December 13, 2017

Lyme-Old Lyme High School Announces Quarter 1 Honor Roll

Lyme-Old Lyme High School Honor Roll
Quarter 1   2017-18

High Honors

Grade 12: Samantha Barretta, Cassandra Burrows, Erin Cornelius, Jacob Coverdale, Matthew Crisp, Anna Donato, Adam Drummond, Kayla Elliott, Hope Femia, Samuel Fuchs, Jace Funaro, Keelin Hurtt, Liam Johnston, Lauren King, Maeve Kolb, Cora Koproski, Sarah Kwon, Jordan Lewis, Bilal Malik, Claudia Mergy, Lauren Mitchell, Shannon Nosal, Emma Pennie, Katherine Pettersen, Julia Ritchie, Emily Rivera, Caroline Sirna, Emma Sked, Julia Smith, Reed Spitzer, Gabriel Stephens-Zumbaum, Felicia Sutton, Bianca Tinnerello, Ryan Wallace, Caroline Wholean, Ellie Wiese, Hannah Wisner, Erik Zawodniak, Madeline Zrenda

Grade 11: Kathryn Atkinson, Catherine Battalino, Lauren Birk, Casey Blue, Mackenzie Blue, Gary Bocian, Claire Britton, Ann Cote, Emma Danes, Britney DeRoehn, Corey Drummond, Grace Edwards, Olin Frederiks, Zachary Gidius, Grace Gilbert, Emily Grenier, Kylie Hall, Colin Hallahan, Ada Harjunpaa, Sarah Hayward, Liam Holloway, Aoife Hufford, Ciara Klimaszewski, Sophie Kyle, Joshua Liefeld, John Manthous, Brynn McGlinchey, Hannah Morrison, Jacob Olsen, Katherine Reid, James Rollins, Olivia Rugg, Noah Rumm, Kellie Sablone, Caroline Sagristano, Anna Sather, Robert Sedlatschek, Peter Sherman, Carson Swope, Emily Tan, Colleen Walsh, Alexander Williams

Grade 10: Alexandra Alpha, Anabella Arias, Emily Balocca, William Bartlett, Emma Bass, Audrey Berry, Rory Cavicke, Daisy Colvin, Elizabeth Cravinho, Isabel Dean-Frazier, Arianna DelMastro, Maria Denya, Julia DiMella, Raymond Doll, Theodore Enoch, Araselys Farrell, Nicholas Fava, Leah Fouquette, Jada Fuentes, Katherine Funaro, Tanner Griffin, Sophia Griswold, Caroline King, Renate Kuhn, Rachael Larson, Brenna Lewis, Connor Maguire, Jacqueline Malizia, Melissa Mauro, Thomas McCarthy, Ryan McTigue, Dylan Mulligan, Chandler Munson, Kyle Myers, Samantha Olson, Sofia Pecher-Kohout, Jenna Porter, Jared Ritchie, Jane Scheiber, Taylor Sedlatschek, Brady Sheffield, Garrett Smith, Emily Speckhals, Olivia Stack, Haley Stevens, Julia Stout, Philip Sweeney, Lydia Tinnerello, Kiera Ulmer, Megan VanSteenbergen, Theodore Wayland, Trevor Wells, Clair Wholean, Anna Williams, Maggie Wisner, Conner Wyman, Katherine Zelmanow

Grade 9: Paige Alpha, Kaylee Armenia, Sophie Arnold, Juliette Atkinson, Rachel Barretta, Olivia Bartlett, Maxwell Bauchmann, Ava Berry, Emma Boardman, Sadie Bowman, Kyuss Buono, Kate Cheney, Emerson Colwell, John Cox, Megan Cravinho, George Danes, Bianca Dasilva, Emily DeRoehn, Francette Donato, Corah Engdall, Sadie Frankel, Fiona Frederiks, Schuyler Greenho, Emma Griffith, Michael Guillet, Catharine Harrison, Alayna Hettick-Harlow, Isabella Hine, Steven Jette, Regan Kaye, Paige Kolesnik, Grace Lathrop, Owen Macadam, Mackenzie Machnik, Madelyn Maskell, Brendan McTigue, Marina Melluzzo, Michael Milazzo, Riley Nelson, Sophia Ortoleva, Connie Pan, Olivia Papanier, Gavin Porter, Jacob Quaratella, Hayden Saunders, Tait Sawden, Jesper Silberberg, Tessa St.Germain, Lian Thompson, Angus Tresnan, Lauren Wallace, Kelly Walsh, Alison Ward, Ellery Zrenda

Honors

Grade 12: Maggy Biega, Cara Cahill, Charlotte Carmody, Anna Catlett, Samantha Caulkins, Rose Cheney, Brendan Cowee, Matthew Cushman, Samuel Frankel, Audrey Gavin, Michaela Giannotti, Natalie Golden, Morgan Greenho, Gillian Holloway, Mikela Jacobson, Heather McGrath, Christopher Munger, Amanda Murphy, Madeline Ouellette, Olivia Scott, Collin Stalls, Mason Swaney, Alexander Swanski, Marieke Warlitz, Abigail Zelmanow

Grade 11: Teresa Allan, Kendall Antoniac, Paige Britton, Liam Clark, Tyler Clark, Lily Cox, Thomas Creagan, Miles Cutler-Stamm, Andy Espinal, Kate Hickie, Mya Johnson, Andrea Kathe, Jillian Kus, Elyza Learned, Peter Macadam, Alexander Montville, Nicholas Myers, Emily O’Brien, Thomas Pennie, Julia Reynolds, Jenny Ritchie, Quinn Romeo, Nicholas Roth, Eli St.Germain, Griffin Standish, Adam Syed

Grade 10: Faith Brackley, Chloe Cahill, Madison Cann, Ethan Carrion, Faith Caulkins, Emilia Cheesman, Brandon Cheng, Ty Dean, Samuel Dushin, Brian Funk, Lucy Gilbert, Kamber Hamou, Connor Hogan, Parker Hubbard, Lauren Huck, Jeffy Joshy, Daniel Kendall, Elizabeth McCarthy, Jonathan Nichele, Samantha Owen, Colby Sides, Summer Siefken, Evan St.Louis, Olivia Tetreault, Taylor Thompson, Sydney Trowbridge, Aedan Using, Katelyn Wells

Grade 9: Colbe Andrews, Emily Ashton, Sonia Bair, Michael Battalino, Hunter Collins, Jackson Cowell, Axel Cruz, Patrick Dagher, Trube Dean, Jackson Goulding, Samantha Gray, Lillian Grethel, Aryn Jones, Elle McAraw, Emma McCulloch, Emma Meekhoff, Timothy O’Brien, Lauren Pitt, Aidan Powers, Ethan Rivera, Kassidy Standish, Katrina Wallace, Avery Welch

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Legal News You Can Use: Smartphones May be Causing More Car Accidents


Suisman Shapiro Sponsored Post — Traffic safety advocates believe that smartphones are causing more deadly car accidents in Connecticut and across the U.S., but new federal statistics show that distracted driving deaths actually declined in 2016. What is going on?

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, only 448 people were killed in smartphone-related car crashes in 2015. That number dipped even further last year. However, traffic fatalities significantly rose the past two years, and a closer look at the data shows that half of all traffic deaths in 2015 involved cars that were driving straight ahead, rather than veering off the road due to weather or a blowout.

Safety experts believe that indicates that some drivers may have been distracted by their phones and simply plowed into something directly in front of them. This hunch correlates with numbers showing that pedestrian, bicyclist and motorcyclist deaths have risen sharply in recent years. For example, pedestrian fatalities rose 21.9 percent between 2014 and 2016. Over the same period, bicyclist and motorcyclist deaths jumped 15.2 and 15.1 percent, respectively. Meanwhile, studies show that smartphone use by drivers has continued to increase.

So why aren’t more traffic fatalities being classified as being smartphone-related? Experts say that some police investigators are overly focused on other accident causes, such as drunk-driving or speeding. Another problem is that it can be difficult to prove that a smartphone was responsible for a crash.

Car crashes caused by distracted drivers are a major problem in Connecticut. Individuals who are injured by a distracted driver have the right to pursue compensation in court. With the help of an attorney, it may be possible to obtain a settlement that covers medical expenses and other losses that have been sustained.

Source: Bloomberg, “Smartphones Are Killing Americans, But Nobody’s Counting“, Kyle Stock, Oct. 17, 2017

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Wildcats Win! Defeat Holy Cross 2-1 in Class S State Final After Double Overtime

Three-peat! Paul Gleason’s Wildcats celebrate their third consecutive state championship victory. Photo by Hildie Heck.

After ending regular time in their state championship game against Holy Cross at 1-1, Old Lyme had to endure two 15-minute periods of overtime. Finally (and thankfully!), Mya Johnson scored the winning goal with just 4 minutes 47 seconds left on the clock.

The Wildcats held on to win their third state championship in as many years.  Johnson was subsequently named MVP of the game.

Old Lyme went down 1-0 to a penalty following a hand-ball in the box after 14 minutes in the second half, but bounced back seven minutes later with a goal by Maddie Oullette on a rebound after a shot from way out by Maddie Zrenda.

Read a full report of the game by Ned Griffen and published Nov. 18 on TheDay.com at this link.

Read a story about Wildcat goalie Emily Rivera by Vicke Fulkerson and published Nov. 19 on TheDay.com at this link.

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Lyme-Old Lyme HS Students Host Rousing Veteran’s Day Assembly, Filled With Emotion

Last Friday, when many public schools gave students a vacation day in honor of Veterans Day, Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools took a different approach. With students attending school for a full day, LOL Schools chose to honor veterans in their community in a highly respectful and meaningful morning of ceremonies that begin in Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School with a hearty breakfast.  After a ceremony there, the veterans moved to the Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) where, after a short reception, they were ushered into the school’s auditorium.

After a welcome by Assistant Principal Jeanne Manfredi, colors were presented and then Emma Sked led the Pledge of Allegiance and asked for a moment of silence in honor of all the nation’s veterans.

Senior Emily Rivera (pictured above) gave opening remarks in which she spoke fondly of her life as the child of military parents and how her dream now is to pursue a career in the US Air Force.

Lyme-Old Lyme Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post #1467 Commander Larry Olsen (right in photo above) was the first guest speaker. He described the origin of Veterans Day and spoke of his deep pride in the strength and integrity of the American military.  Olsen went on to present LOLHS student Alex Williams (left in photo above) with the Voice of Democracy Essay Award and Williams then read an excerpt from his essay.

The screening of a poignant video titled, “A Soldier’s Story,” featuring Old Lyme resident James Keenan followed. A deep hush fell over the auditorium as Keenan described his experience in World War II’s European area of operations in which he initially fought and was then captured, held under horrific conditions in a prison camp, transported in a truck packed with other prisoners almost to the point of suffocation for three long days and nights, before ultimately being liberated by the Allies.

After Brynn McGlinchey and Bella Hine had read the names of the fallen from Lyme and Old Lyme in all wars from World War I onwards, the band changed the somber tone of the proceedings when they struck up the Armed Forces Salute.  Members of each branch of the military stood when their respective part of the Salute was played.

At the end of the music, Caroline LeCour proudly stepped forward to introduce her grandfather, Morris LeCour (pictured below), who offered his own remembrances of his military service.

Following  a spirited rendition of ‘America The Beautiful’ by the combined LOLHS chorus and band, all the individual veterans present were acknowledged one by one.

The colors were retrieved and as the color guard climbed the auditorium stairs, physics teacher and US Navy veteran Glenn Elliott (pictured above) proudly saluted.

After the ceremony, Manfredi (left in photo above) took the opportunity to chat with Emily Rivera (right) and her parents, while each veteran filed out and was presented with a gift bag as a remembrance of the day.

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‘Deck The Walls’ on View at Lyme Art Association Through Jan. 5, 2018

‘Mountain Views’ by Thomas Adkins, oil on linen, is one of the featured works on view in the ‘Deck the Walls’ exhibition at the LAA.

The Lyme Art Association’s annual festive art exhibition and sale is their Deck the Walls holiday show, which is on view through Jan. 5, 2018. There will be an opening reception on Friday, Nov. 17, from 5 to 7 p.m. that is free to the public and will feature live music. All painting purchases from 5 p.m. on Nov.17, through 5 p.m. on Nov. 18, will be tax-free. More than 200 original works of art by member artists will be on display and priced to sell as holiday gifts.

Celebrating Lyme’s Beauty, featuring paintings created during this fall’s paint out at Molson’s Pond, will be on exhibition in the Goodman Gallery.

“For Deck the Walls, the Lyme Art Association features a wide variety of appealing subjects at affordable prices that are great for holiday shopping. We hope to help solve those gift giving dilemmas – a beautiful piece of artwork is always appreciated!” says Jocelyn Zallinger, Gallery Manager.

The Lyme Art Association is open Wednesday through Sunday, from 10 am – 5 pm, and by appointment. The Lyme Art Association is located at 90 Lyme Streetin Old Lyme, at the corner of Halls Road. Call (860) 434-7802 for more information, or visit www.lymeartassociation.org.

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Honoring Those Who Serve … or Served

Firing a three-round salute to honor all US Veterans.

Despite the bitterly cold weather last Friday, a brief but touching ceremony to honor the nation’s veterans was held outside Old Lyme’s Memorial Town Hall led by members of the Lymes’ Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post #1467.

Larry Olsen, Commander of Post #1467, (at left in photo above) gave introductory remarks and offered prayers.  He was joined by fellow VFW members in uniform, the newly-re-elected Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder (in white jacket in photo above) and a number of local townspeople.

A three-round salute was fired and then a Lyme-Old Lyme High School student (in red jacket in photo below) played ‘Taps’ followed by a second student playing the echo.

Finally, when the ceremony was concluded, the veterans were no doubt relieved to go into the town hall for some well-earned refreshments … and warmth!

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Reemsnyder, Nosal Re-elected; Kerr Takes Third Spot on Old Lyme Board of Selectmen,

Incumbent Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder and Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal hug after both were announced respectively as the top two vote-getters in the board of selectmen race.  Both therefore retain their seats.

Democrat Bonnie Reemsnyder swept to a fourth term as Old Lyme Selectwoman with a convincing 1,520 votes over her Republican opponent Judith Read, who polled 1,248 votes. Noting, “It was quite a race,” Reemsnyder commented, “We had a formidable campaign, [against a] formidable opponent. I would not take her [Read’s] candidacy lightly.”

Incumbent selectwoman, fellow Democrat Mary Jo Nosal, received the second highest number of votes with 1,478 while Republican Chris Kerr took 1,266 votes. Since Kerr received more votes than Read, he will take the third spot on the board of selectmen vacated by selectman Arthur “Skip” Sibley, who chose not to run again.  Reemsnyder spoke highly of Kerr saying that since he has served on the board of finance for many years, “He’s familiar with what’s going on.”  Nosal added, “I’m looking forward to working with Chris.”

A smiling Bonnie Reemsnyder celebrates her election to a fourth term as Old Lyme First Selectwoman with BJ Bernblum (right) who was also re-elected to the board of finance. Chris Kerr (rear, left) was elected to the board of selectmen and becomes its newest member.

Having stood outside the polling station since 5:30 a.m., an exhausted Reemsnyder was clearly pleased with the result declaring, “I am very excited — I’m delighted to be continuing to serve Old Lyme.”

Similarly, Nosal summed up her feelings in one word, “Exhilarated. “She added, “I’m very happy.  We had a fabulous team that worked so hard.”  Finally, Nosal expressed thanks to, “All the voters who came out to support us,” while also noting, “Judy ran an excellent race.”

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Mattson Re-elected as Democrat First Selectman in Lyme Joined by Newcomer Kiker; Lord Also Re-elected, Wayland Loses Seat

Steven Mattson

After learning the results of today’s municipal election, Lyme First Selectman Steven Mattson, who received 553 votes, and newly elected Selectman John Kiker (435 votes) issued the following statement:

“We would like to thank the people of the Town of Lyme for electing us to the board of selectmen.  We are grateful to have the opportunity to serve you and work on your behalf for the next two years.

“We look forward to working with Parker Lord (507 votes) on the board of selectmen to:

  • recruit good, experienced townspeople to serve on town boards, commissions and committees, and train them to help lead our town into the future;
  • strengthen our town’s communications on important news, issues and decisions, and explain how residents can take advantage of available opportunities to voice their support or concerns; and
  • ensure important town decisions include a thorough explanation of applicable regulations and residents’ concerns.

“We want to thank all of the many volunteers who helped out – including our peers on the Lyme Democratic Town Committee – for an excellent job running our campaign and encouraging residents to turn out to vote. 

“We were delighted to learn that Lyme voters chose Jeannine Lewis as their choice for District 33 Probate Judge – and eagerly await the final election results for our district.

“We love this town and want to help keep it the way it is – beautiful, historic and sparsely developed.  We look forward to contributing meaningfully to its future.  Thank you.”

Republican First Selectman candidate Mark Wayland received 398 votes.

The Lyme DTC’s mission is to support and strengthen the Democratic Party in the Town of Lyme and the State of Connecticut.  The committee meets on the fourth Thursday of every month at 7:30 p.m. in the Lyme Town Hall (barring holidays or other necessary schedule changes). These meetings are open to the public and all registered Democrats are encouraged to attend.

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Country School Runners Enjoy Record-Breaking Season

From left to right are Kayla Uzwiak, 8th Grader from Killingworth; Ryan Wei, 8th Grader from East Lyme; and Conor Selfor, 8th Grader from Old Saybrook.

MADISON — While local public high school cross country teams have been building toward their championship races, The Country School’s cross country team has been quietly compiling a season record for the girls of 33 wins and only one loss and 35 wins and four losses for the boys. This is the best record for cross country at the PreSchool-8th Grade Madison independent school since it began offering the sport 20 years ago.

The team competes this Saturday in the Connecticut Middle School State Championships at Wickham Park in East Hartford. Many student-athletes are also looking forward to the Junior Olympics cross country state championship, set to take place on November 12. In years past, dozens of Country School athletes have gone on to qualify for Regional Junior Olympics Championships, with several going on to Nationals, including one, Robbie Cozean of Madison, now a sophomore at Xavier High School, who earned All America status three times and finished 2nd in the United States.

The Country School serves 214 students between the ages of 3 and 14, and with only eight boys and seven girls running cross country, its Middle School teams are typically the smallest teams competing in any race. Head of School John Fixx attributes the success of their athletes to many factors, among them, dedication. The team holds optional practices two or more times a week throughout the year during the off-season, including the summer, while practicing five and even six days a week during the fall cross country season. Inevitably, the entire team shows up, with younger running enthusiasts, and even some parents, opting to join in.

Seen here in action are, from left to right, Christopher Yuh, Madison; Gabriel Goodwin, Old Lyme; Liam Boone, Clinton, and Sam Duffy, Madison.

Another factor is school culture. At The Country School, running is regarded as an activity that is fun, inclusive, and open to all ages. The program begins as early as Kindergarten, when interested runners join a group known as the Flying Owlets, a nod to the school’s mascot, an owl. More than 35 students participate in Flying Owlets, with practices taking place a few times a week. They also have opportunities to compete in road races, Junior Olympics, and other venues. As older students and younger students train alongside each other, more seasoned runners are able to model teamwork and persistence for younger runners. It is not unusual to have a 6-year-old 1st Grader running alongside and listening to a 13-year-old 8th Grader talk about the effort it takes to run repeat 200s or a “ladder” workout on the track.

With a history of strong cross country and excellent academics, the school also has the advantage of attracting strong students who are also strong runners. This year, for example, Conor and Margaux Selfors joined the school, entering 8th and 7th Grades respectively. The siblings, from Old Saybrook, have placed at or near the top in multiple races this fall, adding depth and leadership to the team.

The talent on the team is also homegrown. Eighth Grade co-captain Ryan Wei from East Lyme, a top place finisher in several races this year, has attended The Country School for several years, rising up through the running ladder, and Robbie Cozean, the school’s most successful runner ever, began in PreKindergarten. In addition to his successes at The Country School and at Junior Olympics National, Robbie was named All-Courant Cross Country Runner of the Year as a freshman at Xavier.

In addition to Robbie at Xavier, several Country School runners have gone on to compete at the high school level, making their mark at Choate Rosemary Hall, Pomfret, Westminster, Guilford High School, Daniel Hand, Hamden Hall, St. Paul’s, Cheshire Academy, and Avon Old Farms.

Training so many runners, and working with such a wide age span of athletes, requires many coaches, and The Country School is fortunate to have a team of experienced runners and educators leading the effort. In addition to Head of School Fixx, a former cross country and track captain of Greenwich High School and Wesleyan University who founded the Country School cross country team with Jordan Katz, a former student, 20 years ago, the team benefits from the likes of Laura Morrison. A recent and very fast graduate of SUNY Fredonia who now runs for Southern Connecticut State University, where she is attending graduate school during the evenings, Laura oversees The Country School’s after-school program and also coordinating TEDxTheCountrySchool. Spanish teacher Blair Balchunas, a frequent road racer and half marathoner, is another inspiring member of the coaching staff. Organizational genius and great rapport with runners all ages comes from Beth Coyne, Country School Dean of Student Life and Secondary School Counselor.

Founded in 1955, The Country School is an independent, coeducational day school serving students from across the Shoreline. In addition to a rigorous academic program that seeks to educate the whole child through active, hands-on learning, The Country School is committed to vital offerings in the arts and athletics. Athletic contests are played on the school’s new, state-of-the-art outdoor complex, featuring two full-sized athletic fields, four tennis courts, a basketball court, and the cross country course through the woods that flank the 23-acre campus. The campus is a frequent host for athletic events, including a recent nine-school cross country meet. Although the student body is small in number, The Country School has a long tradition of athletic and academic excellence. This year alone, more than 20 Country School alumni are competing on teams at colleges across the country, including Amherst, Bates, Bryant, College of Charleston, Columbia, Dickinson, Fairfield, Hamilton, Harvard, Kenyon, Middlebury, Northeastern, Northwestern, Princeton, St. Lawrence, Union, the University of Rhode Island, and Villanova. Learn more at www.thecountryschool.org.

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Letter From Paris: The State of the Continent – A Snapshot of European Politics

Nicole Prévost Logan

Is the far right forging ahead in Europe?

The political landscape of the European Union (EU) has shifted somewhat to the right during the past few months.  At the core of this trend is the fear of losing one’s identity following the recent surge of migrants.  Angela Merkel’s decision in 2015 to open wide Germany’s borders – and hence Europe’s – has had a lasting impact.  Max Leonard, director of the European Council on Foreign  Relations, based in London, has suggested that the trauma resulting from the decision for Europeans can be compared to that of the 9/11 attack for Americans.

Sebastian Kurz

In Austria , the legislative elections, held on Oct. 17,  gave 31.5 percent of the votes to the conservative People’s Party (OVP) led by Sebastian Kurz.  At age 31, Sebastian Kurz may become the youngest ever Chancellor of that small alpine country of eight million people with a robust economy.  He is not xenophobic nor racist and disapproves of anti-semitism.  However, Kurz may have to strike an alliance with the far right Freedom Party (FPO), which finished in third place behind the declining social democrats (SPO).

To understand Austria, one needs to remember a few facts: it  has been subjected to a flux of Kosovar and Bosniac refugees following  the late 1990s conflict in the Balkans;  it has never been a colonial power and does not have a bad conscience with regard to the economic fate of sub-Saharan migrants. According to French political commentator Christine Okrent, Austria has never gone through the process of “denazification” and considers itself to have been a victim during World War II.  The nostalgia of its past as part of the Habsburg Austro-Hungarian empire still lingers.

Andrej Babis

To complete this snapshot of European politics, the Oct. 20 and 21 legislative elections in the Czech Republic saw Andrej Babis’ party arrive in first place. The 63-year-old tycoon – nicknamed Trump 2 –  proclaims to be anti-immigration, but pro-Europe and pro-NATO. He shares his ideas with the other members of the central European “Visegrad group” (Poland, Hungary and Slovakia.)

Angela Merkel, after her somewhat disappointing results in the last September elections, is reaching out to the Christian Social Union (CSU) and the Greens in order to give her Christian Democrat party (CDU) a comfortable majority. These negotiations may keep her off the front stage until the end of the year.   

In France, Marine Le Pen has practically collapsed after the disastrous debate against Emmanuel Macron on May 3 between the two rounds of the presidential elections. She has become an inaudible adversary in the National Assembly.  Marion, her even more right-wing niece, was clever enough to jump ship last spring.  Marine’s co- president, highly educated Florian Philippot, was ejected from the National Front (FN).  Several legal pursuits for financial “improprieties,” both for her activities as European deputy and in France, are still looming against her. 

After six years of being in the limelight , Marine Le Pen is now in the process of redefining herself. 

Editor’s Note: This is the opinion of Nicole Prévost Logan.

Nicole Prévost Logan

About the author: Nicole Prévost Logan divides her time between Essex and Paris, spending summers in the former and winters in the latter. She writes a regular column for us from her Paris home where her topics will include politics, economy, social unrest — mostly in France — but also in other European countries. She also covers a variety of art exhibits and the performing arts in Europe. Logan is the author of ‘Forever on the Road: A Franco-American Family’s Thirty Years in the Foreign Service,’ an autobiography of her life as the wife of an overseas diplomat, who lived in 10 foreign countries on three continents. Her experiences during her foreign service life included being in Lebanon when civil war erupted, excavating a medieval city in Moscow and spending a week under house arrest in Guinea.

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A Perfect Night for Halloween on Lyme Street

An Old Lyme firetruck leads the traditional Halloween Costume Parade along Lyme Street.

Despite the major storm on Sunday night, the weather was perfect for Halloween. Trick-or-Treaters came in vast numbers to enjoy the evening and wander up and down Lyme Street, along with some of the side roads,  to see what treats — or tricks — were in store. Enjoy the evening again — or for the first time– with our photo essay of Halloween happenings on Lyme Street.

Parades are always such fun!

Lynn Fairfield-Sonn (left on doorstep) and Julie Martel enjoy an amusing moment while handing out candy at the Fairfield-Sonn residence on Lyme Street.

Steve Hallahan and his youngest son, Niall, are delightfully dressed for the occasion!

Watch where you walk!

You never know who’s going to come to the door, but Jocelyn Zallinger greets each visitor regardless with a chocolate bar.

The Mergys take ‘The X-Files’ theme to new heights at their home, the former Catholic church.

Time to take a selfie with the aliens at the Mergy residence!

Have aliens really landed on Lyme Street? Let’s take a closer look …

Barbara Crowley cheerfully hands out candy to Trick-or-Treaters at The Choclolate Shell.

Reaching in for the best candy!

A giant spider is ready to pounce at The Cooley Gallery.

An aerial pumpkin keeps watch over the line at this house.

What a bevy of beautiful princesses and fairies!

All in a night’s work — even a unicorn needs to check his phone!

Lines are everywhere and a dinosaur must wait his turn at Boxwood.

Still patiently waiting …

Is this what happens to all those costumed creatures at the end of the night??

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Friends of Lyme Library Host Sunday Movies: See ‘All Quiet on the Western Front,’ Nov. 19

The line-up for the remaining Sunday Movies to be hosted by the Friends of Lyme Library in November is as follows:

All Quiet on the Western Front
Nov. 19,
 at 2 p.m.
From 1930, based on possibly the most famous book about the First World War, which ended on Nov. 11, 1918. The film rights were bought by Universal Studios and the director, Lewis Milestone used thousands of German army veterans as extras to make the film as realistic as possible. It was considered a truthful account of the war by most critics. Nominated for four Oscars, it won for Best Movie and Best Director. A true classic. 2 hrs. 37 min.

After each movie there will be time to socialize and discuss the film. There is no charge for the event. Feel free to bring your own (non-alcoholic) refreshments.

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Op-Ed: Old Lyme Should Return to Local Health Department; Dramatic Increases in Ledge Light Fees Adversely Impacting Local Residents, Small Businesses

Editor’s Note: The author, Dawn Root, is the owner of Old Lyme Seafood.

Old Lyme joined Ledge Light Health District (LLHD) on Nov 1, 2016 after approval at a Town Meeting by a margin of only 3 votes (82-79).  The time between the first public hearing (scheduled on Aug 29 during prime vacation season, with only 10 days’ notice) and the Town Meeting vote held on Sept 27 was less than a month.  That’s not enough time for public debate on a fundamental change to our town government that has a direct impact on all Old Lyme residents, businesses and organizations.

At the Sept 2016 Town Meeting, we were told that joining LLHD would result in significant cost savings, but it has not.  Previously, Old Lyme residents and businesses paid fees to our Town that helped offset our local health department costs. However, fees paid to LLHD don’t offset town costs, so become additional costs.

LLHD septic and well permit/review fees typically increased between $25-$150.  High septic and well fees have a greater impact on Old Lyme than other LLHD towns, such as New London, Groton, Waterford, East Lyme, because a greater portion of Old Lyme residents and businesses rely on wells and septic systems.

Most LLHD licensing and inspection fees increased between 2- and 10-fold (e.g.: from $50 to $300, or from $20 to $205-$245), and fee adjustments for seasonal vs year-round, or small vs large establishments were eliminated.  Such dramatic fee increases have been particularly challenging to Old Lyme small businesses and organizations because many are seasonal, or serve a much smaller local population than other LLHD communities.

LLHD also introduced many new fees, including $100 late fees, $100 re-inspection fees, and $50 repeat violation fees. When one considers total costs paid to LLHD, there are no costs savings.  The LLHD fee increases have already become a substantial burden to many local residents, small businesses and organizations, as demonstrated by over 100 Old Lyme residents and business owners signing a petition to bring the matter back to another Town Meeting.

The possibility of a future cost reduction was also mentioned at the Sept 2016 Town Meeting, but it was tied to eliminating an extra payment that Old Lyme makes to LLHD to maintain LLHD staff at Town Hall.  Without these extra payments, on-site health staffing may be significantly reduced; currently, LLHD provides on-site staff in Stonington and East Lyme only 2-4 hours/week.

Importantly, we were told that by joining LLHD, Old Lyme would not lose control of this important town function because Old Lyme would “have a seat at the table” on the LLHD board.  In reality, Old Lyme will have minimal influence over future LLHD decisions regarding costs, fees, staffing, and service, because representation on the LLHD board is based on population, and Old Lyme is by far the smallest town in the LLHD – representing only 5% of the total LLHD population (see table below).

Lastly, we were told that Old Lyme could simply try LLHD for 2 years and switch back to a local health department after giving LLHD 6 months’ notice.  Please join me, and many other Old Lyme residents and small business owners adversely impacted by the LLHD changes, in requesting that Old Lyme return to a local health department that will be more responsive to the unique needs of our small, and very special, community.   

LLHD-Member Town Populations (CT Dept. of Public Health 2016 estimates)

Town Population % of LLHD Total
Groton 39,261 27%
New London 26,984 19%
Waterford 19,101 13%
East Lyme 18,886 13%
Stonington 18,647 13%
Ledyard 14,911 10%
Old Lyme 7,469 5%
LLHD TOTAL 145,259 100%
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9 Town Transit Offers Bus Passes to Assist Displaced Puerto Ricans

As Puerto Rican residents displaced by hurricane Maria arrive at Bradley Airport, they are greeted by a public that is eager to assist in taking care of their needs in any way possible. So far, aid with housing, health care, food and clothing is the primary objective. Now 9 Town Transit has now stepped in with an offer to assist with transportation. 

9 Town Transit is offering the lower Connecticut River valley’s newest residents free monthly bus passes.  The passes can be used on any 9 Town Transit bus for unlimited trips throughout the region and even into Middletown, New Haven and New London. “These new residents need to access shopping, medical facilities and jobs, at the very least”, says 9 Town Transit Chairman Leslie Strauss, “These bus passes help them restart their lives here in region.”

Anyone interested in the program must contact their local emergency management director or call the 2-1-1 help hotline. 

To help provide funding for this service, the district has started a fundraiser. For $59, a donor may purchase a pass that will provide unlimited service on all 9TT bus routes, 6 days a week for an entire calendar month. To donate, visit www.9towntransit.com/maria.

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Wildcats Soccer Girls End Regular Season With Perfect Record, First in School History

Lyme-Old Lyme High School Girls’ Varsity Soccer Coach Paul Gleason has much celebrate with one of his assistant coaches (and daughter) Allyson Gleason after his team ended the regular season with a perfect record

The Old Lyme soccer girls wrapped up the first perfect season in the school’s history yesterday with a convincing 4-0 victory over Valley Regional at Lyme-Old Lyme High School. Maddie Zrenda was first to score with an assist from Mya Johnson, who scored the second goal with an assist from Danielle McCarthy.

The third goal was scored by Danielle McCarthy with assist from Britney DeRoehn and the final goal was put in the net by Kaylee Armenia with assist from Bianca Tinnerello.

Emily Rivera with in the Old Lyme goal and made two saves whileLexi Dellarocco defended Valley’s net making 12 saves.

Paul Gleason’s girls finished their regular season with a 16-0-0 record and 10-0-0 in the Shoreline Conference.

Old Lyme will host the Shoreline semi finals Tuesday against the winner of the Cromwell/East Hampton game.

GO WILDCATS!

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Vote for Old Lyme as TripAdvisor’s “Best New England Fall Foliage Getaway”!

Photo of Old Lyme from the Trip Advisor article on “Best New England Fall Foliage Getaways.”

We’re delighted to share the news with our readers that Ashlee Centrella of TripAdvisor has informed us that Old Lyme has been selected as one of their 16 Best New England Fall Foliage Getaways.  That’s good news in itself, but we also have the chance to vote for Old Lyme to be THE Best New England Fall Foliage Getaway!  This honor will be bestowed on the town in New England that offers, in Centrella’s words, “the best small-town charm vacations in New England,” combined with the best fall foliage.

You can read TripAdvisor’s article on the 16 candidates for the honor at this link and most importantly scroll to the bottom to vote (for Old Lyme, of course!) at the end of it.  You don’t have to give your email or register for anything so please, please help Old Lyme win this award.  We’re currently running second with 11 percent of the votes cast, significantly ahead of Essex, Mass. and Damariscotta, Maine, which both have precisely 0 percent of the votes, but way behind Millinocket, Maine, which has a whopping 63 percent of the vote.

So, dear readers, get your fingers to work, and let’s vote like crazy so Old Lyme not only overtakes Millinocket, Maine, but also goes on to win this contest!  We know the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce will be supporting this effort as it would obviously be extremely beneficial to all our tourist- and hospitality-based businesses to win this competition.  We thank the Florence Griswold Museum sincerely for already having highlighted the contest and voting option in their communications.  We are sure the Town of Old Lyme and other civic and community institutions in town will be putting out the word too. Let’s see if we can get some poster up around town publicizing the news.

And if YOU represent an organization that can share this news and the voting option with your members and supporters, then please go ahead and share, share, share via e-mail, social media, and even good old snail mail!

Thank you and VOTE OLD LYME!

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Letter to the Editor: Local VFW Thanks Graybills, All-Pro for Helping Veteran in Need

To the Editor:

Recently we had a local veteran that was in a serious financial situation when his car was damaged beyond repair. Our Veteran’s Post contacted All Pro and the Graybill’s stepped up. They put this veteran in a car at less than full book value; allowing us to pay the remainder of the price. Not many dealers would take a loss, but the Graybill’s at All Pro are always willing to help the community and in this case, a combat veteran.

As we remember Veterans Day, it is nice to have such friends in our town.

Sincerely,

David Griswold,
Old Lyme.

Editor’s Note: The author is a member of the Lyme-Old Lyme VFW Post 1467.

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Artful Living Invites Students to Submit Original Short Plays for Possible Production at ‘The Kate,’ Scholarship Award

AREAWIDE — Artful Living, Killingworth’s multi-generational community theatre, is seeking original scripts of short plays from Connecticut high school students.  This new program, Playwrights For Tomorrow, offers students the opportunity to win a scholarship and have their play produced on stage at Old Saybrook’s Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center (The Kate) on April 29, 2018.

Plays will be reviewed by a panel of theatre professionals. Selected playwrights will be offered the opportunity to collaborate with directors and other theatre artists in the staging of their plays.  Submission Deadline is Jan. 8, 2018.

For full details and an application form, visit www.ArtfulLivingCT.com

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Old Lyme Soccer Girls March on, Extend Unbeaten Record to 15-0

The Wildcats celebrate another goal. File photo by Jennifer Funaro.

Paul Gleason’s soccer girls continued their extraordinary season Saturday with a 4-0 win over Fitch at Poquonnock Plains Park. Mya Johnson had all four goals for Old Lyme with assists from Danielle McCarthy and Britney DeRoehn.

In goal for the Wildcats was Emma McCulloch with four saves while Valentina Silva and Francesca Foster defended the Fitch goal with 12 combined saves.

Old Lyme is now 15-0-0 overall and 9-0-0 in the Shoreline conference.  The girls’ final game of the regular season is against Valley Regional High School at 3:45 p.m. on Wednesday at home.

Also, last week, Old Lyme defeated Woodstock Academy 3-0 on Thursday at Lyme-Old Lyme High School. Maddie Ouellette was first to score for Old Lyme with an unassisted goal. Mya Johnson followed up with two goals with one assisted by Maddie Ouellette.

Emily Rivera and Emma McCulloch were in goal for Old Lyme with 10 cumulative saves. In the net for Woodstock was Irene Askitis with 12 saves. Old Lyme is now 14-0-0 overall and 9-0-0 in the Shoreline.

Last Monday, Old Lyme defeated Old Saybrook at Old Saybrook High School 6-0. The Wildcat’s first goal was scored by Maddie Zrenda on a PK. Mya Johnson had three goals and one assist while Maddie Ouellette had 1put the ball in the net once but also notched two assists. Jenny Ritchie scored one goal and Ciara Klimaszewski had one assist.

In goal for Old Lyme were Emily Rivera and Emma McCulloch with six cumulative saves. In net for Old Saybrook was Kelsey True with 12 saves.

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Legal News You Can Use: Why Many Car Accidents Happen Close to Home

Part of the reason many accidents occur near home is because driving in familiar places can cause drivers to rely on memory instead of what is happening around them. This auto-pilot phenomenon can prevent people from remaining vigilant while driving, potentially causing them to miss important visual cues. It is imperative that drivers combat this phenomenon by staying awake and alert as unpredictable elements, such as other drivers, crossing animals or mechanical failure, can always cause an accident. However, because others are also likely driving on auto-pilot, motorists should also ensure that they always buckle their seat belt no matter how far they are driving.

Further, fatal car accidents are more likely to occur at certain times of times of the day, particularly when workers are heading home or when residents are out running errands. For example, 16 percent of fatal accidents that occurred in 2013 took place between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m.. Further, 31 percent of car accidents in 2013 occurred between 6 p.m. and midnight.

Car accidents that occur on interstates, local highways or even rural roads can result in serious injuries or even death. If the accident occurred due to another driver’s negligence or risky driving habits, those who suffered injuries could seek compensation for the damages they sustained in the incident, including recovering the cost of their medical bills, lost income and pain and suffering. However, some insurance companies may attempt to settle the claim for less than what the injured individuals need. In such an event, filing a lawsuit against the at-fault motorist with an attorney’s help might be advisable.

The Law Firm of Suisman Shapiro focuses on this area of the law.
Sponsored post.

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