March 20, 2018

Enjoy Irish Music This Evening at the Old Lyme-PGN Library

Fiddler Jeanne Freeman and singer/guitarist Dan Ringrose will play Irish music at the OL-PGN Library starting at 6 p.m. this evening.

Continue to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day this evening at 6 p.m. at the Old Lyme-Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library when the Celtic duo of fiddler Jeanne Freeman and singer/guitarist Dan Ringrose will play Irish music for the enjoyment of library patrons.  All are welcome, there is no admission fee and no registration is required.

Freeman’s playing has been described as, “effortlessly virtuosic,” and Ringrose’s voice has been described as, “stunning.”  Together, they bring a lively freshness to traditional and original tunes and songs, along with stories, poetry, and humor.
Both on the faculty of the Connecticut Academy of Irish Music, they have been featured on CT Public Television, at the Greater Hartford Irish Festival, and in many other venues. Enjoy the music and songs of the Emerald Isle as they help celebrate everything Irish in Old Lyme!

Chamber Welcomes MCCD as Speaker at Tomorrow’s Dinner Meeting

Join members of the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce at their next Monthly Dinner Meeting at Stella’s Restaurant & Pizzeria on Wednesday, March 21. All members, prospective members and other interested parties are welcome.

Cocktails and business networking begin at 6 p.m., with a three-course dinner starting at 7 p.m. The cost is $25 per person and the dinner choices are as follows:

Everyone will receive a side Caesar salad  and fresh bread for the tables
Pennette – Italian sausage, peppers, onions, tomatoes, fresh basil and spinach in a garlic chardonnay sauce, tossed with penne. **Can be made vegetarian
Grilled Shrimp Scampi – grilled shrimp & tomatoes n a garlic lemon basil wine sauce served with linguine
Chicken Piccata – baked breaded chicken breast topped with capers with a EVOO and lemon wine sauce served with penne pasta
Fallen Chocolate Cake
Ricotta Cheese Cake

The guest speakers are members of the Mentoring Corps of Community Development (MCCD).  This group, which operates in both Lyme and Old Lyme, does an enormous amount of ‘good works.’  It promises ot be an exciting presentation since everyone is looking forward to hearing what MCCD has achieved to date and what the group plans to do in the future.

New members can join the Chamber and current members can renew at the meeting. Annual membership is still only $50, payable to Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce.

Seating is limited. Make payment for a dinner reservation at this link on the Chamber website or send details by email to email@lolcc.comDinner selections must be received by end of day on Tuesday, March 20, and payment can either be made online or by check brought to the meeting.

Questions? Contact Chamber President Olwen Logan at


Lyme Ambulance Association Donates AED to Lyme Library

Andy Smith (left) President of the Lyme Ambulance Assoc. Board of Directors, presents an AED machine to Jack Sulger of Lyme Library. Photo by Frank Yaskin, 2017.

Lyme Ambulance Association Board of Directors President Andy Smith (left) recently presented an Automated External Defibrillating (AED) machine to Jack Sulger, President of the Lyme Library Association, for use in the Lyme Public Library.

Automated External Defibrillating machines are now found in most public buildings as they are simple to use and can prevent sudden cardiac death.

This donation program is part of Lyme Ambulance Association’s commitment to the Lyme community.


Old Lyme Church Rings Bell 17 Times in Memory of Those Killed in Parkland, Fla.

The First Congregational Church of Old Lyme where the bell will be rung 17 times this afternoon in memory of the 17 individuals shot and killed in Parkland, Fla., last Wednesday.

The First Congregational Church of Old Lyme (FCCOL) held a bell-ringing vigil on the front lawn of its church Sunday afternoon, Feb. 18, ringing the bell in its steeple 17 times, once for each of the victims of the recent mass shooting in Parkland, Fla.

In announcing the community vigil, FCCOL Senior Minister Steve Jungkeit said: “In times past, bells were used in small New England villages as a way of drawing people out of their homes to announce times of worship, celebration and mourning – but also as a way of sounding an alarm, of calling a community to action.”

He continued, “We invite the entire Old Lyme community to come out of their homes and join us, as we remember the 17 individuals who lost their lives to the recent gun violence in Parkland, Florida. The somber tolls will not only remind us of each precious life lost, they will also serve as an alarm, calling us to attention as a community – providing loud, resonant, insistent reminders of the insanity of firearms in this country.”

He concluded, “As a country, we need the clarion call of a bell to rouse us from our national slumber. We need to improve our society and change the way we live.”

The church held vigils after the mass shootings in Las Vegas, Nev., and Sutherland Springs, Texas.


Duck River Garden Club Presents ‘Hello Spring,’ March 26

On Monday, March 26, at 7 p.m. the Duck River Garden Club will present ” Hello, Spring,” featuring guest speaker Sylvia Nichols.  The meeting will be held at the Old Lyme Memorial Town Hall on Lyme Street.

Nichols will provide an  interactive presentation demonstrating simple, easy to create floral designs suitable for spring entertaining or just plain fun.  She will also teach some flower arranging tricks, and give tips on using your own garden material or fresh flowers from a floral store.
Nichols brings a practical approach to playing with flowers.  Her presentation is expected to be funny, enlightening, and entertaining.

CT Farmland Trust Announces Protection of New Mercies Farm in Lyme

Turning the soil with horses at New Mercies Farm.

Connecticut Farmland Trust (CFT) has recently announced the protection of New Mercies Farm in Lyme, Conn. The development rights were donated by a couple to CFT as part of their master plan for the farm and the community around them: to preserve the land for agricultural use, to provide wholesome food for the community, and to create an opportunity for young farmers to pursue their chosen profession.

New Mercies Farm is a small farm at 4.6 acres, but the compact size does not stop the farm managers from sustaining a 100-member Community Supported Agriculture venture. The farm, close to Beaver Brook and Cedar Lake, contains 100 percent important farmland soils.

In 2012, the Hornbakes purchased the property that was slated to be developed for several homesites. They bought the land to conserve it and created a farm where none was before, New Mercies Farm, named after a hymn.

Deborah is a distinguished sculptor and Rod is a physician. They are lifelong organic gardeners who have owned a cattle farm in the past. That has not stopped them from sharing their love and respect for farming. Rod Hornbake will tell you that, “Supporting young farmers is critical. Young people need and deserve our respect and support.”

After the Hornbakes purchased the property with the idea of protecting it and then selling it to a farmer, they found a beginner farmer with whom to enter into a lease-to-buy arrangement, and then leased the land to Baylee Drown and Ryan Quinn. Drown, with her husband Ryan Quinn, already owns Upper Pond Farm one town over. Drown has brought her high energy and passion for excellent, nutritional food to the community just as the Hornbakes had hoped.

“The Hornbake’s goal to preserve a healthy farm then turn the ownership over to young farmers at an affordable cost is an inspiration,” said Elisabeth Moore, CFT’s Executive Director. The organization hopes that more land owners will think about conserving their land in 2018.

Deborah and her husband approached Connecticut Farmland Trust (CFT) in early 2017 to protect New Mercies Farm.  Although the farm is located in a suburban region ripe for housing developments, the family chose to donate for the development rights. CFT staff facilitated the preservation of the farmland. This is also the smallest farm CFT has protected and one of several vegetable farms. Deborah Hornbake is clear, “By accepting our gift of the development rights, the Connecticut Farmland Trust makes the farm affordable to the farmers.”

After closing, Deborah and Rod Hornbake will sell the protected farm to the young farm couple, Baylee Drown and Ryan Quinn, who already manage the land. Drown says, “We are excited to continue the farming tradition in our community. We hope to work within our community to increase the quality and healthfulness of food on people’s plates in their home.” Drowns’ farming style is highly invested in Lyme-Old Lyme’s community and the community responds positively.

Since its founding in 2002, CFT has protected 43 farms, saving 3,364 acres. CFT is a private 501(c)(3) not-for-profit that relies on Connecticut residents to support its operations. CFT is Connecticut’s only statewide land trust, and the only land trust in the state dedicated solely to the protection of agricultural land.


CT River Museum Offers Range of Winter Wildlife Programs, Activities

Eagles on Ice: White-headed adult eagles can be seen in numbers along the lower Connecticut River. Photo by Mark Yuknat.

Winter along the Connecticut River brings many things – including cold winds and grey skies.  But the change in seasons also signals a shift in the ecology of New England’s Great River.  The osprey, the swallows and the egrets may be gone, but in their place now are mergansers, goldeneyes, and the highlight – bald eagles.  These once rare, majestic birds can be seen fishing along the unfrozen lower Connecticut River, a testament to one of the greatest environmental recoveries of the last half century.  To highlight these winter wonders, Connecticut River Museum (CRM) has planned a range of programs and activities.

Connecticut River Museum is happy to again partner with Connecticut River Expeditions to offer Winter Wildlife Eagle Cruises in February and March.  These popular trips offer visitors a chance to get out on the River in winter to see eagles, as well as other winter species that visit the estuary such as harbor seals.

This seal is relaxing on the Connecticut River ice. Photo by Bill Yule.

Cruises aboard the environmentally friendly R/V RiverQuest provide passengers with a comfortable, heated cabin supplied with hot coffee and tea, as well as binoculars to aid in spotting and narration from a staff naturalist.  These cruises depart Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays at various times in the morning and early afternoon, and are $42 per passenger.  Museum members get 10 percent off and group rates are available.

In addition, the Museum will offer its annual Eagles of Essex exhibit, which offers a wealth of information about bald eagles and their return to the lower Connecticut River.  Patrons can try their hand at building an eagle nest, and marvel at life size silhouettes of Eagles and other large raptors, a map showing good shore viewing locations, and other displays.  On the opening day of the season, Saturday, Feb. 3, the exhibit will host Family Activities related to the return of the Eagles from 1 to 4 p.m., free with Museum admission.

On Saturday, Feb. 17 and March 17, award-winning photographer Stanley Kolber returns to CRM to offer his annual Bird Photography Workshop.  Kolber has been photographing birds for years, and takes great pleasure in sharing his experience with aspiring photographers of all levels, through anecdotes, slides, and question and answer.  In addition to helping skills development, his greatest pleasure in giving workshops is the opportunity to kindle and encourage his audience’s interest in the natural world.  He hopes that young people as well as adults will attend the workshops, so that he can impart some of his own enthusiasm to the next generation.  These popular programs are also free with Museum admission.

Species other than Eagles visit our River during the winter months. Photo by Joan Meek.

A Live Birds of Prey Show will be offered on Sunday, Feb. 18 at 4:30 p.m.  CRM will partner with Horizon Wings Raptor Rehabilitation Organization for this annual show, which features a bald eagle and several other species of raptors.  Visitors will be able to get an up close look at the birds while learning more about the lifecycle and ecology of these magnificent animals.  This event will be held at the Centerbrook Meeting House and is free to the public.

For a full listing of event details, visit or call 860-767-8269.  The Connecticut River Museum is located on the Essex waterfront at 67 Main Street and is open Tuesday – Sundays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Connecticut River Museum, located in the historic Steamboat Dock building, offers exhibits and programs about the history and environment of the Connecticut River.

For more information, call CRM at 860.767.8269 or RiverQuest at 860.662.0577.


Tavern Night Returns to CT River Museum, March 23

On Friday, Jan. 26, the Connecticut River Museum brings back its popular 1814 Tavern Night.  This lively 19th century evening will take place at the museum’s historic Samuel Lay House overlooking scenic Essex harbor.  The house will be transformed into a candlelit riverside tavern from the War of 1812. 

The evening includes a bourbon whiskey tasting hosted by Highland Imports, songs by noted musician Don Sineti, tavern games, and a food pairing of early American cuisine provided by Catering by Selene.  Additional wine and beer will be available at the cash bar.

Folk singer Don Sineti will play and sing some rousing tunes at Tavern Night.

Sineti is a folksinger, songwriter, part-time sea chantey man (with one of the most powerful voices on the Eastern Seaboard!), and long-neck, 5-string banjo picker.  For over 20 years, he has entertained with his boundless energy, to deliver rousing renditions of songs from the days of wooden ships and iron men.  With a booming voice and a hearty laugh, he shares his music with audiences of all ages.

There are three candle lit evenings planned.  Two additional Tavern Nights will be held; 

  • March 23 – Heritage Wines and Port Tastings with folklorist Stephen Gencarella & historian Chris Dobbs; Music by Joseph Mornealt
  • April 27  – Olde Burnside Brewing Company beer tastings; music by Rick Spencer, Dawn Indermuehle & Chris Dobbs. 

Save $10 when you buy all three evenings!

Tastings take place at 6 and 8 p.m.  Space is limited and reservations are required.  Call to reserve tickets at 860-767-8269 or visit  Tickets are $24 for museum members or $29 for the general public (must be 21 or older and show valid ID).  Includes bourbon whiskey tasting, light bites, and entertainment.  The evening is sponsored in part by Catering by Selene, Connecticut Rental Center and Bob’s Centerbrook Package Store.

The Connecticut River Museum is located at 67 Main Street, Essex and is open daily from 10 AM – 5 PM and closed on Mondays until Memorial Day. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, $7 for students, $6 for children age 6-12, free for children under 6.  For more information, call 860-767-8269 or go to


Op-Ed: In Light of Current Events, Head of The Country School Confirms, Defends School’s Mission

By John D. Fixx, Head of School at The Country School

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is a moment in which people in the United States and throughout the world celebrate a gentleman who gave his life striving for equality and the principle that all people are created equal.

Our country has stood for generations as an example of hope for people throughout the world. Many relatives of our families and teachers arrived here recently or generations ago. Some arrived as slaves. Some arrived voluntarily to seek a better life of freedom, opportunity, and the pursuit of happiness.

I am concerned that students have recently been hearing from the White House, the entertainment world, and the sports world that not all people are created equal. I send this letter, therefore, to make it clear how language and actions in the news today are counter to our mission at The Country School — to make it clear that as educators we will honor forthright questions from inquisitive students while striving to respect parental prerogative and disparate political viewpoints. It should not be controversial to deplore language and actions that undermine the bedrock on which the United States has been built and has prospered.

Our students might be reading on their phones and hearing stories about the mistreatment of women in Hollywood, on Olympic teams, and by influential men in broadcasting and elsewhere, while also hearing reports of hateful, racist, dangerous words from Washington that are inappropriate to use anywhere on our campus or use, many would argue, anywhere in a polite, civil society.

The Country School’s mission reads, “We nurture every student’s unique role in the community,” and that means that we value their differences. We live our mission daily by “encouraging students to embrace differences, explore new perspectives, and find common ground in a multicultural world.” We honor this ethos especially through our IDEA (Interpreting Diversity Education through Action) Day and Theme Day workshops, but also every day when we teach empathy and kindness.

I am tremendously proud of The Country School’s increasing diversity, as measured in terms of race, culture, family structures, religion, nationality, socio-economic status, and so forth. Our students’ families come from at least 27 different countries and their parents and grandparents speak some 17 languages at home. Our community spans the world, from Poland to Portugal and from China to Cambodia, from India to Israel to Italy to Ireland to Iceland, from Taiwan to Texas, from Lima to London, from Hungary to Sudan, and from California to Colombia. As educators, we cannot defend the idea that some families’ countries are worse or better than other countries.

Our core values state that our students “practice empathy by considering different perspectives and making all members of the community feel welcomed, included, and respected.” The Country School’s Mission Statement speaks to character and leadership development. As we teach our students in the Elmore Leadership Program, there are many ways to lead, and the best leaders bring disparate groups together to accomplish more than any individual could achieve on her or his own. And as part of the Elmore Leadership Program, we also teach students that leaders should use elegant, elevated language, and they should avoid profanity, misogyny, and similar “locker room” language.

We routinely answer questions as candidly and cleanly as we can, keeping our politics as adults as neutral as possible. I write this not to address specific tax policies or the Russian investigation, or a Mexican border wall, or trade agreements, or North Korean missiles, and so forth.

Rather, I want to make clear that it is part of our leadership mission at The Country School to ensure that our students understand that people can disagree agreeably, can use civil and respectful language, and — whether in Connecticut, Washington D.C., New York, or Hollywood — can always follow our primary school rule:

        1. Be kind.

Editor’s Note: Founded in 1955, The Country School serves 215 students in PreSchool to Grade 8 on its 23-acre campus in Madison. See our community in action during our Open House on January 28 from 1-3:30 p.m. Learn more at


Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce Names Looney December’s ‘Business Student of the Month’

Lyme-Old Lyme High School Assistant Principal Jeanne Manfredi presents Lyme-Old Lyme High School junior Patrick Looney with his award as the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce December 2017 Business Student of the Month. Leslie Traver, Lyme-Old Lyme High School Business Department Chair, joined the celebrations.

Lyme-Old Lyme High School junior Patrick Looney has been named the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce ‘Business Student of the Month’ for December 2017.

The Chamber’s ‘Business Student of the Month’ program continues the Chamber tradition of recognizing members of the junior class for demonstrating outstanding initiative in and out of the classroom.

The Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce established the N. Rutherford Sheffield Memorial Award for Entrepreneurial Promise & Achievement for Lyme-Old Lyme High School juniors in 1999 as a way to honor Mr. Sheffield, a member of the Chamber for over 50 years who was highly regarded in our Lyme-Old Lyme community.

Since its inception, nearly 35 juniors at Lyme-Old Lyme High School have been recognized through this program.

(photo, l-r: Jeanne Manfredi, Lyme-Old Lyme High School Assistant Principal;
Leslie Traver, Lyme-Old Lyme High School Business Department Chair;
Patrick Looney, Lyme-Old Lyme High School junior and Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce December 2017 Business Student of the Month)


East Lyme Public Trust Honors Departing Members, Welcomes New Ones at Feb. 27 Meeting

Pat and Jack Lewis, who are retiring as directors of the East Lyme Public Trust.

At their first meeting of 2018  on Feb. 27, the East Lyme Public Trust Foundation will be recognizing the work of departing directors – Pat and Jack Lewis.  The Lewises have served on the foundation since its inception in 1995.

For the past five years, they have served on the Publicity Committee of The Promise of Tomorrow’s Trees projectEach year they would take on the task of delivering posters to all of the businesses on Niantic Main St.   In 2016, they both were also crucial organizers of the Boardwalk Re-dedication. Their enthusiasm and counsel, during 23 years of volunteer service, will be sorely missed.

At this meeting, the East Lyme Public Trust Foundation will also welcome a new Vice-President, Jessica Todd-Director of Finance at Chelsea Groton Bank. Todd, who has a Master’s degree in Accounting from Bryant, is also the Treasurer of the East Lyme Middle School PTA.  In addition, she is on the Sponsorship Committee of the East Lyme Little League. Todd will be replacing John T. Hoye.

Hoye has served as Vice-President since 2003. Throughout those years, he has worked closely with Past President Bob DeSanto, in the development of the boardwalk and the re-construction process. He served as Master of Ceremonies at the first dedication of the Board Walk in 2005 and the Re-dedication in 2016.

In addition, he was instrumental in organizing the group of non-profits of the Public Trust Foundation, The Rotary, the Lions, and the Parks and Rec. Department, to raise money to build the Band Shell at McCook Park, which was dedicated in 2017. Hoye will remain as a Director of the Foundation.

Other new members are Jo-el Fernandez, who works for the State of CT Department of Children and Families, Sandy Greenhouse, who is a primary care physician in Gales Ferry, Rasa Clark, a real estate agent for Berkshire Hathaway Home Services, and Ted Norris, President/owner of Pamlico Group, LLC, a marketing and branding firm specializing in the marine and fishing industries.

Continuing officers are Joe Legg- President, Michelle Maitland-Secretary, and Kathie Cassidy-Treasurer.

The Foundation meets every fourth Tuesday of the month in the Olive Chendali Room in the East Lyme Community Center building.  The public is always welcome to attend these meetings.


Chelsea Groton Bank Awards Grant to East Lyme Public Trust to Improve Accessibility to Niantic Boardwalk

The award was presented by Jessica Todd, Vice President & Comptroller, Chelsea Groton Bank. Shown receiving the award are David Putnam, E.L. Parks and Recreation Director, and Kathie Cassidy, Treasurer- E.L. Public Trust Foundation.

As part of their fall grant cycle, the Chelsea Groton Bank has awarded to the East Lyme Public Trust Foundation $1,500 to be used toward the purchase of an ADA compliant beach accessibility surface mats to allow wheelchair access to the Niantic Boardwalk beaches.

Since 1999, The Chelsea Groton Foundation has provided over $2.3 million in total grants to the community. These grants are awarded to organization that impact the region in health, human and social services, education, economic development, and arts and culture.

Michael Rauh, President and CEO of Chelsea Groton Bank noted, “Through the Chelsea Groton Foundation, we are able to support non-profits who play a critical role in our communities.”

Kathie Cassidy is the chairperson, who has organized the project to install mats on the beach. She commented, “It is the desire of the East Lyme Public Trust Foundation to make Niantic Bay Beach and Hole in the Wall Beach a wheelchair-accessible, friendly place. We want to allow people with mobility impairment to visit and enjoy these beaches.”

Cassidy is continuing to solicit grants from other entities for this project. The Public Trust Foundation is hoping to have the mats installed this spring.


Death of Barbara (Seim) Hill Announced

Barbara (Seim) Hill, Sept. 7, 1925 – Dec. 1, 2017

Barbara (Siem) Hill

Barbara (Seim) Hill, 92, passed away peacefully at home, Bay Village, Sarasota, Florida on December 1, 2017. She was born in Bridgeport, CT September 7, 1925, daughter of Harry E. and Vera (Bertilson) Seim. She obtained her nursing degree from Simmons College. Her beloved husband of 64 years, Nicholas S. Hill IV, predeceased her in 2012.  She retired from a nursing career which culminated in 16 years as Supervisor of the Visiting Nurses Association in Old Saybrook. She resided in Old Lyme for 34 years, where she raised her six children, then Old Saybrook for 31 years, before moving to Sarasota, Florida.

Barbara will be remembered for her sweet kindness, her brightness of spirit and her determination to make the world around her a better place, which she passed on to her children and everyone she met. She saw the positive in every situation. “She was the best mother and grandmother in the world” and she will be dearly missed.

She is survived by her children: Pamela Vernon of Quechee, Vermont; Nicholas S. Hill V (Sophia) of Sherborn, MA; Penny Hill (Larry Wild) of Sarasota, FL; Wendolyn Hill (Richard Sutton) of Lyme, CT; Melinda Hill (Mark Yuknat) of Haddam, CT; and Jeffrey Hill (Sherry) of Old Saybrook, CT.  She is also survived by 9 grandchildren: Kayt and Colin Vernon, Kyra and Alyssa Hill, Hester and Isabel Sutton, Alex Yuknat, Bethany Benak and Samantha Hill; and four great-grandchildren; and her best friend, Ann Daum.

There will be a private service.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in her memory to Visiting Nurses Southeastern CT: VNASC, 403 N Frontage Road, Waterford, CT 06385or Planned Parenthood of Southwest Florida, 736 Central Avenue, Sarasota, Fl 34236.

Online Guest book located at


Old Lyme Historical Society’s 2018 ‘Now and Then’ Calendar Makes Perfect Holiday Gift

The Old Lyme Historical Society (OLHS) will be celebrating the release of the new 2018 Now & Then Old Lyme Community Calendar at a free public reception Thursday, Nov. 9, from 4 to 6 p.m. at the OLHS building at 55 Lyme Street, Old Lyme.  The calendar, along with other publications, will be for sale at the event. All are welcome to attend: wine, beer and light refreshments will be served and a door prize will also be awarded.

There will be a weaving demonstration, exhibition and sale by the Connecticut Handweavers Guild.

This is the fifth year that the OLHS has published this popular calendar that incorporates a different set of photographs from the organization’s archives, again juxtaposing the historical images with contemporary ones of the same scene.  The images included in the calendar are a small sampling of the many interesting archived photographs of Old Lyme establishments,  landscapes, and scenes dating back to the beginning of the twentieth century.

Each calendar month is generously sponsored by a different community organization and includes the dates of their events throughout the year.  The intent is to highlight and assist in marketing activities occurring in Old Lyme in 2018 as well as remembering the past.

The Sponsors of the 2018 Now & Then Community Calendar are: the Town of Old Lyme, Speirs Plumbing, PGN Library, Lyme Art Association, Carousel Shop, Black Hall Grille, First Congregational Church, Bee & Thistle Inn, Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts, Florence Griswold Museum, Cooley Gallery and the Old Lyme Historical Society.

The 2018 Now & Then Old Lyme Community Calendar was designed by James Meehan and edited by Alison Mitchell.  Michaelle Pearson was the copy-editor.

The mission of the OLHS is to “collect, preserve, and interpret the rich history” of Old Lyme.  To find out more about the OLHS and its interesting activities, explore their website at or stop by its office at 55 Lyme St..


Interested in Work of Child & Family Auxiliary? New Volunteers Always Welcome

 New members are always welcome to join theChild & Family Agency’s Lyme/Old Lyme Auxiliary and help with their various fundraising events—from the Polar Express and the Cookie Walk during the Holidays, to the Annual Sale in the Spring, and the biennial Lyme/Old Lyme Garden Tour in June.  Give as much time as your schedule allows.
Child & Family Agency is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to the well-being and development of all children and their families, with emphasis on the unmet needs of children lacking physical, emotional, and intellectual care and nurturing. With offices in New London, Essex, and Groton, and programs dealing with children’s health care, child abuse, family violence, teen pregnancy, parent education, and child guidance, Child & Family Agency is the largest nonprofit children’s service provider in southeastern Connecticut.
Agency funding comes from a variety of state and private sources, with the Auxiliaries raising critical unrestricted funds. Volunteers and supporters are always welcome. For more information, visit

9 Town Transit Offers Bus Passes to Assist Displaced Puerto Ricans

As Puerto Rican residents displaced by hurricane Maria arrive at Bradley Airport, they are greeted by a public that is eager to assist in taking care of their needs in any way possible. So far, aid with housing, health care, food and clothing is the primary objective. Now 9 Town Transit has now stepped in with an offer to assist with transportation. 

9 Town Transit is offering the lower Connecticut River valley’s newest residents free monthly bus passes.  The passes can be used on any 9 Town Transit bus for unlimited trips throughout the region and even into Middletown, New Haven and New London. “These new residents need to access shopping, medical facilities and jobs, at the very least”, says 9 Town Transit Chairman Leslie Strauss, “These bus passes help them restart their lives here in region.”

Anyone interested in the program must contact their local emergency management director or call the 2-1-1 help hotline. 

To help provide funding for this service, the district has started a fundraiser. For $59, a donor may purchase a pass that will provide unlimited service on all 9TT bus routes, 6 days a week for an entire calendar month. To donate, visit


Vote for Old Lyme as TripAdvisor’s “Best New England Fall Foliage Getaway”!

Photo of Old Lyme from the Trip Advisor article on “Best New England Fall Foliage Getaways.”

We’re delighted to share the news with our readers that Ashlee Centrella of TripAdvisor has informed us that Old Lyme has been selected as one of their 16 Best New England Fall Foliage Getaways.  That’s good news in itself, but we also have the chance to vote for Old Lyme to be THE Best New England Fall Foliage Getaway!  This honor will be bestowed on the town in New England that offers, in Centrella’s words, “the best small-town charm vacations in New England,” combined with the best fall foliage.

You can read TripAdvisor’s article on the 16 candidates for the honor at this link and most importantly scroll to the bottom to vote (for Old Lyme, of course!) at the end of it.  You don’t have to give your email or register for anything so please, please help Old Lyme win this award.  We’re currently running second with 11 percent of the votes cast, significantly ahead of Essex, Mass. and Damariscotta, Maine, which both have precisely 0 percent of the votes, but way behind Millinocket, Maine, which has a whopping 63 percent of the vote.

So, dear readers, get your fingers to work, and let’s vote like crazy so Old Lyme not only overtakes Millinocket, Maine, but also goes on to win this contest!  We know the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce will be supporting this effort as it would obviously be extremely beneficial to all our tourist- and hospitality-based businesses to win this competition.  We thank the Florence Griswold Museum sincerely for already having highlighted the contest and voting option in their communications.  We are sure the Town of Old Lyme and other civic and community institutions in town will be putting out the word too. Let’s see if we can get some poster up around town publicizing the news.

And if YOU represent an organization that can share this news and the voting option with your members and supporters, then please go ahead and share, share, share via e-mail, social media, and even good old snail mail!

Thank you and VOTE OLD LYME!


Artful Living Invites Students to Submit Original Short Plays for Possible Production at ‘The Kate,’ Scholarship Award

AREAWIDE — Artful Living, Killingworth’s multi-generational community theatre, is seeking original scripts of short plays from Connecticut high school students.  This new program, Playwrights For Tomorrow, offers students the opportunity to win a scholarship and have their play produced on stage at Old Saybrook’s Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center (The Kate) on April 29, 2018.

Plays will be reviewed by a panel of theatre professionals. Selected playwrights will be offered the opportunity to collaborate with directors and other theatre artists in the staging of their plays.  Submission Deadline is Jan. 8, 2018.

For full details and an application form, visit


Old Lyme Country Club WGA Holds End of Season Awards Luncheon

The OLCC WGA winners gather for a photo, from left to right, Esther Boyle, Eleanor Perkins, Karen Danielson, Carol Gordon, Helene Nichols, Carolyn Daddona, Sharon Craig (with boot), Kacey Constable, Katie Bollo and Elizabeth Conlon

The Old Lyme Country Club Women’s Golf Association (OLCC WGA) held its end of season Awards Luncheon Thursday, Oct. 5.  Hospitality Chairwomen Jacquie DeMartino and Mardee Moore organized a lovely buffet meal.  Vickie Winterer and Eleanor Perkins, the Awards Chairwomen, provided an elegant selection of glassware awards. 

And the winners were:

18 Hole Champion: Helene Nichols

18 Hole Champion Runner-Up: Carolyn Daddona

9 Hole Champion: Maggie Johnston

9 Hole Champion Runner-Uo: Sharon Craig

Senior Club Champion: Helene Nichols

Senior Club Champion Runner-Up:   Carol Gordon

Individual Handicap Champion: Elizabeth Conlon

Individual Handicap Runner-Up: Katie Bollo

36 & Over Champion: Esther Boyle

36 & Over Champion Runner-Up: Eleanor Perkins

Member-Member Champion (2): Kacey Constable & Carol Gordon

Member-Member Runner-Up (2): Karen Danielson & Helene Nichols

Most Improved: Elizabeth Conlon

Most Chip-Ins: Carolyn Daddona

Low Putts: Karen Danielson

Class A Ringers: Lori Polito

Class B Ringers: Carolyn Daddona

Class C Ringers: Ann Jose


See ‘Faerieville USA’ at Flo Gris Museum Through Oct. 29

Children delight in the fun and whimsical creations while adults marvel at the creatively conceived and handcrafted works of art.

The Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme, Conn., presents Faerieville USA: In and Around a Wee Faerie Town on the grounds of museum’s campus through Oct. 29. It was announced on Friday that although the Museum and grounds will be open tomorrow, Columbus Day, the special events scheduled for the day –  the Quirky and Creative Artisan Faire and parade led by the Chester Fife and Drum – have now been moved to Sunday, Oct. 22, due to the inclement weather forecast for Monday.

Visitors follow their map of Faerieville to 31 hand-crafted faerie scenes. Visitors will stroll along Wee Faerie Boulevard and marvel at the quintessential small-town features such as the wee faerie bakery, library, and flower shop. There’s everything faeries need to live, work, and play. This annual event has come to signify an enriching, not-to-be-missed outing for visitors of all ages.

This year’s Wee Faerie Village is the ninth of the Museum’s annual outdoor creative installations. Challenged to create their scenes using natural materials, most artists work for at least six months on their creations.

Erica Mann, a preschool teacher who resides in Pomfret, fashioning the Faerieville Elementary School and Athletic Park for this year’s Wee Faerie Village. She says she’s enjoying thinking back to her favorite memories on a playground and them imagining how those old favorites could be constructed from natural materials like sticks, bark and moss.

A first-time contributor to the Village, Mann states, “I want to create a space that the littlest of faerie folk would love. Being a teacher myself, it is so perfect that I am creating the Faerieville Elementary School. I am designing a magical little place that I would want to teach if only I could shrink down and become one of those wee faeries!”

Wee faeries always welcome!

Artists are selected from across Connecticut and a few from outside the state. This year, students from Deep River Elementary School, Haddam-Killingworth High School, and the Interdistrict School for Arts and Communication (New London) returned to participate in the event. New to the artists’ roster this year are students from Pleasant Valley School in South Windsor, who are contributing the Faerieville Art Museum.

A special feature of Faerieville is Sand-topia, a small city made entirely of sand. Sand sculptor Greg Grady transforms a seven-ton pile of very dense, flat-grained sand into an intricate marvel-worthy mini metropolis.

Special Events

As part of its Wee Faerie Village exhibition, adults and families with children can enjoy a month of faerie-themed activities. Events include, parties, performances, book discussions, and craft activities. Many events are included in Museum admission. Visit for a complete list.

Sundays, October 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29

Every Sunday in October from 11am to 5pm visitors can drop in for Americana-inspired hands-on projects. A different project each week. Program is included in Museum admission.

Columbus Day, Monday, Oct. 9
These events have now been postponed to Sunday Oct. 22, due to the inclement weather forecast for Monday, Oct. 9

The Museum will open on Columbus Day, Monday, Oct. 9, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Faerie dance lessons begin at 11:30 a.m. At noon, Chester Fife & Drum Corps will lead visitors in a parade through Faerieville. Wings, crowns, tiaras, and Americana attire are encouraged. Hands-on crafts from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., shop for artful objects created by local artisans and crafters inspired by the faerie realm. This quirky and creative artisan fair is a special one-day, pop-up event at the Museum. Program is included in Museum admission.

Wednesday, Oct. 11, at 5:30 p.m.

Join artist Maureen McCabe and gallery owner Jeff Cooley at the Cooley Gallery, 25 Lyme Street, Old Lyme for an intimate artful conversation about the work in The Fantastical Art of Maureen McCabe and Ersnt Von Maydell, a gallery show inspired by the fantastical artwork of Baron Ernst von Maydell (German, b. 1884). Cooley is a longtime collector of the fairy-filled images and McCabe created a new body of work inspired by the Baron’s whimsical paintings. A light reception concludes the event. The Fantastical Art of Maureen McCabe and Ersnt Von Maydell is on view at the Cooley Gallery October 7 through November 12, 2017.

Saturday, Oct. 14

From 11am to 4pm visitors can enjoy Faerieville’s Farm Day and Pumpkin Patch Party. Wonder through the pop-up barnyard and impromptu pumpkin patch. Meet Gemini the calf, Poppy the goat, Shasta the donkey, and hens Idina and Girdy before choosing and decorating the perfect pumpkin. Animals are visiting from Wounded Eagle Farm in Canterbury. Pumpkins, gourds, and other fall produce for sale by the Davis Farm of Norwich. Apples for sale from Haywood Farm in New Hartford.

Saturday, Oct. 21
From 11am to 4pm Leslie Evans, Director of the Avery-Copp House Museum, offers a drop-in presentation on the historic use of herbs in attracting or distracting faeries, protection from witches, or controlling others emotions (ie. love potions). Participants discover the “magical” property of these herbs before creating their faerie amulet sachet. Herb-infused snacks and beverages will be available for tasting. Program is included in Museum admission.

Saturday, Oct. 28

Visitors will have Halloween fun from 11am to 4pm with treats and hands-on crafts. Visitors are encouraged to dress up as faeries from around Faerieville (a butcher, a baker, a candlestick maker) to march in the Cavalcade of Costumes Parade. Parade begins at 12noon. Craft-bag prizes for all participants. Program is included in Museum admission.

The Museum is located at 96 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, CT, exit 70 off I-95. The Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10am to 5pm with extended hours on Sunday from 11am to 5pm. The Museum will open on Columbus Day, Monday, October 9 from 10am to 5pm. Admission during the exhibition is $15 for adults, $14 for seniors, $13 for students, $5 for members. Children 12 and under are free thanks to the support of an anonymous donor. Admission includes the outdoor walking tour of the faerie village as well as the Florence Griswold House, Chadwick Studio, Rafal Landscape Center and the Krieble Gallery with three special exhibitions.