July 25, 2017

Play Live Jazz Thursdays at Shoreline Community Center’s Drop-In Sessions

There will be a Live Jazz Session this evening at the Shoreline Community Center, 39 Hartford Ave., Old Lyme, starting at 7 p.m. Piano, guitar, bass and drum musicians are invited to drop by and jam all evening.

Bring refreshments, enjoy the music, and even dance if you want!

This is a fundraiser for the Community Center. The requested donation is $5.

For more information, call Rob at 860-710-1126.

This event is sponsored by the Sound View Beach Association, Inc.

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Cappella Cantorum Presents ‘Music From Around the World.’ Sunday

Cappella Cantorum Men’s Chorus will present Music From Around the World on June 25, 3 p.m. at St.Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Madison.

‘Music From Around the World’ sung by the Cappella Cantorum Men’s Chorus will fill the Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center , the Kate, at 300 Main St., Old Saybrook on Sunday, July 5, at 7:30 p.m. The Chorus will present an extraordinary evening of great male choral music under the direction of Barry B. Asch with accompanist Deborah Lyon.

Featured selection along with their country of origin include: Sweden-Brothers, Sing On!; Wales-All Through the Night; Hebrew-Bashana Haba’ah; France-Cantique de Jean Racine; Germany-Brahms Lullaby; France-Viva L’Amour; and America: Climbin’ up the Mountain Children; Ezekiel Saw de Wheel; Johnny Cash Medley and Hallelujah, Leonard Cohen. 

Tickets are $20 at the door or www.CappellaCantorum.org

An additional concert will be held as follows:.

Sunday, July 9,
3 p.m.

Trinity Lutheran Church, 109 Main St., Centerbrook,
This performance will be followed by a reception.
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Town Woods Park Reopens Today

Town Woods Park was closed for all activities Tuesday, July 4, for a grub control treatment.

The Park will reopen on Wednesday, July 5.

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Lampos, Pearson Skillfully Bring The Lymes’ Revolutionary Role to Life in OL Library Talk

Michaelle Pearson and Jim Lampos gave a fascinating talk at the Old Lyme Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library last Tuesday.

Last Tuesday evening local authors and historians Michaelle Pearson and Jim Lampos gave a captivating talk to a packed house gathered at the Old Lyme-Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library that took the audience back in time to pivotal turning points in the Revolutionary War involving the Lymes.

Husband and wife Pearson and Lampos asked their audience to imagine they were standing at the bend of the “Three roads” as it was then called — McCurdy, Lyme St. and Ferry Road — and then expertly described the street during an ordinary day in bustling colonial times.  Such was their storytelling expertise that as they spoke, you could almost see the shipbuilding on the river, merchant deliveries being made by horse-drawn wagons and the ferry making its way across to Saybrook.

Only then did you realize how much our town has changed … but at the same time, how much it has not changed at all. 

It is not always a given that writers are also good oral story tellers, but when you can almost hear the gallop of Israel Bissell — one of the five riders dispatched with Paul Revere — thundering down Lyme  Street with his call to arms, you know that Pearson and Lampos are exemplary at both and moreover their love of history so strong, that you can’t help but feel it too.

The intricate parts played and the powerful plans made by these memorable figures whom you have heard about all your life are exciting stuff! To know that all this was going on here in this town, shaping not just individual futures but the country’s too, summons up a host emotions.

Lampos and Pearson delivered an extraordinary history lesson that brought Lyme street into a “new light.“  When you have the chance, take the time to hear this talk and you will have a new appreciation for our town greens and the inspirational independence the Lymes had before, during and after the Revolutionary War … and continue to exhibit to this day.

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Reading Uncertainly? ‘The Tide’ by Hugh Aldersey-Williams

A present from a New Hampshire daughter, The Tide is a delightful, entertaining, and thought-provoking mix of lucid, often poetic, language with numerous literary quotations plus detailed scientific explanations of the tides that embellish our lives on this earth. It is Aldersey-Williams’s thought-experiment.

It is also his history of the oceanic tides, mixed with a bit of mathematics. But not more than you can handle. As he notes, “You may be relieved to know that I will leave the mathematics aside here.” And, given that many tell us the world’s tides are soon to be much higher, this is a most worthwhile book.

It is, as he states, “not a book about the sea” (sailors, ships, and winds), but rather a book “about the seas” and the ever-changing space between land and water. The tide, he explains, “offers an irresistible mathematical tease” as we attempt to understand and predict it. It is both a horizontal and a vertical force. That is a “scientific challenge” and “a physical; and psychological influence on our culture.” The classic story of King Canute’s (or Cnut, as the author spells it) attempt to stem the tide may have altered the English view of nobility.

This is the author’s story of watching tides around the world, from the English Channel to, of all places, Griswold Point on the Connecticut River, with a cousin, David Redfield. Tides are entrancing: they give us slow, relative motion that produces a “hallucinatory feeling.” Water is, after all, “an inelastic fluid (that) cannot be compressed or expanded.” I too have been mesmerized: by the 10-foot tides in Tenants Harbor, Maine; by the rising waters in Bosham, West Sussex, England, that regularly swamp cars in the local bar’s parking lot; and by the rushing tidal currents in the Straits of Shimonoseki, between Honshu and Kyushu, Japan, through which we once sent our Navy ship (at slack water, of course!)

He acknowledges the inevitability of climate change and global warming, and the fact they will lead to rising seas: “The greatest impact of rising sea levels and the changing tides that may accompany them will be on human habitation.” After all, we easily succumb to the human drive to cling to shores. “In the long term, if not the short, ‘managed retreat’ is our only option. The sea always wins in the end.”

Trying to ‘stop the sea? “It is a futility that Sisyphus would understand all too well.” So New York is a potential Venice … and New London too!

But do not be deterred by such pessimism. The Tide is full of rich, poetic language, as in this description of birds above the sea: “Once aloft, the birds first coalesce as an egg-shaped cloud low over the water, before gaining height and taking on ever more extravagant, twisted shapes like a pixelated flamenco dancer.”

It is enough to send me down to the end of Ely’s Ferry Road to watch the Connecticut River slip by the marshes of Essex.

Editor’s Note: ‘The Tide’ by Hugh Aldersey-Williams was published by W. W. Norton, New York 2016.

Felix Kloman

About the Author: Felix Kloman is a sailor, rower, husband, father, grandfather, retired management consultant and, above all, a curious reader and writer. He’s explored how we as human beings and organizations respond to ever-present uncertainty in two books, ‘Mumpsimus Revisited’ (2005) and ‘The Fantods of Risk’ (2008). A 20-year resident of Lyme, he now writes book reviews, mostly of non-fiction that explores our minds, our behavior, our politics and our history. But he does throw in a novel here and there. For more than 50 years, he’s put together the 17 syllables that comprise haiku, the traditional Japanese poetry, and now serves as the self-appointed “poet laureate” of Ashlawn Farms Coffee, where he may be seen on Friday mornings. His wife, Ann, is also a writer, but of mystery novels, all of which begin in a bubbling village in midcoast Maine, strangely reminiscent of the town she and her husband visit every summer.

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Old Lyme Property Transactions are Back!

One of the immeasurable joys  — well, actually this one is distinctly measurable — of having a summer intern is that he kindly goes around picking up things that I have dropped. I’m, of course, using that expression figuratively … specifically, in this case, I mean Jacob has been quietly working away in the Old Lyme Town Hall in his spare moments and has now managed to catch up for us with records of all the Old Lyme property transactions in 2017!

We have more to do, including the Lyme property transaction for 2017, because we were way behind with all property transactions, but this is a terrific start — so thank you sincerely, Jacob!

Here’s the link to the 2017 Property Transactions — enjoy!

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Sound View’s Independence Day Parade Steps Off at 10am Today

Leading last year's parade was this cheerful flag-bearer.

The Sound View Parade is typically led by the ever-smiling Joann Lishing.

The Sound View Beach Association (SVBA) hosts its traditional Independence Day parade this coming Saturday, July 1, starting at 10 a.m. from the Shoreline Community Center on Hartford Ave.  in Old Lyme. Described as a true “home town” community parade, children, adults, and civic groups are invited to march or spectate and enjoy this special experience.

The organizers suggest residents should decorate their bikes and wagons, build a float, or wear a patriotic costume.   Pets are also welcome to march.  There will be a VFW Honor Guard, child marchers, decorated bikes, floats, balloons, a marching band, police, fire and ambulance trucks, which will all contribute to a unique, small town experience.

Awards are given in categories such as best-decorated bike or wagon, most patriotic outfit, best float, funniest outfit, and even possibly best-dressed pet. Assembly time for the parade is 9:45 a.m. at the Shoreline Community Center and step-off is 10 a.m.  The parade route includes Hartford, Swan, and Portland Avenues.

Entries in the Parade must be in good taste and in conformance with the Mission and family atmosphere of the SVBA. The decision of the board of directors is final. The SVBA is an all- volunteer, non-profit, civic organization.  It owns and manages the Shoreline Community Center and also provides the flags in the Sound View area.

Everyone is invited to join or help. Frank Pappalardo, who is the chair of the SVBA, says, “We’re always accepting new members, volunteers and donations.  All donations are tax deductible and we are registered for “matching gift” grants with many companies.

For more information, email info@soundviewbeach.com or visit www.soundviewbeach.com

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Free ‘Fix-a-Flat’ Class at Morrissey Bicycles in Old Lyme, Today at 8am

There’s a new bike shop in town!

Morrissey Cycles has opened at 151 Boston Post Rd. near Rogers Lake.

We’ll be publishing an article on this great new store in the next couple of weeks, but meanwhile we wanted to share that tomorrow, Saturday, July 1, the store is hosting a free Fix-a-Flat class at 8 a.m.

Plan to get dirty and bring your bike. The owner, Steve Morrissey, will show you the simplest and safest way to change a bicycle tire. The class will be an hour long … assuming you do not get him talking about the Olympics!

All ages are welcome and everyone who attends will receive a 10 percent discount on any flat tire-related accessories purchased at the time of the class.

This class will help you get back home.

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LAA Hosts Two, New Shows Through Aug. 25

One of the signature paintings of the ‘American Waters’ show on display at the Lyme Art Association is Cean Young’s, ‘Give our Thoughts Wings to Fly,’ in oil.

The opening reception for two, new exhibitions, American Waters and The Artist’s Garden, will be held Friday, June 30, from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Lyme Art Association, 90 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, Conn. All are welcome, admission is free, and there will be both refreshments and live music.

Visitors of all ages will enjoy American Waters, the Lyme Art Association (LAA)’s summer exhibition of work by the area’s premier maritime artists. The show will be on view in the beautiful sky-lit galleries through Aug. 25.

This beautiful sunset by Kim Muller Thym is features in the ‘American Waters’ show.

Gallery manager Jocelyn Zallinger notes, “The lovely, peaceful interior of the Lyme Art Association is the perfect venue for marine-inspired art. The artwork flows from one gallery to the next with scenes of sailboats, beaches, bustling marinas and waves crashing to the shore.”

The exhibition was juried by David Bareford, a Fellow of the American Society of Marine artists.

‘Tidal Drifter’ by Del-Bourree Bach is offered for sale in the LAA’s ‘American Waters’ show.

Concurrent with the American Waters exhibition, the Lyme Art Association will present a smaller exhibition called The Artist’s Garden, in the Goodman Gallery. Artwork will feature images of gardens, birds and flowers.

Lyme Art Association Board President Katherine Simmons states, “American Waters continues an LAA tradition of exhibiting the very best of fine contemporary American marine art. We would especially like to thank our premier media sponsor, The Day, and our supporting sponsor, Aspire Magazine, for making this exhibition happen.”

The LAA was founded in 1914 by the American Impressionists and continues the tradition of exhibiting and selling representational artwork by its members and invited artists, as well as offering art instruction and lectures to the community. The Association is located at 90 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, CT, in a building designed by Charles Adams Platt and located within a national historic district.

Admission is free with contributions appreciated. Gallery hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information on exhibitions, purchase of art, art classes, or becoming a member, visit www.lymeartassociation.org or call (860) 434-7802.

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CT Trust Warns $1.1 Billion Susquehanna Bridge Project Might Set Unacceptably Low Bar for Environmental Protection in CT

Rendering of Susquehanna Bridge Project. Source: David Anderson, “Deadline approaches for comments on Susquehanna rail bridge replacement”, April 6, 2017, Baltimore Sun.

A June 26 announcement by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) that the $1.1 billion Susquehanna Bridge Project on the Northeast Corridor in Maryland poses “no significant impact,” drew sharp comment from Daniel Mackay, Executive Director of the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, who warned that such a decision could set an unacceptably low bar for mitigating historic, cultural and environmental resource impacts from future high speed rail projects in Connecticut.

The proposed rail bridge replacement project bisects the National-Register-listed Havre de Grace Historic District in Maryland, comprised of approximately 1000 historic structures, many from the 18th century, on the banks of the Susquehanna River, and was reported in the Baltimore Sun on June 26, 2017.

“FRA determined that the most comprehensive level of environmental review was not needed for this $1.1 billion dollar rail project in the midst of a historic coastal community in Maryland,” noted Daniel Mackay, Executive Director of the Connecticut Trust. “Connecticut and Rhode Island communities caught in the cross-hairs of FRA’s bypass proposals should be concerned for the signal sent by this Maryland project – the process ahead may not yield the protections that communities want for themselves.”

Since the FRA released draft plans on November 15, 2015 to expand new high-speed railroad corridors across coastal Connecticut and Rhode Island, under a federal planning process called “NEC Future,” the Connecticut Trust, and its grassroots partner SECoast, have led a campaign to counter FRA’s insensitive approach to transportation planning for the Northeast Corridor routes through Connecticut.

“FRA’s plan represents a once-in-a-generation decision that will fundamentally shape the communities, economies and ecology of coastal southern New England,” explained Gregory Stroud, Director of Special Projects at the Connecticut Trust, and co-founder of SECoast. “The only sure way to protect our communities from these types of impacts is to fully remove these projects from the Record of Decision.”

The FRA is expected to announce a long-delayed Record of Decision for NEC Future this summer, finalizing a blueprint for the Northeast Corridor which will shape infrastructure decisions and investment through 2040, or later. The current blueprint has been in place since a similar process completed in 1978. The Northeast Corridor, which connects cities between Washington, D.C. and Boston, is the nation’s busiest rail corridor.

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Old Lyme Town Band Gives Sound View Concert Tonight

The Old Lyme Town Band

The Town of Old Lyme and the Sound View Commission are sponsoring family-friendly concerts at Sound View Beach this summer.

The first concert in the 2017 series will be held this evening, Thursday, June 29,, and feature the Old Lyme Town Band.  The free outdoor concerts will take place from 7 through 8.30 p.m., near the flag pole at the end of Hartford Avenue at Sound View Beach.

Bring a blanket or a lawn chair, and settle in for a lovely evening of sunset music.  The band plays a little bit of everything from marches, movie-themed medleys, and jazz, to big band, pop, and classical. Everyone is welcome to attend these family-friendly events.

There is no rain location for this concert.  Should a weather cancellation be necessary it will be posted on the Town of Old Lyme website under “News & Announcements.”

The original Old Lyme Town Band existed from 1886 to 1910. The band members practiced in the “Band Room,” a building on the corner of Shore and Ferry Roads that has since been converted to a residence.

In the summer of 1975, Michele Smith Dickey, a granddaughter of one of the original band members, re-formed the band in anticipation of the US bicentennial celebration. Dickey took lessons on a trombone which reputedly belonged to a member of the original Old Lyme Town Band.

Donald Janse, then director of cadet musical activities at the US Coast Guard Academy and past director of the Coast Guard Band, was the first conductor of the modern band.

Since 1975, the band, whose members represent many area towns, has presented concerts from Guilford to Mystic, and from Old Lyme to Middletown, particularly during the summer.
Rehearsals are held Monday evenings from 7  to 9 p.m. at Christ the King Church in Old Lyme. New members of all ages are welcome with no auditions. For further information, contact the band at this link.
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Old Lyme Library Celebrates its Founders Day Tonight, All Welcome

Historic photo of the Old Lyme Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library.

Join the Old Lyme-Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library for an evening reception on Wednesday, June 28, at 7 p.m., celebrating the Library’s history and art.  The library was founded in June 1898.

The event features guest speaker Michaelle Pearson and honored guest Townsend Ludington.

All are welcome, but the favor of an RSVP at this link is requested.

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State Budget Discussion at OL Church Draws Large Crowd With Wide Range of Concerns, Questions

Attendees at Monday night’s state budget discussion listen attentively to a speaker.  Photo by Jacob Ballachino.

About 60 community leaders and citizens, including members of the clergy from both New London and Middlesex Counties,  attended a “Conversation on the State Budget,” Monday evening at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme (FCCOL)

Only two state-elected representatives attended out of a total of the 55 senators and representatives invited. State Rep. Devin Carney, (R-23rd), whose district includes Lyme, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook and the southern segment of Westbrook, and State Rep. Melissa Ziobron (R- 34th), whose district includes East Haddam, East Hampton and Colchester, attended.

Carney and Ziobron answered questions from the audience carefully and thoughtfully, shedding light on how the budget process is proceeding. They also listened attentively to concerns raised by many of those who attended.

Chief among those concerns was expressing the importance of maintaining appropriate and adequate state funding for programs that are critical to those most in need throughout the state. In light of pending federal cuts to health care programs, maintaining the State of Connecticut’s support of medical care for the low-income and elderly was a constant theme of the evening.

Many of those who attended made it clear that, if the priorities and commitment to support the neediest among us were clearly articulated, paying higher taxes would seem both an appropriate and honorable response. Cutting taxes was not considered a priority. Several speakers commented how it is a privilege to live in this area and, as a consequence, there should be an expectation to pay a fair share to compensate for those who shoulder unreasonable burdens in Connecticut’s cities.

There was a lively discussion about the state pension-funding crisis during which former State Senator Melodie Peters reminded the audience that state employees had paid into those funds over many years.  She expressed her firm opinion that it is critical now to honor the state’s commitments to those people.

There was almost universal consensus that the state is in a challenging place in terms of the budget and compromise on all sides in the legislature is imperative. Frequently, questions were raised about why the two parties seem so crippled by partisanship.

A wide-ranging discussion about increasing state revenues ensued. Questions were raised regarding the possibility of re-implementing tolls and taxing sugary drinks. Another audience member asked, “Could we add a small fee onto our car registrations to fund our state parks and their employees?”  A third speaker questioned whether the state could consider raising taxes on those in upper income brackets.

The subject of the questions then moved to business with one audience member asking, “Can we incentivize businesses to come to this state?” while another questioned, “Is it possible to raise the minimum wage so that people in the state have more ability to participate in our economy?”

The Rev. John Selders of Amistad Congregational Church in Hartford, Conn., who serves as coordinator of the Moral Monday, Conn., program, and Moral Monday Board Member Pamela Selders helped to lead the discussions, along with FCCOL Senior Associate Minister Carleen Gerber

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Hear Lampos, Pearson Talk About Their Fascinating Book, “Revolution in the Lymes,” Tonight at OL Library

This evening at 7 p.m., local authors and historians Jim Lampos and Michaelle Pearson will be speaking about their most recent book, “Revolution in the Lymes,” at the Old Lyme-Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library. All are welcome and admission is free to this fascinating presentation.

The Revolutionary War in the Lymes started as a rebellion of ideas. From its origins in the Cromwellian Saybrook Colony, Lyme (today’s Lyme, Old Lyme, East Lyme and Salem) prospered under the free hand of self-governance and spurned King George III’s efforts to rein in the wayward colonies.

In 1765, Reverend Stephen Johnson wrote incendiary missives against the Stamp Act, declaring on Nov. 1, 1765, “My dear distressed country! For you I have wrote; for you I daily mourn, and to save your invaluable Rights and Freedom, I would willingly die.”

A few years later, the town hosted its own Tea Party, burning one hundred pounds of British tea near the town green. When the alarm came from Lexington in 1775, Lyme’s citizens were among the first to answer.

Lampos and Pearson will explore how local Patriots shaped an epic revolt.

Asked what lasting impact she hoped the book will have, Pearson replied, “We hope this book will bring a renewed interest, rediscovery and appreciation of the forgotten patriots of Lyme, such as Major General Samuel Holden Parsons, Governor Matthew Griswold, Reverend Stephen Johnson and John McCurdy. All were figures of wealth and stature before the Revolution, who sacrificed their treasure, and imperiled their lives for the cause of freedom.”

She continued, “They were dedicated patriots from the outset, and their actions and writings helped shape the ideological ground upon which the Revolutionary War was fought.”

Pearson added, “We also hope to initiate and encourage a line of historical inquiry that focuses on tracing the roots of the American Revolution back to the Cromwellian cause in the English Civil War of the 1640’s. The connections between the Cromwellians of 1640 and the Lyme revolutionaries of 1776 were direct, and Lyme’s patriots knowingly used the Cromwellians’ opposition to King Charles I, and Lyme’s subsequent history of self-government, as the basis for their own opposition to King George III.”

Michaelle Pearson and Jim Lampos will give an author talk on their book, “Revolution in the Lymes,” Tuesday evening at the Old Lyme-PGN Library. Photo by Angela Chicoski Photography.

Michaelle Pearson holds a B.A. in Journalism and Photography from Creighton University, and a J.D. from New York Law School. She was Director of Copy at Arnell Group, and continues to work as a freelance writer and editor. Pearson sits on the Old Lyme-Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library Board and is a Trustee of the Old Lyme Historical Society. She has written articles of local and historic interest for newsletters and magazines including River and Sound, Events, and the OLPGN newsletter. Pearson is also a member of the New York Genealogical & Biographical Society and the Connecticut Society of Genealogists.

Jim Lampos received his B.A. in Sociology (Summa Cum Laude) from Brandeis University, where he was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa. He completed the General Course at the London School of Economics and was awarded a Kaplan Fellowship to attend the New School for Social Research, where he received his M.A. in Urban Affairs and Policy Analysis. Lampos is a published poet and musician who has released eight CDs, toured nationally and has been featured on network television. He and his wife, Michaelle Pearson, have previously co-authored Rumrunners, Governors, Beachcombers and Socialists – A History of Old Lyme Beaches, and Remarkable Women of Old Lyme.

Lampos and Pearson live in Old Lyme.

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CT Historic Preservation Office Seeks Public Input at Meeting on Statewide Plan, Tonight in Old Saybrook

The Connecticut State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) is working on a Comprehensive Statewide Historic Preservation Plan to be completed by the end of the year.

The plan will be a planning document at an intensive level, addressing the treatment of historic and cultural resources across the state. It will serve as a guide for planning and decision making by the SHPO, Towns, agencies, non-profit organizations, and others who may affect these resources.

For southeast Connecticut, there will be a meeting at The Pavilion at Saybrook Point Park, 154 College St., at Saybrook Point, Old Saybrook, CT on Tuesday, June 27, from 7 to 9 p.m.

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Old Lyme First Congregational Church, ‘Moral Monday’ Group Host Community Conversation on State Budget’

State Senators and Representatives from 30 Area Towns Invited To Attend Public Forum
Event is Free and Open to the Public

The First Congregational Church of Old Lyme (FCCOL) and the nonprofit organization, Moral Monday CT, are hosting a “Community Conversation on the State Budget” tonight at 7 p.m. to help facilitate a peaceful, respectful, community conversation on the state budget between area elected officials, nonprofit groups and members of the general public. 

The public forum hopes to inspire an insightful discussion surrounding the state’s planned cuts to health care, education and social services and their likely impact on marginalized populations.

More than 30 area elected officials have been invited to attend the public forum on the church’s front lawn, including the state senators and representatives who represent the citizens of Branford, Cheshire, Chester, Clinton, Deep River, Durham, East Haddam, East Haven, East Lyme, Essex, Guilford, Haddam, Hamden, Killingworth, Lyme, Madison, Meriden, Middlefield, Middletown, Montville, New Haven, New London, North Branford, North Haven, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook, Salem, Wallingford, Waterford and Westbrook.

In the event of bad weather, the forum will take place inside the church’s historic Meetinghouse.

Moral Monday CT is a statewide coalition of individuals and organizations – originally brought together through the Black Lives Matter movement – that fights for civil rights and social justice for black and brown people in Connecticut.  The organization was founded by Bishop John Selders, Lady Pamela Selders and Minister Cornell Lewis.

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Ramblin’ Dan Stevens to be Inducted in CT Blues Hall of Fame This Evening in Old Lyme

Ramblin’ Dan Stevens (center) of Old Lyme will play at the ‘Rock The Dock’ event at Black Hall Outfitters this evening. Stevens will be inducted into the CT Blues Hall of Fame at the start of the evening.

This evening, veteran folk-blues musician Ramblin’ Dan Stevens of Old Lyme will be inducted into the Connecticut Blues Hall of Fame in a ceremony starting at 6 p.m. at Black Hall Outfitters on Shore Rd.(Rte. 156) in Old Lyme. All are welcome. Take a picnic and enjoy the beautiful location along with the sounds of music.

Ramblin’ Dan and a selection of his musician friends will give a concert after the ceremony.

 

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Celebrate CT Historic Gardens Day at FloGris Museum Today

The Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme hosts a celebration of the site’s historic gardens featuring special events, displays, demonstrations, and family activities this Sunday, June 25.

Take a day to celebrate Connecticut’s Historic Gardens Day on Sunday, June 25, from 12 to 4 p.m. The Museum is proud to be a member of the group (cthistoricgardens.org) and to be a participant in this special state-wide celebration of Connecticut’s stunning historic gardens. Member sites host special events and activities celebrating their gardens. Choose the gardens in your own backyard, or plan a day-trip to see those further afield.

At the Florence Griswold Museum, visit the gardens and landscape that inspired a generation of artists. Enjoy refreshments on Miss Florence’s porch. Get creative and pick up all the painting supplies necessary to make your own masterpiece in the garden or down by the river. Discover more about the landscape using one of the Museum’s new “Explorer Kits.” Have lunch at Café Flo.

Grounds admission is free; regular admission applies for historic house and gallery.

Events will take place rain or shine, though activities may vary depending on the weather.

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Update on Saunders Hollow Roadwork

Saunders Hollow Rd. in Old Lyme will be closed Monday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. from Rte. 156 to Sill Ln.

Only homeowners will be permitted access to Saunders Hollow Rd. Monday

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Old Lyme’s Children’s Learning Center Creates a Delicious ‘Edible Garden’

The OLCLC Edible Garden is thriving.

The cold start to the month of June may have had many gardeners worried about their harvest. Thanks to the pro bono labor of Anu Koiv, the children of the Old Lyme Children’s Learning Center (OLCLC) have already been enjoying fruits and vegetables from their thriving edible garden.

Anu Koiv not only works pro bono on the edible garden, but also on the beds that surround the OLCLC.

“Not only do the kids get to learn about eating healthy foods, but they learn about sustainability and how to manage their own garden,” says Alison Zanardi, director of the OLCLC. It is not very often that preschoolers have the opportunity to interact with a garden and a myriad of different fruits and vegetables like this one. The kids can interact with the plants in the sensory garden, feeling and smelling different tantalizing plants, like mint, cacti and more.

Vegetables patiently waiting to be picked by the preschoolers.

Preschoolers are free to walk around the garden during their time outside and select whatever food that they choose from their luscious garden. Kale chips, fresh tomatoes, blueberries, and strawberries are often enjoyed as snacks.

More vegetables in the Edible Garden that are ‘ripe for the picking’ by the preschoolers.

Anu Koiv is the mastermind behind the garden, and the staff and students are all extremely appreciative of the work she has done.  Not only is she building a garden for the benefit of the preschooler’s education, but also to benefit the wildlife who will be inhabiting the garden. “We’re inviting nature back into the landscape of the courtyard. Each and every plant has ornamental and food value,” notes Koiv.

Pike’s Playground is named in honor of Connie Pike, founder of the OLCLC.  Children can interact with plants in the sensory garden.

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