September 21, 2017

SECWAC Hosts Irish Scholar, Author on Monday to Discuss a Century of Gender Equality Activism in Ireland

The Southeast Connecticut World Affairs Council (SECWAC) will host Irish author and independent scholar Micheline Sheehy Skeffington, pictured left, at 6 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 11, at Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School Auditorium, located at 53 Lyme St, Old Lyme, CT, 06371. She will deliver remarks based on her social activism and the history of her family’s involvement in Irish nationalism.

Sheehy Skeffington’s address will be preceded by a reception at 5:15 p.m., and the SECWAC Annual Meeting at 5:45 p.m.

This is part of her tour from Ireland to follow in her grandmother’s footsteps across the U.S. during the suffrage movement in 1917 (https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/hanna-and-me-passing-on-the-flame.) She inherited her activism from her illustrious grandparents, Hanna and Francis Sheehy Skeffington, who were renowned early 20th century suffrage activists and Irish nationalists.  A pacifist who tried to stop looting in Dublin during the 1916 Easter Rebellion, Francis was arrested by British soldiers and, without trial or due process of any sort, executed by firing squad along with two other innocent civilians who were journalists. Their murders contributed to the transformation of public opinion after the rebellion was suppressed.

In the face of British objections, Hanna visited the US in 1917, speaking on behalf of the cause of Irish independence at many cities from New York to Butte (Montana) to San Francisco.

She will also discuss 21st century gender equality issues in the workplace in Ireland. In 2014, Sheehy Skeffington, a retired professor of plant ecology, won a gender discrimination case against the National University of Ireland (NUI) Galway, with the Irish Equality Tribunal pointing to multiple failures in the promotion procedure that echo barriers faced by female academics in other Irish and international universities.  She continues to campaign on the issue of gender inequality in academia, having donated her compensation money to help five other female lecturers in challenging their promotion decisions.

The presentation is a part of the SECWAC Speaker Series.  SECWAC meetings are free to members ($75/year; $25/year for young professionals under 35).  Walk-in’s are $20 for the general public (non-members; the $20 cost can subsequently be applied towards a SECWAC membership) and free for area college and high school students.

Immediately following the presentation,  SECWAC meeting attendees have the option to attend a dinner at Old Lyme Country Club with the speaker for $35.  Reservations required by Friday, Sept. 8, at 860-912-5718.

SECWAC is a regional, nonprofit, membership organization affiliated with the World Affairs Councils of America (WACA). The organization dates back to 1999, and has continued to arrange eight to 10 Speaker Series meetings annually, between September and June. The meetings range in foreign affairs topics, and are hosted at venues along the I-95 corridor, welcoming members and guests from Stonington to Old Saybrook, and beyond.

SECWAC’s mission is “to foster an understanding of issues of foreign policy and international affairs through study, debate, and educational programming.” It provides a forum for nonpartisan, non-advocacy dialogue between members and speakers, who can be U.S. policy makers, educators, authors, and other experts on foreign relations. For more information, visit www.secwac.org.

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A La Carte: Apricots and Almonds Make Great Galette!

Apricot and Almond Galette

My mother always wanted to live in San Diego, but as far as she got was Troy, NY.

She was born in the beginning of the 20th century, died in the beginning of the 21st century and was buried in an ecumenical cemetery not more than 20 blocks or so from where she lived her whole life.  San Diego, she said, correctly, had the perfect climate: fairly sunny, warm in the daytime and cooler at night. No snow ever.

For me, almost any season is okay. I like the autumn smell of wood smoke in the air and in winter, curling up with two cats as I read long, meandering novels. Spring never seems to linger too long and, now, we bid adieu to summer.

No matter the season, I love to cook. I am still having such fun with all the summer vegetables. I eat two or three tomatoes a day. I am grilling zucchini and summer squash outside or sautéing them with a little butter and garlic and salt on the cooktop in the kitchen. Last night I roasted a spaghetti squash, then tossed the innards with chopped tomatoes, basil and a little butter. Today I will make a frittata with sweet peppers for a 9:30 am meeting at my house.

Next weekend I will make a little dessert with fresh peaches and almonds. The recipe below, from calls for apricots, but any stone fruit will do.

Apricot and Almond Galette

From Bon Appetit, June, 2017

Yield: 4 servings

One-half cup blanched almonds
One-third cup sugar, for more for sprinkling
1 large egg
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
One-half teaspoon almond extract (optional, but I do love almond extract)
One-half teaspoon pure vanilla extract
Pinch of salt
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour (plus more for surface)
1 package frozen puff pastry, preferably all-butter, thawed
12 apricots (about 1 and one-quarter pound), halved and pitted (or other stone fruit, quartered if large)

Place a rack in middle of oven and preheat to 425 degrees. Pulse almonds and one-third of sugar in a food processor until very finely ground. Add egg and pulse to combine. Add butter, almond extract (if using), vanilla extract, salt and 1 tablespoon flour; pulse until almond cream is smooth.

Roll out pastry on a lightly floured surface just enough to smooth out any creases.

If you are using a package of pastry than as 2 sheets, stack and roll out to a one-quarter- to one-third rectangle.

If your package contains a single 16-inch to 10-inch sheet of puff pastry, halve it crosswise and roll out one half on a lightly floured surface until rectangle is one-quarter to one-third inch thick, saving remaining half for another use. Transfer to a parchment-lined (or Silpat-lined) baking sheet. Fold over edges of pastry to make a one-half inch border around sides. Prick surface all over with a fork (this keeps the pastry from rising too much when baked and helps it cook through. (Spread almond cream over pastry, staying inside borders. (Chill dough in the freezer for a few minutes if it becomes too soft to work with.) Set apricots, cut sides up, on top of the cream. Sprinkle lightly with sugar.

Bake until pastry is golden brown and puffed, 15 to 20 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 325 degrees and continue to bake until pastry is deep golden brown and cooked through and apricots are softened and browned in spots, 15 to 20 minutes longer.

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Parking Ban CANCELLED for Hartford Ave. Today

The Town of Old Lyme has cancelled the previously announced parking ban for Hartford Ave. from Bocce Lane to Pond Rd. on Tuesday, Sept. 5, beginning at 6 a.m. due to planned milling of portions of the road.

Paving of Hartford Ave. is tentatively scheduled for Friday, Sept. 8, and a similar ban on parking will be issued, and then confirmed depending on the weather.

The roadwork will be re-scheduled and the Parking Ban reissued at a later date.

Follow LymeLine.com for the latest information.

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Rep. Carney Applauds the Passage of a New Opioid Bill Signed on ‘International Overdose Awareness Day’

State Rep. Devin Carney (R-23rd) stands at left as Governor Malloy signs the new opioid bill.

State Representative Devin Carney (R-23) attended a bill signing of Public Act 17-131, An Act Preventing Prescription Opioid Diversion and Abuse at the Hartford Public Library on Thursday, Aug. 31. Joining him were many legislative colleagues, local officials and advocates, who all stood in support of the legislation that seeks to curb the growing opioid crisis in Connecticut.

This ceremonial bill signing took place as the state took part in “International Overdose Awareness Day.”

From Jan. 1, 2015 through Aug. 2, 2016, Connecticut recorded 800 deaths due to overdose. The bill, which passed the House of Representatives unanimously expands upon legislation passed in 2016 and 2015, and includes some of the following aspects:

  • Instructs the Alcohol and Drug Policy Council to convene a working group to study substance abuse treatment referral programs that have been established by municipal police departments to refer persons with an opioid use disorder or who are seeking recovery from drug addiction to substance abuse treatment facilities;
  • Reduces the maximum opioid drug prescription for minors from 7 days to 5 days and maintains current law that allows a prescribing practitioner to exceed the limit for chronic pain, palliative care or acute pain if necessary as long as it is documented in the medical record
  • Requires individual and group health insurers to cover medically necessary detox treatment, as defined by American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) so that those looking for help cannot be turned away due to insurance issues;
  • Increases data sharing between state agencies regarding opioid abuse or opioid overdose deaths;
  • Increases security of controlled substances prescriptions by requiring scheduled drugs be electronically prescribed;
  • Allows patients to file a voluntary non-opioid form in their medical records indicating that they do not want to be prescribed or administered opioid drugs.

“Today, I was proud to stand with both Republicans and Democrats alongside Governor Malloy to enact bipartisan legislation that will help in the fight against opioid addiction. Opioid addiction is something that affects every community in our state, including every town within the 23rd District,” said State Rep. Devin Carney, continuing, “While drug addiction is not new, the addition of fentanyl into the equation is causing people from across the state to lose their lives at an alarming rate.”

Carney added, “Everyone, including me, knows someone who has been affected by drug addiction, whether it’s a parent, child, grandchild, or friend and I believe our society must continue working to battle this or we will continue to see lives taken far too soon.”

He noted, “I applaud the State of Connecticut for being a leader in this area and legislators from across the political spectrum for joining together to work towards solutions in an attempt to combat this growing epidemic. I also want to thank those within my community who have worked so hard to educate, communicate, and share their stories about drug addiction.”

Connecticut is expected to see more than 1,000 accidental drug-related deaths in 2017.

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Cournoyer Named LOL Schools 2016-17 ‘Teacher of the Year’

On an unseasonably cold day, Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools sailed smoothly into the 2017-18 academic year today with both a new principal and assistant principal — Mark Ambruso and Noah Ventola respectively — in charge at LOL Middle School.

The middle school is also home to the LOL Schools ‘Teacher of the Year’ Patricia Cournoyer, who was “crowned” yesterday at the All-School Administration, Faculty, and Staff Convocation. A popular choice, Cournoyer has been the physical education and health teacher for more than 10 years at the middle school and interacts with all students at each grade every year.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Non-Certified Employee of the Year Eileen Griswold stands with Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Business Manager Holly McCalla, and Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser.

Eileen Griswold, who works in the Business Office was named Non-certified Employee of the Year at the same event.

Asked his aspirations for the new school year, Ian Neviaser, Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent, responded, “We are excited for another year of new learning, growth, and development in the Lyme-Old Lyme Schools. It is our intention to continue on the path of success that has been our standard for many years. We are excited to welcome all of our students back to campus to continue the tradition of excellence that has become synonymous with Lyme-Old Lyme.”

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Rogers Lake Drawdown to Begin After Labor Day

Every leap year, Rogers Lake is scheduled to be lowered in the fall so that landowners can perform any maintenance at the waters edge. But this did not happen in 2016 due to the drought.

Because of this, the drawdown will take place this fall (2017) as follows:

  • The drawdown will start after Labor Day and the full drawdown of a maximum of 14 inches should occur by mid-September.
  • The drawdown will be maintained from mid-September to Nov. 1.

The Rogers Lake Authority can be contacted at Rogers-Lake-Authority@googlegroups.com

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I-95 Exit 71 Northbound On-Ramp to be Closed Overnight Monday & Tuesday

The I-95 northbound Exit 71 on-ramp on will be closed this evening (Monday) and tomorrow (Tuesday) nights through to the morning of Aug. 29 and Aug. 30 respectively.

Message boards and a detour will be in place prior to the closure redirecting traffic to avoid the ramp in question.

We have not yet been advised of a time when the closure will commence, but will post it as soon as it is made available.

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Lyme-Old Lyme Troop 26 Boy Scouts Conquer ‘Swamp Base’ in Louisiana

These intrepid Lyme-Old Lyme Troop 26 Boy Scouts and Scot Leaders attended ‘Swamp Base’ in July of this year. From left to right, (front row) Brooke Smith, Swampbase guide; Mike Miller, Theodore Wayland, Dennys Andrades, Maxwell Bauchmann, and Peter Bauchmann; (back row)  Mark Wayland, John Miller, Evan St. Louis, and Mary Powell-St.Louis.

Editor’s Note: This personal account of the Swamp Base 2017 experience was submitted by Life Scouts Evan St. Louis and Theodore Wayland.

The steady lapping of our oars was only interrupted as we had to lean back in our canoe seats to avoid low branches, while we were keenly observed by the alligators swimming by …

On July 7, Lyme-Old Lyme Boy Scout Troop 26 became the first ever Connecticut troop to attend the Boy Scouts of America High Adventure called Swamp Base. This program is based at the Atchafalaya Swamps in southern Louisiana. On the day of our arrival, our crew of five scouts and four adult leaders visited the nearby town of Lafayette, to sample local cuisine and to become acclimated to the local temperature and humidity. 

The next day, our first full day in the area, we traveled to a historical region called Vermilionville and learned about the Acadian culture of southern Louisiana. We met our guide for the trip, Brooke, a sophomore at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette (ULL.) That night we thoroughly checked all our equipment and provisions then fell fast asleep in the ULL dorms.

Cypress groves stand tall in the Henderson Swamp.

Our swamp venture began very early that next morning as we drove to a spot at the start of a canal and launched our canoes. The canal went on for 4.4 miles. At the end of the canal, it seemed as though there was a wall of trees, and that section of paddling was aptly called “The Wall” by our guide. That area was perhaps the most challenging section of the whole trip. There were trees and shrubs very close together, and you had to stay in the middle of the waterway to avoid wasp nests.

Thankfully, we made it through this section unscathed and there were no wasps anywhere else on the trip.

After the narrows opened up into the Henderson Swamp, there was much more room to maneuver. The first day we traveled 19.3 miles to houseboats where we would be sleeping. The Henderson swamp had areas where the Cypress trees were logged over 100 years ago, and any trees that are left were considered the runts back then.

Our houseboat captain gave a fascinating overview on the alligators of the Bayous, and their role in the environment. At this point, we had seen enough alligator behavior to realize that they are more scared of us then we were of them, and would try to avoid us.

The next morning, we had an exciting airboat tour of the outlying areas of Henderson Swamp where cypress trees grew in groves. It truly is amazing that the Cypress trees can grow in over six feet of water. After all of the beautiful sights on the airboat tour, it would be back to traveling under our own power.

This day we would cover 10.3 miles; however, after paddling only about a mile from the houseboats, we had to portage our canoes over a levee. This portage was 900 feet long and over the 25-foot-tall levee, but with the extra weight of gear and canoes, it felt much longer. The late morning heat was near its peak adding to the challenge of this portage. After that, the paddle was nice and slow with a wide-open waterway, with plenty of shade from the heat.

That night, we slept on Rougarou Island in hammocks covered with mosquito-netting. The Rougarou was a creature similar to a werewolf in the legends of the Laurentian French communities – fortunately there were no modern versions present during our trip! We also had a blowgun contest with very basic materials – this was fun, but may not have provided us too much security if a Rougarou showed up.

Our next day of paddling was 14.4 miles and not too difficult, but the wildlife was probably the most diverse that we saw throughout our trip. We saw a wide variety of birds and plants in different areas, and quite a few alligators, the most on any day of our journey. Midday of this paddle, it began pouring with rain, and there was an interesting sight of the giant raindrops bouncing on the water as they hit it, but multiplied millions of times. This was the point we were really glad to have dry bags, so none of our gear got wet.

After the rain stopped, we still had to cross two lakes, which were strenuous, but we knew how close Island Outpost was, our final stop. Once we arrived, the Boy Scout crew that had arrived the previous day helped us get our canoes onto the dock. On Island Outpost, there were showers, and clean water was readily available. We would be sleeping in cabins for two nights, on bunks in rustic cabins, after enjoying our jambalaya dinner prepared for us. 

Catfish for dinner!

The next day at Island Outpost we had no paddling and enjoyed other relaxing activities including swimming, boating, and paddle boarding. There were fishing trips by boat, and setting out catfish jug lines. After later checking the jug lines to harvest our catch, we enjoyed a catfish fry that would be a side to gumbo for dinner with plentiful Cajun spice to notch up the heat.

The morning of the last day, we woke up before 5 a.m. to be able to see the sunrise at 6:13 a.m. on Sandy Cove from a great vantage point. We were in the water at about 5:30 a.m. and started immediately. We made it to the outlook point just in time, because within a minute of us arriving, the top of the sun had started to peek above the horizon. It was definitely worth waking up for, to see the sun climb up into the sky rapidly.

A beautiful early morning view of the bayou.

After eating breakfast on the water, we continued paddling, trying to get to the next scheduled portage early before it got too hot. We went in between ancient Cypress trees on the edge of Lake Fausse  Pointe. There were a few alligators there that were very close to us. It was fabulous here too in terms of both the view and the overall cleanliness of the area.

The second portage was easier than the first, except for the very end. The end of the second portage, behind the levee, was referred to as the “Swamp Stomp” – an area several hundred-feet long where there was thick mud and certain areas of waist-high water that we had to wade through pulling our canoes. Once we were through the Swamp Stomp, we came out onto a chilly river.

This part of our trek was the easiest, because there was a current that carried us almost the whole way to the end of our journey. We had gone swimming off the canoes from time to time on previous days of the trip, but with this current it was not necessary to paddle as much, and at this time it was much more refreshing and enjoyable to be in the water.

The conquerers of Swamp Base High Adventure 2017 stand with paddles in hand at the end of their successful journey.

At the end of our paddling adventure, we had completed 61.6 miles of canoeing the swamps and lakes of this amazing area over five days. We had a sense of accomplishment at completion, and all of us agreed if offered the chance to conquer the Swamp again, we would be there! 

Y’all come back now, won’t ya?!

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Old Lyme Town Hall Gets a Facelift

Painters from Martinez Painting work on the upper sections of Old Lyme Town Hall.

During 2007-2008, Old Lyme’s Memorial Town Hall was renovated and an addition built, providing ADA accessibility and mechanical upgrades as well as expanded space. The results pleased both staff and visitors but that was nearly 10 years ago, and in some areas, the paint on the older portion of the facility failed to adhere.

It also became apparent that many of the plantings along the building were too close to the exterior siding and this, in combination with the passage of time, caused a number of areas of rot and deterioration.

The front entrance of the Old Lyme Town Hall is being refreshed with a new coat of paint.

This summer, the exterior of the building was power-washed and the deteriorated skirt and corner boards (which contained lead-based paint) were removed. These latter will be replaced with material that resists rot and is appropriate for use at or near ground level.

All remaining surfaces will be scraped, encapsulated and will receive two coats of fresh paint.

Even the flag pole gets a fresh coat of paint!

The contractor for project, which started Aug. 1 and should be completed by Sept. 10, is Martinez Painters of Clinton, Conn. 

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Federation of Old Lyme Beaches Hosts ‘Meet The Democratic Candidates’ Event Tonight

The Federation of Old Lyme Beaches is hosting two ‘Meet the Candidates’ nights on Friday, Aug. 18, and Friday, Aug. 25, respectively for the Republican and Democratic candidates for the Old Lyme Board of Selectmen.

Challengers Jude Read and Chris Kerr are the Republican candidates for First and Second Selectmen – they were on hand last Friday, Aug. 18.

Incumbents Bonnie Reemsnyder and Mary Jo Nosal are the Democratic candidates for the same positions and will similarly be on hand at tonight’s event being held from 7 to 10 p.m.

Both events will be held at the Shoreline Community Center, 39 Hartford Ave. Sound View.

Parking is available across the street from the Community Center.

Municipal elections awill be held this November and this is an opportunity to hear directly from the candidates about important issues facing Old Lyme and particularly the beach areas. Candidates for Old Lyme Selectmen, Boards, and Commissions are invited to make presentations and answer your questions.

The Federation of Beaches urges everyone to attend and become informed voters.

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Sound View Hosts Final, Free Concert in Summer Series Tonight, ‘Duke Robillard & His All-Star Band’ Perform

Duke Robillard

The Town of Old Lyme and the Sound View Commission are sponsoring family-friendly, outdoor concerts at Sound View Beach this summer.

The final concert in the 2017 series will be held Thursday evening, Aug. 24, and features Duke Robillard and his All Star Band. International recording artist and Grammy nominee, Duke is recipient of many awards including: The Blues Music Awards “Best Blues Guitarist,” Canadian Maple Blues Awards “Best International Blues Artist,” The French Blues Association “Album of the Year” and “Guitarist of the Year.”

BB King himself has called Duke “One of the great players.” Duke was also the founder of “Roomful of Blues” band.

The free concerts will take place from 7 through 8.30 p.m., near the flag pole at the end of Hartford Avenue at Sound View Beach.

Bring a blanket or a lawn chair, and settle in for a lovely evening of sunset music.

Everyone is welcome to attend these family-friendly events.

In the event of rain, the concert will be moved indoors to the Shoreline Community Center at 39 Hartford Ave. in Sound View.

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Letter to the Editor: First Selectmen Candidates Should Focus on Positive Future for Old Lyme, Not Negative Past

To the Editor:

This November Old Lyme will be having a municipal election. Either the incumbent Bonnie Reemsnyder, a Democrat, will prevail, or Judith Read, a Republican, will become First Selectwoman.

I am a native born resident of Old Lyme, and have happy memories of spending summers riding my bike, having ice cream at James Pharmacy ( a dime bought you a generous scoop of vanilla, chocolate or strawberry), and listening to katydids.. Old Lyme is a special place where civility and responsible citizenship can still prevail, and change is slow and measured ever since it was established as a “plantation” in the 1665 Loving Parting agreement with Saybrook Colony.

In my opinion, civility and openness is needed more than ever in this forthcoming election. It troubles me when I hear sotto voce that Bonnie did nothing about possible train tracks running through the center of town, or cares nothing about our beach communities, or about improvements on Halls Road.  I have been at meetings convened by our First Selectwoman at which these serious matters were discussed. The 85 page report sent to the DOT attests to her hard work at getting qualified professionals to weigh in on a poorly conceived route for express train tracks.

Wouldn’t it be refreshing if we went back to the League of  Women Voters forums (remember them?) where the candidates outline specific plans for the Town, not what evil things the other candidate has done to destroy the Town. Perhaps we could get national news coverage which would be beamed directly to Capital Hill in Washington. Old Lyme could even set a trend for problem-solving. As my grandchildren might say “what a concept”.

Sincerely,

Alison C. Mitchell,
Old Lyme.

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Legal News You Can Use: Proving Negligence in a Car Accident Case

Photo by Samuel Foster on Unsplash

SPONSORED POST: To recover compensation in a car accident case, a plaintiff must satisfy the required elements of a negligence claim: duty, breach, causation and damages. Specifically, the plaintiff must persuade the jury that the defendant breached his or her duty of care, resulting in injury, by a preponderance of the evidence standard.

Element Two: Breach of Duty

As we discussed in a recent post, every licensed driver has a duty of care to operate his or her vehicle in a responsible manner. That duty includes abiding by traffic laws and paying attention to traffic and road conditions. Thus, the most contested element of a car accident case is usually not whether a duty existed, but whether the defendant driver’s actions breached that duty.

Types of Evidence in a Car Accident Claim

A plaintiff may use both direct and circumstantial evidence in a car accident case. Thanks to technology, there may be direct evidence of a defendant driver’s actions. For example, street cameras may have recorded the driver running a stop sign or red light. If a crash victim suspects that the other driver was texting behind the wheel, a subpoena to the driver’s cell phone carrier may confirm that suspicion. Many newer motor vehicles also contain an Event Data Recorder (EDR), or “black box,” which may have recorded speed and braking patters immediately before the collision.

Creating a Trial Narrative With Expert Testimony

Suisman Shapiro also has established relationships with accident reconstruction specialists. These professionals may offer testimony that interprets circumstantial evidence, such as skid marks, vehicle resting positions, EDR data, and the driver’s memories immediately before the crash. However, none of this evidence may be apparent without the skilled investigative efforts of a personal injury attorney.

The Law Firm of Suisman Shapiro focuses on this area of the law.

Source: Washington Post, “Study on drug-impaired driving gets pushback — from other safety advocates,” Fredrick Kunkle, May 1, 2017

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Old Lyme Land Trust Announces Annual Kayak Regatta, Sept. 10

The Old Lyme Land Trust hosts the 4th Annual Kayak Regatta, Sept. 10.

All kayakers and canoers are invited to join the 4th annual Kayak Regatta. The Regatta will launch at 1 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 10, from the Lieutenant River boat launch, located on Rte. 156 near Ferry Rd.

The launch will start on the rising tide; boaters can take the opportunity to put ashore at the Morning Glory Café for lunch or to meet with friends, or continue up river to explore from the water the natural beauty and features of the Lieutenant River.

The river was once a thriving boat building center and is now a serene protected waterway surrounded by salt marsh and cliffs. The tour will pass several Old Lyme Land Trust preserves, Lohmann Buck Twining and the Roger Tory Peterson Refuge. On the eastern bank of the river the Regatta will pass the picturesque grounds of the Bee and Thistle Inn and the Florence Griswold Museum. During the high tide, a side trip up the Mill Brook River is possible. Beaver dams and fish ladders can be seen before reaching Rogers Lake.

The Regatta will be led by Fred Fenton, an experienced kayaker and a long time director of the Old Lyme Land Trust (OLLT). Fenton will point out special features of the area and answer questions about the preserves.

The return trip will start about 3 p.m. as the tide changes

The Regatta will be held rain or shine. No registration is needed and there is no charge for the Regatta. Donations to the OLLT will be gratefully accepted.

For more information, visit www.oldlymelandtrust.org or contact fredffenton@gmail.com. Send your e-mail if you would like to be notified of cancellation.

Personal flotation devices, i.e. life jackets are mandatory.

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Rockfall Foundation Invites Nominations for Local Environmental Champions

The Rockfall Foundation is seeking nominations for the 2017 Environmental Awards, which recognize individuals, organizations, and businesses for environmental efforts that contribute to the quality of life in the Lower Connecticut River Valley. Two categories of awards include the Distinguished Service Award and Certificates of Appreciation in the areas of preservation, conservation, restoration, or environmental education.

Awardees are recognized at the Rockfall Foundation’s annual meeting and grants celebration in November. Nominations must be submitted by September 15, 2017 and a form can be downloaded at www.rockfallfoundation.org or one can be requested by calling 860-347-0340.

Founded in 1935 by Middletown philanthropist Clarence S. Wadsworth, the Rockfall Foundation is one of Connecticut’s oldest environmental organizations. The Foundation supports environmental education, conservation and planning initiatives in the Lower Connecticut River Valley through public programs and grants.
In addition, the Rockfall Foundation operates the historic deKoven House Community Center that offers meeting rooms and office space for non-profit organizations.

For additional information about the 2017 Environmental Awards or the Rockfall Foundation, visit www.rockfallfoundation.org or call 860-347-0340.

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Youth Soccer Registration Now Open With Old Lyme Parks & Recreation

Photo by Peter Glaser on Unsplash

The Fall Soccer Program is now open to Old Lyme residents. Teams are co-ed and are grouped by grade as follows: 

  • Pre-K (Ages 3-4)        
  • Grade K          
  • Grade 1         
  • Grade 2/3           
  • Grade 4/5

All games/sessions will be held at Town Woods Park. Pre K and Grades K-1  Instructional Soccer sessions will be held on Saturday mornings. Games for Grades 2-3 and Grades 4-5 will be held on Saturday mornings and these teams will practice on the field prior to their game.

Registration will be closed and forms must be received by Thursday, Sept. 7Forms are available at the Old Lyme Town Hall and on the Old Lyme Town Hall website. Note that Lyme Residents must sign-up with Lyme Parks & Recreation. Lyme and Old Lyme players will be combined on teams at the coaches meeting.

Teams will be formed at the Tentative Coaches Meeting on Saturday, Sept. 9The meeting will be held at the OL Town Hall Meeting Room. 

  • Pre-K, Grade 1 and 2 Coaches will meet at 9 a.m. 
  • Grades 2-3 and 4-5 coaches will meet at 10 am.

Coaches will be contacted by Old Lyme Parks & Recreation prior to the meeting to confirm the date and times of the meeting.

The tentative schedule is Saturday mornings from Sept. 16-Oct. 28, 2017. Coaches will call with details after the Teams have been formed and the schedules are made. Volunteer coaches are essential to the success of the Program. Your help is needed and appreciated.

For further information, contact Old Lyme Parks and Recreation Director Don Bugbee at 860.434.1605, ext. 235  or parkrec@oldlyme-ct.gov

Link to Parks and Recreation for schedules, cancellations and general information are on the Parks & Recreation page of the Old Lyme Town website. Programs are listed by season.

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State to Hold Public Hearing Today in Hartford on Millstone’s Role in State

The state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) and the Public Utilities Regulatory Authority (PURA) will hold a public hearing on Thursday Aug. 17, regarding Gov. Malloy’s executive order initiating a study of Millstone’s role in Connecticut.

This is an opportunity to share your perspective about Millstone Power Station.

Those who wish to testify may attend the public hearing at 9:30 a.m. in the Gina McCarthy Auditorium, 79 Elm Street, Hartford.

RSVP to DEEP.EnergyBureau@ct.gov by Tuesday, Aug.15, by 4 p.m. if you plan to attend and/or present oral comment at the meeting.

You can also submit written comments by emailing them to DEEP.EnergyBureau@ct.gov.

For more information on the public hearing click here.

To read the request for comment click here.

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LOL Chamber Hosts ‘Business After Hours’ Tonight at Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds; All Welcome

A view across the Sculpture Grounds.

This Wednesday evening, the Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Chamber of Commerce is hosting a special Summer Business After Hours at Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds in Old Lyme from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Prospective Chamber members are welcome to join current members in this beautiful outdoor location, which slopes gently down to the Lieutenant River and where more than 100 outdoor sculptures are located. This is a great opportunity to see the Chamber in action and evaluate whether you wish to join.

Sculptor Gilbert V. Boro in his studio.

Join Chamber members to network with other local businesses and also hear acclaimed sculptor and the owner of Studio 80, Gilbert Boro, talk about his remarkable abstract works and his lifelong dedication to the arts.  Boro is also hosting the 2017 Summer Sculpture Showcase at the moment, which adds works by some 20 guest sculptors to the usual inventory of sculptures on display.

Three works by Gilbert Boro can be seen in this photo.

It will be possible for current members to renew their membership during the evening and prospective members to sign up as members right away.  The Chamber year runs from July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018.

The Chamber’s 2017 Scholarship winners, Olivia Ellis and Sophie Christiano, will also be in attendance to be honored for their achievements.

Appetizers, wine and soft drinks will be served. There is no charge to attend but an RSVP to email@lolcc.com would be helpful for planning purposes.

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Play Beach Blanket Bingo Tonight at White Sand Beach!

Beach_Blanket_BingoPlay Beach Blanket Bingo Wednesday evening from 6 to 8 p.m. at White Sand Beach.

Hosted by Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB), the price for this fun, family evening is $5 per person or $20 per family. All are welcome.

A pizza dinner is included and prizes will be awarded to Bingo! winners.

Bring your beach blanket, bug spray … and your appetite!

This event is open to all Lyme-Old Lyme families.  Check the LYSB website or Facebook page after 5 p.m. for possible weather postponements.

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Death of Popular, Former LOL Middle School Teacher Announced

Richard LaVecchia. Photo courtesy of Potter Funeral Home, Willimantic.

Richard “Rich” LaVecchia, known affectionately to his students as “Mr. L,” passed away on Saturday, Aug. 12, of brain cancer.  Mr. LaVecchia was an immensely popular sixth grade science teacher at Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School for more than 40 years.  As his obituary states, “He engaged his students with hands-on experiments and interactive lessons that inspired many to go on in the field or, at least, return to say “hi” and share a desk-drawer snack.”

Today, we have heard nothing but fond memories of Mr. LaVecchia and the highest praise for his teaching and interpersonal skills from colleagues, Region 18 parents and former students alike.

Thank you for your outstanding and inspiring service to so many students, Mr. L.  You will be sadly missed.

RIP.

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