August 24, 2019

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RTC picnic AD 2019 for Lyme Lines (1)

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Lymes’ Senior Center Summer Sounds Concert Series

Sumer Sounds Concert Series 2019

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Kokomo’s

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Turtle Talk Tonight! RTP Estuary Center Hosts Presentation in Old Lyme

Ever wonder how that Spotted Turtle you saw swimming under the ice survives the winter, or why that Snapping Turtle crawls across your backyard every June?

Come learn about the impressive diversity of species that share our state, and the interesting ways they make their livings in our midst.

Starting at 7 p.m. this evening at the Roger Tory Peterson Estuary Center  in Old Lyme, RTPEC staff and volunteers will highlight the habitat needs and behaviors of different species, as well as conservation threats and the things you can do to help these charismatic creatures.

Learn how water quality affects turtle habitats, and get up close to live turtles.

The cost is $25 per person; register here.

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Halls Road Improvements Committee Open House, June 15

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Safe Grad Committee Hosts Cow Chip Raffle Today!

The Lyme-Old Lyme High School Safe Grad Committee is hosting a Cow Chip Raffle, Sunday, April 7, at Hamburg Fair Grounds.  Proceeds from the event will benefit the graduation night celebrations for the Class of 2019

Buy your deed and on the day of the event squares will be assigned by a random drawing.  There will be a huge bingo board created at the event so participants can see the location of their square.  Now the fun part comes as the cow determines the winner!  The game is over when the cow places its “chip” on what becomes the winning number.

Prize amount will be determined by total deeds sold.

Participants do not have to be present to win.

To purchase tickets or for further information, contact Beth Cote at BethCote@sbcglobal.net or 860-460-6901 or Tracy McGlinchey at TracyMcGlinchey@comcast.net or 860-227-2131.

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Lyme-Old Lyme Junior Women Sponsor Bingo Fundraiser Tonight for Lyme Ambulance Association

On Saturday, April 6, the Lyme-Old Lyme Junior Women’s Club is sponsoring a Bingo Evening with cash and other valuable prizes galore at the Hamburg Fire House, 213 Hamburg Rd. in Lyme.

All proceeds will benefit the Lyme Ambulance Association, which, apart from Lyme, is also the first responder to calls in the lower portion of East Haddam and provides Mutual Aid to both East Haddam and Old Lyme.

Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and play starts at 6 p.m.

Drinks and snacks will be provided.  The event is BYOB.

Tickets are $20 per person for 10 game and $1 or $2 for specials.  Pre-registration earns you an extra game!

For tickets and questions, call Beverly at 860-434-5667.

 

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See ‘Anything Goes’ Before it Goes! Today at 2 or 7pm

Philip Sweeney, as Billy Crocker, and Elyza Learned as Reno, play the lead roles in ‘Anything Goes,’ which opens tonight at Lyme-Old Lyme High School.

It’s Delightful, It’s Delicious … it’s Anything Goes!

An exciting moment for the ocean liner’s passengers in Anything Goes.

Lyme-Old Lyme High School’s (LOLHS) spring musical Anything Goes opens tonight: Welcome Aboard!

The full cast of ‘Anything Goes’ in the dress rehearsal earlier this week.

Anything Goes follows nightclub singer Reno Sweeney on her voyage from New York City to England aboard the ocean liner the S.S. American. Reno’s friend Billy Crocker, a stockbroker, has stowed away aboard the ship in pursuit of his love, Hope Harcourt.

‘Anything Goes’ Director and professional opera singer Brian Cheney, second from right, gives some advice to Thomas Pennie (center) who plays Lord Evelyn Oakleigh in the musical.

The only problem is that Hope is already engaged to a rich British man, Lord Evelyn Oakleigh.

Rehearsing a scene are from left to right, Margot Paynter (back), Olivia Rugg, who plays Evangeline Harcourt, Liam Clark who approses the role of Eli Whitney, Caroline King (back), the male lead, Billy Crocker, played by Philip Sweeney, Maggie Rommel, Madison Babcock, Sadie Frankel (black/white striped sweater in the back-plays Henrietta T. Dobson), and Hannah Morrison (red shirt-plays Hope Harcourt

The show includes memorable songs by Cole Porter that many audience members will recognize, such as I Get a Kick Out of You, It’s De-Lovely, You’re the Top, and of course, Anything Goes. 

Joining the love triangle is Moonface Martin, Public Enemy #13 who has boarded the boat disguised as a minister, and his sidekick Erma. Together with the help of the dancing sailors and two Chinese gangsters, Reno and Moonface must assist Billy on his mission to win back Hope’s heart.

Anything Goes features choreography by Bethany Haslam of The Dance Center of Old Lyme, set construction by LOLHS Art Department Chair William Allik, costume design by Denise Golden, music direction by LOL Middle School Chorus teacher Laura Gladd, and direction by Brian Cheney.

Although this is Cheney’s first time directing a production at LOLHS, he has been the assistant director to Laura Gladd at LOL Middle School for the past few years as well as directed many other high school and college productions.

Cheney has also been a professional performer for more than 20 years and is an acclaimed opera singer both nationally and internationally. He says, “I think what’s been the most fulfilling thing for me is to be able to give the students a glimpse at what a professional rehearsal process is like.” Cheney adds, “It’s been great being able to support them in that way.”

“Mr. Cheney really lets you as the actor discover who the character is yourself,” says junior Philip Sweeney, who plays Billy Crocker. “Then he’ll just make any changes if there’s any problems.”

“And if you have a question, you know he has an answer for you,” adds senior Elyza Learned, who plays Reno Sweeney. “And if he doesn’t right away, he’ll get back to you.”

In addition to Sweeney and Learned, the musical stars senior Hannah Morrison as Hope Harcourt, junior Jonathan Hamilton as Moonface Martin, and senior Thomas Pennie as Lord Evelyn Oakleigh. The show also features senior Liam Clark as Eli Whitney and senior Olivia Rugg as Evangeline Harcourt, and senior Kendall Antoniac as Erma.

“I hope people come see the show because we’ve worked really hard, and it’s also really funny,” says Morrison. “There’s some awesome dancing and our costumes are going to be great and our set is really cool…overall, it’s just going to be a great show!”

“It’s a classically-period, comedic piece so it’s a really funny show,” adds Cheney. “And I believe this is going to be one of the best musical performances the community has seen at the high school.”

Anything Goes opens at LOLHS on Thursday, Feb. 7 at 7 p.m. There are also 7 p.m. performances on Friday, Feb. 8, and Saturday, Feb. 9. Additionally, there is a matinee performance at 2 p.m. on Saturday.

Tickets can be purchased at this link or at the door, $12 for students and senior citizens and $15 for adults.

For more information, call the high school at 860-434-1651

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Halls Rd. Improvement Committee Offers ‘Frequently Asked Questions’

We received the following Frequently Asked Questions from BJ Bernblum, the Halls Rd. Improvements Committee Chairman. He asked that we publish them since, in his words, “At the Old Lyme public meeting held on Dec. 6, 2018, and in emailed comments received by the Halls Road Improvements Committee afterwards, a number of questions were raised that need to be answered.”

Bernblum states that this document of Frequently Asked Questions prepared by the committee, dated Jan. 28, and published below, “… attempts to do this.”

A view of Halls Rd. today looking north. Photo courtesy of the Yale Urban Design Workshop.

We thank the Halls Rd. Improvement Committee for sending us these FAQ’s and, as always, we look forward to hearing reader’s thoughts on them.

Question 1:  Why should the town get into the development business?  Isn’t that better left to private developers?

Answer:  It shouldn’t and yes.  We are not suggesting that the town take charge of development on Halls Road but, rather, that we take steps to encourage private parties to develop the neighborhood in a manner and direction that will comply with current requirements (safety, complete streets, ADA accessibility, etc.) and best serve the needs of the community.  These steps would include adopting a “master plan” and guidelines for future development, investing limited funds in infrastructure and public spaces, and making appropriate changes to the town’s zoning code and Plan of Conservation and Development, all intended to allow for and encourage private developers to invest in upgrading existing structures and undertaking new construction. 

Question 2:  Halls Road is fine the way it is—why is the town considering changes? 

Answer:   Halls Road, our central commercial center, has developed haphazardly over many years.  It is inhospitable to pedestrian and bicycle traffic, portions of it are esthetically unattractive or looking tired, and residents currently have to leave town to seek products or services they cannot obtain locally. 

If nothing is done, we are concerned that the business environment will deteriorate, businesses will close, and even fewer goods and services will be available.  With thoughtful planning and inducements, we should be able to:

i.  improve the business environment, thereby assisting existing businesses, attracting new ones, and growing and diversifying the tax base;

ii.  create a physically-attractive neighborhood, safe and inviting for pedestrians and bicyclists;

iii. stimulate the development of housing that is inviting to down-sizing residents and to young folks wanting to move to town; and

iv. provide public spaces for civic events and recreation.

The ultimate objective is to create a vibrant town center that has more to offer the citizens of Old Lyme and is one we can be proud of. 

Question 3:  What is the new plan for Halls Road?

Answer:  The plan does not yet exist; it is still developing and is flexible. The goal is to reach majority agreement on what the Halls Road neighborhood might ideally look like.  Initially, we held a public meeting to obtain feedback regarding those elements residents would like to see included.  The meeting produced many ideas, including the ability to park once and walk the entire road, creation of green space with a community gathering area, development of mixed-use facilities (or a mix of uses), and esthetic enhancements.  

We recently held a second public meeting to gain further input, and will hold more meetings in the future.  The Yale Urban Design Workshop is assisting us in developing a master plan, but we need substantial input from town residents and stakeholders in order to come up with sound ideas that enjoy widespread support.

Question 4:  What is the process for developing a master plan?

Answer:  Once we have enough public input to begin to see the outlines of a plan, we will present these ideas to local and state governmental authorities for input and necessary approvals.  At the town level, the plan will likely need buy-in from the Board of Selectmen, the Board of Finance, the Zoning Commission and the Planning Commission, as well as amendments to the zoning regulations and the Plan of Conservation and Development. 

At the state level, we will need approval from the Department of Transportation, which owns Halls Road.  A master plan can be finalized only when it enjoys broad public support and satisfies governmental requirements.

Question 5:  What is the anticipated time-frame for implementing the plan?

Answer:  The Committee intends to develop a master plan and set of guidelines for the future development of Halls Road.  The plan would consist of several phases to be pursued in an orderly sequence over time, so that work done in one phase supports, or at least does not interfere with, improvements to be made in a subsequent phase.  Each phase will also be expected to “stand on its own,” in the sense that its completion will add value to the town even if subsequent phases are not pursued. 

For example, an initial phase might consist of improving access, such as by adding sidewalks, a bike path, improved signage, and a pedestrian bridge over the Lieutenant River.  The timing and exact nature of subsequent phases, and the changes that will be implemented, will of course depend on future events, including available funding and the decisions made by private developers and property-owners. 

Hence the timing is unpredictable, but this is surely a multi-year process over which the master plan will evolve, perhaps substantially but consistent with the guidelines, to address changes over time in the town’s commercial and residential needs.

Question 6:  Will the plan result in unfettered growth and additional traffic?

Answer:  We view this project as a rehabilitation of the Halls Road neighborhood, and any potential growth must be managed to fit the needs and the character of the town.  For example, we would encourage architectural design in keeping with the small New England town flavor of Old Lyme. 

There is no intent or appetite to change our “town business center” into a dense retail environment but, instead, to attract a limited number of businesses that our neighbors would like to enjoy locally (e.g., a restaurant, coffee shop, bakery, jewelry store), and enhance the patronage for existing businesses.  These changes would increase auto traffic somewhat. 

However, we intend to limit congestion through a design that encourages folks to park once and then walk the neighborhood, rather than drive from place to place.

Question 7:  How can this plan survive the overflow traffic from tie-ups on I-95?

Answer:  These tie-ups will not be materially exacerbated by a normal increase in Halls Road traffic, and they occur infrequently enough so that they should not discourage business development along the road, which is currently a pass-through. 

The plan might call for locating parking behind the main shopping and business buildings and creating tertiary access roads and walkways, which would mitigate the Halls Road bottleneck.  For example, we might explore the construction of a local access road south of the current Old Lyme Marketplace buildings (the Big Y plaza).  

Question 8:  Will private property owners be required to make changes or invest money?

Answer:  No one will be required to do anything.  Other than the state right-of-way along Halls Road, the real estate in question is privately owned and changes must be voluntary.

The expectation is that property owners will see the advantages of making changes to their property in order to increase profitability.  Alternatively, they may discover that they can sell their property at an attractive price to a motivated developer who is ready to invest in a significant project consistent with the town’s guidelines. 

Question 9  How will the plan be financed and how much will it raise property taxes?

Answer:  The objective is to have this project be tax neutral or result in a tax rate decrease because of an increase in the tax base.  The public infrastructure would hopefully be financed, at least in part, through state and federal grants, and from new tax revenue generated by the new construction, although this might initially require town bonding.  The private development will be financed by developers and property owners, who may also help pay for common amenities such as wastewater management, sidewalks and landscaping. 

The town might consider creating a Tax Increment Financing (TIF) District like the one just approved in Old Saybrook, under which new tax revenue generated by new construction may be allocated, in whole or in part, to improvements in the district and to financial inducements to developers.  In all events, any material town expenditures will have to be approved at a town meeting.

Question 10:  What happens if I-95 is widened in the future or the exit or entrance ramps are reconfigured?

Answer:  That question is impossible to answer, not knowing what properties the government might want to seize by eminent domain.  However, given the current economic condition of the state and the absence of any such plans, we do not think it prudent to forego changes benefitting the town because of a remote, future risk.

Question 11:  What do you mean by residential housing on Halls Road and why is it needed?

Answer:  We would seek to enable the construction of reasonably-priced rental properties and condominiums.  Many concerns have been expressed about young people who want to move to town (perhaps after college) or out of their parents’ homes, and older folks who are retiring or downsizing and would like to remain in Old Lyme, but cannot do so because of the lack of appropriate housing. 

The Halls Road neighborhood, as envisioned with expanded resources, offers an ideal location for this housing, since both groups prefer to live in areas where they can walk to stores, restaurants, banks, recreational facilities and other amenities.  Furthermore, the retailers in the neighborhood would surely benefit from the presence of these residents.

Question 12:  How do you intend to address increased wastewater?

Answer:  A good question that must be addressed, but there are solutions other than municipal sewers.  For example, it might be feasible to construct a community treatment facility that would process the wastewater to a condition where it can safely be discharged.  

Question 13:  How can the town validate what types of improvements would be the most successful for the town, its businesses and the tax base?

Answer:  One way would be to retain a professional consultant such as CERC (the Connecticut Economic Resource Center) to perform an economic review of Old Lyme and the region, and recommend what improvements would likely be most viable.  Such a study would give our residents and businesses guidance on the development possibilities and the impact on taxes.  It would also serve as an attraction to serious investors, both for its content and as an indication of the town’s seriousness about supporting the project.

Question 14:  How can I have input to the plan or keep updated on the progress?

Answer:  There are several ways for you to stay informed and be heard, and we hope you will utilize them.  We will hold more public meetings and focus groups, and intend to develop a page on the town’s website where we can provide updates and receive input.  You can also send an email to the Halls Road Improvements Committee at hallsroadcommittee@oldlyme-ct.gov, or ask to speak personally with any of us.

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Letter to the Editor: Pre-K for Some, But Not All

SEE COMMENT ADDED 1/27. According to the writer of the Comment, the Region 18 Board of Education has changed its proposed policy to include children born between Sept. 1 and Dec. 31

To the Editor:

The LOL Board of Education has proposed to expand the current special-needs lottery pre-K program into one available to all children in the district. This is great news!  Unfortunately, there is a gaping hole in the proposed program. It introduces a September 1st age eligibility cut off date even though the state of Connecticut strongly encourages children turning five before January 1st to enter kindergarten. This discrepancy means that children born after September 1st cannot participate in the program the year before they are slated to begin kindergarten.

Leaving out children born in the last four months of the year results in one out of every three children in a potential incoming kindergarten class being excluded from attending pre-K. It seems to directly contradict the stated intentions of the program. If the proposed pre-K program wants to “ensure limited variability among kindergartners in terms of skills and school readiness,” then why are we leaving out one in three kids?  Surely kindergarten teachers would prefer all of their students, not just some, have access to pre-K before coming to them.

This program has the potential to be a transformative equalizing force for our children and for our town, but it needs to truly include every child in order to do so. If the program is just available for some of our children while leaving out the youngest members of an incoming kindergarten class, it becomes instead something great for only some and a way for others to be left behind, and that isn’t universal or fair.

If you are interested in signing a letter in support of having the LOL pre-K expansion program’s age eligibility align with that of Connecticut kindergarten, please go to https://tinyurl.com/preK4all and thanks!

Sincerely,

Danielle Kuczkowski,
Old Lyme.

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‘The Country School’ Hosts Open House Today

The Country School jn Madison is holding an Open House on Sunday, Jan. 27, from 1 to 3:30 p.m.

This is an opportunity to meet engaged students and passionate teachers. Also, learn about the rigorous academic program and commitment to honoring the creativity, sense of wonder, and exuberance of childhood.

Learn about the school’s signature programs – STEAM, Elmore Leadership, Outdoor Education, and Public Speaking – and their rich offerings in the arts and athletics.

Tour the transformed 23-acre campus. Hear how alumni are thriving at top high schools and colleges across the country.

Founded in 1955, The Country School is a coeducational, independent day school serving students in PreSchool through Grade 8. To learn more and register, visit https://www.thecountryschool.org/admission/open-house.

For information about the school’s $10,000 60th Anniversary Merit Scholarship opportunity for students entering Grades 4-8, visit http://www.thecountryschool.org/scholarship.

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Get Organized with Ellen Madere Tonight at Old Lyme Library

Ellen Madere will discuss tactics for getting organized at the OL-PGN Library Wednesday evening.

Keep those New Year’s Resolutions and get organized! 

Join an informal, enlightening, and entertaining discussion with Ellen Madere at Old Lyme’s Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library on Wednesday, jan. 23, at 6:30 p.m. She will answer your questions and give you room-by-room tips and tricks to stay ahead of the clutter. 

Madere is a contributor for RealSimply’s “Ask the Organizer” and Principal Consultant for Ellen Gets it Done.  She will make order out of your chaos and you’ll live happily ever after!

The event is free but advance registration is requested for planning purposes either at this link or by calling the library at 860-434-1684.

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Wildcats Overwhelm Bellringers 70-29, Continue Unbeaten Conference Run

Playing on their home court, Old Lyme crushed East Hampton Monday evening ultimately winning by 70-29. Coach Kirk Kaczor said by email, “The boys played their best game of the season.” 

Aedan Using leaps to make a shot in this file photo from the Old Lyme game against the Haddam-Killingworth Cougars.

Aedan Using led the team with an extraordinary 21 points, 14 rebounds, five assists and four steals. 

Brady Sheffield added 11 points and, in Kaczor’s word, “… did a fantastic job of setting the tone on the defensive end.”

Connor Hogan added 10 points. 

The win advances the Wildcats to 6-1 overall and 6-0 in the Shoreline Conference. 

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Red Cross Offers Incentives to Blood Donors During January

The American Red Cross is offering a special incentive to increase blood and platelet donations in January, a historically challenging time. All donors who present at Red Cross blood drives in New England (Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and Rhode Island) and New York will receive a $5 Dunkin’ Gift Card by email *. 

Also, all those who come to donate between Jan. 1 and Jan. 6 will receive a free long-sleeved Red Cross T-shirt**. 

“January is a time we tend to see a dip in the blood supply,” said Patricia Sablitz, director of donor recruitment, Red Cross Biomedical Services. “Donors may not have had time to come in during the holidays, and the threat of severe weather is always looming here in the northeast. This incentive is one way to remind donors the need for blood doesn’t take a winter break.” 

In order to receive the gift card, all donors must have a valid email on file with the Red Cross at the time of donation. In addition to the emailed gift card, donors who give blood or platelets from Jan. 1-6, 2019 will receive a free long-sleeved T-shirt**. 

Download the American Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit RedCrossBlood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age in most states  (16 with parental consent where allowed by state law), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements. 

Blood and platelet donors can save time at their next donation by using RapidPass® to complete their pre-donation reading and health history questionnaire online, on the day of their donation, before arriving at the blood drive. To get started, follow the instructions at RedCrossBlood.org/RapidPass or use the Blood Donor App. About the American Red Cross 

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit RedCross.org or CruzRojaAmericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.  

*Red Cross donors in CT, MA, ME, NH, NY, RI and VT who receive this offer and come in to donate during promotional time frame are eligible (Jan. 1-31, 2019). Limit one (1) per donor. This offer is non-transferable and not redeemable for cash. Offer is subject to change at any time in the promotional time frame. Instructions on how to redeem the gift certificate voucher will be emailed to the address listed in your American Red Cross donor profile approximately 30 days after an attempted donation. The gift certificate voucher can be redeemed at GiftCertificates.com. © 2019, DD IP Holder LLC. The Dunkin’ trademarks, logos and designs are registered trademarks of DD IP Holder LLC and used under license. Dunkin’ Donuts is not a sponsor of this promotion. The Dunkin’ Gift Card is subject to complete terms and conditions, which can be found at https://www.dunkindonuts.com/content/dunkindonuts/en/help/terms.html#ddcard

**While supplies last. All items are non-transferable and not redeemable for cash.

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New Year’s Schedule for Lyme, Old Lyme Town Halls

Lyme Town Hall and Lyme Transfer Station will be closed Monday, Dec. 31, and Tuesday, Jan. 1, in observance of the New Year’s holiday.

Old Lyme Town Hall will be closed on New Year’s Day (Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019.)

Old Lyme Transfer Station will be closed on New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day.

Lymes’ Senior Center has special holiday hours as follows: 
New Year’s Eve (Monday, Dec. 31): 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Closed New Year’s Day, (Tuesday, Jan. 1)

Old Lyme trash and recycling will follow a normal schedule on Dec. 31 (New Year’s Eve.) Trash and recycling that would normally be picked up on Tuesday (New Year’s Day) will be picked up the following day.  Automated containers should be curbside by 7 a.m. There will be no return trips.

Christmas trees will be picked up in Old Lyme during the week of Jan. 14. If you would like the Town to pick up your tree, you must have it curbside by 7 a.m. on Monday, Jan. 14. If you miss pick up on your street, you can take your tree to the Transfer Station (open Tuesday through Saturday) at no charge. There will be no return trips for curbside pick up.

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See ‘Sculpture Dances’ at 2pm Today at Studio 80 During Old Lyme’s Midsummer Festival

Dance bursts forth in a free performance inspired by the beauty of Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds, 80-1 Lyme Street, during the Old Lyme Midsummer Festival tomorrow!

Dancers from GUSTO Dance, IMMIX Dance Project and Mystic Moves Dance Theatre come together from 2 to 3 p.m. to perform “Sculpture Dances.”  These wonderful dances celebrate the special magic of the sculptures, the natural surroundings and summer.

The performance is free and all are welcome.

(Photo credit: Christina Goldberg; Sculpture: Gil Boro)

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Greenho, Danes are Class S State Tennis Doubles Champions

From left to right, Morgan Greenho celebrates his Class S state doubles tennis victory with coach John Pfeiffer and partner George Danes.

Last Thursday, Lyme-Old Lyme High School senior Morgan Greenho and freshman George Danes won the CIAC Class S boys’ tennis doubles championship at Yale. The pair, who were top seeds, defeated Patrick Markovics and Matthew Newfield of Morgan High School 6-3, 3-6, 6-4.

Moment of victory! Morgan Greenho raises his arms in celebration while his doubles partner George Danes gives a thumbs-up sign.

Old Lyme has not won the Class S doubles championship since Dane Pfeiffer and David Neaton’s success in 2003. Dane is the son of the current coach, John Pfeiffer.

Reaching for the sky … or rather the ball!

Sadly, Greenho and Danes lost on Saturday in the quarterfinals of the CIAC State Open at Amity, but despite that, the pair still enjoyed an extraordinarily successful season.

Many congratulations to Morgan and George!

 

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Happy Thanksgiving!

Photo by Patrick Fore on Unsplash

We wish a very happy Thanksgiving to all our readers, their families and friends — we hope you all enjoy a wonderful day!

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Light Up Old Lyme 2017

Light Up Old Lyme 2017_v3

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