May 22, 2017

Lyme Girl Scout Troop #63632 Celebrates Installation of ‘Little Free Library’ for the Community

The Girl Scouts involved in the creation of the Little Free Library, all of whom attend Lyme School, gather for a group photo. From left to right, Hoshena Gemme, Emma Rose Arelt, Ella Keim, Ava Gilbert, Jen Datum, Chloe Datum and Christy Cooper.  Photos by Barbara Arelt unless otherwise stated.)

A dedication ceremony was held Sunday, April 23, for a Little Free Library that has been installed in the side courtyard of the Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB) courtesy of local Girl Scout Troop #63632.  The new Library is a “take a book, return a book” free book exchange.

The Girl Scout Troop, which is primarily comprised of girls currently in 4th grade at Lyme Consolidated Elementary School, earmarked annual cookie sale profits to design, build, install and maintain a Little Free Library at their host site, the LYSB on Lyme Street.

Little Free Library is a nonprofit organization that inspires a love of reading, builds community, and sparks creativity by fostering neighborhood book exchanges around the world. Through Little Free Libraries, millions of books are exchanged each year, profoundly increasing access to books for readers of all ages and backgrounds.

If you take a book (or two) from a Little Free Library, you do not need to return that specific book. However, in order to keep the Little Free Library full of good choices for the whole neighborhood, the next time you swing by the Library, bring a few books to share.  Little Free Library book exchanges function on the honor system; everyone contributes to ensure there are always quality books inside.

Last fall the Girl Scouts and their troop leader, Jennifer Datum, voted to proceed with the Little Free Library project to demonstrate the Troop’s appreciation for their community and to build teamwork skills. The Library will be stocked initially with books from Troop members’ personal collections. The girls will also be responsible for its monthly maintenance.

Chris Arelt (right), owner of Nautilus Architects, who donated the design of the Library, stands with his wife Barbara and daughter Emma Rose in front of the newly-installed Library. Emma Rose is a member of Troop #63632.

Because LYSB is located in the village of Old Lyme, the Little Free Library design needed to be reviewed and approved by the town’s Historic District Commission.  Two Troop members, Chloe Datum and Ava Gilbert, presented the Commission with a classic design donated by Old Lyme architect Christopher Arelt of Nautilus Architects, father of Troop member Emma Rose Arelt.

Construction of the library included quality materials generously donated by Rings End in Niantic. The design was built and installed by Gary Lankerd, a master carpenter based in Waterford.  Additional details were implemented by Philip Schaller, owner of Signs & Digital Graphics in Deep River.

Many of the people involved in the project attended the dedication ceremony. From left to right, Gary Lankerd (Lankerd Custom Carpentry), Christopher Arelt (Nautilus Architects), Bonnie, LYSB Director Mary Seidner, Jen Datum (Girl Scout Troop leader) and John Forbis (Old Lyme Historic District Commission.) Photo by Mary Seidner.

The Troop’s dedication and reception ceremony was for everyone involved in this project, including leaders from the Old Lyme community and the Girl Scout Council. The Troop also expressed their thanks to Mary Seidner, Director of LYSB, who was instrumental in supporting both the Troop and this community service project.

Under the direction of Troop leaders, the Girl Scouts will be submitting the Little Free Library project for the Girl Scouts Bronze Award, which is the highest award a Junior can earn.  Working toward obtaining this award demonstrates their commitment to helping others, improving their community and the world, and becoming the best they can be.

For more information about Girl Scouts of Connecticut, visit www.gsofct.org

For more information about the Little Free Library program, visit LittleFreeLibrary.org

For more information about Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau, visit lysb.org.

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A Little Humor in Celebration of The Bard’s Birth- and Death-Day

Today is not only St. George’s Day (the equivalent for England of St. Patrick’s Day for Ireland) but also both William Shakespeare’s birth- and death-day. Well, to be honest, the latter is a definite while the former is one which, to quote from Wikipedia, “has proved appealing to biographers.”  It is known for sure that Shakespeare was baptized in Stratford-upon-Avon in England on April 26, 1564, and so the April 23 date has simply been deduced from that.

In honor of the great Bard, we are delighted to publish this delightful submission from our good friend and book reviewer Felix Kloman and his wife Ann of Lyme.  This is sure to put a smile on the faces of all our Shakespeare-ophiles!

Memories of Yorick

Late last fall, a scrawny young mouse named Yorick politely asked to spend the winter with us, providing entertainment and conversation in return for a modest meal each day. We greeted him with enthusiasm, and shared stories . But, of late he has seemed much fatter and far hungrier. We fed him more and, of course, warned him not to go into the pantry, where we had set a trap for some rapacious relatives. He didn’t follow our advice.

Alas, poor Yorick!

 

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Lyme Committee on Volunteerism Hosts Town’s Inaugural Volunteer Open House Today

Dozens of Volunteer Opportunities Available To Help Keep Lyme Beautiful, Safe and Healthy

The Lyme Committee on Volunteerism announced today that the first-ever “Lyme Volunteer Open House” will be held Sunday, April 23, from 12 to 3 p.m., at the Lyme Fire House – to kickoff National Volunteer Week and help address the Town’s critical need for volunteers.

According to the Committee, while the Town of Lyme employs only a handful of full-time employees, in order to operate efficiently, it staffs more than 140 additional positions with volunteers.  Representatives of more than 20 Town boards, committees and commissions – as well as some local nonprofits – will be on hand at the Open House to help residents discover volunteer opportunities that match their interests, skills and availability.

“Volunteers play a critical role in keeping our town safe, beautiful and healthy,” said Town Board of Selectman Steven Mattson. “Our town couldn’t function without them.”  He encouraged residents to stop by the Open House to learn about ways their time and talents could benefit the community.

Some volunteer positions are short term, others long term; some are designed for individuals, others can be done in groups or with families.  Groups looking for volunteers at the Open House include:

The Town of Lyme Lyme Land Conservation Trust
Friends of the Lyme Public Library Lyme Garden Club
Lyme Public Hall Association Open Space Committee
Lyme Local History Archives Lyme Parks & Recreation Commission
Lyme Cemetery Commission Friends of Whalebone Cove
Lyme Consolidated School PTO Lyme Ambulance Association
Lyme/Old Lyme Education Foundation Lyme Fire Company
Mentoring Corps for Community Development Lyme Grange 147
Lyme-Old Lyme Volunteer Connection Friends of Lymes’ Senior Center
Lyme Farmers Market, Inc. Lyme Veterans Memorial Committee
Camp Claire Lyme Republican Town Committee
Hamburg Fair Committee Lyme Democratic Town Committee
High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

Mattson said the Open House is the perfect way for residents to find ways to give back to the Town while mingling with their friends and neighbors, and enjoying an array of free picnic food – including donations by Four Mile River Farm and Deep River Snacks.

The event is sponsored by the Town of Lyme and the Lyme Committee on Volunteerism.

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2nd Annual Tag Sale Today at LOL High School Supports Mission of Friends of Music

The 2nd annual Friends of Music Tag Sale, will bring bargains galore to the Lyme-Old Lyme High School’s (LOLHS) gym and Commons areas on Saturday, April 22, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.  Proceeds from the sale will help advance the mission of the Lyme-Old Lyme Friends of Music, who provide support to the music programs in Lyme-Old Lyme Schools at all levels.
Items for sale will include housewares, toys, books, CDs and DVDs, sporting goods, furniture, tools, and more.  Clothing and bedding will not be included in the tag sale.
 
Spring cleaning? Moving? Donations of items to the Friends of Music Tag Sale will be gladly accepted on Friday, April 21, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the high school:  housewares, furniture, sporting goods, toys, books, CDs and DVDs, artwork, tools, etc., in good condition—but no clothing, please.
 

Friends of Music was established in the early 1980s in response to District budget cuts that threatened to affect arts programs in our schools. Today Friends of Music provide support to Lyme-Old Lyme Schools music programs at all levels: materially, by funding unbudgeted and unexpected items, and administratively, by assisting with uniform distribution, staffing at events, and more.

 

Friends of Music also supports LOLHS students individually by awarding scholarships to selected graduating seniors.

 

More information on Friends of Music and the 2nd annual Tag Sale can be found at www.friendsofmusiclol.org or e-mail friendsofmusiclol@gmail.com. 
As a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, Friends of Music can accept matching funds from employers. 
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Carney, Ziobron to Host In-Depth Legislative Budget Forum This Evening in Hadlyme, 6pm

State Representative Devin Carney

State Representative Melissa Ziobron

State Representatives Devin Carney, R-23rd, and Melissa Ziobron, R-34th, will hold a legislative budget forum and meet with constituents from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 21, at the Hadlyme Public Hall, 1 Day Hill Road.

Carney, a member of the legislature’s Finance Committee and Ziobron, the ranking member of the Appropriations Committee, will provide an overview of Connecticut’s budget and fiscal situation. They will present a summary of the state budget process, the Governor’s proposed budget and what to expect in the remainder of this legislative session.

For more information, contact the legislators’ office at (800) 842-1423.

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Clean Out Your Medicine Cabinet, Old Lyme’s Prescription Drug Take-Back Day is Saturday

The National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day Logo - DEA

Since the first Lyme-Old Lyme Drug Take Back event in 2011, citizens have returned more than 500 pounds of medications to prevent misuse.

On Saturday, April 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Lyme Street Fire House, the Community Action for Substance Free Youth (CASFY) Coalition will give residents another opportunity to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription and over-the-counter drugs.

Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinets. Twenty seven percent of seniors at Lyme-Old Lyme High School report it would be “very or sort of easy to obtain a prescription drug without your own prescription.”  (Lyme-Old Lyme Youth Survey, Dec. 2015). You have the opportunity to return unwanted medications at this bi-annual event, so that you don’t inadvertently contribute to someone’s misuse of a drug.

Should you miss this Drug Take Back event, you can dispose of your medications at Drug Drop Boxes located in area police stations including Troop F in Westbrook and the East Lyme Police Station in Niantic.

The misuse of prescription pain relievers and tranquilizers is more prevalent in the U.S. than use of all types of illicit drugs, except marijuana.  These medications are readily available in many home medicine cabinets and are easily diverted, misused and abused.

According to the Center for Disease Control, drug overdose deaths now kill more Americans than car crashes.  Prescription pain pills are driving the increase in overdoses.  Studies show that the majority of young people who abuse medicines obtain their supply from family and friends.

This event is co-sponsored by CASFY Coalition, Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau, Old Lyme Police Department, Troop F State Police, and Old Lyme Fire Department,

For more information about the Drug Take Back event, or CASFY Coalition, contact LYSB at 860-434-7208 or visit www.lysb.org

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Rockfall Foundation Announces 12 Grants for Environmental Projects, Recipients Include Lyme Land Conservation Trust

The Board of Directors and Grants Committee of the Rockfall Foundation are pleased to announce that twelve environmental programs throughout the Lower Connecticut River Valley received grants in the latest funding cycle. More than $28,000 was awarded to support environmental education and conservation efforts that will have a combined benefit for nearly 2,000 students and many more adults and families in the region.

“These grants, awarded through a competitive process, support the wonderful work being done in the area of environmental education and conservation throughout our region,” said Marilyn Ozols, President of the Foundation. “We are grateful that the generosity of our donors makes it possible for us to support so many worthwhile programs.”

Environmental education is a priority area for the Foundation and programs that serve and engage children and youth represent the several of those receiving grants. Public schools and non-profit organizations will provide hands-on environmental education programs in Middletown, Durham, Lyme, Old Saybrook, and Westbrook. Additionally, several conservation projects and public events will present residents throughout the Lower Connecticut River Valley with information on urban farming, removal of invasives, and tree identification, as well as provide volunteer opportunities.

Grantees include:

Indian Hill Cemetery Association – “A Celebration of the Trees of Indian Hill Cemetery” will encourage visitors to utilize Indian Hill Cemetery as a place where they can learn about trees, be inspired by trees, enjoy the view and walk quietly. Tree identification activities, school programs, and the addition of signs will support this effort. $1,000

Van Buren Moody Elementary School – “Moody School Courtyard Nature Enrichment Programs” will train teachers to use the school’s courtyard gardens for education enrichment, thereby increasing the amount of time students spend outside learning about the environment. The program will also involve students and families in maintaining and managing the gardens to create a sense of ownership and connection to the courtyards and the natural world. $1,030

Regional School District 13 Elementary Schools – “Taking the Next Generation Science Standards Outside” will encourage elementary students to engage in the Science and Engineering Practices emphasized in the Next Generation Science Standards, while exploring the nature trails near their schools and noting problems that could be investigated and addressed. $1,100

Connecticut River Coastal Conservation District – “Urban Farm-Based Education Programs at Forest City Farms: A Farm Days Pilot Project” will promote an ongoing urban agriculture initiative in Middletown focused on improving urban farming conservation practices, building community interest and engagement in farming, developing farming/gardening knowledge and skills, and helping address food insecurity. Hands-on activities will take place at Forest City Farms. $1,500

Middlesex Land Trust and Everyone Outside – “Middlesex Land Trust Preserves: Great Places to Spend Time Outside” will revive and foster an interest in nature by connecting children and families with their local environment through field trips and public trail walks, helping them gain an understanding and appreciation of nature in order to become future stewards of the environment. $1,500

Snow Elementary School – “Outdoor Explorations at Snow Elementary School” will provide students and teachers with hands-on science and nature programs, including teacher training, mentoring and curriculum development leading to greater interest in science and stewardship of the natural world. $1,900

Lyme Land Conservation Trust – “The Diana and Parker Lord Nature and Science Center” to support the planning and development of educationally-focused content that is directed to all ages and will engage school-age children, and to support a unique and interactive interpretive trail within the Banningwood Preserve. $2,000

Valley Shore YMCA – “Farm to Table Specialty Camp,” an innovative new program that will teach children the important life skills of gardening, harvesting produce for themselves and others, and environmental sustainability. $2,225

Macdonough Elementary School – “Macdonough School Takes the Classroom Outside” will provide hands-on science education for K through 5th grade students, including an understanding of the natural world and the local ecosystem, to enhance students’ connection with nature. $2,570

Connecticut River Watershed Council – “European Water Chestnut Strategy for the Connecticut River Watershed” will directly educate more than 250 individuals on how to identify, manage and report European Water Chestnuts; educate thousands of residents about the plant and its threat to our waterways; and involve volunteers in hand removal of documented infestations. $3,500

Connecticut Forest and Park – “Highlawn Forest Invasive Removal and Education Program,” part of a strategic Forest Management Plan, to use the property as a recreation and education asset through careful timbering and an invasive removal process. The program will be a model for environmental planning and will offer a unique opportunity for hands-on environmental education for landowners and municipalities. $4,000

SoundWaters – “Coastal Explorers: A Bridge for Sustainability for Watershed Exploration for Middle School Students” will provide students from Middlesex County with hands-on science education focused on their local estuarine habitats and watershed to encourage a deeper understanding of the natural world via a combination of study and stewardship activities. $6,000

Founded in 1935 by Middletown philanthropist Clarence S. Wadsworth, the Rockfall Foundation is named for the large waterfall in Wadsworth Falls State Park. In addition to its grants, the Foundation sponsors educational programs and owns and maintains the deKoven House Community Center. The Rockfall Foundation awards grants annually through a competitive process that is open to non-profit organizations and municipalities located in the Lower Connecticut River Valley. For additional information or to make a tax-deductible contribution, please visit www.rockfallfoundation.org  or call 860-347-0340.

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Robert Tougias, ‘Day’ Columnist, Birding Expert to Speak at Lyme Public Hall, April 23

On Sunday, April 23, at  2 p.m. the Lyme Public Hall Association will present a program on Wild Birds of Connecticut-Natural History and Conservation with  New London Day columnist Robert Tougias.

Tougias syndicates nature articles in newspapers throughout New England and writes birding columns for newpapers in Connecticut. His articles on wildlife have appeared in many nature/outdoors magazines.

He began birding at the age of seven and has been presenting his artwork in juried shows since age eleven. His books include Birding Western Massachusetts: A Habitat Guide to 26 Great Birding Sites from the Berkshires to the Quabbin.

The program is free and open to the public.

The Lyme Public Hall is located at 249 Hamburg Road (Route 156) in Lyme, Connecticut.  For  more information go to www.lymepublichall.org, or call 860 526-8886.

The Lyme Public Hall Association is a non-profit organization dedicated to the appreciation of Lyme’s history, culture, and community through the preservation and use of the historic hall, its archives and historical programs.

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Lyme Public Hall Celebrates Earth Day with Town-Wide Clean Up Through April 23

The Lyme Public Hall Association and the Town of Lyme are sponsoring a town-wide roadside clean-up April 1 through 23 in celebration of Earth Day.  Plastic trash bags will be available free to the public at the Hadlyme Country Store at the corner of Ferry Road and Rte. 82.  Bags can also be obtained at the Reynolds Store at 254 Hamburg Rd. (Rte. 156) in Lyme, the Lyme Public Library, and the Lyme Town Hall.

Residents are invited to collect litter that has accumulated along the roads over the winter months. The Town of Lyme will pick up bags left along the road side. Trash bags will be available after April 1.

For more information call 860 526-8886 or email wdenow@comcast.com.

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Lyme-Old Lyme High School Multi-Class Reunion to be Held July 29

A Lyme-Old Lyme High School multi-class reunion spanning the years 1985-1995 has been announced.  It will be held on Saturday, July 29, from 6 to 11 p.m. at Groton Motor Inn & Suites99 Gold Star Hwy., Groton, CT.

The cost (non-refundable) is $50.00, which includes a buffet dinner and cash-only bar.  The menu includes:

•Tossed Salad

•Warm rolls & butter

•Teriyaki Chicken

•Baked Cod

•Top Round w au jus

•Pasta and Sauce

•Green Bean Almondine

•Creamy Garlic Mashed Potatoes

•Desserts

•Coffee regular and decaffeinated, and hot tea

Hotel Policy:  debit and credit cards are not accepted for our bar.  ATM on premises.

For discounted hotel arrangements, call the hotel @ 860-445-9784.  Ask to reserve a room in our room block for a discounted rate.  Use “Lyme-Old Lyme High School Reunion 2017” as the Group Code.  The cut-off date for reserving the room block at the hotel is Thursday, June 29.

Share your favorite pictures by sending them to LOLH8992@gmail.com

Visit the event Facebook page at LOLHS Wildcat Reunion Hub: https://www.facebook.com/groups/544288812424026

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Old Lyme Churches Host Community Dinner Tonight to Raise Awareness, Support for Syrian Refugee Family Resettlement in Lyme


The First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, Christ the King Church and Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church will hold a joint community dinner – featuring a smorgasbord of traditional Syrian foods and dishes – at 6 p.m. on Saturday, April 1, at Christ The King Church. The aim of the dinner is to help raise awareness and support for the churches’ efforts to resettle a second family of Syrian refugees in Lyme.

There is no charge to attend and enjoy the community dinner; admission is free.  An offering will be taken up during the meal to allow anyone who would like to contribute to the churches’ ongoing Syrian family relocation efforts to do so.

The meal will be prepared by members of the Hamou family – the first family of Syrian refugees that the churches helped resettle to the Old Lyme community last year – and served with the assistance of congregation members.

The churches encourage residents who would like to attend the dinner to RSVP via email to any of the church offices:  FCCOL, fccol@fccol.org; Christ the King Church, ctkoldlyme@aol.com; Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church, office@saintannsoldlyme.org.

Steven Jungkeit, Senior Minister of the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme.

In announcing the community dinner, FCCOL Pastor Steve Jungkeit said, “The images of the horrific refugee crisis in the Middle East have touched the hearts of so many of us in Old Lyme.  We were proud to link arms with our friends at Christ the King Church and Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church to sponsor the resettlement of the Hamou family – to help the family into a new home, schools and jobs here in Old Lyme.”

Jungkeit continued, “It’s been a rewarding experience for everyone involved.  And now the Hamou family is joining with us to help our churches rescue another Syrian refugee family from warfare and persecution.  I am incredibly proud of the community of Old Lyme and invite everyone to join us for this fund-raising dinner.”

For more information, visit FCCOL at www.fccol.org, Christ the King Church at https://www.christthekingchurch.net, and Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church at http://saintannsoldlyme.org.

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LYSB Hosts Summer Camp & Activities Fair This Evening

Kids_from_Camp_FlyerThis evening, Wednesday, March 29, Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau will host a Summer Camp and Activities Fair from 5 to 7 p.m. in the Lyme-Old Lyme High School Commons. Admission is free and all are welcome.

More than 30 local camps will be participating in the Fair, which represents a great opportunity to pick up brochures, meet camp representatives, and maybe even register for some camps or classes.

It’s a unique one-stop-shopping spectacular!

Pizza will be available for purchase.

Click here to view the flyer for the event.

Organizations attending the 2017 Camp Fair include:
ABC Gymnastics
Arts Center Killingworth
Bushy Hill Day Camp
Camp Claire
Camp Hazen YMCA
The Childrens Tree Montessori
Community Music School
Connecticut River Museum
Denison Pequotsepos Nature Center
Eastern Connecticut Ballet
Engineering Imagination
Eugene O’Neill Theater Center
Florence Griswold Museum
Girl Scouts of CT
High Hopes Therapeutic Riding
Horses Healing Humans
Incarnation Camp
Lyme Old Lyme Soccer Club
Lyme Park & Rec
Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau
Madhatters Theatre Company
Maritime Education Network
Mystic Seaport
Niantic Bay Sailing Academy
North Cove Yacht Club
Old Lyme Children’s Learning Center
Old Lyme Park & Rec
Old Lyme PGN Library
Pettipaug Sailing Academy
Pequot Sherwood Daycamp
Rise Martial Arts Academy
Shoreline Arts Alliance
String Theory School of Music
Thames Valley Music School Arts Camp
Treehouse Players
Valley Shore YMCA

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Final Week to View Lyme Academy College Student Work at Old Lyme Town Hall

The vestibule of Old Lyme Town Hall’s Meeting Room is one of several places that artwork by students from Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts is on display in the town hall.

The Town of Old Lyme is currently hosting an exhibition through the end of March featuring works from Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts students. The exhibition showcases recent works from Bachelor of Fine Art (BFA) students, freshmen to seniors, in all disciplines, including Drawing, Illustration, Painting, and Sculpture.

A new picture hanging system was installed at the town hall in late spring, when an inaugural exhibit featured pieces created by students in classes at the Lymes’ Senior Center. Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder explains “Art is such an important part of our Old Lyme community. We installed the new system for the express purpose of displaying art from organizations in our community.”

The art work by Lyme Academy students currently on view in Old Lyme Town Hall incorporates a variety of styles and media.

Asked his reaction to the opportunity for Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts students to participate in the exhibition at the town hall, Campus Dean Todd Jokl, told LymeLine, “The College is thrilled to be a part of this exhibition in the Old Lyme Town Hall. We are honored the town partnered with us to showcase some of our remarkable student artists’ work.”

“We hope the exhibition of our BFA students’ work symbolizes the important connection the College has with this community and how excited we are to be collaborating with so many institutions in the area. As we all know, this town and region offer a remarkable network of support and interest in the arts and culture. We cherish our role as being an active member of the community.”

The public is welcome to participate in College openings, lectures, workshops, and various community and undergraduate programs.

Lyme Academy College, as part of the University of New Haven, is the only Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design institution in the State of Connecticut. Lyme Academy College has played an integral part in the town’s culture since 1976. The College has grown in numbers, ranking and prestige from a small community art school to a national presence.

The student exhibit can be viewed during regular town hall hours: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday.

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Help Us Determine the Future of LymeLine.com, Please Take This Survey

We are delighted to have been asked by a professor from the School of Journalism at the University of Kansas, Dr. Peter Bobkowski, to participate in a project to research the news audiences of hyperlocal news websites.

The professor and two of his graduate students are conducting this study to understand better who reads local news websites, and about their readership and social habits. This will entail you completing a survey, which the professor and his students have created.

We would really appreciate as many readers as possible taking the time to complete the survey, which is expected to take approximately 10 minutes.  You can find the survey at this link.  When you click on the link, the landing page is a Consent Information Statement with more information.

The information you supply will remain completely anonymous at all times.  The raw data from the survey will be shared with us and will help us determine the future of LymeLine.com, but we stress again it will be in a form that it is totally anonymous.  The survey will be open until Monday, April 3.

Thank you so much for your support and assistance!

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Carney, MacLachlan to Hold Coffee Hours in Westbrook, Saturday

State Rep. Jesse Maclachlan (R-34th)

State Representative Devin Carney

State Rep’s. Devin Carney and Jesse MacLachlan will hold coffee hours in Westbrook at the Westbrook Public Library located at 61 Goodspeed Drive on Saturday, April 1 starting at 10 a.m.

This event will provide constituents with an opportunity to ask questions or share their ideas and concerns about state government or local issues.

Anyone unable to attend, but who would like to speak to either legislator can contact Carney’s or MacLachlan’s office at 800-842-1423 or by email at: devin.carney@housegop.ct.gov andjesse.machlachlan@housegop.ct.gov.

Carney represents the 23rd General Assembly District, which includes the towns of Lyme, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook and a portion of Westbrook.

MacLachlan represents the 34th General Assembly District, which includes the towns of Clinton, Killingworth and a portion of Westbrook.

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Friends of Whalebone Cove Host Talk on “Future of the Connecticut River” in Hadlyme

A winter view of Whalebone Cove.

‘The Future of Connecticut River’ will be the topic of the featured speaker at the annual meeting of Friends of Whalebone Cove on Sunday, March 26, at 4 p.m. in Hadlyme.

Stephen Gephard, supervising fisheries biologist with the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) Inland Fisheries Division in Old Lyme, will present a program in which he reviews the history of the Connecticut River since pre-colonial times and offers his predictions on how the River will be used in the 21st century.

Gephard is well known in conservation circles up and down the Eastern Seaboard.

In 2014, then President Barack Obama appointed him as commissioner of the Council of North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organization, an international body established by an intergovernmental convention in 1984 that seeks to restore and manage Atlantic salmon populations.

And last year the Northeastern Division of the American Fisheries Society (NED) presented him with the its NED President’s Award.

Throughout his 30+ year career with Connecticut DEEP, Gephard has advocated for the restoration of habitat of diadromous fish across the state, region, nation and world, and continues to work for the benefit of the species he manages.

Friends of Whalebone Cove was formed last year by area residents to help government and private conservation agencies protect the fragile eco-systems in Hadlyme’s Whalebone Cove, which is listed as one of North America’s important freshwater tidal marshes in international treaties that cite the Connecticut River estuary as a wetland complex of global importance.

A representative from the US Fish & Wildlife Service Silvio O Conte Refuge will also give a short presentation on the Conte Refuge’s new Comprehensive Conservation Plan. Much of Whalebone Cove and the surrounding upland is part of the Conte Refuge.

The Friends of Whalebone Cove annual meeting is open to the public, both members and non-members. It will be at Hadlyme Public Hall, One Day Hill Road, Lyme. Refreshments will be served.

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Lyme-Old Lyme HS Hosts Open House for Prospective Students

US News & World Report ranked Lyme-Old Lyme High School 8th in Connecticut in their just published listing of America’s Best High Schools.

School offers tuition options for students not resident in Lyme or Old Lyme

Next Thursday, March 23, Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) welcomes prospective students who do not currently attend a Lyme-Old Lyme School and/or their parents to visit the high school during its spring Open House for Prospective Students.

In order to offer a customized experience for each prospective student and/or their parents, interviews are being offered throughout the day to accommodate varying schedules.  Interviews will be preceded by a student-led tour of the high school.  This format is intended to allow all attendees an opportunity to gain an overview of the school and interact with current students, as well as to obtain answers to individual questions and information on curriculum, student opportunities and more.

In terms of the type of students and/or families the District is aiming to attract, Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser explains, “This event is offered for students in a variety of situations such as students whose families are looking to move to the area, students who reside here but attend private, parochial, or magnet schools, and tuition-paying students who live in other towns.”

Last month, the College Board released the Class of 2016 Advanced Placement (AP®) Cohort Data, which showed that Lyme-Old Lyme Schools came in as the school system in Connecticut with the second highest overall performance. No other Middlesex or New London County school system achieved a ranking higher than 20th

View from inside the Commons atrium at Lyme-Old Lyme High School.

In April 2016, LOLHS was named the eighth best public high school in Connecticut by US News & World Report in their listing of Best High Schools.  Moreover, LOLHS was ranked nationally at #429 and consequently, as one of the top 500 schools in the country, was awarded US News & World Report’s highest honor of a gold medal. Within the state, LOLHS had the highest ranking of any school in New London County and came in ahead of Simsbury, Greenwich and Darien High Schools.

Year after year, LOLHS graduates are accepted into a wide range of diverse and highly selective schools across the US and in some cases, internationally. The Lyme-Old Lyme School system has become a pipeline to the Ivy League schools and the “Little-Ivies” in addition to such schools as Duke, MIT and Stanford, and in the most recent figures available, over 88 percent of LOLHS 2014 graduates pursued higher education.

Facilities at the high school are exceptional with state-of-the-art technology implemented throughout the building thanks to a $49 million renovation project completed in 2014.  The math, science, language, and technology and engineering areas along with the art, music, drama and athletic facilities are now of a quality and sophistication that resembles a college environment, rather than a high school.

Students hard at work in a Chinese class at Lyme-Old Lyme High School, where recently released results show the school achieved the second highest AP scores in the state.

Current enrollment at LOLHS is 487 students across Grades 9 through 12 and the average class size is between 15 and 18.  The school offers a full spectrum of core subjects taught in-house, including 17 Advanced Placement subjects, and also an extensive range of online classes taken through the Virtual High School program.

Students also have the option to pursue the acclaimed Techno-Ticks robotics program along with more than 35 other extra-curricular clubs including High School Bowl, Mock Trial, and Key Club.  Lyme-Old Lyme High School enjoys exceptionally strong music, drama and art programs, which have been recognized with numerous awards both at the state level and nationally.

The school’s athletic program has similarly received innumerable honors over the years and is proud to have several past, present and future Olympians among its alumni.

If you would like to attend this informative event, call Glynis Houde at 860-434-2255 to schedule your appointment.

For further information, contact Tracy Lenz, Director of School Counseling, at 860-434-2255 or lenzt@region18.org or James Wygonik, Principal, at 860-434-1651 or wygonikj@region18.org.

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Lyme-Old Lyme MS Science Olympians Win State Championship, Now Move Onto National Contest in Ohio

State champions! The Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School Science Olympians proudly display their winner’s trophy.

It’s not only the UConn Women’s Basketball team that’s enjoying an extraordinary run.  This weekend, the Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School Science Olympiad team completed a remarkable feat by taking top honors in the 2017 Connecticut Science Olympiad State Championship for the fifth time in the past six years.

And now, as reigning state champions, the Lyme-Old Lyme team moves forward to the National Science Olympiad Competition on May 19-20, in Dayton, Ohio, where its members will represent the State of Connecticut.  The Lyme-Old Lyme team again dominated the Connecticut contest amassing gold medals in nine events, silvers in 10, and bronze medals in three events.

Science Olympiad competitions are like academic track meets, consisting of a series of 23 team events in each division (Division B is middle school; Division C is high school). Each year, a portion of the events are rotated to reflect the ever-changing nature of genetics, earth science, chemistry, anatomy, physics, geology, mechanical engineering and technology.

Proudly wearing their medals, team members Sadie Frankel (right) and Bella Hine share smiles after their team won the state Science Olympiad championship.

By combining events from all disciplines, the Science Olympiad encourages a wide cross-section of students to become involved. Emphasis is placed on active, hands-on group participation. Through Science Olympiad, students, teachers, parents, principals and business leaders bond together and work toward a shared goal (https://www.soinc.org/).

Lyme-Old Lyme Science Olympiad coaches Shannon Glorioso and Elizabeth Dushin credit the support of the community for their continued success. “The Lyme-Old Lyme community support, whether it is directly coaching the Olympians, helping to manage all the behind-the-scenes tasks, making monetary donations to allow the team to purchase much-needed supplies or any of the other ways the community has supported the team are truly why this team has been so successful.”

Asked his reaction to the result, Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser responded, “We are so proud of the ongoing success of our students and coaches in this amazing program. This is yet another example of the strong STEM programming offered by the Lyme-Old Lyme Schools where we offer a private school experience in a public school setting.”

Congratulations to these budding scientists and good luck in Ohio!

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Dean Appointed Director of Curriculum & Professional Development at Lyme-Old Lyme Schools

Michelle Dean, Lyme-Old Lyme Schools newly appointed Director of Curriculum & Professional Development.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools have announced the appointment of Michelle Dean as the next Director of Curriculum and Professional Development. Dean, who is currently serving as Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School Principal, will begin her new position on July 1, 2017.

Dean will replace Beth Borden, who is retiring after 17 years with the district and 44 years in the field of education. 

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser commented, “We are pleased to promote Mrs. Dean to this position as she has proven herself time and time again in the roles she has played throughout the district. Her varied background in education, combined with her passion for research and professional development, will allow us to continue the great work that is taking place under Beth Borden’s leadership.”

Dean first came to the Lyme-Old Lyme Schools as Assistant Principal at Lyme-Old Lyme High School. She also has experience as an English teacher and school counselor.

The district has begun advertising for the position of Middle School Principal and encourages high quality applicants to apply at http://www.region18.org.

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Stella Swoops in with Heavy Snow, High Winds … and then Rain?

First snow plow of the day … there surely will be many more.

Winter Storm Stella is here.

The Governor has declared a State of Emergency meaning a statewide travel ban is in effect. Lyme-Old Lyme Schools, Lyme and Old Lyme Town Halls and Libraries, the Lymes’ Senior Center and many businesses from the size of Pfizer, Inc. downwards are closed.  Events galore have been cancelled, including recycling and trash pick-up in Old Lyme. A parking ban is in effect on all town roads from 6 a.m. to midnight today.

To reach the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in Old Lyme, call 860.598.0120.

The Respite Center at the Lymes’ Senior Center on Town Woods Road and/or the regional Emergency Shelter at the East Lyme High School will be opened if necessary. Information will be available through the EOC and on LymeLine.com, and also will be reported on the Town of Old Lyme’s website and Facebook/Twitter.

State and local officials urge residents to stay off the roads during the storm … and stay safe.

Latest weather reports, however, predict Southeastern Connecticut will not now experience the brunt of the storm with the snow turning first to sleet and then rain later this morning.

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