

Mariette leaves behind her beloved Dan; sons, David (Pat), Mark, John, and Kevin; grandchildren, David (Danielle), Stephen (Danielle), Shawn, Christopher, Carina, Ryan (Danielle), Meredith, Taylor, and Connor Hogan; great grandchildren; Michaela, David, Ava, Devyn, Brooklyn Hogan, and Anja Czaja; and sister, Jeannine Gauvin Saller (Bill), as well as nieces and nephews.

A Wake to celebrate Mariette’s life will take place Monday, August 19, 2019, from 4:00 to 7:00 pm at the Wakelee Memorial Funeral Home, 167 Wakelee Avenue, Ansonia. A Mass of Christian Burial (Meeting Directly at Church) will be held on Tuesday, August 20, 2019, 10:00 am in the Church of the Assumption, 61 North Cliff Street Ansonia. Interment will follow in All Saints Cemetery, North Haven.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Assumption School, Ansonia. Online condolences may be made at www.wakeleememorial.com.

To send flowers to the family of Mariette Hogan, please visit Tribute Store

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Enjoy a Pie & Ice Cream Social This Evening at Lyme Public Hall

LYME — An old-fashioned Pie and Ice Cream Social will be held at the newly air-conditioned Lyme Public Hall on Sunday, Aug. 18 from 6:30 to 8 p.m.

Home-made pies of all kinds will be available for enjoyment. The cost per person is $5, with children age 6 and under free.

Pies will also be available for sale while they last.  Entertainment will be provided by the Eight Mile River Band.

This event is sponsored by the Lyme Public Hall & Local History Archives, Inc.

It is a throwback to the early 20th century, when the Hall sponsored many such gatherings for the community.

The Lyme Public Hall is located at 249 Hamburg Rd. (Rte. 156) in Lyme, Conn. For more information, visit www.lymepublichall.org

The Lyme Public Hall & Local History Archives, Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to the appreciation of Lyme’s history, culture, and community through the preservation and use of the historic hall, its archives and historical programs.

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Today is Last Day of Lyme’s ‘Hamburg Fair’; Enjoy Traditional Favorites, Top Local Musicians, Food & Fun

view_of_fair

All the fun of the Hamburg Fair ends today, Sunday, Aug. 16, at 6 p.m.

LYME, CT — Milestone Midway Carnival rides, kids games, food concessions, oxen-pull, arts and crafts, and top local musicians are among the favorite attractions for visitors attending the annual Hamburg Fair, now celebrating its 118th year.  Hosted by The Lyme Grange, the fair takes place rain or shine Friday, Aug. 16, from 5 to 10:30 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 17, from 9 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. and Sunday, Aug. 18, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 1 Sterling City Road, Lyme, Conn. (located at the intersection of Rte. 156 and across from Reynolds’ Subaru).

General admission to the fair is $7 per person, children up to age 12 are free.   Senior Citizens and Active Service men and women receive a reduced rate of $5 per person (ID required).  Tickets are available for purchase at the entrance and $5 parking is offered on and nearby the site.

The three-day family friendly fair showcases many agricultural fair traditions including entries and exhibits for flowers, photography, crafts, quilts, fruits, vegetables and more.  The intimate size of the fair makes for easy navigation, parking and crowd control.

Llamas are to love ...

Llamas are to love … at the Hamburg Fair!

Young fairgoers will enjoy children’s games offered on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., which will include a watermelon eating contest, face-painting, a three-legged race and prize-winning contests.  Visitors are invited to watch the traditional horse pull on Saturday at 10 a.m., 4 p.m. and a new three-horse pull at 8 p.m.  The oxen pulls will take place throughout the day on Sunday, beginning at 9 a.m.

Free on-stage music talent and entertainment has become part of the Hamburg Fair tradition.  From country to rock, fiddlers to funk, there is something for everyone who enjoys live music.

The fair kicks off Friday evening music with performances in the amphitheater from country music favorites Charlie Marie and Nashville Drive.

See many local young artists hosted by Music Now and Nightingale’s Showcase on Saturday afternoon followed by A Completely Different Note – an a capella singing group from UConn featuring Braiden Sunshine, who will warm the stage up for Chris MacKay and the Toneshifters Saturday evening.

Sunday afternoon opens with something new – The Pickin’ Party, an all-inclusive musical experience where participants play and sing together as a group led by Ramblin’ Dan Stevens concluding with the traditional Bristol Old Time Fiddlers.

Rides are always a major attraction at the Fair.

Rides are always a major attraction at the Fair.

The full musical entertainment line-up is as follows:

Friday 

  • 6:00-8:00pm: Charlie Marie – Country Music Duo
  • 8:30-10:30pm: Nashville Drive – Rockin’ Modern Country Band

The ferris wheel at Hamburg Fair is always a popular attraction.

Saturday

  • 1:00pm -5:45pm: Music Now/Nightingale’s Showcase – Up and coming local talent
    • 1:00-1:20           Michael DeGaetano
    • 1:25-1:45           Emily May
    • 1:50-2:20          Jess Kegley
    • 2:25-2:55          Chris Gregor
    • 3:00-3:30         Drew Cathcart
    • 3:40-4:15          Shook
    • 4:20-4:55         Sophia and Addie
    • 5:05-5:45         Whiskey and Aspirin
  • 6:00-7:00pm: A Completely Different Note – Acapella singing group from UConn featuring Braiden Sunshine
  • 7:30- 9:30pm: Chris MacKay and the Toneshifters – upbeat eclectic mix of rockabilly, swing and blues

Sunday

  • 1:00-3:00pm: The Pickin’ Party – an all-inclusive musical experience where participants play and sing together as a group led by Ramblin’ Dan Stevens
  • 3:00-6:00pm: Bristol Old Time Fiddlers

Highlighted Sponsors of the Hamburg Fair include Reynolds’ Subaru, Hamilton Point Investments, GeoMatrix, Maddy Mattson Coldwell Banker Bank, Benedetto Heating & AC LLC, Bogaert Construction, Guilford Savings Bank, Middlesex Health, LymeLine.com, Lyme Public Hall Association, Block Design Build, Sapia Builders, Allyson Cotton William Pitt/Sotheby’s, and New England Power Equipment.

Visit www.hamburgfair.org for fair schedule, exhibit entry, and more information.

The 118th Hamburg Fair is hosted by Lyme Grange #147 and organized by many local volunteers to build community relationships and create lasting family memories.  Money raised from the event proceeds are used to fund the Grange Association, Lyme Fire Association and Lyme Ambulance Association.

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A la Carte: Baby Carrot Soup is Best Served Chilled

Okay, I am having more fun this summer than I have in, at least, two years.

Last year was fine, too, as was the summer before. But this year, I am pain-free, since I had my hip replacement on July 1. A couple of Sundays ago I went to our boules party and saw people I rarely see except during the summer and our Christmas party in early December. I am not on a team this year, but I was able to throw a couple of boules (the game itself is called pétanque, while the stainless steel balls are called boules, but we all call the game boules, too). If they need a fill-out a team for the next two games, I can actually play.

I am also having such a good time with my CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) produce. Unlike most farms, I can pick anything I want that is available at the farm stand. Last week I bought about eight pounds of tomatoes, some green frying peppers, a big loaf of bread (made by the chef of the Oyster Club in Mystic) and almost three bags of baby carrots.

Now, let us talk about baby carrots. The carrots I bought were about the length of my pinkie finger, but even thinner, and the carrot tops were still attached. They are nothing like the “baby carrots” you buy at the supermarket. Those carrots are pared and thrown into a machine to make them look as if they are all the same size.

Sure, they are really carrots, but the ones I bought are tiny, sweet and still taste like the soil they grew in. I ate a lot them, then made a carrot soup I chilled and served with a dollop of sour cream (or crème fraiche.) I found the recipe online, but added a few fillips.

Of course, feel free to use big or smaller supermarket carrots.

 

Chilled Baby Carrot Soup

3 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
1 medium  sweet onion, chopped
3 tablespoons fresh ginger, sliced thin
3 cloves fresh garlic, minced
1 pound of carrots, pared and diced (if they are really baby carrots, just clean them of tops and soil)
1 carton of low-salt chicken stock or vegetable stock
One-half teaspoon each of salt and yellow curry (I was out of Indian curry so I added a little red chili paste)
One-quarter teaspoon red pepper flakes (use less if you don’t like things too spicy)
1 can unsweetened coconut milk
Salt and pepper to taste

In a heavy-bottomed stock pot, add oil over medium heat. Add onion, ginger and garlic. Cook until just translucent, about 5 minutes. Add diced carrots and cook for another 3 or 4 minutes. Add stock and cook until just boiling, then reduce heat and add salt and yellow curry (or a quarter teaspoon or less red or yellow chili paste and/or red pepper flakes). Cook on medium-low for about 30 minutes. Remove from the heat and let cool for at least an hour.

Using an immersion stick (which I do not have, I used my big Ninja), purée the soup. Put it back on the heat and add a can of coconut milk. Cook until hot and taste for seasoning. You can serve the soup hot, but I chill it and serve it cold with a dollop of sour cream or crème fraiche.

About the Author: Lee White, a local resident, has been writing about restaurants and cooking since 1976 and has been extensively published in the Worcester (Mass.) Magazine, The Day, Norwich Bulletin, and Hartford Courant.  She currently writes Nibbles and a cooking column called A La Carte for the Times and Shore Publishing newspapers, and Elan, a quarterly magazine, all of which are now owned by The Day. 

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Reading Uncertainly? ‘Identity’ by Francis Fukuyama

Stanford University’s Francis Fukuyama always challenges our minds. From his The End of History and the Last Man, addressing our futures after the end of the Cold War (1992), and continuing with The Origins of Political Order (2011) and Political Order and Political Decay (2014), two monster 600+ page tomes, his newest, and briefest (a slim 183 pager!) is Identity.

Who on earth are we? Fukuyama sees we humans as trying to manage, simultaneously, two conflicting pressures. The first is “isothymia,” — “the demand  to be respected on an equal basis with all other people,” and “megalothymia” — “the desire to be recognized as superior.”  This disparity has “historically existed in all societies; it cannot be overcome; it can only be channeled or moderated.”

He continues: “Contemporary identity politics is driven by the quest for equal recognition by groups that have been marginalized by their societies. But that desire for equal recognition can easily slide over into a demand for recognition of the group’s superiority.”

His themes are thymos (the third part of the soul), recognition, dignity, identity, immigration, nationalism, religion and culture. He calls on many earlier observers: Socrates, Luther, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Hobbes, Locke, Mill, Nietzsche, Herder, Adam Smith, Sartre, Freud, and Kahneman, arguing that the demand for dignity, “should somehow disappear is neither possible nor desirable.” Resentment at indignities remains a powerful force, a “craving for recognition” we must learn to understand and balance.

National identities are “critical for the maintenance of a successful political order.” They begin with a “shared belief in the legitimacy of the country’s political system, whether that system is democratic or not.” They include physical security, quality of government, economic development, “a wider radius of trust,” and strong social safety nets, all of which eventually make possible “liberal democracy itself.”

His chapter on religion and nationalism is particularly challenging. Can people who share a particular culture and language be subsumed into a global belief system (Hinduism; Buddhism; Communism; Islam; Christianity)? Probably not, but these systems continue to try. The advent of social media makes “identity” now the property of groups, not individuals.

Fukuyama cannot resist a comment of Trump, a “political figure who almost perfectly describes … narcissism: narcissism led Trump into politics, but a politics driven less by public purposes than his own inner need for public affirmation.” And “Trump (is) the perfect practitioner of the ethics of authenticity that defines our age: he may be mendacious, malicious, bigoted, and un-presidential, but at least he says what he thinks.”

“What is to be done?” he asks.  One, ”confusion over identity” is a “condition of living in the modern age.” Two, a “pan-European identity may someday emerge.” Three, “education is the critical ingredient”, but it must include a process of universal not parochial values, economic mobility, interdependence, and a growing exposure to other humans and their customs.

We humans seem to be simultaneously breaking down walls and building new ones!

Editor’s Note: ‘Identity’ by Francis Fukuyama was published by Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, New York 2018

Felix Kloman

About the Author: Felix Kloman is a sailor, rower, husband, father, grandfather, retired management consultant and, above all, a curious reader and writer. He’s explored how we as human beings and organizations respond to ever-present uncertainty in two books, ‘Mumpsimus Revisited’ (2005) and ‘The Fantods of Risk’ (2008). A 20-year resident of Lyme, he now writes book reviews, mostly of non-fiction, which explores our minds, our behavior, our politics and our history. But he does throw in a novel here and there. For more than 50 years, he’s put together the 17 syllables that comprise haiku, the traditional Japanese poetry, and now serves as the self-appointed “poet laureate” of Ashlawn Farm Coffee, where he may be seen on Friday mornings. His late wife, Ann, was also a writer, but of mystery novels, all of which begin in a village in midcoast Maine, strangely reminiscent of the town she and her husband visited every summer.

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Old Lyme’s Suzanne Thompson Discusses Shared Solar on her WLIS/WMRD Radio Show, Listen Anytime

Suzanne Thompson’s guest this week on her CT Outdoors radio show is David Desiderato, Connecticut Fund for the Environment’s Shared Solar Coordinator.

OLD LYME — What is Shared Solar and did you know that it is coming to Connecticut? It’s a way for people who don’t have the right roof or location for solar panels to reduce their electricity costs by participating in a shared solar project.
Find out how you and your community can participate in this new program on CT Outdoors with Suzanne Thompson of Old Lyme.  Thompson’s guest this week is David Desiderato, Connecticut Fund for the Environment’s Shared Solar Coordinator.
Listen Saturday, Aug. 17, 1-1:30 p.m. or Sunday, Aug. 18, 7-7:30 a.m., on WLIS 1420 AM/Old Saybrook and WMRD 1150 AM/Middletown, streaming at http://www.wliswmrd.net.  Or play back on your PC or Mac anytime from http://www.wliswmrd.net, click the On Demand icon, look for pop-up screen from radiosecurenetsystems.net, and scroll to CT-Outdoors-81319—Shared-Solar-Toolkit. 
You also can learn more on CFE’s website, http://www.ctenvironment.org, and download your Shared-Solar-Toolkit at Shared Solar Toolkit – CFE/Save the Sound
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‘Fresh Expressions’ on View at Lyme Art Association through Sept. 30

‘Kayak rack’ by Neil Ruenzel is the featured work of the ‘Fresh Expressions’ exhibition, which opens Friday at the Lyme Art Association.

OLD LYME — The juried member show titled, Fresh Expressions: Late Summer Painting and Sculpture celebrates portraits, landscapes, still life paintings and sculpture and is on view through Sept. 30.

Gallery hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am-5 pm, and by appointment. Admission is free but a $5 donation is suggested.

Lyme Art Association is located at 90 Lyme Street, Old Lyme.

For further information, call (860)434-7802 or visit lymeartassociation.org

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Death Announced of Joan K. Kelley of Lyme; Memorial Service to be Held in Old Lyme, Sept. 7

JOAN K. KELLEY 
1942-2019

Joan Kelley and Sophie.

Joan K. Kelley, 77, of Lyme, Connecticut passed away peacefully on July 23rd, 2019 at her home on Beaver Brook Road after an extended struggle with cancer.  She was surrounded by close friends and caregivers, and importantly, by her two beloved golden retriever companions, Mollie and Zoie, as was her wish. 

Joan was the Office Manager for the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme for the past 12 years, a position she truly loved and performed with extraordinary skill, grace, compassion and unfailing good humor  In that capacity, she was the first person that many people encountered when they walked through the church doors, or when they called on the phone. She was the very definition of the values of hospitality and grace to which the church is dedicated. But for so many who had the privilege of knowing her, she was much more than a colleague, or a welcoming presence in the office.  She was a dear friend.  Above all, Joan loved gathering with friends, being with friends, cooking for friends, and spending time with those she cared about deeply. 

And when the time came, they surrounded her bedside, and helped her to know that she wasn’t alone, that she was loved, and that she was an important part of their lives.  Joan taught all who knew her something of what it is to be a friend. 

Joan was an accomplished artist, and had a passion for gardening, knitting and quilting.  She was also a great lover of poetry, especially the poems of Mary Oliver.   A few months ago, she shared with her friends Mary Oliver’s “When Death Comes.”  Despite the title, it’s a hopeful poem, as Joan always was.  The poem will be read at her memorial service at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme on Saturday, September 7th, 2019 at 2 p.m. 

Joan is survived by her brother Peter Winkler and his wife Lee Rogers of Gilbert, Arizona.  Also by her daughter Kathryn Johnston and her husband Blake, by her son David Minns and his wife Carrie, and by five grandchildren, Liam, Katie, Hanna, Jack and Will, all of Portland, Oregon. 

Contributions in lieu of flowers may be made in her name to The First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, 2 Ferry Road, Old Lyme, CT 06371, in care of The Minister’s Discretionary Fund. To share a memory of Joan or send a condolence to her family please visit www.rwwfh.com . Arrangements by the Robinson, Wright & Weymer Funeral Home in Centerbrook.

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Sound View Sewer Vote in Old Lyme Passes by Over 300 Votes, Pappalardo Says Schism Created: Sound View vs the Town

OLD LYME — The Sound View Sewer Project in Old Lyme passed comfortably by 883 votes to 565, after all votes were double-counted in Tuesday’s referendum. The proposal therefore secured a margin of 318 votes with 61 percent voting in favor of bonding $9.44 million to fund the proposed sewer project and 39 percent voting against.  A total of 1448 residents and/or property owners voted representing less than 30 percent of registered voters.

After the result had been announced, Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder commented, “I think the people spoke and it is time to move on to next steps. We made sure that everyone had a chance to vote with a full day of a referendum, absentee ballots available and several public info sessions.”

Sound View Commission Chairman Frank Pappalardo. File photo.

Asked for his reaction to the result, Frank Pappalardo, who is chair of Old Lyme’s Sound View Commission and a director of the Sound View Beach Association, Inc., told LymeLine.com in an email, “Today’s referendum vote in favor of a $9.5 mil bond for sewers is disappointing. I believe that many in Old Lyme were not aware complexities regarding the sewer issue facing Old Lyme and specifically the Sound View area.”

He added, “The cost recovery method of placing the entire burden on a small group of property owners is unprecedented. And to further the concerns are the unrealistic individual property owner costs in excess of $15,000 and reaching over $100,000 for some.”

Pappalardo concluded, “We’ve work so hard to unify the town and beach community and have made great strides. Now with this vote we have created a schism: Sound View vs the Town. And set in motion a number of legal challenges.  There must be a way to find common ground and make this work for all in Old Lyme.”

For a fuller account of the implications of the referendum, read Mary Biekert’s article titled, “Old Lyme voters approve $9.44 million Sound View sewer project,” published this evening on theday.com.

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Old Lyme Residents Vote in Referendum Today on Sound View Sewer Project

The Cross Lane Polling Station in Old Lyme open at 6 a.m.

Old Lyme voters go to the polls today to vote in a town-wide referendum on whether the Town should appropriate $9.5 million to fund the proposed sewer project in the Sound View neighborhood.

The question on the ballot is: “Shall the Town of Old Lyme appropriate $9,500,000 for construction of the Sound View and Miscellaneous Town Area B Sewer Project and authorize the issuance of bonds, notes and other obligations to finance said appropriation? ” The response options are simply Yes or No.

The Cross Lane Polling Station opens at 6 a.m. today and closes at 8 p.m. Voters must present identification in order to vote.

We will publish the result here on LymeLine.com very shortly after their announcement.

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