June 29, 2022

Community Calendar

Feb
7
Sun
CT Audubon Hosts ‘Superb Owl’ Zoom Presentation with Live Owls @ Virtual
Feb 7 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

LYME/OLD LYME — Connecticut Audubon hosts Superb Owl Sunday on Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 7, at 2 p.m.

This popular live owl event is being held virtually this year. All are welcome.

Join Mary-Beth Kaeser from Horizon Wings as she introduces these local owl species: Great-horned, Eastern Screech, Northern Saw-whet, Barred and Barn owls.

The fee for this fun hour of owls is $5.

Register at this link and you will receive your Zoom link in your registration confirmation.

All proceeds benefit CT Audubon’s education and conservation programs in the Greater Hartford Region.

Feb
9
Tue
Resources Available to Women- and Minority-owned Businesses: Webinar @ Virtual
Feb 9 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

HARTFORD – On Tuesday, Feb. 9, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., State Rep. Devin Carney (R-23) will join Bi-partisan Women’s Legislative Caucus Members State Rep’s Donna Veach (R-30) and Christie Carpino to host an informational webinar to discuss resources available to women- and minority-owned businesses.

Register for the forum using this link.

The webinar will feature Fran Pastore, CEO of the Connecticut Women’s Business Development Council (WBDC) and is expected to cover the WBDC’s Equity Match Grant Program.

The Equity Match Grant Program provides grants to women-owned/minority-owned businesses to help businesses pivot, expand or restructure during the pandemic and beyond. Grants range from $2,500 to $10,000 for clearly defined projects that will have a measurable impact on business.

“The funding businesses receive through grants provided by the WBDC and other organizations is crucial to getting some of these businesses over the hump and to continue thriving, without them many would be forced to not just close temporarily, but forever,” Rep. Veach said. “It’s important that businesses know the type of funding is available to them in order to prevent that from happening.”

“Outreach to local businesses, especially those owned by women and minorities, is so important right now,” said Rep. Carpino. “I am excited to partner with WBDC to bring this information into the community.”

“The grants from Women’s Business Development Council are a good opportunity to women and minority-owned businesses if they need extra resources due to the coronavirus pandemic,” said Rep. Carney. “The Council is always there to assist business owners and those considering starting a business with training, education, and funding opportunities.”

 

Feb
10
Wed
SECWAC Presents “A New US Paradigm for the Middle East” @ Virtual
Feb 10 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Trita Parsi presents, “A New US Paradigm for the Middle East”

Off the Rails: Connecticut’s Transportation Future Post-Covid @ Virtual
Feb 10 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

OLD LYME — The PGN Library hosts commuter advocate Jim Cameron, who will answer questions and offer a status update on CT transportation crisis addressing topics like:

•Will riders return to commuter rail?
•Who will pay to keep the trains running, and where will money be found for our highways?
•How will new residential / workplace trends affect CT’s economy?

Click here to register and receive a link for this virtual program.

Feb
15
Mon
Presidents’ Day @ Lyme, Old Lyme Town Halls Closed
Feb 15 @ 9:06 pm – 10:06 pm
Feb
18
Thu
Exploring the Importance of Pollinator Pathways @ Virtual
Feb 18 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Exploring the Importance of Pollinator Pathways
To register for this Zoom program, email programreg@lymepl.org
You will receive a zoom link several days before the presentation.

Learn about Pollinator Pathways with eco-friendly gardening experts Jim Sirch and Mary Ellen Lemay.

Pollinator pathways are pesticide-free corridors of native plants that provide nutrition and habitat for bees, butterflies, and other pollinators, which are vital for the health of the planet. These pathways are crucial to biodiversity, the production of healthy crops, and the health of ecosystems that wild animals rely on for food and habitat.
Most native plants require less watering and upkeep than ornamentals and the pollinators you attract will help your other garden plants and vegetables flourish as well.
Watching butterflies fluttering carelessly through our yards, drifting from here to there on a gentle breeze, occasionally stopping to display their colorful murals relieves stress. Why not create an area for them to thrive?
Many Lyme residents have part of their yards that are mostly unused or a patch of grass they are constantly maintaining and can never get just right.
Join this effort to learn about the benefits of pollinator pathways and how you can create your own.

Jim Sirch is Education Coordinator for the Yale Peabody Museum for Natural History. Mary Ellen LeMay owns a company that specializes in the use of natural systems for habitat restoration.

The presentation is free and open to all, brought to you by the Friends of the Lyme Public Library. For more information call the library: 860 434-2272.

Feb
22
Mon
DRGC Monthly Meeting: Learn Your Insects @ Virtual meeting hosted by Duck River Garden Club
Feb 22 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

OLD LYME — Old Lyme’s Duck River Garden Club (DRGC) continues to hold virtual presentations and meetings on Zoom while COVID restrictions are in place. These DRGC presentations are open to the public and require advance registration.

Virtual socials take place at 6:30 p.m., presentations at 7 p.m., followed by a business meeting for members.

Katherine Dugas.

Join DRGC on Monday, Feb. 22, via Zoom to hear Katherine Dugas, Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station (CAES) research technician, discuss current insect and plant disease conditions in Connecticut, including latest known migration of invasive Spotted Lanternfly, Emerald Ash Borer and Southern Pine Beetle.

Brush up on your insect ID skills, learn about the latest threats to our environment and what you can do to help.

Katherine is daughter of Albert and Denise Dugas of Old Lyme.

Dugas earned her Bachelors Degree from Connecticut College in 2005 and Master’s Degree from URI in 2008. She works in the Insect Information and Plant Disease Information Offices of CAES.

To register for this free program, call or email Karen Geisler, DRGC president, 860-434-5321, karengr007@gmail.com. One needs to have free Zoom app to see this virtual program, phone call-in also available.

Check DRGC’s website and the club’s public Duck River Garden Club of Old Lyme Facebook page for any changes to planned programs.

DRGC welcomes new members, who can join via the membership form on the website. For further information on membership, contact Karen Geisler. Attendance at DRGC virtual programs counts toward the required two meetings for prospective club members.

Feb
27
Sat
Eco-Safari of the Connecticut Watershed @ Lyme Public Library & virtual
Feb 27 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

LYME Lyme Public  Library hosts an Eco-Safari of the Connecticut Watershed presented by Jim Arrigoni on Saturday, Feb. 27, 2 p.m.  

The Connecticut River is recognized as one of the most ecologically and culturally important  rivers on the East Coast. In this interactive webinar, conservation biologist Jim Arrigoni will take you on a virtual tour of the watershed, highlighting the flora and fauna and unique aspects of  its natural and human history.  

Email programreg@lymepl.org to receive the Zoom link for this event.

Mar
6
Sat
Unplugged Weekend @ Venues throughout Lyme & Old Lyme
Mar 6 all-day
Animal Tracking Program Hosted by Lyme Library @ Lyme Public Library & virtual
Mar 6 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Photo by Tatiana Colhoun on Unsplash.

Animal Tracking presented by the Denison Pequotsepos Nature Center
Saturday, March 6, 2pm

In this Zoom presentation sponsored with the Lyme Land Trust, you will learn to identify the tracks of local wildlife as well as how to interpret the stories they tell. In addition, you will also meet an owl who leaves telltale tracks behind from a hunt.

 

Presented by the Denison Pequotsepos Nature Center in Mystic, CT. Founded in 1946, DPNC provides environmental education programming for all ages on a wide variety of natural history and environmental science topics.

 

This program is sponsored by the Friends of the Lyme Public Library for March 2021.

 

Email programreg@lymepl.org to register for this Zoom program.

Mar
7
Sun
Unplugged Weekend @ Venues throughout Lyme & Old Lyme
Mar 7 all-day
Mar
9
Tue
What is Today’s Pot? A Community Conversation @ LYSB & virtual
Mar 9 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
LYME/OLD LYME — The Lyme-Old Lyme Prevention Coalition (LOLPC) hosts a virtual meeting this evening at 7 p.m. with featured speaker John Daviau, MACP, CPS, a community psychologist and prevention specialist.
The event is intended to spark a community conversation about all aspects of marijuana and Lyme-Old Lyme youth. Topics to be discussed include:
  • Science related to public health and our youth
  • Marijuana industry right now
  • Status of legalization of marijuana in Connecticut
All are welcome to join this Zoom conversation.
The experience, knowledge, and energy of LymeLine.com readers are much needed as everyone works together to foster the positive impact of the LOLPC in our community.
Register at this link to receive the Zoom access information.
Mar
10
Wed
‘Your Carbon Footprint;’ Virtual Lecture Hosted by OL-PGN Library @ Virtual, hosted by OL-PGN Library
Mar 10 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Wednesday, March 10, 6:30 p.m.

The Old Lyme-PGN Library hosts a free Zoom lecture titled, “Your Carbon Footprint,” by Old Lyme resident Alan Poirier.

This event is promoted by Sustainable Old Lyme.

Sign up for the Zoom link at http://oldlymelibrary.org.

Mar
11
Thu
Asian Fusion Cooking Demonstration with Chef James Martell  @ Lyme Public Library & virtual
Mar 11 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Asian Fusion Cooking Demonstration with Chef James Martell 

Thursday, March 11, 5 p.m.

James Martell, the head chef at On the Rocks Restaurant at the Fox Hopyard Golf Club in East Haddam, will demonstrate how to prepare an Asian Fusion dinner as well as mocktails and cocktails to complement the dish. Learn how he makes tuna rolls, quick kimchi, and Buffalo Chicken Rangoon.

Email programreg@lymepl.org to register for this virtual program and obtain the Zoom link.

Coral Reefs: Rainforests and Canaries of the Sea @ RTPEC & virtual
Mar 11 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Coral Reefs: Rainforests and Canaries of the Sea
Leading expert on marine biology will deliver free lecture on March 11th at 6 PM 
Mark Hixon, Ph.D. is one of the world’s leading experts on coral reefs. Using stunning visuals, Dr. Hixon will summarize the many gifts our coral reefs provide us, describe human-caused threats to our reefs, and review practical solutions that can help us to preserve them.
 
Dr. Hixon is the Sidney and Erika Hsiao Endowed Chair in Marine Biology and Chair of the Zoology Graduate Program at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. His research analyzes what determines the number of fish in the sea, how so many species naturally coexist, and how marine reserves and artificial reefs help conserve sea life and enhance fisheries. A Fulbright Senior Scholar and Fellow of the International Coral Reef Society, Dr. Hixon is past chair of both the Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee for NOAA and the Ocean Sciences Advisory Committee for the National Science Foundation. Dr. Hixon has given TED talks, serves on the editorial boards of multiple scientific journals and appeared on the PBS TV show “Saving the Oceans.”
 
Included with participation in the lecture is a special offer: a dinner available for pick-up on the day of the event prepared by renowned chef Ani Robaina, formerly chef at the Microsoft Conference Center and the Pond House in Hartford
and currently owner and chef at Ani’s Table. The cost is $75. For additional information and Zoom registration, please visit ctaudubon.org/RTPEClectures 
or call 860-598-4218.

The Roger Tory Peterson Estuary Center’s Connecticut River Lecture Series is celebrating its seventh year with these Zoom presentations – each featuring a prominent scientist focusing on a critical environmental issue.

The second in the series on April 8 will be on Butterflies: Monarchs, Migrations, and Conservation. The third on April 29 will focus on The Secret Life of Plankton: The Base of the Marine Food Web. All of the programs are free, but space is limited and registration is required.
 
Named for the internationally and locally renowned artist, scientific illustrator, environmental educator, and conservation advocate, the Roger Tory Peterson Estuary Center is known for its work in environmental education, conservation, research, and advocacy. Throughout the past year, the Center has continued to serve young people and adults across the region, offering small group programs like bird walks and owl prowls, a virtual CT River ecology course, seasonal nature crafts for kids via Zoom, and more. 
Mar
15
Mon
Community Food Share Garden Introductory Planning Meeting @ Virtual
Mar 15 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Jim Ward tends the Community garden at Clinton. He hopes to set up a similar venture in Old Lyme and invites other volunteers to join him at an initial planning meeting. Photo submitted.

OLD LYME — Do you believe that access to healthy food is important?

Do you believe that a community should support members in need?

Do you have interest in growing food and cultivating relationships between neighbors, friends and community members?

If your answer to any or all of those questions is, ‘Yes,’ then you might wish to consider joining a discussion to plan a community food garden to support the nutritional needs of the shoreline community by providing local food pantries with fresh produce.

Jim Ward, a resident of Old Lyme since 2006 whose wife attended Old Lyme schools and taught in the district, is the initiator of the project. Asked how he came up with idea for the garden, he explained, ” While I have always been interested in gardening and landscaping, my interest in the garden was initiated while I was participating in the 2020 UCONN Master Gardening Program.’

Ward continued, “As a participant in the program you are responsible for a certain amount of outreach hours and I volunteered and continue to volunteer at the Food for All garden in Clinton.”

Noting, “The atmosphere at this very successful Food Bank garden was one of a small community,” he pointed out that there were always plenty of volunteers, who between them had, “A broad range of gardening skills, from no gardening experience to master gardeners.”

Moreover, Ward emphasized, “Everyone shared their knowledge of gardening and cooking … along with local and national political conversations.”

The catalyst for trying to start the endeavor in Old Lyme was simply, in Ward’s mind, the type of community found in Lyme-Old Lyme, which Ward felt, “Would be very supportive of this type of initiative.” He therefore set out, “to replicate the Food for All garden project.’

His plan was not only wholeheartedly supported in principle by the volunteers of the Clinton garden, but he noted that in addition, “They gave me access to their records and provided advice on the daily and annual demands of the garden.”

Finding a location for the garden in Old Lyme did not prove quite so straightforward, however. Ward said, “My wife and I researched town-owned lands defaulted to the Town, but didn’t find any that were suitable and could see why many were defaulted.”

Proposed site of the Lyme-Old Lyme Community Share Garden at Town Woods Field. Photo submitted.

Finally, the seed of an idea evolved, when, in Ward’s words, “We thought of Town Woods as it had water, electricity, parking, restrooms, proximity to the Senior Center and it served as a hub of activity for many residents.”

Asked what has happened since the potential site was identified, Ward explained, “Through generous cooperation of the Parks and Recreation Commission and with site approval by the Old Lyme Inland Wetlands Commission, a parcel of land behind the Field House at Town Woods Park has been secured.”

He added enthusiastically, “The location, amidst the park’s organically-managed fields, with access to water, electricity and parking, is ideal.”

The timeline for starting the project is, according to Ward, “Totally dependent on funds.” he states, “With the generous assistance of the Parks and Recreation Commission, we have cleared the large hurdles of land and water, so the next big hurdle will be the fencing for the garden.”

What is his best guess for how things will progress? Ward responds, “With that being said I would love to see a fence up, some site prep, and soil testing by this fall with a small planting next spring.”

The proposal was mentioned at the Old Lyme Board of Selectmen’s meeting last Tuesday, Feb. 16, when Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal described the project as, “A really neat thing,” and “Pretty exciting.” First Selectman Timothy Griswold felt the board needed one of their members to “Prepare a checklist of what we [the board of selectmen] need to do,” and coordinate the effort between all the town boards and commissions involved. Selectman Chris Kerr agreed to take on that role.

The next step for the project is a kick-off virtual planning meeting scheduled for Monday, March 15, when, says Ward, “We will discuss organization of a non-profit, fundraising, sustainability, outreach, education and community engagement.” There are two options timewise for the meeting, 12 noon or 6 p.m.

All are welcome and he stresses, “Differing viewpoints, experience, backgrounds and ages are encouraged. No gardening experience is required.”

To register for either March 15 meeting and obtain the Zoom log-in information or raise any questions, email Ward at jimdub@gmail.com​.

Community Food Share Garden Introductory Planning Meeting @ Virtual
Mar 15 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Jim Ward tends the Community garden at Clinton. He hopes to set up a similar venture in Old Lyme and invites other volunteers to join him at an initial planning meeting. Photo submitted.

OLD LYME — Do you believe that access to healthy food is important?

Do you believe that a community should support members in need?

Do you have interest in growing food and cultivating relationships between neighbors, friends and community members?

If your answer to any or all of those questions is, ‘Yes,’ then you might wish to consider joining a discussion to plan a community food garden to support the nutritional needs of the shoreline community by providing local food pantries with fresh produce.

Jim Ward, a resident of Old Lyme since 2006 whose wife attended Old Lyme schools and taught in the district, is the initiator of the project. Asked how he came up with idea for the garden, he explained, ” While I have always been interested in gardening and landscaping, my interest in the garden was initiated while I was participating in the 2020 UCONN Master Gardening Program.’

Ward continued, “As a participant in the program you are responsible for a certain amount of outreach hours and I volunteered and continue to volunteer at the Food for All garden in Clinton.”

Noting, “The atmosphere at this very successful Food Bank garden was one of a small community,” he pointed out that there were always plenty of volunteers, who between them had, “A broad range of gardening skills, from no gardening experience to master gardeners.”

Moreover, Ward emphasized, “Everyone shared their knowledge of gardening and cooking … along with local and national political conversations.”

The catalyst for trying to start the endeavor in Old Lyme was simply, in Ward’s mind, the type of community found in Lyme-Old Lyme, which Ward felt, “Would be very supportive of this type of initiative.” He therefore set out, “to replicate the Food for All garden project.’

His plan was not only wholeheartedly supported in principle by the volunteers of the Clinton garden, but he noted that in addition, “They gave me access to their records and provided advice on the daily and annual demands of the garden.”

Finding a location for the garden in Old Lyme did not prove quite so straightforward, however. Ward said, “My wife and I researched town-owned lands defaulted to the Town, but didn’t find any that were suitable and could see why many were defaulted.”

Proposed site of the Lyme-Old Lyme Community Share Garden at Town Woods Field. Photo submitted.

Finally, the seed of an idea evolved, when, in Ward’s words, “We thought of Town Woods as it had water, electricity, parking, restrooms, proximity to the Senior Center and it served as a hub of activity for many residents.”

Asked what has happened since the potential site was identified, Ward explained, “Through generous cooperation of the Parks and Recreation Commission and with site approval by the Old Lyme Inland Wetlands Commission, a parcel of land behind the Field House at Town Woods Park has been secured.”

He added enthusiastically, “The location, amidst the park’s organically-managed fields, with access to water, electricity and parking, is ideal.”

The timeline for starting the project is, according to Ward, “Totally dependent on funds.” he states, “With the generous assistance of the Parks and Recreation Commission, we have cleared the large hurdles of land and water, so the next big hurdle will be the fencing for the garden.”

What is his best guess for how things will progress? Ward responds, “With that being said I would love to see a fence up, some site prep, and soil testing by this fall with a small planting next spring.”

The proposal was mentioned at the Old Lyme Board of Selectmen’s meeting last Tuesday, Feb. 16, when Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal described the project as, “A really neat thing,” and “Pretty exciting.” First Selectman Timothy Griswold felt the board needed one of their members to “Prepare a checklist of what we [the board of selectmen] need to do,” and coordinate the effort between all the town boards and commissions involved. Selectman Chris Kerr agreed to take on that role.

The next step for the project is a kick-off virtual planning meeting scheduled for Monday, March 15, when, says Ward, “We will discuss organization of a non-profit, fundraising, sustainability, outreach, education and community engagement.” There are two options timewise for the meeting, 12 noon or 6 p.m.

All are welcome and he stresses, “Differing viewpoints, experience, backgrounds and ages are encouraged. No gardening experience is required.”

To register for either March 15 meeting and obtain the Zoom log-in information or raise any questions, email Ward at jimdub@gmail.com​.

Mar
18
Thu
The ABCs of Pollinator Plants: Free Webinar @ Virtual
Mar 18 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Wednesday, March 18, 6 p.m.

The ABCs of Pollinator Plants,” a free webinar by Suzanne Thompson, co-chair of Pollinate Old Lyme!, and the Roger Tory Peterson Estuary Center.

Learn what native plants support your favorite birds and pollinating insects.

Email PollinateOldLyme@gmail.com for the Zoom link

Mar
20
Sat
‘The Other Side of the Ice’ Hosted by Lyme Library @ Lyme Public Library & virtual
Mar 20 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

‘The Other Side of the Ice’ presented by Sprague Theobald
One Family’s Treacherous Journey Negotiating the Northwest Passage
Saturday, March 20, 3 p.m.

Sprague Theobald, an award-winning documentary filmmaker and expert sailor with more than 40,000 offshore miles under his belt, always considered the Northwest Passage—the sea route connecting the Atlantic to the Pacific—the ultimate uncharted territory.

Since Roald Amundsen completed the first successful crossing of the fabled Northwest Passage in 1906, only 24 pleasure craft have followed in his wake.

From his home port of Newport, Rhode Island, through the Passage and around Alaska to Seattle, it would be an 8,500-mile trek filled with constant danger from ice, polar bears, and severe weather

What Theobald couldn’t have known was just how life-changing his journey through the Passage would be.

Unrelenting cold, hungry polar bears, and a haunting landscape littered with sobering artifacts from the tragic Franklin Expedition of 1845 make The Other Side of the Ice a harrowing story of survival, adventure, and, finally, redemption.

Email programreg@lymepl.org to register for this Zoom program.

Mar
22
Mon
OL Historical Soc. Hosts Lecture on Last Trap Fishermen of R.I. @ Virtual
Mar 22 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

OLD LYME — Old Lyme Historical Society opens its Spring Lecture Series Wednesday, March 31, at 7 p.m. with a presentation by Markham Starr titled, In History’s Wake: The Last Trap Fishermen of Rhode Island.

This slideshow covers the last of the four floating trap fishing companies in Rhode Island.  This fishery, going back over 150 years, once dominated the coastline, but was quickly abandoned with the advent of the modern trawler.

The presentation follows the four companies as they build and fish their unique floating traps, which were over 1,500’ long.

This is a free, virtual event. All are welcome.

Register at info@oldlymehistorical.org to obtain the Zoom link.

Mar
23
Tue
SECWAC Presents Speaker on Peace Movement by Indigenous Women in India, Tuesday
Mar 23 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Binalakshmi Nepram

LYME/OLD LYME — The Southeast Connecticut World Affairs Council (SECWAC) has announced that Binalakshmi Nepram is to speak on the peace movement by Indigenous women in India at 6 p.m., Tuesday, March 23, via Zoom. The virtual presentation is free for members; $20 for non-members. Registration is required.

Binalakshmi Nepram will discuss the story of the forgotten, former Asiatic nation state of Manipur located on the Indo-Burma border. She will trace the struggle of the Indigenous Women of the state, now located in Northeast India, and how they developed a unique and unprecedented women’s movement.

Nepram will throw light on the unreported conflict region that is home to South Asia’s longest running war, where a martial law called the Armed Forces (Special Powers) Act has been imposed on the population since 1958; she will also discuss the resilience of the people who have long struggled for democracy and rule of law.

Nepram’s presentation is part of the SECWAC 2021 monthly Speaker Series. Register in advance at https://scwac.wildapricot.org/event-4089174

Binalakshmi “Bina” Nepram is an indigenous scholar and a woman human rights defender, whose work focuses on deepening democracy and championing women-led peace, security, and disarmament in Manipur, Northeast India, and South Asia.

She is the founder of three organizations: the Manipur Women Gun Survivors Network, the Control Arms Foundation of India, and the Global Alliance of Indigenous Peoples, Gender Justice, and Peace. In 2010 Bina also initiated the Northeast India Women Initiative for Peace to ensure that indigenous women in Northeast India are included in peace talks and peace processes.

Bina has authored and edited five books, including Deepening Democracy, Diversity, and Women’s Rights in India (2019), Where Are Our Women in Decision Making? (2016), Meckley: A Historical Fiction on Manipur (2004) and South Asia’s Fractured Frontier (2002).

Her work has garnered international recognition, including the Anna Politskovskaya Award (2018), Women have Wings Award (2016), CNN IBN Real Heroes Award (2011), Ashoka Social Innovators Fellowship (2011), and the Sean MacBride Peace Prize (2010).

SECWAC is a regional, nonprofit, membership organization affiliated with the World Affairs Councils of America (WACA). The organization dates back to 1999, and has continued to arrange at least 8-10 meetings annually, between September and June.

The meetings present a range of topics in international affairs, foreign policy and diplomatic history, and are hosted at venues along the I-95 corridor, welcoming members and guests from Stonington to Old Saybrook, and beyond.

SECWAC’s mission is “to foster an understanding of issues of foreign policy and international affairs through study, debate, and educational programming.” It provides a forum for nonpartisan, non-advocacy dialogue between members and speakers, who can be U.S. policymakers, educators, authors, and other experts on foreign relations. Learn more at http://secwac.org.

‘Renewable Energy’ Webinar: Hosted by OL-PGN Library @ Virtual hosted by OL-PGN Library
Mar 23 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Tuesday, March 23, 6:30pm:

Renewable Energy” is a free webinar offered by the OL-PGN Library and promoted by Sustainable Old Lyme.

Local resident Bill McNamara will discuss the advancements in sustainable technologies and give an update on the renewable energy landscape:
  • Clean Energy Technologies
  • Federal and State Policies
  • Future Innovative Trends
  • How to get involved
Mar
25
Thu
Community-wide Book Group on ‘Waking Up White’ @ Zoom meeting
Mar 25 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

OLD LYME — Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church in Old Lyme, Conn., will hold a community-wide discussion group on the book Waking Up White by Debby Irving on  Thursday, March 25, from 5:30 to 7 p.m.

In this book, Irving describes her “aha!” moment regarding the racial tensions she sensed in her life and in society. This moment launched an adventure of discovery and insight that drastically shifted her worldview and upended her life plan.

All are invited to join this discussion group, as these highly topical issues are explored. Share, listen, gain new insights, and make new friends.

The discussion will take place via Zoom. The Zoom link is on the home page of Saint Ann’s website at www.saintannsoldlyme.org.
Registration is not required.

For further information about this program, call 860-434-1621.

Saint Ann’s is an Episcopal parish in Old Lyme, CT that invites and welcomes visitors to this program. The church’s mission is to enrich the community and introduce visitors to the parish.

Saint Ann’s is located at 82 Shore Rd. (Rte. 156), two miles off I-95, Exit 70. Parking is adjacent to the church.

For information about the parish, contact Kathy Rowe at 860-434-1621, via email at office@saintannsoldlyme.org, or visit Saint Ann’s online at www.saintannsoldlyme.org.

Saint Ann’s is a Level 2 Green House of Worship. This recognition is awarded by the CT Interreligious Eco-Justice Network (IREJN), a program of environmental stewardship that grants certificates of achievement for implementing eco-friendly measures in buildings and within congregations.

Mar
27
Sat
Site Walk of Proposed LOL Food Share Garden @ Town Woods Park
Mar 27 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am
Mar
29
Mon
DRGC Monthly Meeting: Spring Backyard Birding @ Duck River Garden Club Virtual Meeting
Mar 29 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

OLD LYME — Duck River Garden Club (DRGC) presents Spring Backyard Birding at 7 p.m., a virtual program about how to attract and support eastern bluebirds, ruby-throated hummingbirds and Baltimore orioles by Jessica Penfield of Wild Birds Unlimited, Old Saybrook.

This DRGC presentation is open to the public and requires advance registration.

Virtual socials take place at 6:30 p.m., presentations at 7 p.m., followed by a business meeting for members.

To register for this free program, call or email Karen Geisler, DRGC president, 860-434-5321, karengr007@gmail.com. You must have the free Zoom app to see this virtual program, phone call-in also available.

Check DRGC’s website and the club’s public Duck River Garden Club of Old Lyme Facebook page for any changes to planned programs.

DRGC welcomes new members, who can join via the membership form on the website. For further information on membership, contact Karen Geisler. Attendance at DRGC virtual programs counts toward the required two meetings for prospective club members.

Mar
31
Wed
OL Historical Soc. Presents ‘Last Trap Fishermen of R.I.’ Lecture @ Zoom meeting
Mar 31 @ 7:00 pm – 8:15 pm

OLD LYME — Old Lyme Historical Society opens its Spring Lecture Series Wednesday, March 31, at 7 p.m. with a presentation by Markham Starr titled, In History’s Wake: The Last Trap Fishermen of Rhode Island.

This slideshow covers the last of the four floating trap fishing companies in Rhode Island.  This fishery, going back over 150 years, once dominated the coastline, but was quickly abandoned with the advent of the modern trawler.

The presentation follows the four companies as they build and fish their unique floating traps, which were over 1,500’ long.

This is a free, virtual event. All are welcome.

Register at info@oldlymehistorical.org to obtain the Zoom link.

Apr
7
Wed
Share the Beach: Webinar Hosted by OL-PGN Library @ Virtual hosted by OL-PGN Library
Apr 7 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Wednesday, April 7, 6:30 p.m.

Share the Beach” is a free webinar hosted by the OL-PGN Library and presented by Shaun Roche, US Fish & Wildlife Service.

His presentation will cover shorebirds, Diamondback Terrapins, Horseshoe Crabs, and more.
Roche is the Visitor Services Manager of the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge in Westbrook. He will discuss the many different creatures with which we share the tidal ponds and marshes.
Discover some of the interesting projects happening that support this habitat and how you can help

Sign up for the Zoom link at http://oldlymelibrary.org.

‘A Photographer’s Vision’ Zoom Presentation by Joe Standart @ Lyme Land Trust & Virtual
Apr 7 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Winter scene by Joe Standart.

LYME — Join award-winning photographer Joe Standart on Wednesday, April 7, at 7 p.m. for a Zoom presentation featuring his photography of the natural world, and to celebrate the submissions and announce the winners for fall/winter season in the Lyme Land Trust’s photography program, Imagining Lyme.

Focusing first on his own luminous photographs, Standart will explain how site selection, composition, time of day, and light influence his creative process. His presentation will include landscape examples and highlights from his many years of experience photographing in Lyme and in remote landscapes in other parts of the world.

After his slideshow, Standart will announce the three photographs for the fall/winter season that best express a mood using light and the category for the spring season of Imaging Lyme will be announced and explained.

Sue Cope, Environmental Director of the Lyme Land Trust will moderate the program.

Standart is a Lyme Land Trust board member and an internationally-recognized photographer, who is well-known for his series of public art exhibits featuring monumental portraits of the diverse residents of New London, Litchfield, New Haven, Hartford, and other communities. His provocative exhibit, WE ARE-A Nation of Immigrants, was installed on the New Haven Green and surrounding buildings to act as a catalyst for honest dialog.

To register for the program, email sue.cope@lymelandtrust.org. You will be sent a link a few days before the Zoom event.

To see the showcase of all submitted photos go to: http://imagininglyme.org/galleries/

As part of the Imagining Lyme program, a walk with Joe Standart has been scheduled for May 1, 2021.

Apr
8
Thu
‘Designing to Share’ Hosted by Old Lyme-PGN Library @ Zoom meeting
Apr 8 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

Local Community-Building Graphic Designers Share Tips with Youth

In a heavily visual and virtual world, good design and curation is key to making an impact.

On April 8, 2021 at 9:30 a.m. Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library in partnership with Region 18 is offering Designing to Share, a panel for Youth audiences discussing the ins and outs of graphic design – particularly in the fields of arts, culture, and independent media. 

The program features Juanita Austin, founder of Cultured AF, New London, CT and Andre Salkin, founder of @leftnortheast, Lyme-Old Lyme High School ’20. They will share how they got started, their current projects, and how their design skills have helped them accomplish their goals. The panel, Designing to Share, will be moderated by Nike Desis, Young Adult Librarian, Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library.

Discussion will also cover topics such as free design software, establishing an audience and a “look,” using and citing credible sources, with time for Q&A with the presenters.

Juanita Austin is a curator and cultural producer, born and raised in New London, Conn. A graduate from the University of Connecticut, with a B.A. in Digital Media & Design, she has served as a leader on many grassroots community arts initiatives and now runs her own arts collective, Cultured AF.

She’s passionate about building community and creating experiences that brings art into everyone’s lives. Cultured AF’s headquarters are located at Cultured Studios, a gallery, arts boutique, and community event space in downtown New London.

Austin notes, “My work centers on supporting underrepresented artists and creating safe and equitable spaces for those artists to thrive.”

Andre Salkin is a co-admin of the grassroots, journalistic, justice-centered resource for young people known as @leftnortheast on Instagram. Attracting 52K followers in less than a year, @leftnortheast is “committed to discourse, education, and solidarity.”

Currently studying journalism at Boston University since matriculating from L-OL High School in 2020, Salkin’s academic studies inform his social media output, and the rigorousness and success of his social media platform help inspire his studies.

Commenting on corporate ownership of media he says ”I think sources of alternative media … can have a huge impact on how people see the world.”

Desis comments, “Youth who are at all curious about the creation of helpful and inspiring graphics seen on social media – especially as a tool for grassroots community building- will have a unique opportunity to get behind the scenes with the founders of impactful arts and media platforms.” –

To attend or find about more about the program, contact Nike Desis at ndesis@oldlymelibrary.org

‘Butterflies: Monarchs, Migrations and Conservation’: Virtual Interview Hosted by RTPEC @ Virtual hosted by RTPEC
Apr 8 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Thursday, April 8, 6:30pm:

Butterflies: Monarchs, Migrations and Conservation” with Robert Pyle, Xerces Society Founder, interviewed by Evan Griswold.

Part of the free 2021 Connecticut River Lecture Series offered by the Roger Tory Peterson Estuary Center.

Register at https://www.ctaudubon.org/rtp-programs-events/