October 17, 2017

‘I Hate Musicals: The Musical’ Opens at Ivoryton Playhouse

Equity member Stephen Wallem plays the lead in Ivoryton Playhouse’s upcoming production of  “I Hate Musicals: the Musical.”

Simpsons’ television writer and producer Mike Reiss is back in Ivoryton with his hilarious world premiere of I Hate Musicals: The Musical. It’s the story of a cranky comedy writer trapped in the rubble of an LA earthquake.  His life is playing out before his eyes in the form of a musical — and he hates musicals …  With numbers sung by everyone from Sigmund Freud and Satan, will he learn to be less cranky?

Previews for I Hate Musicals: The Musical begin Sept. 27 and then the show opens at the Playhouse Sept. 29 and runs through Oct. 15.

Stephen Wallem*, a SAG Award-nominated actor best known as Thor Lundgren for seven seasons on the Emmy-winning Showtime series “Nurse Jackie”, will lead the cast as Alvin, the comedy writer. Stephen worked as a stage actor and After Dark Award-winning cabaret singer in Chicago before moving to New York to make his television debut on “Nurse Jackie.” Other television appearances include Randall on Louis CK’s surprise limited series “Horace and Pete” and Chad on “Difficult People.”

I Hate Musicals: The Musical features new music composed by Walter Murphy, composer of the 70’s classic A Fifth of Beethoven (which was included in the soundtrack of Saturday Night Fever. The play is one man’s zany ride through relationships with mothers and fathers, analysts and wives and with a host of surprising characters making unexpected appearances. Ultimately, the story is a traditional one about life, love, show business, and the importance of being kind.

Reiss, who is writer and producer for the long running TV show, The Simpsons, also created the animated series The Critic; the webtoon Queer Duck and worked on the screenplays for Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs; Horton Hears a Who!; The Simpsons: The Movies; and, My Life In Ruins. Ivoryton audiences turned out in droves in the June 2013 for his hilarious play, I’m Connecticut, which was a huge popular and critical success and Comedy is Hard in September of 2014 with Micky Dolenz and Joyce DeWitt.

Directed by James Valletti, the cast includes Playhouse favorite R. Bruce Connelly*, and Will Clark, Sam Given*, Amanda Huxtable*, Ryan Knowles*. The set design is by Dan Nischan, lighting by Marcus Abbott and costumes by Elizabeth Cipollina.

Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.

Tickets are $50 for adults, $45 for seniors, $22 for students and $17 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org  (Group rates are available by calling the box office for information.) The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

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Musical Masterworks Opens New Season, Oct. 21-22

Artistic Director Edward Arron will emcee the first Musical Masterworks concerts on Oct. 21 and 22.

As Musical Masterworks opens its 27th season of chamber music, the organizers are pleased to be introducing a number of internationally-acclaimed new artists to this series, as well as welcoming back Musical Masterworks veterans, such as Chee Yun on violin, Todd Palmer on clarinet and Jeewon Park on piano.

The season’s first concerts are Saturday, Oct. 21, at 5 p.m. and Sunday, Oct. 22, at 3 p.m. at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, an acoustically rich venue for chamber music. 

Edward Arron, Musical Masterworks Artistic Director, described how special the series is to him, “I take great comfort knowing that, after all of these years, Old Lyme, Conn., remains a sanctuary for the magnificent art of chamber music.  As time passes, I feel more strongly than ever that the arts are an indispensable part of a healthy society, and a necessary escape from the constant distractions of the fast-paced world in which we live.”

Musical Masterworks’ season runs October 2017 through April 2018.  To purchase a series subscription ($150 each), a mini-subscription ($100 each) or individual tickets ($40 individual; $5 student), visit Musical Masterworks at www.musicalmasterworks.org or call 860.434.2252.

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Old Lyme Soccer Girls March On Undefeated

Photo by Peter Glaser on Unsplash

Paul Gleason’s Old Lyme soccer girls defeated Old Saybrook 3-0 at home today. Lydia Tinnerello was first to score and Mya Johnson followed up with two goals. There were no assists.

Emily Rivera was in goal for Old Lyme and had two saves. Kelsey True was in net for Old Saybrook with six saves.

Old Lyme is 6-0-0 overall and 3-0-0 in the Shoreline.

The following are brief reports from each game that has contributed to the Wildcats’ current unbeaten record.

On Wednesday, Old Lyme defeated East Hampton 4-0 at Lyme-Old Lyme High School. Kaylee Armenia had two goals, Maddie Ouellette had two goals and one assist, while Caroline Wallace added an assist.

Emily Rivera was in net for Old Lyme with three saves and Emma Cook was in net for East Hampton, also with threee saves.

Old Lyme defeated Westbrook at Westbrook High School last Friday, Sept. 15, 6-0. Mya Johnson was the first to score in the first half with an assist from Maddie Ouellette. Ciara Klimaszewski scored three goals; one in the first half unassisted and two in the second half assisted by Britney DeRoehn and Colleen Walsh. Grace Lathrop scored unassisted in the first half and Maddie Ouellette scored unassisted in the first half.

Emily Rivera and Emma McCulloch were in goal for Old Lyme with one save each.

On Sept. 12, Old Lyme defeated Morgan 2-0 at Lyme-Old Lyme High School. Maddie Zrenda scored the first goal assisted by Mya Johnson in the first half. Emily DeRoehn scored the second goal in the second half assisted by her sister Brittany DeRoehn.

In goal for Old Lyme was Emily Rivera who had seven saves. In goal for Morgan was Rebecca Cockley with nine saves.

Go Wildcats!

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Lyme Fire Company Hosts 61st Annual Steak Dinner & Fundraiser, Oct. 21

The Lyme Fire Company will hold its 61st Annual Steak Dinner & Fundraiser on Saturday, Oct. 21, from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Hamburg Fire Station,213 Hamburg Road (Route 156) in Lyme, Conn.

The cost is $25 for adults and $8 for children, age 12 and under. All are welcome.

For more information, contact Tom Davies at (860) 526-9292.

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Lyme Land Trust Executive Director George Moore to Retire, Search for Replacement Underway

George Moore, Lyme Land Trust Executive Director, has announced his retirement.

George Moore, the Land Trust’s Executive Director for the last five years, has announced that he will be retiring when his replacement can be brought on board.

Land Trust President John Pritchard made the announcement and said, “The Land Trust is deeply grateful for George’s service and dedication over the last 14 years. He was elected to the Land Trust Board as a volunteer director in 2003. In 2007, he was elected Board President, and in 2013 the Board appointed him as its first Executive Director. Through his vision and effective management, George has helped transform the Land Trust into one of the most active and successful in the State.

Prichard noted that among his many accomplishments – in addition to the day-to-day management of the Land Trust — are building the Land Trust’s membership to the point that it represents half the households in Town; the acquisition of numerous preserves on his watch, including Chestnut Hill, Walbridge Woodlands, Banningwood and most recently, Brockway- Hawthorne; assisting with securing the coveted national accreditation from the Land Trust Alliance; initiating the President’s Circle composed of the Land Trust’s most generous supporters; arranging for the production of the PBS film on the Land Trust and conservation in Lyme, as well as its sequel, The Rest of the Story (both of which can be viewed here); and organizing and managing the Land Trust’s highly successful annual fundraiser, a regionally recognized, fun and scenic biking event for all ages and abilities: the Tour de Lyme.

The Land Trust has commenced a search for a new Executive Director. Potential applicants for the position can find the job description and application process at the following link: http://www.lymelandtrust.org/employment-opportunities/

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Collins of Old Lyme Named a ‘Best Lawyer in America’ … Again

Attorney John A. Collins, III of Suisman Shapiro.

John A. Collins, III of Old Lyme has again been selected by his peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America® 2018. Collins is an attorney specializing in the field of Personal Injury Litigation at Suisman Shapiro Attorneys at Law in New London.

Two of Collins’s fellow attorneys at Suisman Shapiro, Matthew E. Auger and Robert B. Keville , were also named in the Best Lawyers listing — Auger in the practice area of Medical Malpractice Law and Keville in the area of Workers’ Compensation Law.

Since it was first published in 1983, Best Lawyers® has become universally regarded as the definitive guide to legal excellence. Best Lawyers lists are compiled based on an exhaustive peer-review evaluation. Lawyers are not required or allowed to pay a fee to be listed; therefore, inclusion in Best Lawyers is considered a singular honor. Corporate Counsel magazine has called Best Lawyers “the most respected referral list of attorneys in practice.”

“For more than a third of the century,” says CEO Steven Naifeh, “Best Lawyers has been the gold standard of excellence in the legal profession.” President Phil Greer adds, “We are extremely proud of that record and equally proud to acknowledge the accomplishments of these exceptional legal professionals.”

Collins has successfully obtained verdicts or public settlements up to $10 million on behalf of injured victims over a 30-year law practice. He currently serves as the Managing Partner of Suisman Shapiro. The Connecticut Bar Foundation honored Attorney John A. Collins, III, in 2005 with his selection as a Life Fellow. “Selection as a Fellow requires demonstrated superior legal ability and devotion to the welfare of the community, state and nation, as well as to the advancement of the legal foundation”. Source: Connecticut Bar Foundation.

Auger handles serious personal injury cases, including wrongful death claims, automobile collisions, slip and falls, medical malpractice, nursing home negligence and product liability. Mr. Auger is a Board Certified Civil Trial Advocate with the National Board of Trial Advocacy. He is also a Captain in the Judge Advocate General Corps of the United States Naval Reserve and is a Judge of the Gaming Disputes Court for the Mohegan Tribe of Indians in Connecticut.

Keville is a Director who concentrates in Worker’s Compensation and Civil Litigation. Mr. Keville is a member of the Connecticut Bar, both State and Federal. He is also a member of the Connecticut Trial Lawyers Association. Mr. Keville’s practice focuses on the representation of injured workers in State and Federal Worker’s Compensation forums, as well as serious personal injury claims. He has tried numerous cases to conclusion and has appeared before various Appellate tribunals, up thru and including the State of Connecticut Supreme Court.

Editor’s Note: Suisman Shapiro Attorneys-at-Law is the largest law firm in eastern Connecticut. It is located at 2 Union Plaza, P.O. Box 1591, New London CT 06320. Phone: (860) 442-4416. For further information, visit www.suismanshapiro.com

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Musical Masterworks, Community Music School Announce Scholarship Recipient from Old Lyme

From left to right, Alden Murphy and Abigail Nickell stand with Musical Masterworks scholarship winner Giovanna Parnoff at the piano.

Musical Masterworks and Community Music School are pleased to announce the recipient of the first Musical Masterworks Scholarship in Honor of Nancy D. Thomas.

Giovanna Parnoff, already an accomplished pianist and exceptional sixth grade student from Old Lyme, was presented with the scholarship by Alden Murphy, President of Musical Masterworks and Abigail Nickell, Executive Director of Community Music School.

“We are so pleased to honor Nancy’s memory with an award to one of her very own students, in partnership with another of her most beloved arts organizations.’ said Nickell.  Nancy Thomas was a devoted staff member of Musical Masterworks for nearly 25 years.   “It is particularly fortuitous that Giovanna, as a life-long student of Nancy Thomas, is the first winner of this scholarship; we couldn’t be more pleased,” added Murphy.

Giovanna has attended The Community Music School since she was six months old. She discovered her love of music through Kindermusik and Kate’s Camp programs and eventually started individual piano instruction under the tutelage of Nancy Thomas at the age of 3.

She has received perfect scores at the New London Piano Festival organized by the Middlesex/New London Chapter of the Connecticut State Music Teacher’s Association. Giovanna is a member of Mensa and Intertel, two high IQ societies and was recently inducted into the Junior Mensa Honor Society for her academic performance, leadership skills and volunteerism/community service.

Giovanna has been accepted into Duke University’s Talent Identification Program, Stanford University’s Gifted and Talented Program, and Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth. She is a competitive foil fencer, and has been coached for six years by the Fencer’s School of CT.

Giovanna is an award-winning poet, having seen her work published in “The Mensa Bulletin” and “The Young American Poetry Digest.” She lives in Old Lyme with her parents, Dr. John Parnoff and Ms. Monique Heller, and her younger sister, Mattea, who is also a piano student at The Community Music School.

The Musical Masterworks Scholarship in Honor of Nancy D. Thomas provides the tuition for a middle school student to take music lessons, 30 minutes each, for one full year at Community Music School.  The scholarship will be awarded annually for the next four years.  To be eligible, the candidate must be a student of classical voice or instrumental music and reside in Middlesex County or New London County.

Community Music School offers innovative music programming for infants through adults, building on a 34-year tradition of providing quality music instruction to residents of shoreline communities. CMS programs cultivate musical ability and creativity, and provide students with a thorough understanding of music so they can enjoy playing and listening for their entire lives.  Learn more at www.community-music-school.org or call 860.767.0026.

Musical Masterworks brings to Southern New England world-class chamber music performances and outreach programs which attract, entertain, and educate a diverse audience. Now planning its 27th season, Musical Masterworks offers five weekends of performances from October through May in Old Lyme.  Learn more by visiting www.musicalmasterworks.org or by calling 860.434.2252.

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Wildcat X-Country Teams Start Season with Second Place Overall in Blue Dragon Invitational

The LOLHS Cross-Country girls came in first place overall in the Blue Dragon Invitational.

In a terrific start to the season, the Lyme-Old Lyme High School Cross-Country team placed second Wednesday in the Overall Girls/Boys Division in the Blue Dragon Invitational in Portlad, Conn., which was their first meet of the new academic year.

The LOLHS Cross-Country boys came in second overall.

The girls team came first overall out of 14 teams while the boys placed second out of 24 teams.

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Letter to the Editor: Do Old Lyme Republicans Embrace the National Republican Agenda?

To the Editor:

As you consider Republican candidates in local elections, it should be questioned whether these candidates endorse the national platform of bigotry, ignorance and hypocrisy. The SECT association of RTCs campaign kickoff featured keynote speaker Michelle Malkin, whose latest book suggests that the Japanese internment camps of the 1940s should be reinstituted for our Muslim citizens.

Do SECT voters trust leaders supported by a party that denies climate change, when the shoreline has the most to lose ? Do SECT voters support leaders whose party denies the value of scientific investigation and seeks to deny healthcare for millions of Americans, particularly when some of our biggest employers are engaged in scientific research to cure disease ?

In Old Lyme, our community has opened our hearts, our wallets and our attics to welcome two Syrian refugee families to our community. Are we going to embrace leaders who have endorsed platforms of bigotry and hate ?

Before you decide that racist agendas are not in our backyard, ask if you are willing to take a risk on someone beholden to the Republican party, whose campaign kickoff event has already shown where their allegiance lies.

Sincerely,

Candace Fuchs,
Old Lyme.

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Old Lyme Girls Crush East Lyme 3-0, First Win in Wildcat History Over Vikings

Senior Captain Keelin Hurtt races towards the goal in Saturday’s game against East Lyme.

In their first game of the season, the Lyme-Old Lyme High School varsity soccer girls defeated East Lyme 3-0 at East Lyme High School for the first time in school history. The Wildcats are coached by Paul Gleason with Assistant Coaches Allyson Gleason and Jeremy Kiefer.

The Wildcats gather in their famous huddle before the game begins.

Senior captain Keelin Hurtt scored two goals assisted respectively by Mya Johnson and Kaylee Armenia. The ‘Cats third goal was unassisted by senior captain Maddie Ouellette.

Emily Rivera was in goal for Old Lyme where she made 13 saves.

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A La Carte: Apricots and Almonds Make Great Galette!

Apricot and Almond Galette

My mother always wanted to live in San Diego, but as far as she got was Troy, NY.

She was born in the beginning of the 20th century, died in the beginning of the 21st century and was buried in an ecumenical cemetery not more than 20 blocks or so from where she lived her whole life.  San Diego, she said, correctly, had the perfect climate: fairly sunny, warm in the daytime and cooler at night. No snow ever.

For me, almost any season is okay. I like the autumn smell of wood smoke in the air and in winter, curling up with two cats as I read long, meandering novels. Spring never seems to linger too long and, now, we bid adieu to summer.

No matter the season, I love to cook. I am still having such fun with all the summer vegetables. I eat two or three tomatoes a day. I am grilling zucchini and summer squash outside or sautéing them with a little butter and garlic and salt on the cooktop in the kitchen. Last night I roasted a spaghetti squash, then tossed the innards with chopped tomatoes, basil and a little butter. Today I will make a frittata with sweet peppers for a 9:30 am meeting at my house.

Next weekend I will make a little dessert with fresh peaches and almonds. The recipe below, from calls for apricots, but any stone fruit will do.

Apricot and Almond Galette

From Bon Appetit, June, 2017

Yield: 4 servings

One-half cup blanched almonds
One-third cup sugar, for more for sprinkling
1 large egg
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
One-half teaspoon almond extract (optional, but I do love almond extract)
One-half teaspoon pure vanilla extract
Pinch of salt
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour (plus more for surface)
1 package frozen puff pastry, preferably all-butter, thawed
12 apricots (about 1 and one-quarter pound), halved and pitted (or other stone fruit, quartered if large)

Place a rack in middle of oven and preheat to 425 degrees. Pulse almonds and one-third of sugar in a food processor until very finely ground. Add egg and pulse to combine. Add butter, almond extract (if using), vanilla extract, salt and 1 tablespoon flour; pulse until almond cream is smooth.

Roll out pastry on a lightly floured surface just enough to smooth out any creases.

If you are using a package of pastry than as 2 sheets, stack and roll out to a one-quarter- to one-third rectangle.

If your package contains a single 16-inch to 10-inch sheet of puff pastry, halve it crosswise and roll out one half on a lightly floured surface until rectangle is one-quarter to one-third inch thick, saving remaining half for another use. Transfer to a parchment-lined (or Silpat-lined) baking sheet. Fold over edges of pastry to make a one-half inch border around sides. Prick surface all over with a fork (this keeps the pastry from rising too much when baked and helps it cook through. (Spread almond cream over pastry, staying inside borders. (Chill dough in the freezer for a few minutes if it becomes too soft to work with.) Set apricots, cut sides up, on top of the cream. Sprinkle lightly with sugar.

Bake until pastry is golden brown and puffed, 15 to 20 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 325 degrees and continue to bake until pastry is deep golden brown and cooked through and apricots are softened and browned in spots, 15 to 20 minutes longer.

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Tickets Now Available for 44th Season of Collomore Concerts in Chester

The Claremont Trio opens the 44th season of the Collomore Concerts on Sept. 24.

CHESTER — For its 44th season, the Robbie Collomore Music Series will offer all four of its concerts in the fall, between Sept. 24 and Nov. 26. These will be on Sundays at 5 p.m. in the historic and charming Chester Meeting House. It is now the time to buy your season subscription.

Beginning the season, on Sunday, Sept. 24, is the Claremont Trio, brought to Chester as the Barbara and Edmund Delaney Young Artists Concert. Called “one of America’s finest young chamber groups,” these three young women have performed worldwide to great acclaim, both as a trio and as individual soloists. One reviewer wrote, “Their exuberant performance and gutsy repertoire… was the kind of fresh approach that keeps chamber music alive.” Their Chester concert will feature sonatas by Bach, Debussy, Britten and Rachmaninoff.

Internationally renowned Jason Vieaux and Julien Labro pair up on classical guitar and bandoneon on Oct. 15.

In recent years, Jason Vieaux and Julien Labro have thrilled Collomore Concert audiences separately – Jason playing classical guitar in a solo concert and Julien playing accordion with the Detroit Hot Club. When the Collomore committee heard they had joined forces touring, playing the guitar and bandoneon, they jumped at the opportunity to have them return to Chester on Sunday, Oct. 15.  You can expect something “entertaining, fun, exciting, virtuosic in the unusual pairing of these two instruments. The program contains some modern classical, world music from Brazil and Argentina, and even some pop music.”

Latin Jazz comes to Chester on Nov. 5, with the Curtis Brothers Quartet featuring Ray Vega, percussionist.  The Curtis Brothers Quartet takes bold steps towards a modern Latin Jazz sound, fearlessly pushing their musical approach into new territories. Their unique rhythmic concept is what separates them from most other jazz quartets. All of their music, original or not, is based on the percussive concepts that they have accumulated through their various musical experiences.

And on Nov. 26, the soulful songs of the Gullah culture will be brought to life by Ranky Tanky, a five-piece band of native South Carolinians who mix the low country traditions with large doses of jazz, gospel, funk, and R&B. They’ve been called “infectious, intoxicating and exotic” with
“frisky and hypnotic rhythms with a bone-deep mix of spirituals and gutbucket blues.”

Buy a season subscription now and save money, plus you’ll be certain you will have a seat even when a concert is sold out. A subscription to all four concerts is just $98. Individual concert tickets cost $28. For students from elementary through graduate school, a subscription is $15 ($5 per concert). Tickets and subscriptions can be purchased online at www.collomoreconcerts.org using PayPal. All ticket-holders are invited to stay for a reception after the concert to meet the performers. For more information, check the website or call 860-526-5162.

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Reading Uncertainly: ‘Payoff’ by Dan Ariely

What is “motivation” and how does it affect our daily activity? Is motivation “central to our lives”? Dan Ariely, a professor of behavioral economics at Duke University, explores the human feeling of identification with and empathy for others, suggesting these two feelings help stimulate motivation, while their absence destroys it.

This brief book (103 pages) combine stories from Dr. Ariely’s personal life and his continuing work studying our strange behaviors. It continues his earlier work: Predictably Irrational, The Upside of Irrationality, and The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty, all of which I’ve read with fascination.

At the very start, the author describes his own teenage accident in Israel, in which he sustained severe burns over some 70 percent of his body, leading to three years of hospitalization and slow and painful recovery. It was then he began to discover the idea of motivation, enlarged later when he helped a friend’s two teenage children, similarly injured.

As he writes, “I also realized how many of our motivations spring from trying to conquer a sense of helplessness and reclaim even a tiny modicum of control over our lives.” Any success in such an effort becomes a “feeling of accomplishment.” This then leads to the need to “look closely at the positive side of motivation,” creating pleasure and affection for your own handiwork.

But does financial reward motivate us? Ariely suggests “money matters far less than we think.” We should avoid “overemphasizing the countable dimension and beware (my italics) treating the uncountable dimension as if it were easily countable.” This skewers the old adage that if you can’t count it, it doesn’t exist!

He continues: “In short, these findings suggest that when we are in the midst of a task, we focus on the inherent joy of the task, but when we think about the same task in advance, we over-focus on the extrinsic motivators, such as payment and bonuses. This is why we are not good predictors of what will motivate us and what will crush our motivation. This inability to intuit what will make us happy at work is sad.” Trust and goodwill seem to be far better inspirations than cash … Is it possible that large bonuses are actually counterproductive?

Dr. Ariely concludes: “We are certainly far from grasping the full complexity of motivation, but the journey to understand  … (its) nuances … (is) exciting, interesting, important and useful.”

As usual, brevity enhances comprehension. A short book motivates continued reading!

Editor’s Note: ‘Payoff ‘ by Dan Ariely is published by TED Books, New York 2016.

Felix Kloman

About the Author: Felix Kloman is a sailor, rower, husband, father, grandfather, retired management consultant and, above all, a curious reader and writer. He’s explored how we as human beings and organizations respond to ever-present uncertainty in two books, ‘Mumpsimus Revisited’ (2005) and ‘The Fantods of Risk’ (2008). A 20-year resident of Lyme, he now writes book reviews, mostly of non-fiction that explores our minds, our behavior, our politics and our history. But he does throw in a novel here and there. For more than 50 years, he’s put together the 17 syllables that comprise haiku, the traditional Japanese poetry, and now serves as the self-appointed “poet laureate” of Ashlawn Farms Coffee, where he may be seen on Friday mornings. His wife, Ann, is also a writer, but of mystery novels, all of which begin in a bubbling village in midcoast Maine, strangely reminiscent of the town she and her husband visit every summer.

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Rep. Carney Applauds the Passage of a New Opioid Bill Signed on ‘International Overdose Awareness Day’

State Rep. Devin Carney (R-23rd) stands at left as Governor Malloy signs the new opioid bill.

State Representative Devin Carney (R-23) attended a bill signing of Public Act 17-131, An Act Preventing Prescription Opioid Diversion and Abuse at the Hartford Public Library on Thursday, Aug. 31. Joining him were many legislative colleagues, local officials and advocates, who all stood in support of the legislation that seeks to curb the growing opioid crisis in Connecticut.

This ceremonial bill signing took place as the state took part in “International Overdose Awareness Day.”

From Jan. 1, 2015 through Aug. 2, 2016, Connecticut recorded 800 deaths due to overdose. The bill, which passed the House of Representatives unanimously expands upon legislation passed in 2016 and 2015, and includes some of the following aspects:

  • Instructs the Alcohol and Drug Policy Council to convene a working group to study substance abuse treatment referral programs that have been established by municipal police departments to refer persons with an opioid use disorder or who are seeking recovery from drug addiction to substance abuse treatment facilities;
  • Reduces the maximum opioid drug prescription for minors from 7 days to 5 days and maintains current law that allows a prescribing practitioner to exceed the limit for chronic pain, palliative care or acute pain if necessary as long as it is documented in the medical record
  • Requires individual and group health insurers to cover medically necessary detox treatment, as defined by American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) so that those looking for help cannot be turned away due to insurance issues;
  • Increases data sharing between state agencies regarding opioid abuse or opioid overdose deaths;
  • Increases security of controlled substances prescriptions by requiring scheduled drugs be electronically prescribed;
  • Allows patients to file a voluntary non-opioid form in their medical records indicating that they do not want to be prescribed or administered opioid drugs.

“Today, I was proud to stand with both Republicans and Democrats alongside Governor Malloy to enact bipartisan legislation that will help in the fight against opioid addiction. Opioid addiction is something that affects every community in our state, including every town within the 23rd District,” said State Rep. Devin Carney, continuing, “While drug addiction is not new, the addition of fentanyl into the equation is causing people from across the state to lose their lives at an alarming rate.”

Carney added, “Everyone, including me, knows someone who has been affected by drug addiction, whether it’s a parent, child, grandchild, or friend and I believe our society must continue working to battle this or we will continue to see lives taken far too soon.”

He noted, “I applaud the State of Connecticut for being a leader in this area and legislators from across the political spectrum for joining together to work towards solutions in an attempt to combat this growing epidemic. I also want to thank those within my community who have worked so hard to educate, communicate, and share their stories about drug addiction.”

Connecticut is expected to see more than 1,000 accidental drug-related deaths in 2017.

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Cournoyer Named LOL Schools 2016-17 ‘Teacher of the Year’

On an unseasonably cold day, Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools sailed smoothly into the 2017-18 academic year today with both a new principal and assistant principal — Mark Ambruso and Noah Ventola respectively — in charge at LOL Middle School.

The middle school is also home to the LOL Schools ‘Teacher of the Year’ Patricia Cournoyer, who was “crowned” yesterday at the All-School Administration, Faculty, and Staff Convocation. A popular choice, Cournoyer has been the physical education and health teacher for more than 10 years at the middle school and interacts with all students at each grade every year.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Non-Certified Employee of the Year Eileen Griswold stands with Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Business Manager Holly McCalla, and Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser.

Eileen Griswold, who works in the Business Office was named Non-certified Employee of the Year at the same event.

Asked his aspirations for the new school year, Ian Neviaser, Lyme-Old Lyme Schools Superintendent, responded, “We are excited for another year of new learning, growth, and development in the Lyme-Old Lyme Schools. It is our intention to continue on the path of success that has been our standard for many years. We are excited to welcome all of our students back to campus to continue the tradition of excellence that has become synonymous with Lyme-Old Lyme.”

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Rogers Lake Drawdown to Begin After Labor Day

Every leap year, Rogers Lake is scheduled to be lowered in the fall so that landowners can perform any maintenance at the waters edge. But this did not happen in 2016 due to the drought.

Because of this, the drawdown will take place this fall (2017) as follows:

  • The drawdown will start after Labor Day and the full drawdown of a maximum of 14 inches should occur by mid-September.
  • The drawdown will be maintained from mid-September to Nov. 1.

The Rogers Lake Authority can be contacted at Rogers-Lake-Authority@googlegroups.com

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A la Carte: When it’s Humid and Hot, Salmorejo Hits the Spot

Salmorejo

Yes, it has been humid and hot, hot, hot.

Usually at this point in late summer, I am sort of done with the beach. Last Saturday I went out to dinner with friends and to see a movie (“Wind River” is terrific. Don’t miss it.). Because we  had decided to go to see the movie in Mystic, although it is not our favorite destination cinema hall (don’t like the recliners that don’t “recline” our legs), we had wine at my condo before the movie.

Nancy mentioned that I was pretty tan and had I been at the beach that afternoon. “No,” I explained, “this was pretty much left over from my four days at the New Jersey shore. Anyway, it was too hot to go to the beach,.”

As September begins to beckon, I think about cooking. Sure, I cook during the summer, but I grill meats, vegetables and desserts on my Weber, prepping salad and eating inside. Of course, produce is gorgeous this time of year and, finally, there are tomatoes.

Last week I stopped at Becky’s in Waterford and bought tomatoes, beets and a pint of those yellow cherry tomatoes. Maybe they are called Sun Gold. In any case, I ate the full pint by the time I got off I-95.

Last night I looked over my new issue of Food & Wine, the issue about Spain. I looked up the recipes and found one for a tomato soup. It sounded divine. I had enough tomatoes to double the recipe. It should be served cold. I love cold soup, especially when the weather is still sticky and hot, so I would happily eat it for a couple of days. And the recipe uses no heat, just a blender.

Salmorejo

From Food & Wine, September, 2017

Yield: serves 4

2 and one-half pounds vine-ripened tomatoes, cored and chopped
One-half pound rustic white bread, crust removed, cubed (2 and one-half cups)
2 garlic cloves
1 teaspoon sherry vinegar
One-quarter cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for serving, if you like
Kosher salt
2 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and chopped
One-half cup chopped serrano ham (prosciutto will do nicely)

In a blender, puree the chopped tomatoes with the bread, garlic, vinegar and one-half cup of water at high speed until very smooth. about 1 minute. With the blender on, drizzle in the one-quarter cup of oil until incorporated. Season with salt, Cover and refrigerate until the soup is cold, at least 30 minutes.

Divide the soup among 4 bowls. Garnish with chopped eggs and ham, then drizzle with olive oil and serve.

Make ahead: The soup can be refrigerated for up; to 2 days.

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Old Lyme Town Hall Gets a Facelift

Painters from Martinez Painting work on the upper sections of Old Lyme Town Hall.

During 2007-2008, Old Lyme’s Memorial Town Hall was renovated and an addition built, providing ADA accessibility and mechanical upgrades as well as expanded space. The results pleased both staff and visitors but that was nearly 10 years ago, and in some areas, the paint on the older portion of the facility failed to adhere.

It also became apparent that many of the plantings along the building were too close to the exterior siding and this, in combination with the passage of time, caused a number of areas of rot and deterioration.

The front entrance of the Old Lyme Town Hall is being refreshed with a new coat of paint.

This summer, the exterior of the building was power-washed and the deteriorated skirt and corner boards (which contained lead-based paint) were removed. These latter will be replaced with material that resists rot and is appropriate for use at or near ground level.

All remaining surfaces will be scraped, encapsulated and will receive two coats of fresh paint.

Even the flag pole gets a fresh coat of paint!

The contractor for project, which started Aug. 1 and should be completed by Sept. 10, is Martinez Painters of Clinton, Conn. 

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Elected Officials, Candidates, Potential Candidates Turn Out for Annual Lyme DTC Picnic

Congressman Joe Courtney and Lyme Selectman Candidate John Kiker at the LDTC picnic. Photo by Shauna MacDonald.

Congressman Joe Courtney, Secretary of State Denise Merrill, State Representative Matthew Lesser,  two potential 2018 gubernatorial candidates – Jonathan Harris and Chris Mattei – along with District 33 probate judge candidate Jeannine Lewis and Lyme First Selectman Steve Mattson were among the speakers at the Annual Lyme Democratic Committee (DTC) Picnic held this past Saturday, Aug. 19.  The event was emceed by John Kiker, the Democratic candidate for Lyme selectman, at the Sunset Hill Vineyard.

The speakers addressed the need to turn out Democrats for the upcoming municipal elections on Nov. 7 and to more actively engage local Democrats year round in their state and local governments.  Lewis, Mattson and Kiker are all up for election in November in Lyme as, respectively, District 33 probate judge, first selectman and selectman.

Lyme First Selectman Steve Mattson (2nd from left) and District 33 Probate Judge Candidate Jeannine Lewis (speaking) at the LDTC picnic. Photo by Shauna MacDonald.

Mattson said, “As we move toward this November’s election, I believe this is the message you will hear. Get involved in your town.  Love your town.  That is the reason I agreed to run for first selectman and I know John shares the same objective as he runs for selectman.”

Kiker said he hoped to encourage more residents to actively participate in discussions and decisions that could potentially affect the town – by serving on and attending the meetings of our boards, commissions and committees – so Lyme remains the beautiful, historic community it is.

The Lyme DTC’s mission is to support and strengthen the Democratic Party in the Town of Lyme and the State of Connecticut.  The committee meets on the third Thursday of every month at 7:30 p.m. in the Lyme Town Hall. The meetings are open to the public and all registered Democrats are encouraged to attend.

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Letter to the Editor: First Selectmen Candidates Should Focus on Positive Future for Old Lyme, Not Negative Past

To the Editor:

This November Old Lyme will be having a municipal election. Either the incumbent Bonnie Reemsnyder, a Democrat, will prevail, or Judith Read, a Republican, will become First Selectwoman.

I am a native born resident of Old Lyme, and have happy memories of spending summers riding my bike, having ice cream at James Pharmacy ( a dime bought you a generous scoop of vanilla, chocolate or strawberry), and listening to katydids.. Old Lyme is a special place where civility and responsible citizenship can still prevail, and change is slow and measured ever since it was established as a “plantation” in the 1665 Loving Parting agreement with Saybrook Colony.

In my opinion, civility and openness is needed more than ever in this forthcoming election. It troubles me when I hear sotto voce that Bonnie did nothing about possible train tracks running through the center of town, or cares nothing about our beach communities, or about improvements on Halls Road.  I have been at meetings convened by our First Selectwoman at which these serious matters were discussed. The 85 page report sent to the DOT attests to her hard work at getting qualified professionals to weigh in on a poorly conceived route for express train tracks.

Wouldn’t it be refreshing if we went back to the League of  Women Voters forums (remember them?) where the candidates outline specific plans for the Town, not what evil things the other candidate has done to destroy the Town. Perhaps we could get national news coverage which would be beamed directly to Capital Hill in Washington. Old Lyme could even set a trend for problem-solving. As my grandchildren might say “what a concept”.

Sincerely,

Alison C. Mitchell,
Old Lyme.

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