October 16, 2017

Lyme Fire Company Hosts 61st Annual Steak Dinner & Fundraiser, Oct. 21

The Lyme Fire Company will hold its 61st Annual Steak Dinner & Fundraiser on Saturday, Oct. 21, from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Hamburg Fire Station,213 Hamburg Road (Route 156) in Lyme, Conn.

The cost is $25 for adults and $8 for children, age 12 and under. All are welcome.

For more information, contact Tom Davies at (860) 526-9292.

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Lyme Land Trust Executive Director George Moore to Retire, Search for Replacement Underway

George Moore, Lyme Land Trust Executive Director, has announced his retirement.

George Moore, the Land Trust’s Executive Director for the last five years, has announced that he will be retiring when his replacement can be brought on board.

Land Trust President John Pritchard made the announcement and said, “The Land Trust is deeply grateful for George’s service and dedication over the last 14 years. He was elected to the Land Trust Board as a volunteer director in 2003. In 2007, he was elected Board President, and in 2013 the Board appointed him as its first Executive Director. Through his vision and effective management, George has helped transform the Land Trust into one of the most active and successful in the State.

Prichard noted that among his many accomplishments – in addition to the day-to-day management of the Land Trust — are building the Land Trust’s membership to the point that it represents half the households in Town; the acquisition of numerous preserves on his watch, including Chestnut Hill, Walbridge Woodlands, Banningwood and most recently, Brockway- Hawthorne; assisting with securing the coveted national accreditation from the Land Trust Alliance; initiating the President’s Circle composed of the Land Trust’s most generous supporters; arranging for the production of the PBS film on the Land Trust and conservation in Lyme, as well as its sequel, The Rest of the Story (both of which can be viewed here); and organizing and managing the Land Trust’s highly successful annual fundraiser, a regionally recognized, fun and scenic biking event for all ages and abilities: the Tour de Lyme.

The Land Trust has commenced a search for a new Executive Director. Potential applicants for the position can find the job description and application process at the following link: http://www.lymelandtrust.org/employment-opportunities/

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Wildcat X-Country Teams Start Season with Second Place Overall in Blue Dragon Invitational

The LOLHS Cross-Country girls came in first place overall in the Blue Dragon Invitational.

In a terrific start to the season, the Lyme-Old Lyme High School Cross-Country team placed second Wednesday in the Overall Girls/Boys Division in the Blue Dragon Invitational in Portlad, Conn., which was their first meet of the new academic year.

The LOLHS Cross-Country boys came in second overall.

The girls team came first overall out of 14 teams while the boys placed second out of 24 teams.

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Hear About “Hiking the Appalachian Trail” This Evening with Sam Ducharne at Lyme Library

High in the Appalachians. (File photo)

At 7 p.m. this evening, the Friends of Lyme Library host Sam Ducharme, who will give a talk titled, “Hiking the Appalachian Trail.”

Ducharme is a retired K9 officer, who will speak about his adventures hiking the Appalachian Trail.  This modern-day adventure started out from Springer Mountain, Ga., and after a 2,180 mile, 14-state backpacking trip, ended at Mt. Katahdin in Maine.

With no prior backpacking experience, he learned on the trail. Ducharme will share the stories of how he cooked, what it was like sleeping in a hammock for six months through three seasons, and the rugged beauty of the Appalachian Mountains.  The images and stories will leave you with a renewed awe of the beauty of our country and its people.

The Lyme Public Library is located at 482 Hamburg Rd./Rte. 156, Lyme, CT 06371.

For more information, call (860) 434-2272.

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State Orders Recount in Republican Primary for 33rd District Probate Judge; Delia Wins by Nine Votes in First Count

Tuesday’s unofficial winner, Anselmo Delia.

The Connecticut Secretary of State has informed all the towns that comprise the 33rd District Probate Court that they need to conduct a recount of Tuesday’s Republican Primary.

Tuesdya’s race between the party-endorsed candidate Attorney Anselmo Delia of Clinton and challenger Attorney Kevin Hecht of Old Saybrook ended with a 859-850 win for Delia after all the unofficial results had been declared in the nine towns.

Unofficial results given on the Connecticut Secretary of State’s webpage for Lyme show Hecht winning by a more than 2 to 1 margin.  The final count was 44 votes for Hecht and 20 for Delia.

Results from the remaining eight towns in the district were as follows:

Chester: Hecht 23 – Delia 12
Clinton: Delia 444 – Hecht 228
Deep River: Delia 24 – Hecht 14
Essex: Delia 79 – Hecht 59
Haddam: Delia 140 – Hecht 37
Killingworth: Hecht 78 – Delia 53
Old Saybrook: Hecht 277 – Delia 46
Westbrook: Hecht 90 – Delia 41.

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Final Day Today of Community Music School’s Free Preview Week

Community Music School, located at 90 Main Street in Centerbrook and 179 Flanders Rd. in East Lyme, welcomes the general public to visit during Free Preview Week Sept. 11 through 15. Children and adults can tour the School’s studios, meet teachers and staff, enjoy a free preview lesson, and learn about a vast array of programs for all ages including private and group lessons, adult cabaret, jazz ensemble, string ensembles, music therapy services, Kindermusik for babies and toddlers, and more.

During the academic year, Community Music School is open from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.Monday to Thursday, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays. Those interested in a 30-minute preview lesson are requested to call 860-767-0026 for scheduling.  The public is also welcome to observe any group class or ensemble during Free Preview Week.

For additional information, visit www.community-music-school.org/programs or call CMS at 860-767-0026.

Community Music School offers innovative music programming for infants through adults, building on a 34 year tradition of providing quality music instruction to residents of shoreline communities. CMS programs cultivate musical ability and creativity, and provide students with a thorough understanding of music so they can enjoy playing and listening for their entire lives.  Learn more at www.community-music-school.org or call (860)767-0026.

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Republican Primary for Judge of Probate Being Held Today in Lyme

Anselmo Delia is the Republican party endorsed candidate for Judge of Probate in the 33rd District.

Registered Republicans in Lyme are eligible to vote today, Tuesday, Sept. 12, in a primary election to determine the party’s candidate for the office of judge of probate for the 33rd District in the November election.

In addition to Lyme, the District 33 Probate Court, which is located in Old Saybrook, covers Chester, Clinton, Deep River, Essex, Haddam, Killingworth, Old Saybrook and Westbrook.

Kevin J. Hecht of Old Saybrook is challenging the party-endorsed candidate, Anselmo Delia, of Clinton.

There is no Democratic Primary since party-endorsed candidate Jeannine Lewis is not being challenged.

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Old Lyme Girls Crush East Lyme 3-0, First Win in Wildcat History Over Vikings

Senior Captain Keelin Hurtt races towards the goal in Saturday’s game against East Lyme.

In their first game of the season, the Lyme-Old Lyme High School varsity soccer girls defeated East Lyme 3-0 at East Lyme High School for the first time in school history. The Wildcats are coached by Paul Gleason with Assistant Coaches Allyson Gleason and Jeremy Kiefer.

The Wildcats gather in their famous huddle before the game begins.

Senior captain Keelin Hurtt scored two goals assisted respectively by Mya Johnson and Kaylee Armenia. The ‘Cats third goal was unassisted by senior captain Maddie Ouellette.

Emily Rivera was in goal for Old Lyme where she made 13 saves.

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Registration Open Through Today for Madhatters December Production

Madhatters Theatre Company is registering for their December production of ‘Scrooged, with a twist.’  Registration is open to students age 6-18 years.  Rehearsals begin on Saturdays in September at Lyme’s Youth Service Bureau in Old Lyme.

Performance week is Dec. 11-17 at Chester Meeting House in Chester.  Registration is open through Sept. 8.

For further information and to register, email: madhattersctc@aol.com or call (860) 395-1861  www.ctkidsonstage.com/madhatt

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Cappella Cantorum Concert Registration Scheduled for Monday

Cappella Cantorum Men’s Chorus by Madeleine Favre of Deep River.

Registration and first rehearsal for Cappella Cantorum’s 2017 Christmas concert will be Monday, Sept. 11, at 7 p.m. at John Winthrop Middle School, 1 Winthrop Rd., Deep River. No auditions are required.

All are welcome to join Cappella Cantorum and its new director, Simon Holt, to prepare for the Dec. 2 concert. Holt is also the artistic director of the Salt Marsh Opera and director of music at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme. He joins Cappella in its 48th year.

The program will feature Bach’s Cantata #140 (“Sleepers Wake”), Rutter’s “Gloria” and Vaughan Williams’ “Fantasia on Christmas Carols.”

Registration fee is $40; music is $20. Late registration will be Sept. 18, same time and place. Use the rear entrance.

For more information or to register in advance, visit www.CappellaCantorum.org.

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Reading Uncertainly: ‘Payoff’ by Dan Ariely

What is “motivation” and how does it affect our daily activity? Is motivation “central to our lives”? Dan Ariely, a professor of behavioral economics at Duke University, explores the human feeling of identification with and empathy for others, suggesting these two feelings help stimulate motivation, while their absence destroys it.

This brief book (103 pages) combine stories from Dr. Ariely’s personal life and his continuing work studying our strange behaviors. It continues his earlier work: Predictably Irrational, The Upside of Irrationality, and The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty, all of which I’ve read with fascination.

At the very start, the author describes his own teenage accident in Israel, in which he sustained severe burns over some 70 percent of his body, leading to three years of hospitalization and slow and painful recovery. It was then he began to discover the idea of motivation, enlarged later when he helped a friend’s two teenage children, similarly injured.

As he writes, “I also realized how many of our motivations spring from trying to conquer a sense of helplessness and reclaim even a tiny modicum of control over our lives.” Any success in such an effort becomes a “feeling of accomplishment.” This then leads to the need to “look closely at the positive side of motivation,” creating pleasure and affection for your own handiwork.

But does financial reward motivate us? Ariely suggests “money matters far less than we think.” We should avoid “overemphasizing the countable dimension and beware (my italics) treating the uncountable dimension as if it were easily countable.” This skewers the old adage that if you can’t count it, it doesn’t exist!

He continues: “In short, these findings suggest that when we are in the midst of a task, we focus on the inherent joy of the task, but when we think about the same task in advance, we over-focus on the extrinsic motivators, such as payment and bonuses. This is why we are not good predictors of what will motivate us and what will crush our motivation. This inability to intuit what will make us happy at work is sad.” Trust and goodwill seem to be far better inspirations than cash … Is it possible that large bonuses are actually counterproductive?

Dr. Ariely concludes: “We are certainly far from grasping the full complexity of motivation, but the journey to understand  … (its) nuances … (is) exciting, interesting, important and useful.”

As usual, brevity enhances comprehension. A short book motivates continued reading!

Editor’s Note: ‘Payoff ‘ by Dan Ariely is published by TED Books, New York 2016.

Felix Kloman

About the Author: Felix Kloman is a sailor, rower, husband, father, grandfather, retired management consultant and, above all, a curious reader and writer. He’s explored how we as human beings and organizations respond to ever-present uncertainty in two books, ‘Mumpsimus Revisited’ (2005) and ‘The Fantods of Risk’ (2008). A 20-year resident of Lyme, he now writes book reviews, mostly of non-fiction that explores our minds, our behavior, our politics and our history. But he does throw in a novel here and there. For more than 50 years, he’s put together the 17 syllables that comprise haiku, the traditional Japanese poetry, and now serves as the self-appointed “poet laureate” of Ashlawn Farms Coffee, where he may be seen on Friday mornings. His wife, Ann, is also a writer, but of mystery novels, all of which begin in a bubbling village in midcoast Maine, strangely reminiscent of the town she and her husband visit every summer.

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Cournoyer Named LOL Schools 2016-17 ‘Teacher of the Year’

On an unseasonably cold day, Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools sailed smoothly into the 2017-18 academic year today with both a new principal and assistant principal — Mark Ambruso and Noah Ventola respectively — in charge at LOL Middle School.

The middle school is also home to the LOL Schools ‘Teacher of the Year’ Patricia Cournoyer, who was “crowned” yesterday at the All-School Administration, Faculty, and Staff Convocation. A popular choice, Cournoyer has been the physical education and health teacher for more than 10 years at the middle school and interacts with all students at each grade every year.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Non-Certified Employee of the Year Eileen Griswold stands with Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Business Manager Holly McCalla, and Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser.

Eileen Griswold, who works in the Business Office was named Non-certified Employee of the Year at the same event.

Asked his aspirations for the new school year, Ian Neviaser, Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent, responded, “We are excited for another year of new learning, growth, and development in the Lyme-Old Lyme Schools. It is our intention to continue on the path of success that has been our standard for many years. We are excited to welcome all of our students back to campus to continue the tradition of excellence that has become synonymous with Lyme-Old Lyme.”

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Rogers Lake Drawdown to Begin After Labor Day

Every leap year, Rogers Lake is scheduled to be lowered in the fall so that landowners can perform any maintenance at the waters edge. But this did not happen in 2016 due to the drought.

Because of this, the drawdown will take place this fall (2017) as follows:

  • The drawdown will start after Labor Day and the full drawdown of a maximum of 14 inches should occur by mid-September.
  • The drawdown will be maintained from mid-September to Nov. 1.

The Rogers Lake Authority can be contacted at Rogers-Lake-Authority@googlegroups.com

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Lyme-Old Lyme Troop 26 Boy Scouts Conquer ‘Swamp Base’ in Louisiana

These intrepid Lyme-Old Lyme Troop 26 Boy Scouts and Scot Leaders attended ‘Swamp Base’ in July of this year. From left to right, (front row) Brooke Smith, Swampbase guide; Mike Miller, Theodore Wayland, Dennys Andrades, Maxwell Bauchmann, and Peter Bauchmann; (back row)  Mark Wayland, John Miller, Evan St. Louis, and Mary Powell-St.Louis.

Editor’s Note: This personal account of the Swamp Base 2017 experience was submitted by Life Scouts Evan St. Louis and Theodore Wayland.

The steady lapping of our oars was only interrupted as we had to lean back in our canoe seats to avoid low branches, while we were keenly observed by the alligators swimming by …

On July 7, Lyme-Old Lyme Boy Scout Troop 26 became the first ever Connecticut troop to attend the Boy Scouts of America High Adventure called Swamp Base. This program is based at the Atchafalaya Swamps in southern Louisiana. On the day of our arrival, our crew of five scouts and four adult leaders visited the nearby town of Lafayette, to sample local cuisine and to become acclimated to the local temperature and humidity. 

The next day, our first full day in the area, we traveled to a historical region called Vermilionville and learned about the Acadian culture of southern Louisiana. We met our guide for the trip, Brooke, a sophomore at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette (ULL.) That night we thoroughly checked all our equipment and provisions then fell fast asleep in the ULL dorms.

Cypress groves stand tall in the Henderson Swamp.

Our swamp venture began very early that next morning as we drove to a spot at the start of a canal and launched our canoes. The canal went on for 4.4 miles. At the end of the canal, it seemed as though there was a wall of trees, and that section of paddling was aptly called “The Wall” by our guide. That area was perhaps the most challenging section of the whole trip. There were trees and shrubs very close together, and you had to stay in the middle of the waterway to avoid wasp nests.

Thankfully, we made it through this section unscathed and there were no wasps anywhere else on the trip.

After the narrows opened up into the Henderson Swamp, there was much more room to maneuver. The first day we traveled 19.3 miles to houseboats where we would be sleeping. The Henderson swamp had areas where the Cypress trees were logged over 100 years ago, and any trees that are left were considered the runts back then.

Our houseboat captain gave a fascinating overview on the alligators of the Bayous, and their role in the environment. At this point, we had seen enough alligator behavior to realize that they are more scared of us then we were of them, and would try to avoid us.

The next morning, we had an exciting airboat tour of the outlying areas of Henderson Swamp where cypress trees grew in groves. It truly is amazing that the Cypress trees can grow in over six feet of water. After all of the beautiful sights on the airboat tour, it would be back to traveling under our own power.

This day we would cover 10.3 miles; however, after paddling only about a mile from the houseboats, we had to portage our canoes over a levee. This portage was 900 feet long and over the 25-foot-tall levee, but with the extra weight of gear and canoes, it felt much longer. The late morning heat was near its peak adding to the challenge of this portage. After that, the paddle was nice and slow with a wide-open waterway, with plenty of shade from the heat.

That night, we slept on Rougarou Island in hammocks covered with mosquito-netting. The Rougarou was a creature similar to a werewolf in the legends of the Laurentian French communities – fortunately there were no modern versions present during our trip! We also had a blowgun contest with very basic materials – this was fun, but may not have provided us too much security if a Rougarou showed up.

Our next day of paddling was 14.4 miles and not too difficult, but the wildlife was probably the most diverse that we saw throughout our trip. We saw a wide variety of birds and plants in different areas, and quite a few alligators, the most on any day of our journey. Midday of this paddle, it began pouring with rain, and there was an interesting sight of the giant raindrops bouncing on the water as they hit it, but multiplied millions of times. This was the point we were really glad to have dry bags, so none of our gear got wet.

After the rain stopped, we still had to cross two lakes, which were strenuous, but we knew how close Island Outpost was, our final stop. Once we arrived, the Boy Scout crew that had arrived the previous day helped us get our canoes onto the dock. On Island Outpost, there were showers, and clean water was readily available. We would be sleeping in cabins for two nights, on bunks in rustic cabins, after enjoying our jambalaya dinner prepared for us. 

Catfish for dinner!

The next day at Island Outpost we had no paddling and enjoyed other relaxing activities including swimming, boating, and paddle boarding. There were fishing trips by boat, and setting out catfish jug lines. After later checking the jug lines to harvest our catch, we enjoyed a catfish fry that would be a side to gumbo for dinner with plentiful Cajun spice to notch up the heat.

The morning of the last day, we woke up before 5 a.m. to be able to see the sunrise at 6:13 a.m. on Sandy Cove from a great vantage point. We were in the water at about 5:30 a.m. and started immediately. We made it to the outlook point just in time, because within a minute of us arriving, the top of the sun had started to peek above the horizon. It was definitely worth waking up for, to see the sun climb up into the sky rapidly.

A beautiful early morning view of the bayou.

After eating breakfast on the water, we continued paddling, trying to get to the next scheduled portage early before it got too hot. We went in between ancient Cypress trees on the edge of Lake Fausse  Pointe. There were a few alligators there that were very close to us. It was fabulous here too in terms of both the view and the overall cleanliness of the area.

The second portage was easier than the first, except for the very end. The end of the second portage, behind the levee, was referred to as the “Swamp Stomp” – an area several hundred-feet long where there was thick mud and certain areas of waist-high water that we had to wade through pulling our canoes. Once we were through the Swamp Stomp, we came out onto a chilly river.

This part of our trek was the easiest, because there was a current that carried us almost the whole way to the end of our journey. We had gone swimming off the canoes from time to time on previous days of the trip, but with this current it was not necessary to paddle as much, and at this time it was much more refreshing and enjoyable to be in the water.

The conquerers of Swamp Base High Adventure 2017 stand with paddles in hand at the end of their successful journey.

At the end of our paddling adventure, we had completed 61.6 miles of canoeing the swamps and lakes of this amazing area over five days. We had a sense of accomplishment at completion, and all of us agreed if offered the chance to conquer the Swamp again, we would be there! 

Y’all come back now, won’t ya?!

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Encore Opportunity for Public to Explore I-Park’s 2017 Site-Responsive Art Trail Today


EAST HADDAM
— I-Park is re-opening the 2017 Site-Responsive Art Trail for a second public viewing. The event will be today, Saturday, Aug. 26, from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. with a rain date of Sunday, Aug. 27. Although the artists will not be onsite for the exhibition, 11 of the 12 installations created during the May residency will be represented.

For additional information, write events@i-park.org or call 860-873-2468.

I-­Park is an artists-in-residence program offering fully-funded, four-week residencies in visual arts, architecture, moving image, music composition/sound art, creative writing and landscape/ecological design. Since its founding in 2001, I-­Park has sponsored more than 800 residencies, and has developed cross-­disciplinary projects of cultural significance and brought them into the public domain.

I-­Park’s 450-acre campus encourages dialogue between the natural and built environments, and has been the setting for exhibitions, performances, symposia, and programs that facilitate artistic collaboration.

For more information, visit i-­park.org.

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Marc Black Plays 50s, 60s Music in Summer Concert Tonight at Lyme Library

Marc Black will play at Lyme Public Library Aug.
25. All are welcome and admission is free.

Marc Black plays ‘Music of the 50s and 60s’ on Friday, Aug. 25, at 7 p.m. at Lyme Public Library, 482 Hamburg Rd./Rte. 156, Lyme, CT.

Black presents the history of the 50s and 60s through the lens of popular music of the time.  This is an engaging, humorous program in which the audience will relive this colorful time in our history.  This is a second return engagement.  Black has performed at the library for the last two years and both performances were standing room only.  

Call to register at (860) 434-2272 or email programreg@lymepl.org

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Elected Officials, Candidates, Potential Candidates Turn Out for Annual Lyme DTC Picnic

Congressman Joe Courtney and Lyme Selectman Candidate John Kiker at the LDTC picnic. Photo by Shauna MacDonald.

Congressman Joe Courtney, Secretary of State Denise Merrill, State Representative Matthew Lesser,  two potential 2018 gubernatorial candidates – Jonathan Harris and Chris Mattei – along with District 33 probate judge candidate Jeannine Lewis and Lyme First Selectman Steve Mattson were among the speakers at the Annual Lyme Democratic Committee (DTC) Picnic held this past Saturday, Aug. 19.  The event was emceed by John Kiker, the Democratic candidate for Lyme selectman, at the Sunset Hill Vineyard.

The speakers addressed the need to turn out Democrats for the upcoming municipal elections on Nov. 7 and to more actively engage local Democrats year round in their state and local governments.  Lewis, Mattson and Kiker are all up for election in November in Lyme as, respectively, District 33 probate judge, first selectman and selectman.

Lyme First Selectman Steve Mattson (2nd from left) and District 33 Probate Judge Candidate Jeannine Lewis (speaking) at the LDTC picnic. Photo by Shauna MacDonald.

Mattson said, “As we move toward this November’s election, I believe this is the message you will hear. Get involved in your town.  Love your town.  That is the reason I agreed to run for first selectman and I know John shares the same objective as he runs for selectman.”

Kiker said he hoped to encourage more residents to actively participate in discussions and decisions that could potentially affect the town – by serving on and attending the meetings of our boards, commissions and committees – so Lyme remains the beautiful, historic community it is.

The Lyme DTC’s mission is to support and strengthen the Democratic Party in the Town of Lyme and the State of Connecticut.  The committee meets on the third Thursday of every month at 7:30 p.m. in the Lyme Town Hall. The meetings are open to the public and all registered Democrats are encouraged to attend.

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Rockfall Foundation Invites Nominations for Local Environmental Champions

The Rockfall Foundation is seeking nominations for the 2017 Environmental Awards, which recognize individuals, organizations, and businesses for environmental efforts that contribute to the quality of life in the Lower Connecticut River Valley. Two categories of awards include the Distinguished Service Award and Certificates of Appreciation in the areas of preservation, conservation, restoration, or environmental education.

Awardees are recognized at the Rockfall Foundation’s annual meeting and grants celebration in November. Nominations must be submitted by September 15, 2017 and a form can be downloaded at www.rockfallfoundation.org or one can be requested by calling 860-347-0340.

Founded in 1935 by Middletown philanthropist Clarence S. Wadsworth, the Rockfall Foundation is one of Connecticut’s oldest environmental organizations. The Foundation supports environmental education, conservation and planning initiatives in the Lower Connecticut River Valley through public programs and grants.
In addition, the Rockfall Foundation operates the historic deKoven House Community Center that offers meeting rooms and office space for non-profit organizations.

For additional information about the 2017 Environmental Awards or the Rockfall Foundation, visit www.rockfallfoundation.org or call 860-347-0340.

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Youth Soccer Registration Now Open With Old Lyme Parks & Recreation

Photo by Peter Glaser on Unsplash

The Fall Soccer Program is now open to Old Lyme residents. Teams are co-ed and are grouped by grade as follows: 

  • Pre-K (Ages 3-4)        
  • Grade K          
  • Grade 1         
  • Grade 2/3           
  • Grade 4/5

All games/sessions will be held at Town Woods Park. Pre K and Grades K-1  Instructional Soccer sessions will be held on Saturday mornings. Games for Grades 2-3 and Grades 4-5 will be held on Saturday mornings and these teams will practice on the field prior to their game.

Registration will be closed and forms must be received by Thursday, Sept. 7Forms are available at the Old Lyme Town Hall and on the Old Lyme Town Hall website. Note that Lyme Residents must sign-up with Lyme Parks & Recreation. Lyme and Old Lyme players will be combined on teams at the coaches meeting.

Teams will be formed at the Tentative Coaches Meeting on Saturday, Sept. 9The meeting will be held at the OL Town Hall Meeting Room. 

  • Pre-K, Grade 1 and 2 Coaches will meet at 9 a.m. 
  • Grades 2-3 and 4-5 coaches will meet at 10 am.

Coaches will be contacted by Old Lyme Parks & Recreation prior to the meeting to confirm the date and times of the meeting.

The tentative schedule is Saturday mornings from Sept. 16-Oct. 28, 2017. Coaches will call with details after the Teams have been formed and the schedules are made. Volunteer coaches are essential to the success of the Program. Your help is needed and appreciated.

For further information, contact Old Lyme Parks and Recreation Director Don Bugbee at 860.434.1605, ext. 235  or parkrec@oldlyme-ct.gov

Link to Parks and Recreation for schedules, cancellations and general information are on the Parks & Recreation page of the Old Lyme Town website. Programs are listed by season.

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Last Day to Enjoy 116th Hamburg Fair, See the Famed ‘Ox Pull’ at 9am

Midway Carnival rides, animal exhibits, food concessions, pony rides, oxen-pull, crafts, kids games and top local musicians are among the favorite attractions for visitors attending the annual Hamburg Fair, now celebrating its 116th year.

Hosted by The Lyme Grange, the fair takes place rain or shine Friday Aug. 18, 5 to 10:30 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 19, 9 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. and Sunday, Aug. 209 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 1 Sterling City Rd., Lyme, Conn. (located at the intersection of Rte. 156 and across from Reynolds’ Subaru.)

General admission to the fair is $7 per person, children up to age 12 are free.   Senior Citizens and Active Service men and women $5 per person (ID required).  Tickets are available for purchase at the entrance and free parking is offered on and nearby the site.

The three-day, family-friendly fair showcases many agricultural fair traditions including entries and exhibits for farm, animal, crafts, fruits, vegetables and more.  The intimate size of the fair makes for easy navigation, parking and crowd control.

Young fairgoers will enjoy children’s games offered on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., which will include a watermelon-eating contest, face-painting, three-legged race and prize winning contests.  Visitors are invited to watch the traditional pony- and horse-pulls on Saturday at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. and the oxen-pull on Sunday morning at 9 a.m.

Free on-stage music talent and entertainment is a growing Hamburg Fair highlight.  From country to pop, fiddlers to funk, there is something for everyone who enjoys live music.  The fair kicks off Friday evening music with performances in the amphitheater from country music favorites Katie Perkins and Branded.

See many local young artists hosted by Music Now and Nightingale’s Showcase on Saturday afternoon including; Connected, Sophie Spaner, Jake Kulak and Braiden Sunshine.  Saturday evening features local headliners Plywood Cowboy followed by Shiny Lapel Trio.  Sunday afternoon concludes with the tradition of bluegrass and fiddling by Eight Mile River Band and the Old Time Fiddlers.

The full music entertainment line-up is as follows:

Friday

  • 6:00-8:00pm: Katie Perkins
  • 8:30-10:30pm: Branded

Saturday

  • 1:00pm -5:45pm: Music Now/Nightingale’s Showcase – Up and coming local talent
    • 1:00-1:10: Rossi Sisters
    • 1:20-1:40: Galen Donovan
    • 1:45- 2:05: Chris Gregor
    • 2:10-2:30: Ciara Klimaszewski
    • 2:35-2:55: Chloe Morgan
    • 3:00-3:20: Sophie Spaner
    • 3:25-3:45: Greta Stroebel
    • 3:55-4:30: Conn3cted
    • 4:45-5:45: Jake Kulak and the Lowdown with special guest  Braiden Sunshine
  • 6:00-8:00pm: Plywood Cowboy
  • 8:30- 10:30pm: Shiny Lapel Trio

Sunday

  • 12:00-1:30pm: BlueGrass Duo
  • 1:45-3:00pm: Eight Mile River Band
  • 3:00-6:00pm: The Old Time Fiddlers

Each year the Hamburg Fair honors a cherished community member.  The 116th Hamburg Fair is dedicated in memory of Marita Knutson Rand, who proudly supported her community as a member and secretary of the Lyme Grange #147 and served as Hamburg Fair Committee Chairman and gatekeeper for over 30 years.  Knutson Rand was well known in the community through her involvement in Lyme Girl Scouts, Sunday school teaching at the First Congregational Church of Lyme, American Legion Auxiliary, Lymes’ General Store as a partner and Old Lyme Pharmacy Gift as shop manager for 35 years.

Highlighted sponsors of the Hamburg Fair include Reynolds’ Subaru, Hamilton Point Investments, GeoMatrix, Essex Savings Bank, Connected Systems, Guilford Savings Bank, Bogaert Construction, Middlesex Hospital, Lyme Public Hall Association, Wind River Environmental, Maddy Mattson Coldwell Banker, Block Design Build, Sapia Builders, Ring’s End, New England Power Equipment and Tiffany Built.

Visit www.hamburgfair.org for fair schedule, exhibit entry, and more information.  The 116th Hamburg Fair is hosted by Lyme Grange #147 and organized by many local volunteers to build community relationships and create lasting family memories.

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