March 21, 2018

Enjoy Irish Music This Evening at the Old Lyme-PGN Library

Fiddler Jeanne Freeman and singer/guitarist Dan Ringrose will play Irish music at the OL-PGN Library starting at 6 p.m. this evening.

Continue to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day this evening at 6 p.m. at the Old Lyme-Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library when the Celtic duo of fiddler Jeanne Freeman and singer/guitarist Dan Ringrose will play Irish music for the enjoyment of library patrons.  All are welcome, there is no admission fee and no registration is required.

Freeman’s playing has been described as, “effortlessly virtuosic,” and Ringrose’s voice has been described as, “stunning.”  Together, they bring a lively freshness to traditional and original tunes and songs, along with stories, poetry, and humor.
Both on the faculty of the Connecticut Academy of Irish Music, they have been featured on CT Public Television, at the Greater Hartford Irish Festival, and in many other venues. Enjoy the music and songs of the Emerald Isle as they help celebrate everything Irish in Old Lyme!

Chamber Welcomes MCCD as Speaker at Tomorrow’s Dinner Meeting

Join members of the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce at their next Monthly Dinner Meeting at Stella’s Restaurant & Pizzeria on Wednesday, March 21. All members, prospective members and other interested parties are welcome.

Cocktails and business networking begin at 6 p.m., with a three-course dinner starting at 7 p.m. The cost is $25 per person and the dinner choices are as follows:

Everyone will receive a side Caesar salad  and fresh bread for the tables
Pennette – Italian sausage, peppers, onions, tomatoes, fresh basil and spinach in a garlic chardonnay sauce, tossed with penne. **Can be made vegetarian
Grilled Shrimp Scampi – grilled shrimp & tomatoes n a garlic lemon basil wine sauce served with linguine
Chicken Piccata – baked breaded chicken breast topped with capers with a EVOO and lemon wine sauce served with penne pasta
Fallen Chocolate Cake
Ricotta Cheese Cake

The guest speakers are members of the Mentoring Corps of Community Development (MCCD).  This group, which operates in both Lyme and Old Lyme, does an enormous amount of ‘good works.’  It promises ot be an exciting presentation since everyone is looking forward to hearing what MCCD has achieved to date and what the group plans to do in the future.

New members can join the Chamber and current members can renew at the meeting. Annual membership is still only $50, payable to Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce.

Seating is limited. Make payment for a dinner reservation at this link on the Chamber website or send details by email to email@lolcc.comDinner selections must be received by end of day on Tuesday, March 20, and payment can either be made online or by check brought to the meeting.

Questions? Contact Chamber President Olwen Logan at


LYSB Hosts Community Forum on Vaping Tonight

Vaping paraphernalia

Lyme Youth Service Bureau’s (LYSB) recent survey shows alarming rates of youth vaping in Lyme and Old Lyme. In response, LYSB will host a Community Forum on Youth Substance Use on Monday, March 19, at 7 p.m. in the Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School auditorium to learn more about this growing trend that is popular among teens nationwide.  This is a rescheduled date due to last week’s snowstorm.

A Youth Panel comprising students from Lyme-Old Lyme Schools will participate in the forum to offer insights into the behavior of Lyme-Old Lyme youth in the context of substance use and abuse.

The evening will include:

  • a vaping presentation
  • results of the recent youth survey
  • Q & A with the youth panel
  • available resources

All are welcome to attend this free — and important —  forum.


Talking Transportation: Citizen Anger About Imminent Transport Funding Cuts Needs to be Directed at Legislature

In recent weeks I’ve been criss-crossing the state talking to folks about our transportation crisis:  the proposed fare hikes on trains and buses coupled with service cuts on the branch lines, and the multi-billion spending cuts at CDOT.

I call it the “Winter of our discontent” magical misery tour.

From Woodbridge to New Canaan, from Old Lyme to West Haven, I’ve talked to crowds large and small, explaining what’s going to happen July 1 and why.  Most folks knew something about our impending doom, but they all left unhappy about the cuts’ specific impact on their lives.

Like the First Selectwoman from Old Lyme who said taxpayers were going to have to spend $600,000 repairing a local bridge because, for the third year in a row, CDOT doesn’t have enough money to share with municipalities.

Or the manager of The Roger Sherman Inn in New Canaan who said she’d probably have to close if off-peak train service was cut on the branch, making it impossible for her cooks and waiters to get to work.

But the culmination of all these presentations was last Tuesday night’s public hearing in Stamford before an SRO crowd of 200+ angry residents.  I’d come more to listen than talk, but couldn’t resist and used my allotted three minutes to ask…

“What are we doing here?  Why are we at this hearing when nothing that you or I say tonight will do anything to change the inevitability of these fare hikes and service cuts?  This may be cathartic, but it’s just political theater.  The folks you should really be talking to are not from CDOT but your State Rep and State Senator.  The legislature created this funding problem and only they can fix it.  If they raise the gas tax and get serious about making motorists pay their fair share, none of these service cuts or fare hikes will happen”.

I was speaker number 11 of more than 80 who signed up to speak.  Some of them waited 4 hours for their few minutes in front of the mic.

But not the politicians.  As State Rep’s arrived, they were whisked by the CDOT Commissioner to the front of the speaker’s line, jumping the queue.  The Commissioner is no fool.  He knows who controls his budget and it isn’t the old guy with a walker complaining about the buses.

When the pols spoke it was the usual platitudes but no new ideas.  “Don’t raise fares, find other funding sources,” said one.  What funding sources?  To their credit, some of the pols did stay to listen, but others (including at least one gubernatorial hopeful) did their grandstanding and split.

One State Rep did have the guts to poll the crowd on their appetite for raising the gasoline tax and tolling our roads, both of which got loud support, much to his surprise.  The people have spoken so now’s the time for action.

By the way … what kind of message does it send when scores of New Canaan residents go to the Stamford hearing to oppose rail service cuts but take a chartered bus instead of the train?

People are angry.  But they need to direct their anger not at the CDOT but at the legislature, holding them accountable for their inaction.

Posted with permission of Hearst CT Media

Jim Cameron

About the author: Jim Cameron is founder of The Commuter Action Group, and a member of the Darien RTM.  The opinions expressed in this column are only his own.  You can reach him at

For a full collection of “Talking Transportation” columns, visit


Lyme-Old Lyme High School Presents ‘Once Upon a Mattress,’ Opens Thursday

Reharsing a number from the show are, from left to right, Hannah Morrison, Lauren Mitchell, Katie Reid, Haley Stevens, Emma Bass, Heather McGrath, and Grace Edwards.

Hear ye, hear ye! The dates for the Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) spring musical are rapidly approaching and the whole community is invited!

This year, the Old Lyme Players are tackling the classic comedy Once Upon a Mattress. The musical reveals the untold stories of The Princess and the Pea as the audience discovers that the “lost princess” was actually royalty in the swamp lands, not a girl wandering through a storm, who stumbled upon the castle.

Princess Winnifred, nicknamed “Fred,” falls in love with the dapper Prince Dauntless and must pass the Queen’s virtually impossible royalty test before she and Dauntless can get married, but Queen Aggravain plots to sabotage Fred so that she and Dauntless cannot be together. Meanwhile, Lady Larken and Sir Harry, an unmarried couple living in the kingdom, are expecting a child, and they wait anxiously for the royal wedding since no one in the kingdom is allowed to get married before Prince Dauntless.

The musical is directed by Jim Motes with musical direction by Kristine Pekar, choreographed by Bethany Haslam, and conducted by Jacob Wilson. The show also features sets by William Allik along with costumes created and organized by Denise Golden.

Once Upon a Mattress stars Natalie Golden as Princess Winnifred, Caroline LeCour as Queen Aggravain, Jacob Olsen as Prince Dauntless, and Lauren Mitchell as the Minstrel. Additionally, the show features Sean Spina as the king, Elyza Learned and Liam Clark as Lady Larken and Sir Harry, Haley Stevens as the Jester and Sophia Griswold as the Wizard

The cast auditioned for the show in December and has been rehearsing weekdays from 2:45 to 5:30 p.m. with additional Sunday choreography rehearsals from 4 to 6 p.m. The company has devoted a great deal of time and energy to the production and is eagerly anticipating sharing the production with the audience.

Old Lyme Players encourage audience members to arrive ready to sit back, relax and enjoy this lighthearted musical comedy set in a fairy-tale world, which the cast and crew magically create onstage.

Once Upon a Mattress opens at LOLHS on Thursday, March 22, at 7 p.m.  There are also 7 p.m. performances on Friday, March 23 and Saturday, March 24.  In addition, there is a matinee performance at 2 p.m. on the Saturday.

Tickets, sold online at this link  and at the door, are $12 for students and senior citizens and $15 for adults. For more information, call the high school at 860-434-1651.


Family Wellness: Screens, Media and Family Life

How invasive is technology in our lives?  Photo by Alejandro Escamilla on Unsplash

The idea for this column came from a reader, but there is also a general clamor for information about this topic that I am privy to in my work with families.

Anna and Rosalie Shalom were the picture of old school, imaginative play in their West Orange, New Jersey, home. The two, 5 and almost 3, labored in harmony at their task, preparing an elaborate pretend dinner to be served at the tiny table in their playroom. They set out play plates. They loaded them up with wooden fruits, vegetables, and dairy products. They sat down, ready to dig in. Ah, but first: they whipped out their pretend cell phones to make sure that no pressing pretend calls or texts required their attention. Their parents cringed. Where had they learned that? (See this article published in Time magazine about raising the screen generation)

Well, Anna and Rosalie aren’t in any imminent danger, but we probably understand why this was cringe-worthy for their parents.  I did observe real imminent danger posed by cell phone use just the other day – a young person almost struck by a car while crossing a busy Boston street, chatting on her phone.  (Coincidentally, I was on my way to a conference where topics around children’s phone, screen and media use abounded.)

So how have screens, phones and media affected family life?

Let’s start with a little context to this question.  According to The Moment, a time tracking app with nearly 5 million users, the average person spends four hours per day interacting with his or her cell phone.  The amount of time children 8-years-old and younger spend on phones or tablets had increased 10 fold between 2012 and 2017, according to a study by Common Sense, which also found that in 2017, 42 percent of kids in the same age group had their own mobile device, up from only 1 percent in 2011. I have to admit to shock and knee jerk dismay at these numbers.  It should be noted that TV usage still predominates for young people’s consumption of media. 

I think we all can think of many ways technology has made our lives easer.  What in the world did we do in the past when our car broke down on the road?  When Junior did not know what time play practice finished up?  When grandmother fell?

Media and technology are here to stay.  So what concerns do families have about media use?  Or “problematic media use,” as many psychologists have termed media use that interferes with “RL” (real life)? 

Real life includes when toddlers learn to play with each other (there is some evidence that excessive screen time results in decreased social and emotional development in young children).  Real life also includes the development of closeness and trust, learning logical reasoning, abstract thought, problem solving and creativity (see this story published in the Wall Street Journal about how cell phones hi-jack our minds).  Real life includes separating from parents during freshman orientation (see this article published in the New York Times about the mental health of college freshmen). 

So yes, there is evidence that excessive media use and dependency can interfere with “RL.”  But there still remains much research to do into the “who, what, when, why and how much” questions concerning family media use and screen time.

So what are we families to do while we wait for more research?  Families need to self-monitor as best they by can looking at their media usage and real (family) life. may provide some help for us, as perhaps can Anya Kamenetz’s new book, The Art of Screen Time: How Your Family Can Balance Digital Media and Real Life.

I tend to be a bit of a technophobe, but will end on a positive note:  My son, a “digital native,” and my elderly mother bonded over his expertise in technology and her fear and ignorance of all things digital – enhancing both their “RLs” and strengthening their relationship.

Betsy Groth

Betsy Groth is an APRN, PMHS – BC and a pediatric nurse practitioner with advanced certification in pediatric mental health.

She is a counselor, mental health educator and parent coach in Old Lyme and writes a monthly column for us on ‘Family Wellness.’

For more information about Betsy and her work, visit Betsy’s website at


A la Carte: St. Paddy’s Day Recipes for Any Day

Irish soda bread

Remembering St. Patrick’s Day is easy since my second oldest grandchild was born in Massachusetts on the day before St. Patrick’s Day.

When we heard that Sydney had peeked into this world early that morning of March 16, we drove as quickly as we could, legally, and were at the hospital, without breakfast, in less than two hours. I had grabbed a few clementines and I peeled them and we ate them on the way up. Our daughter-in-law, Nancy, was holding this gorgeous baby girl, as proud father, Peter, sat next to her bed.

While Doug and I stared in wonder at all three of them, Nancy waited until I sat, then handled swaddled Sydney into my arms. As I touched her face, wondering how such a beautiful baby might be in my arms, she turned her little mouth and sucked on my finger. It must have been the clementines, but she has loved oranges ever since.

That little baby graduated from the University of Rochester with a degree in biomedical engineering and now lives in Boston, working on software for a computer start-up. I thought it might be fun to drive to Boston and meet Syd and her parents for dinner, until I realized that the last place I wanted be the day before St. Patrick’s Day might be Boston.

So, I will make a corned beef with vegetables (I’m not wild about the corned beef, but I love cabbage and carrots) and serve it with Irish soda bread and a grape nut pudding, the last must have been created in Boston, as corned beef was, too.

Irish Soda Bread

From Breads, Rolls and Pastries (Yankee Books, a division of Yankee Publishing Inc., Dublin, NH, 1981)
Yield: Makes 1 loaf
4 cups flour
1 tablespoon baking soda
1 to 2 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons caraway seed (optional)
1 cup raisins, currants or Craisins (optional)
2 cups buttermilk (or 2 cups milk soured with 1 tablespoon white vinegar for 10 minutes)
Melted butter

Preheat oven to 375 degrees and grease a baking sheet or loaf pan with melted butter.

Sift together flour, soda, sugar and salt. If used, blend in seeds and raisins and mix well. Stir in buttermilk to form soft dough (like biscuit dough). Turn out onto floured surface and knead gently for 1 minute. Roll into a ball and flatten top to form a loaf about 9 inches in diameter. With a floured butter knife or spatula, cut top of dough about one-inch deep into equal sections (one cut north and south through the center, the other east and west through the center. Place in baking sheet, brush with melted butter and bake 30 to 40 minutes.

Grape Nuts Custard

2 eggs
One-eighth teaspoon salt
one-third cup sugar
One-half teaspoon vanilla
2 cups light cream (you can use heavy cream)
2 tablespoons butter
One-quarter cup Grape Nuts cereal

Butter an 8-inch square pan and put aside. (You can double the recipe and butter a 9-inch by 13-inch pan.)
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Whisk eggs, salt, sugar and vanilla, and set aside.
Scald cream with butter.
Add about one-quarter cup of scalded milk to egg mixture, whisking quickly. Add another quarter cup of cream, again whisking. (This “tempers” the eggs so they don’t become scrambled eggs.) Add the rest of the cream, whisking.
Pour entire mixture into buttered pan. Sprinkle Grape Nuts evenly on top. Do not mix in.
Place the pan into a larger pan to which you have pour warm water half way up the smaller pan (this larger pan with water is called a “bain Marie,” or water bath). Place the bain Marie in oven until custard is set in the middle, about 25 to 35 minutes. Remove from the oven and bring to room temperature; cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 8 hours, or overnight.


And the Winner is … Trivia Bee Creates a Big Buzz in Town!

2018 Trivia Bee champions RTC Elephants, (from left to right, Atty. Mike Miller, LOLHS Class of 2013 alumnus Sam Stadnick, State Rep. Devin Carney (R-23rd) and Cliff Johnson) proudly pose with their coveted Bee Trophy.

UPDATED 11:34am: It was a hotly-contested event with brainpower being tested to the extreme.

The 2018 Trivia Bee organized by the Lyme-Old Lyme Education Foundation (LOLEF) was held Friday evening in the Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School auditorium and saw more than a dozen teams doing battle over challenging questions posed by WFSB News Anchor Eric Parker.

The 3-PEAT team played hard to the bitter end taking the RTC Elephants to three rounds of play-off questions in the ‘Sting Off’ before finally succumbing to the runner-up position.

There were three ‘swarms,’ which involved all the competing teams in a 10-question play-off situation to identify the three finalists, who ultimately were the All-Pro, 3-Peat and RTC Elephant teams.

Concentration was intense among this team’s members whilst working on their answers.

With tension rising in the final round, All-Pro fell out of contention fairly rapidly but 3-Peat and the RTC Elephants kept going neck-and-neck question after question. When finally the last available question was posed, the RTC Elephants secured the win with the correct answer while 3-Peat had to settle for second place after a valiant effort.

Question master and Channel 3 news anchor Eric Parker (standing) and timekeeper Rob Roach kept things under control at all stages.

All funds raised at the event benefit programs and equipment selected by LOLEF for Lyme-Old Lyme Schools.

After the winners were declared, the judges, (second from left to right, Martha Shoemaker, and LOL Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser) posed with LOL Education Foundation Board member Liz Rubitski (extreme left.)

The Old Lyme Historical Society’s (OLHS) team, some members of which are pictured below, came dressed in wonderful costumes (but surprisingly did not win the Best Costume award) and also put up a valiant fight in the quiz section to no avail.

And we just had to include a full-length photo of this dashing gentleman …

So to the OLHS team, better luck next year … and to all the competitors, sponsors and the LOLEF, thanks for making an otherwise cold and dull Friday evening into a fun-filled night at which everyone learned something and funds were raised for a worthy cause.


Art Supply Expo to be Held at Lyme Art Association, April 7

The Lyme Art Association (LAA) at 90 Lyme Street, Old Lyme Conn., is presenting the second annual Art Supply Expo on Saturday, April 7, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Art Supply Expo is an opportunity for artists to meet premier art supply vendors, learn about new techniques and materials, see demonstrations, and enjoy discounts and special offers. This event is free and open to the public.

The Art Supply Expo is the brainchild of the Lyme Art Association’s Education and Activities Committee, who felt that the region’s numerous active art associations and artists could benefit from finding high quality vendors under one roof demonstrating and selling their wares. Companies signed on enthusiastically, knowing that online sales, while convenient, are not the best tool for demonstrating their unique and high quality materials and supplies.

Vendors who will be participating also include Royal Talens, Chelsea Classical Studio, Wholesale Frame Company, Vasari, Jerry’s Artarama, and New Wave Palettes.

The LAA was founded in 1914 by the American Impressionists and continues the tradition of exhibiting and selling representational artwork by its members and invited artists, as well as offering art instruction and lectures to the community. The Association is located at 90 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, CT, in a building designed by Charles Adams Platt and located within the town’s historic district. Admission is free with contributions appreciated. Gallery hours areWednesday through Sunday10 to 5 pm, or by appointment.

For more information on exhibitions, purchase of art, art classes, or becoming a member, call 860-434-7802 or visit


‘Exhibition in Four Acts’ on Show at Lyme Art Association

Four new exhibitions, each with a different theme, will be on view in the Lyme Art Association (LAA)’s beautiful historic galleries from March 18. “A Show in Four Acts” features a separate exhibition in each gallery: Interiors/Exteriors, Animal Kingdom, Holding Still, and Faces and Forms run concurrently.  An opening reception for all four exhibitions will be held on Sunday, March 18, from 2 to 4 p.m.

“A visit to the Lyme Art Association to see the A Show in Four Acts feels like visiting four different galleries.  There is a variety and a shift in mood as you move from one gallery to the next,” states gallery manager, Jocelyn Zallinger.  “This show also allows a visitor to focus on each genre in a way that is not possible in other exhibitions.”

The Lyme Art Association was founded in 1914 by the American Impressionists and continues the tradition of exhibiting and selling representational artwork by its members and invited artists, as well as offering art instruction and lectures to the community. The Association is located at 90 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, CT, in a building designed by Charles Adams Platt and located within an historic district.

Admission is free with contributions appreciated. Gallery hours are Wednesday through Sunday12 to 5 p.m. or by appointment.

For more information on exhibitions, purchase of art, art classes, or becoming a member, call 860-434-7802 or visit


Old Lyme Land Trust Presents Speaker on Bobcats at Annual Meeting This Afternoon; All Welcome

The elusive Bobcat

The 52nd Annual Meeting of the Old Lyme Land Trust will be held on Sunday, March 18, 3 to 5 p.m. at the Lymes’ Senior Center, 26 Town Woods Rd, Old Lyme.

This year’s meeting features Paul Colburn speaking on “Bobcats: Connecticut’s Secretive Wild Cats.” Colburn is a 2015 graduate of the Master Wildlife Conservationist Program. He is one of the State’s most active and popular wildlife speakers. His talks on this elusive and elegant creature have drawn interested and appreciative audiences.

All area residents are invited to hear how the Trust works to preserve open spaces for conservation and passive recreation in Old Lyme. Trustees of the Old Lyme Land Trust will also report on new property acquisitions during 2017 and plans for acquiring additional open spaces for the benefit of the town and region. 

The meeting is free and open to the public; refreshments will be served.

The Old Lyme Land Trust currently manages 14 preserves totaling more than 1000 acres. The Trust is an independent, not-for-profit corporation not affiliated with the Town of Old Lyme.


High Hopes Holds Open House for Prospective Volunteers Today

One of the many tasks that volunteers undertake at High Hopes is to side-walk horses while program participants ride.

There is a place in Old Lyme where people of all ages come together with a very special herd of therapeutic horses to improve the lives of people with physical, cognitive and emotional disabilities.

On St. Patrick’s Day – Saturday, March 17 – between 10 a.m. and noon,  the community is invited to join the staff at High Hopes to find out about a wide range of volunteering opportunities this spring and summer.

“Although we hold programs all year round,” says Volunteer Manager, Amy Tripson, “summer is one of our busiest times when we open High Hopes to the wider community through five weeks of all-inclusive horse camp as well as providing our regular programs. We are looking for volunteers of all ages but would like to encourage middle and high school students (aged 14 or older), seasonal residents, and active retirees in particular. Just one hour a week, or one week during summer camp can make all the difference to one of our campers.”

At the Open House, classes will be running, and the volunteer team will be on hand to answer questions, discuss the types of volunteer jobs available, and create a schedule to suit you.

“No experience with horses is needed,” says Marie Manero, “we provide general orientation and side-walker training for all of our volunteers, and those that want to do more work with the horses can take additional training opportunities in horse-handling and barn activities.”

Over the course of a year High Hopes, an internationally recognized therapeutic riding and horsemanship center, relies on the help of over 650 volunteers to supplement its small staff and provide programs for a wide range of individuals and groups, as well as support its fundraising activities.

Participants include children and adults with physical disabilities, veterans living with PTSD, children grieving the loss of a parent, families recovering from domestic violence and individuals and their families supporting a loved one with a life-long cognitive disability. High Hopes serves over 60 towns in Connecticut and beyond, works with 10 different school districts and a variety of different agencies from across the state. In the summer, High Hopes staff also provide an off-site program at Harkness Camp in Waterford.

If your organization supports community activities and you would like to bring a group of volunteers to High Hopes for the day, the High Hopes volunteer team would also like to talk to you.

For more information, to meet a few volunteers, and/or to express interest in this event, visit


It’s LOL Education Foundation’s Annual Trivia Bee Tonight

full_5738The Lyme-Old Lyme Education Foundation’s (LOLEF) 6th Annual Trivia Bee will be held Friday, March 16, starting at 7 p.m. prompt at Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School.

Local businesses, community organizations and neighborhoods are invited to enter teams of four into this adult trivia contest, arguably the most “bee-dazzling fun-draiser” in The Lymes!

Full details of the contest and rules are at this link.

Teams are encouraged (but not required) to choose a fun team name and dress in costume. The evening will be hosted by LOLEF and there will be entertainment with prizes galore for the audience between rounds.

Fighting off stiff competition, the Lyme firemen were the ultimate winners of the coveted Trivia Bee trophy in 2016.

The winning team from each round will participate in a championship round. Teams will compete for the Honey Cup, a perpetual trophy, as well as the honor of being crowned Lyme-Old Lyme’s Trivia Bee Champion. Prizes will also be awarded for the Best Team Costume and Best Team Name.

Spectators are encouraged to cheer on their favorite teams in person. Audience admission to the Bee is free.

Refreshments, local honey and tech-raffle tickets will be available for purchase.

The LOLEF supports innovative educational initiatives throughout our schools and community. Thanks to community support, the LOLEF has donated over $160,000 since its inception in 2006. The LOLEF works closely with, but is independent of, Lyme-Old Lyme Schools.

The LOLEF counts on the success of fundraisers such as the Trivia Bee to keep the Foundations’ grants program vibrant.

Businesses and organizations are invited to enter a team of their own or, if they prefer, to sponsor a team made up of teachers and or students from our local schools. Admission is $200 for each team.

If you would like to participate in the Bee or become a corporate sponsor, visit this link for all the information relating to the event or call Roger Nosal at 860-434-0814 with questions.

Visit the Facebook page for the event at this link.


LYSB’s 33rd Annual ‘Youth Art Show’ on View at Lyme Academy Through March 24

Sculpture by Mya Johnson

The 33rd Annual Youth Art Show is currently on view in the Sill House Gallery at Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts of the University of New Haven located at 84 Lyme Street. All are welcome.

Sponsored by Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB), the show features work by more than 150 students in Lyme-Old Lyme Schools from Kindergarten through Grade 12, including many pieces that have recently won impressive awards in state and local competitions.

The show is on view daily except for Sunday, March 18, through Saturday, March 24.  The Sill House Gallery is open daily from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Saturday.  Admission is free.

For more information, contact Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau at 860-434-7208 or visit


LYSB’s 33rd Annual ‘Youth Art Show’ Opens With Reception This Afternoon at Lyme Academy

The opening reception for the 33rd Annual Youth Art Show will be held this afternoon from 4 to 7 p.m. in the Sill House Gallery at Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts of the University of New Haven located at 84 Lyme Street. All are welcome.

Sponsored by Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB), the show features work by more than 150 students in Lyme-Old Lyme Schools from Kindergarten through Grade 12, including many pieces that have recently won impressive awards in state and local competitions.

The show is on view daily except for Sunday, March 18, through Saturday, March 24.  The Sill House Gallery is open daily from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Saturday.  Admission is free.

For more information, contact Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau at 860-434-7208 or visit


Lyme-Old Lyme High School Hosts Open House Today for Prospective Students

Students hard at work in a Chinese class at Lyme-Old Lyme High School, where it is a popular elective subject.

Next Thursday, March 15, Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) welcomes prospective students who do not currently attend a Lyme-Old Lyme School and/or their parents to visit the high school during Spring Open House.

In order to offer a customized experience for each prospective student and/or their parents, interviews are being offered throughout the day to accommodate varying schedules. Each meeting with a school counselor will be preceded by a student-led tour of the high school. This format is intended to allow all attendees an opportunity to gain a general overview of the school and interact with current students, as well as to obtain answers to individual questions and information on curriculum, student opportunities and more.

In December 2017, Lyme-Old Lyme High School was named to the 8th Annual Advanced Placement (AP®) District Honor Roll by the College Board. Only 447 schools were named to this prestigious list in the United States and Canada. Superintendent Ian Neviaser noted, “This continues to support our strong reputation as a premier school district in Connecticut and the nation as a whole” adding, “The Lyme-Old Lyme Schools are committed to expanding the availability of AP courses among prepared and motivated students of all backgrounds.”

Lyme-Old Lyme High School hosts an Open House for prospective Students, March 15

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools were also named #18 in’s ranking of 2018 Best School District in Connecticut, which gave them the top spot in New London County, and in’s ranking of 2018 High Schools with Best Teachers in Connecticut, Lyme-Old Lyme Schools came in 10th.

In 2016, LOLHS took 6th place statewide in terms of SAT results, with average scores significantly above the state average in all disciplines, while in April 2015, Lyme-Old Lyme High School was awarded the 185th spot nationally and the 5th place statewide in Newsweek‘s annual list of Americas Top High Schools.

Facilities at the high school are exceptional with state-of-the-art technology implemented throughout the building thanks to a $49 million renovation project completed in 2014. The math, science, language, and technology and engineering areas, along with the art, music, drama and athletic facilities are now of a quality and sophistication that resembles a college environment, rather than a high school.

View from inside the Commons atrium at Lyme-Old Lyme High School.

Current enrollment at LOLHS is 475 students from Grades 9 through 12 and the average class size is between 15 and 20. The school offers a full spectrum of core subjects taught in-house, including 17 Advanced Placement subjects, and also an extensive range of classes taken online.  Students also have the option to pursue the acclaimed Techno-Ticks robotics program along with more than 35 other extra-curricular clubs including High School Bowl, Mock Trial, and Key Club.

Lyme-Old Lyme High School enjoys widely acclaimed music, drama and art programs, which have been recognized with numerous awards both at the state level and nationally. The school’s athletic program has similarly received innumerable honors over the years and is proud to have several past, present and future Olympians among its alumni.

The colleges attended by LOLHS graduates include a wide range of Ivy League and top-tier schools each year. Complementing the academic success of the students, the high school faculty is renowned for their commitment and dedication to the students with most having obtained a sixth year teaching qualification.

If you would like to attend this informative event, please call Glynis Houde at 860-434-2255 to schedule your appointment.

For further information, contact Tracy Lenz, Director of Guidance, at 860-434-2255 or or James Wygonik, Principal, at 860-434-1651 or


Old Lyme Town Hall Closed Today; Trash, Recycling Pick-Ups Postponed

The Old Lyme Town Hall is closed today due to the storm. Town officials ask that residents stay off the roads as much as possible today. A Parking Ban is in effect from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. to enable all town roads to be safely plowed.

Old Lyme Sanitation has postponed trash and recycling pick-ups today.

Tuesday’s pick-ups move to Wednesday;  Wednesday and Thursday will be picked up on Thursday.

Visit  to confirm schedule changes.

The Old Lyme Transfer Station will be closed Tuesday and will reopen Wednesday.

The EOC (Emergency Operations Center) will monitor all calls at 860 598 0120

If you lose power, report your outage directly to Eversource at 800-286-2000 or online at

To report downed power lines or another emergency, always call 911.


Old Lyme Meetings, Scheduled for Tonight, Postponed Due to Storm; LOL Schools Closed

Due to today’s winter storm, Lyme-Old Lyme Schools are closed and tonight’s Old Lyme Water Pollution Control Authority (WPCA) and Board of Finance (BOF) meetings have been cancelled.

The WPCA meeting will now be Thursday, March 15, at 7:30 the Meeting Hall at Memorial Town Hall.

The BOF meeting will be held Tuesday, March 20, at 7 p.m. in the Meeting Hall at Memorial Town Hall.


LOL Chamber of Commerce Invites Applications from High School Seniors for Two Scholarships

One Scholarship Recognizes Business Leadership, Second is for Promise and Achievement in the Arts

The Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Chamber of Commerce is offering two scholarships this year to high school seniors who are resident in Lyme or Old Lyme and either currently attending an accredited high school or pursuing a home school program.  The scholarships are also open to all students attending Lyme-Old Lyme High School regardless of town of residence.

The two scholarships are the Business Leadership Senior Scholarship and the Senior Scholarship for Promise and Achievement in the Arts.  The Chamber’s intent is to present a single award of $1,000 for each scholarship. The Chamber, however, reserves the right to change the amount of the award and/or to make additional awards if deemed appropriate.

For both scholarships, the applicant must submit the appropriate application form, both of which are available in the Lyme-Old Lyme High School Guidance Office or online on the Chamber’s website at this link. The deadline for receipt of applications is midnight on Friday, April 27 — the deadline will be strictly applied.

For the Business Leadership Senior Scholarship, the applicant must have demonstrated achievement in economics, business, technology, or a closely related area; be entering college in fall 2017 to pursue a career in a business-related field, and demonstrate the use of his/her skills in a community setting that requires an ability to balance and integrate academics with community service and/or paid employment: for example, in an internship, a part-time job, a business or a nonprofit organization.

For the Senior Scholarship for Promise and Achievement in the Arts, the applicant must have demonstrated achievement in the arts; be entering college in fall 2017 to pursue a Bachelor of Fine Arts or equivalent degree at a recognized art school or college, and demonstrate the use of his/her skills in a community setting that requires an ability to balance and integrate art and academics with community service and/or paid employment: for example, in an internship, a part-time job, a business or a non-profit organization.

The LOL Chamber of Commerce Scholarship program has awarded over $33,000 in scholarships and grants to local students since its inception. The Chamber Scholarship Fund is supported through donations to CMRK clothing donation bins located in Lyme and Old Lyme: at the Lyme Firehouse, behind The Bowerbird, at 151 Boston Post Rd., and on Rte. 156 at Shoreline Mowers.

For more information about the scholarship program, contact LOL Chamber of Commerce Scholarship Committee Co-Chairs Russ Gomes at or  Olwen Logan at or 860.460.4176.

For more information about the LOL Chamber of Commerce, visit or call hamber President Oldwen Logan at 860-460-4176.


This Afternoon, Old Lyme Church Hosts ‘Honest Conversations with Muslim Neighbors’

The First Congregational Church of Old Lyme (FCCOL) will hold “Honest Conversations with Muslim Neighbors” – a thought-provoking discussion among area residents – arranged by the Connecticut Council for Interreligious Understanding (CCIU), the Muslim Coalition of Connecticut and the Hartford Seminary – on Sunday, March 11, at 2 p.m., in the Sheffield Auditorium.

During the event, local residents will hear from – and can ask questions of – other Connecticut residents who are Muslims, and who are articulate about their faith and eager to deepen community perceptions and understanding of their faith.

The church and the event organizers believe that together, through conversation, a more peaceful world can be promoted for everyone.

The event is free and open to the public.

The First Congregational Church of Old Lyme is a community of people of faith who care about the world in which we live, whether it’s right outside our door or half a world away. The church strives to be a place of grace, welcoming everyone, regardless of theological expression. The church Constitution states that “each member shall have the undisturbed right to follow the word of God according to the dictates of his or her own conscience, under the enlightenment of the Holy Spirit.”